Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'project management'

Daniel Holbach

I’m very proud of what quite a number of teams achieved together last week. On Friday we announced the opening of the Ubuntu Touch software store. Just to quickly illustrate who was all responsible for this, here’s a list of the teams/projects involved:

  • Click itself – the format in which we ship apps.
  • Community team – helped with coordination of whole app story and project management.
  • Design team – putting together plans for how the experience should be.
  • *dations teams (Foundations, Phonedations), getting everything in the phone image, helping with the integration of the download service.
  • IS, setting up servers and help with deployment.
  • Online Services (Client) – writing the code for the whole app management experience on the client side.
  • Online Services (Server) – putting together the software store, review capabilities, etc.
  • SDK team – teaching QtCreator about Ubuntu apps and click packages.
  • Security team – defining and putting together our app confinement strategy.
  • Unity teams – integration of the app scope and other bits and pieces.
  • Lots of others (feedback, code review, encouragement, etc).

I’m sure I forgot to mention a team or two, but it’s at least worth trying to point out who all was responsible for this. The security confinement, the SDK and Unity have obviously been under heavy development for a longer time already, some plans existed before, but the vast majority of what you can see now was planned three months ago. So with this in mind, I feel everybody involved in this project deserves a big hug and some words of praise. This is a great achievement.

There are definitely a bunch of things still left to be done, but now we have:

  • a good app development experience,
  • a software store you can easily submit apps to,
  • a mobile OS where you can easily install apps.

Go (virtual) team! :-D

Screenshot stolen from Michael Hall (https://plus.google.com/109919666334513536939/posts/T5dtW92Miid)

This project was my first try at project managing and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Hundreds of emails, lots of meetings and discussions on IRC made the software store a reality. Everybody worked very hard to bring this to fruition and it was a fantastic feeling to be able to download some new apps on my Nexus 7 today.

As I said above: there is still quite a few things we’ve got to do, so the coming weeks are going to bring us a lot of great stuff: purchases, some automation of the app review, easy app updates, apps with compiled code and much much more. Stay tuned and keep publishing your great apps!

Big hugs to the extended team, you are all heroes and thanks for the great time with you!

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Victor Palau

I had a CR-48 Chromebook for a while, which has recently fallen in disuse. While I have never being totally convinced about Chrome OS being a polished, well designed, interface that simplifies the “always connected” user journey that Google was envisioning, I liked the concept.

Now I am reading in ArsTechnica that Chrome OS is getting a brand new look, that is … basically.. well, not new. While I am sure there are many technical advantages of a fully hardware accelerated windows managers, my issue is with the [lack of] concept.

Google has spent much energy convincing users that they do not need to have local apps, that they can do everything in the cloud and that the portal to this experience is Chrome. Having an OS which the only application that could possibly run, and at full screen, was the browser was a controversial but bold move. More over, it really hit home the user experience they were targeting.

This new UI seems to be sending the opposite message. It seems to be saying: “OK, we were wrong.. but  maybe if we make Chrome OS look more like windows you will like it better?”. Is that really the message? Well if you give me an app launcher in a desktop, I am bound to ask for local apps. If you give me off-line sync for Google apps, I am bound to ask for local apps.

I fear Google is paving the road to [windows vista] hell with good window manager intentions. I am primary an Ubuntu user, and what I like about it is that every single release over the last few years has continue to build on a design concept. Every new release is closely wrap on a consistent user message. Take as an example the HUD introduced in 12.04: it is new and different, but somehow it feels like it always belonged in Unity.

I am bought into the Ubuntu user experience, and I am excited to see what a new release will bring. If I had bought into the Chrome OS experience, I think I will be asking for a refund.

Anyway, I am looking forward to the new Chrome OS UI being available for the CR-48. Maybe I will change my mind once I get my hands on it.


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Victor Palau

I have commented several times on the 2-weekly cadence that we follow at the certification team, but I haven’t gone into much detail on our 6 monthly cycle. We have just completed the Natty cycle (normally release date + 2/3 weeks) and we are about to start our Oneiric one.

6 monthly cycles help to plan achieving longer goals that drive the user stories implemented by the team in each iteration/sprint. During Natty, we had a loose coupling between these two.  I regularly (once a month) reviewed the progress of the Natty backlog and made sure that nothing was falling through the cracks. Despite the good completion rate in Natty, it was more of a case of the user stories forming the Blueprints (6 monthly requirements) than the other way around.

For Oneiric, the certification team went into UDS-O with much better defined blueprints. This has not only resulted in better sessions, but also on well defined backlog. Clearly, there is no much point trying to tight down what we will be doing in 4/5 months, so user stories towards the end of the cycle are vague and fairly large.  User stories for the next 2 months are better understood and described.

We have been collecting velocity data for the last few months, so by asking the team to roughly size new stories and review the sizes for the “next_iteration+1″, I hope to be able to build a burn up/down chart over the next few weeks! I will keep you posted.


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