Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'planet'

James Westby

We’ve recently rolled out some changes to the submission process for Click Applications that should make it easier for you to submit new applications, and allow them to be approved more quickly.

Previously when submitting an application you would have to enter all the information about that application on the website, even when some of that information was already included in the package itself. This was firstly an irritation, but sometimes developers would make a mistake when re-entering this information, meaning that the app was rejected from review and they would have to go back and correct the mistake.

With the new changes, when you submit an application you will wait a few seconds while the package is examined by the system, and you will then be redirected to the same process as before. However this time some of the fields will be pre-filled with information from the package. You won’t have to type in the application name, as it will already be there. This will speed up the process, and should reduce the number of mistakes that happen at that stage.

We’ve also been working on a command-line interface for submitting applications. It’s not polished yet, but if you are intrepid you can try out click-toolbelt.

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Jono Bacon

So, we have announced the Ubuntu App Showdown where you can build some awesome Ubuntu apps and win prizes such as the Nexus 7 (2013) tablet and the Meizu MX3, we have provided an update on lots of great updates going on such as refined HTML5 support and a raft of developer.ubuntu.com updates, we have revised and improved how the dash and scopes work (more developer docs on this coming soon!), we have simplified how apps are uploaded to the store, and of course, Ubuntu handsets are hitting the market later this year so our app devs will have plenty of new users to consume their apps. But, why stop there?

We are not here to build a good app developer community, we are here to build the most empowering, rewarding, and fun app developer community there is, all powered by openness and collaboration.

As such, I am delighted to announce that next week Ubuntu App Developer Week beginning on Monday 3rd March at 2pm UTC and running all week

This is a week with a range of tutorial sessions for how to build apps for Ubuntu across QML, HTML5 and more. All of these sessions take place online in a series of Google Hangouts, complete with embedded chat channels where you can interact with the speaker and ask questions.

This includes sessions such as the following for QML apps:

  • Game Development with QML and Box2D
  • Internationalize your apps
  • Extending QML with a C++ Plugin
  • Ubuntu UI Toolkit tips and tricks for beginners
  • Responsive Layouts
  • Testing with qmltestrunner
  • Making the perfect user acceptance test
  • Integrating U1DB in your app
  • Content Exchange in a confined world
  • Add download capabilities to your apps

and the following for HTML5 apps:

  • Building HTML5 apps with Ubuntu
  • Cordova in HTML5 Apps
  • Platform APIs for HTML5 Apps
  • HTML5 UbuntuUI Components
  • Debugging HTML5 apps

We also have a few other sessions such as a feedback session on the software store and how to get compiled code into click packages.

How Do I Join?

Ubuntu App Developer Week is available freely to anyone who chooses to join. You don’t have to be an expert, and you don’t have to know how to write apps with the Ubuntu SDK yet. Beginners are very welcome!

All of the sessions, their times, and how to join them are available on the Ubuntu App Developer Week schedule. Just show up at the right time, click a session, and you are ready to go!

We still have some slots free if you want to volunteer to run a session. If you would like to, please email Michael Hall.

The fun starts next week on Monday 3rd March at 2pm UTC and runs all week. We hope to see you there!

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Jono Bacon

The focus on content is a core principle that drives how we build Ubuntu. This not only includes getting the clutter out of the way and maximizing your view on your content (such as integrated window borders and overlay scroll-bars), but it also includes searching for, browsing, and consuming content as easily as possible.

At the core of this latter approach to content is the Ubuntu dash and the scopes that power it. For those unfamiliar with this technology, when you tap or click the Ubuntu button on your Ubuntu computer, smart-phone, or tablet you currently see a number of different views such as Home, Apps, Music, and Videos.

Within these views we have a series of “scopes” that deliver both online and offline content. As an example, in our music scope we show music on your computer/device as well as music available to download or purchase online too.

All of this integrates search right into the heart of Ubuntu; no longer do you need to open up a software store, music app, or video app to access content you either own or would like to aquire…it is all integrated into the core of Ubuntu.

Ever since we released this technology we have been evaluating the feedback from our users, through formalized user testing, as well as input from content providers who are keen to deliver content via these services. We have reviewed all of this feedback and made a set of changes that improve and refine how the dash and scopes work, and we want to share some of those updates here.

This post does not summarize all improvements we are making; we have other refinements in store, and we will provide those updates closer to the time.

All screenshots in this post are of working code on the phone and tablet, much of which you can see at MWC this week. This technology will also be coming to the desktop at a later date.

The Core of the Dash

One of the constraining aspects about our previous dash was some of the limitations in terms of how scope results are presented to the user. Ubuntu users will be very familiar with a search resulting in the same visual structure of how results appear, which you can then click a result to see a preview view with more details.

We have refined and improved this by building a “dash toolkit” that can be used to customize how results are displayed now.

As an example, here are some screenshots of the dash displaying different types of results:

The Scopes Store

In our previous dash the notion of scopes were something that the Ubuntu development team were primarily involved in – we would ship a number of scopes switched on by default and the user could enable/disable those scopes where appropriate.

In our new dash we are treating scopes almost like in-dash apps; that is, a scope is something a provider can ship to users and the user can enable or disable the scopes that are of most interest to them. This makes the dash infinitely pluggable, more tuned to the user’s needs, and combined with the customization of how results are displayed, it makes the dash far more compelling for both users and content providers.

This range of scopes is delivered by the Scopes store which provides a range of categories and available scopes.

As an example, if you are a Grooveshark fan you can head into the Scopes store and add the Grooveshark scope and now your search will return Grooveshark content.
In action

Let’s take this new technology for a spin to demonstrate how it works.

In the screenshot below we can see the familiar apps scope. Here we can see apps that are installed, apps available to download, and we can search for apps too:

Let’s now see a more customized scope in the form of a guide to Barcelona:

Here you can see a combination of recommended places to visit, transport information, weather and more:

This scope is pulling together a variety of online components in a customized view and can be shipped as a scope that you can install on your computer or device.

Let’s look at another example. Here we have a scope for World Cup information:

Finally, let’s take a look at how we browse and install scopes. This is the scopes store:

Here we can select a scope easily and install it by tapping it.

When will I get this?

This technology is going to be arriving for Ubuntu for smart-phones and tablets in the next few weeks. Those of you using Ubuntu for devices can expect to find it as part of a norma system update.

For the desktop this technology will arrive at a later date when converge our Unity 8 platform on the desktop. We expect this to be around the time of Ubuntu 14.10 – Ubuntu 15.04.

The Developer Story

This new technology opens up a wealth of opportunities for developers. Over the coming weeks we will be providing a full tutorial, API documentation, quick-start guides, and more on developer.ubuntu.com to help you get stared building and deliver scopes to users.

We will announce when this content has been released on this blog.

FAQ

Why did you change the dash and scopes?

Based on feedback from our users, through formalized user testing, and input from content providers, we wanted to make a series of improvements to refine how the dash and scopes work.

When can we expect this technology to arrive?

We expect these improvements to be landing in the Ubuntu for phones and tablets images in the next few weeks.

How can I enable/disable scopes?

You determine which scopes are searched by adding them to (or removing them from) your favourites list. Even if a scope is not in your favourites list, you can explicitly navigate to that scope and start a search, without adding that scope to your favourites list. So, you are in complete control at all times of which scopes are searched.

What security/privacy measures are you putting in place with this technology?

While we will ship with a set of default scopes, the user can switch of any scopes if they choose to do so.

Each scope runs as a separate process in its own sandbox, secure via AppArmor. The sandbox is enforced at the kernel level, so it is impossible for a scope implementation to break out of the sandbox (for example, by making system calls directly).

Scopes that are installed in the device have exactly one of two possible AppArmor profiles: network access or file system access. If a scope can access the network (for example, to retrieve email headers from a remote imap account), that scope cannot access the file system. Conversely, if a scope can access the file system (for example, to search for locally-installed media files), it cannot access the network. This prevents a scope from retrieving sensitive information from the file system and then shipping it out via the network to some remote server.

Scopes are also prevented from accessing each others’ network endpoints. This means that a scope installed on the device cannot send queries to other scopes on the device in an attempt to collect private information.

What languages can I write these scopes in?

C++, Javascript, and Go.

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albertomilone@gmail.com

In this Ubuntu release cycle I worked, among other things, on improving user experience with hybrid systems and proprietary graphics drivers. The aim was to make it easier to enable the discrete card when in need of better performance i.e. when the integrated card wouldn’t be enough.

In 13.10 I focused mainly on enablement, making sure that by installing one extra package together with the driver, users would end up with a fully working system with no additional configuration required on their end.

As for 12.04.3, I backported my work from 13.10 and I also made sure that Jockey (the restricted drivers manager in Precise) detects systems with hybrid graphics, recommends the correct driver – hiding any drivers which may support the card but not in a hybrid graphics context – and installs the extra package when users decide to enable the discrete card. The installation process is very straightforward, however, if you’re still using the old kernel/X stack, Jockey won’t show any drivers. The backported stack from Raring (which comes by default with 12.04.3) is required.

There are some known issues, which will be fixed in a near future.

If you would like to try this work on your system, you can find the instructions here.

 

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roaksoax

Filming Fast & Furious 7…

Note: The car is what we call a Combi in Peru, which is a form of public transportation. While I didn’t create the FF7 original pic, it is mock to peruvian combi drivers because those are one of the most reckless drivers in the world.

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roaksoax

For a while, I have been wanting to write about MAAS and how it can easily deploy workloads (specially OpenStack) with Juju, and the time has finally come. This will be the first of a series of posts where I’ll provide an Overview of how to quickly get started with MAAS and Juju.

What is MAAS?

I think that MAAS does not require introduction, but if people really need to know, this awesome video will provide a far better explanation than the one I can give in this blog post.

http://youtu.be/J1XH0SQARgo

 

Components and Architecture

MAAS have been designed in such a way that it can be deployed in different architectures and network environments. MAAS can be deployed as both, a Single-Node or Multi-Node Architecture. This allows MAAS to be a scalable deployment system to meet your needs. It has two basic components, the MAAS Region Controller and the MAAS Cluster Controller.

MAAS Architectures

Region Controller

The MAAS Region Controller is the component the users interface with, and is the one that controls the Cluster Controllers. It is the place of the WebUI and API. The Region Controller is also the place for the MAAS meta-data server for cloud-init, as well as the place where the DNS server runs. The region controller also configures a rsyslogd server to log the installation process, as well as a proxy (squid-deb-proxy) that is used to cache the debian packages. The preseeds used for the different stages of the process are also being stored here.

Cluster Controller

The MAAS Cluster Controller only interfaces with the Region controller and is the one in charge of provisioning in general. The Cluster Controller is the place the TFTP and DHCP server(s) are located. This is the place where both the PXE files and ephemeral images are being stored. It is also the Cluster Controller’s job to power on/off the managed nodes (if configured).

The Architecture

As you can see in the image above, MAAS can be deployed in both a single node or multi-node. The way MAAS has being designed makes MAAS highly scalable allowing to add more Cluster Controllers that will manage a different pool of machines. A single-node scenario can become in a multi-node scenario by simply adding more Cluster Controllers. Each Cluster Controller has to register with the Region Controller, and each can be configured to manage a different Network. The way has this is intended to work is that each Cluster Controller will manage a different pool of machines in different networks (for provisioning), allowing MAAS to manage hundreds of machines. This is completely transparent to users because MAAS makes the machines available to them as a single pool of machines, which can all be used for deploying/orchestrating your services with juju.

How Does It Work?

MAAS has 3 basic stages. These are Enlistment, Commissioning and Deployment which are explained below:

MAAS Process

Enlistment

The enlistment process is the process on which a new machine is registered to MAAS. When a new machine is started, it will obtain an IP address and PXE boot from the MAAS Cluster Controller. The PXE boot process will instruct the machine to load an ephemeral image that will run and perform an initial discovery process (via a preseed fed to cloud-init). This discovery process will obtain basic information such as network interfaces, MAC addresses and the machine’s architecture. Once this information is gathered, a request to register the machine is made to the MAAS Region Controller. Once this happens, the machine will appear in MAAS with a Declared state.

Commissioning

The commissioning process is the process where MAAS collects hardware information, such as the number of CPU cores, RAM memory, disk size, etc, which can be later used as constraints. Once the machine has been enlisted (Declared State), the machine must be accepted into the MAAS in order for the commissioning processes to begin and for it to be ready for deployment. For example, in the WebUI, an “Accept & Commission” button will be present. Once the machine gets accepted into MAAS, the machine will PXE boot from the MAAS Cluster Controller and will be instructed to run the same ephemeral image (again). This time, however, the commissioning process will be instructed to gather more information about the machine, which will be sent back to the MAAS region controller (via cloud-init from MAAS meta-data server). Once this process has finished, the machine information will be updated it will change to Ready state. This status means that the machine is ready for deployment.

Deployment

Once the machines are in Ready state, they can be used for deployment. Deployment can happen with both juju or the maas-cli (or even the WebUI). The maas-cli will only allow you to install Ubuntu on the machine, while juju will not only allow you to deploy Ubuntu on them, but will allow you to orchestrate services. When a machine has been deployed, its state will change to Allocated to <user>. This state means that the machine is in use by the user who requested its deployment.

Releasing Machines

Once a user doesn’t need the machine anymore, it can be released and its status will change from Allocated to <user> back to Ready. This means that the machine will be turned off and will be made available for later use.

But… How do Machines Turn On/Off?

Now, you might be wondering how are the machines being turned on/off or who is the one in charge of that. MAAS can manage power devices, such as IPMI/iLO, Sentry Switch CDU’s, or even virsh. By default, we expect that all the machines being controlled by MAAS have IPMI/iLO cards. So if your machines do, MAAS will attempt to auto-detect and auto-configure your IPMI/iLO cards during the Enlistment and Commissioning processes. Once the machines are Accepted into MAAS (after enlistment) they will be turned on automatically and they will be Commissioned (that is if IPMI was discovered and configured correctly).. This also means that every time a machine is being deployed, they will be turned on automatically.

Note that MAAS not only handles physical machines, it can also handle Virtual Machines, hence the virsh power management type. However, you will have to manually configure the details in order for MAAS to manage these virtual machines and turn them on/off automatically.

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roaksoax

I just wanted to share a few pics I was sent of the Volcano & my hometown… enjoy!

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roaksoax

After the success of the improvements of PowerNap in Ubuntu Natty 11.04, we will be having another session st UDS-O Thursday the 12th at 15:00. In this session we will discuss the following:

  • Second Stage action when running in PowerSave mode.
  • Support for port-ranges in Network Monitors
  • Changing the polling monitoring system to an event based system.
  • Client/Server approach to monitor/manage PowerNap “client machines” over the network for data center wide deployments
  • Server ARP network Monitoring for Automatic Wake-up of Clients.
  • API like approach for Integration with other projects.

Everyone who’s interested are more than welcome to join! For more information, the blueprint can be found HERE.

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roaksoax

Thursday the 12th at noon we will be having the HA Cluster Stack session. In the session we will discuss the following:

  • Discuss the adoption of new upstream releases of the HA Cluster Stack to include in Oneiric in preparation for the next Ubuntu LTS release.
  • Finish up work items from previous sessions (mainly documentation).
  • Gather feature requests and discuss the creation of meta-packages.
  • And, if the time allows us, I’d like to follow up with HA for OpenStack as they had a session in their Design Summit about it.

If you are interested of the Future of HA Clustering in Ubuntu, you are more than welcome to join this session. For more information the blueprint can be found HERE.

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roaksoax

Here are the minutes of the server team meeting. They can also be found online with the irc log here.

=== Meeting Actions ====

  • No actions.

==== Review ACTION points from previous meeting ====

  • Daviey to submit UDS-O topic for translations and docs
    • Talked to David P. about it and agreed to participate in the UDS-O session.
  • jamespage to helpout with verification of euca-dhcp bug
    • DONE
  • jamespage to discover process/location for fixing ubuntu server documentation
    • DONE
    • Docs up to date: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ServerTeam/KnowledgeBase#Documentor resources

==== Natty Development ====
Focus is now on bug fixing rather than development.

  • robbiew: any remaining work items should be universe related or non-code
  • SpampS mentioned a few items are remaining:
  • http://people.canonical.com/~platform/workitems/natty/canonical-server.html

==== Ubuntu Server Team Events ====

  • SpamapS: Apr. 13,14 I will be at the MySQL Users’ Conference in Santa Clara, CA
  • jamespage: I’ll be attending puppet camp europe on the 28/29 April in Amsterdam
  • zul: Apr 25 – 29 I will be at the Openstack summit, Santa Clara, CA

==== Weekly Updates & Questions for the QA Team (hggdh) ====

  • initial ISO tests via jenkins are all done, with success except for ec2.
  • Proposed to discuss jenkins usage on UDS.

==== Weekly Updates & Questions for the Kernel Team (smb) ====

  • Launchpad bug 751253 in linux (Ubuntu) “Many interrupts and slow disk I/O on Lucid xen guest” [Undecided,New] https://launchpad.net/bugs/751253
  • <smb> thinks really that sounds a bit like maybe xen version or actually a lot of traffic as that machine had 500GB going out in 5 days

==== Weekly Updates & Questions for the Documentation Team (sommer) ====

  • Not present
  • SpampS suggested to select someone else to drive the team.
  • RoAkSoAx suggested to remote the item from the Agenda until replacement is found.

==== Weekly Updates & Questions from the Ubuntu Community ====

  • kim0: Will be running a weekly community IRC meeting for the Ensemble team. This will be run in #ubuntu-cloud starting tomorrow at 6pm-UTC, it will be merged with the older community meeting. Everyone attending this meeting is a good candidate to attend tomorrow’s
  • That meeting will provide a high level overview of development in the Ensemble world since last meeting/week.
  • Writing an announcement on http://cloud.ubuntu.com/ right now, which I’ll mirror on planet, and everyone is encouraged to spread/tweet…etc

==== Open Discussion ====

  • kirkland throwing a release party:   http://blog.dustinkirkland.com/2011/04/austins-natty-release-party.html

==== Announce next meeting date and time ====

  • Tuesday, April  19th 2011 16:00 UTC

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roaksoax

Cancer or AIDS?

Don’t worry, I don’t have the sickness nor I desire it to anyone (Knock on wood). This post represents my thoughts on the recent presidential elections held in Peru.  I’m not gonna go into much detail but rather give a brief overview of how I see things in my country. Also, I apologize if the reference to the sicknesses offends someone, as I’m just really trying to represent what great amount of people in my country think. (Not only me, but my family, friends, the young and the old, and even the press)

Yesterday Sunday, presidential elections were held. 5 were the candidates, 3 of which were the most popular. Unfortunately, only two of them go to a second stage on which the president will be elected. These are, Keiko Fujimori (Cancer) and Ollanta Humala (AIDS).

Keiko Fujimori, daughter of Alberto Fujimori, former president of Peru between 1990 and 2000 (after two consecutive periods) and 2001 (third period). Keiko Fujimori, very well educated person, having studied in the US. His father, the worst kind of man in the world. During this presidency, he stole millions and millions of dollars. He was supposed to only server two consecutive periods according to laws, however, his desire for power was greater that he tricked the elections and won a third time. After this, videos of his advisor Vladimiro Montesinos bribing congress man/business man/etc appeared on TV. The advisor, decided to scape the country, and with him Alberto Fujimori. He created a show trying to look after Vladimiro, however, it was just a distraction to help him scape (or so is presumed). Then, months later (if I recall correctly), he went to Japan for a presidential visit. However, once he arrived there, he declared himself as Japanese citizen and resigned to the presidency. Years later he tried to came back to Peru through Chile, but he was caught and now he is serving his sentence in jail for all the crimes he committed. It is presumed that along with his advisor, they stole millions of dollars from Peru, bribed people, controlled newspapers and all that sort of stuff. He managed to hide (or destroy) most of the evidence they got against him, but he left his advisor hanging. Anyways, during his first few years as a president, he didn’t do all bad things though. He pretty much eliminated terrorism and pulled Peru up economically, from a sinking ship. Peru was submerged in inflation. His daughter, however, doesn’t have anything to offer to the country. She got where she is thanks to the popularity of her father. Vote percentage (~26%)

Ollanta Humala, on the other hand, very badly educated (from my point of view). Retired commander from the Peruvian Army. Very well educated father, and murderer brother. Puppet of Hugo Chavez. Well, there’s not really much to say about him rather than he is just incompetent. His brother (and presumably him) organized a a take over of a small town in the Peru mountains leader-ed by the brother (Ollanta of course always said he wasn’t involved). They killed cops.  His brother is currently in jail and he has admitted that his brother was involved (I presume after left abandoned by him to rotten in Jail). In the northern part of the country, Indians from the jungle started a quarrel with the current government, taking roads and killing lots of cops. It was proven with videos and intelligence report that this was all organized by Ollanta and his puppets. Anyways, with help of Hugo Chavez, he has been trying to buy the country. In poor places, he has created organizations financed by Chavez, to “feed” (or should I say recruit) people to join the cause. Anyways, he has proven himself uneducated in the debates and an idiot in various aspects of the current situation of Peru in general. However, this didn’t prevent him from being the highest voted in Peru (~30%).

So anyways, Ollanta wants to renegotiate all the international treaties. He wants to change the constitution. He wants to give the wealth of the country to the poorest (and obviously take it from the richest’s and middle class). He wants to do what Chavez and Evo (president of Bolivia) did to their countries. He wants to rule all his life in a dictatorship rather than a democracy. Economically, he is gonna f**** the country up for his own interests. Which ones? Power, Money, you know. On the other side, Fujimori, is gonna probably follow his daddy’s saying. Yeah, she is just a face behind the master mind.

30% of the country was ignorant enough to chose for Ollanta. Yes only the poor, who were maliciously tricked, voted for Ollanta. Now, around 30% of the Peruvian population is considered to be poor. From that percentage, almost all voted for Ollanta (from my point of view). 26% of the population voted for Fujimori. The rest, around 56% voted for other candidates, mainly 3, who weren’t intelligent enough to join forces against a common enemy (again, they all went towards their own personal interests rather than the country’s sake). Unfortunately for us, everybody that decided to vote against the worse, voted for 3 of the candidates and that wasn’t enough to beat the enemy.

So you may wonder, why has this happened. In short and as I mentioned above, it is a combination of lack of judgment and education. Yes, Peru is a country on which education is not a priority. (State universities, schools, etc etc, simply suck). So candidates took advantage of the lack of education to get votes. Unfortunately for us, there were so many candidates that the worst ended up having the most votes. If I recall correctly, Peru is a country that has 85% of the biodiversity of the world. We have gold, natural gas, silver, and other minerals. We are so rich in many stuff, but yet, so poor in education and judgment. Congressman, Presidents, etc, they only worry about their own pockets and people is just so ignorant that they keep voting for them. People don’t vote objectively, they just vote because of the fancy things presidents say. Ignorants, voted for the ignorants. Fujimorists, voted for Fujimori. The rest, voted for the better, unfortunately, the better wasn’t united.

To conclude, Peru is now in the hands of us the voters to decide for the better. Not the best, the better. I just hope people see the way I see it. Unfortunately, we are between Cancer and AIDS. I believe if Fujimori ends up as a president, we have some hope, but if not, we are doomed. People is scared of getting the Fujimori clan into the government again, but most of us are even more scared of having Ollanta changing the country Chavez’ like!

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roaksoax

For all of those who don’t know, “PowerNap is a screen saver for servers except it doesn’t save your screen, it saves the environment and lowers your energy bill.” Dustin Kirkland :). PowerNap was originally created by Dustin to be integrated with (UEC), but it has been extended for Home use. Originally, it put to sleep machines (suspend, hibernate, poweroff) when a list of Processes were not found in the process table for  a determined period of time. However, during the Natty cycle improvements were made. So, PowerNap now puts to sleep (suspend, poweroff, powersave) machines that are tagged as underutilized  by a set if Monitors.

Improvements Overview

  • PowerNap, has a set of Monitors to be able to detect activity within the server and determine if it is idled or not. If it is, PowerNap will execute an ACTION. Administrators can chose what monitors to enable/disable. These are:
    • ProcessMonitor: Looks for a process in the process table.
    • IOMonitor: Monitors IO activity by process name.
    • InputMonitor: Monitors Mouse/Keyboard input activity connected to USB.
    • LoadMonitor: Monitors a server load threshold.
    • TCPMonitor: Monitors active TCP connections (i.e. SSH).
    • UDPMonitor: Monitors activity received in any user defined UDP port.
    • WoLMonitor: Monitors WoL packets on ports 7 and/or 9.
    • ConsoleMonitor: Monitors console activity.
  • The process starts when PowerNap begins monitoring for an ABSENT_PERIOD (i.e. 300secs). If within that period no activity has been detected, then PowerNap executes an ACTION.
    • Before the ACTION is taken, PowerNap enters to the GRACE_PERIOD (I.e 30 seconds), notifying the user that the ACTION will be taken in GRACE_PERIOD amount of seconds. (i.e. On second 270 PowerNap will notifies its users and the period between 270 and 300 seconds is known as GRACE_PERIOD).
  • The possible ACTIONS are:
    • Best-effort – Automatically decide between a user defined action or any of the other methods listed below (these methods rely on pm-utils)
    • Suspend (Command: pm-suspend)
    • Hibernate (Command: pm-hibernate)
    • Poweroff (Command: poweroff)
    • Powersave – Newly added method that reduces the Power Consumption (Command: pm-powersave)
  • The PowerSave method executes a set of scripts both provided by pm-utils and PowerNap. These scripts have the objective to reduce the power consumption of the machine by turning off hardware capabilities or tuning the OS. It is possible to provide any custom script as well as chose which to enable or disable. Examples of these scripts are:
    • Turn off all the CPU cores except of one.
    • Reduce the cores frequency to the lowest possible.
    • Disable WoL from Network Cards.
    • Change the NIC speed from 1Gbps to 100Mbps.
    • Turn off USB ports.
    • Disable HAL polling.
  • Now, when the PowerSave ACTION is taken, the machine keeps running in a lower power state. PowerNap keeps Monitoring until activity is detected. Once any of the Monitors detects activity, the PowerSave action is reverted.

 

PowerWake

  • PowerWake is simply a tool that sends WoL packets to an specified IP/Broadcast address to be able to wakeup a server.

 

Additional Tools

  • powernap-now: Sends a signal to the PowerNap daemon to execute the ACTION regardless of the state of the monitors.
  • powerwake-now: Sends a signal to the PowerNap daemon to wakeup during the PowerSave mode.
  • Note that these commands have to be executed in the machine running PowerNap. If this needs to be done through the network, then the command will have to be sent remotely to be executed in the machine.


The Future

  • Second Stage Action: Second Stage Action when entered into PowerSave mode. (i.e. Suspend after 2 hours after running in PowerSave mode).
  • Client/Server Model: The main Idea is to create a powerwaked Server that tracks all the machines using PowerNap in the network and is able to schedule wakeups, upstates, etc, etc.

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roaksoax

Currently, I connect my laptop to a 22-inch TV. I do this using HDMI. But, I’m now planning to get two 22-inch LCD monitors. However, I was wondering how can I connect the two external monitors to my laptop to independent screens.

I was reading online that getting a DualHead2Go device would be one of the options (regardless of its resolution restrictions). Does anyone have one of this??

Or, Does anyone know of a USB to VGA (or HDMI) adapter that works out of the box in Ubuntu, and provides a decent resolution for 22 inch LCD’s?

UPDATE: Today, I decided to make a little test with my laptop in the attempt to connect two external monitors to it. (HP dv4t with an nVidia GeForce G 105M). What I simply did is:

First, I connected an external monitor through VGA. I enabled it and disabled the laptop LCD.
Second, I connected a second external monitor through HDMI. The monitor was recognized, I enabled, and it was supposedly enabled. However, there was no video output. The reason is because it was HDMI and I was using the Nouveau driver due to the X breakage in Natty.

So, wondering if this would actually work I decided to try the same in Windows. And you know what? It worked! I didn’t test it throughly though. I just connected two external monitors, one to VGA and one to HDMI (and of course turned of my LCD screen). So, whenever the nVidia/X fix is available in Natty I’ll try the same configuration. I’m pretty sure it will work.

I’m now wondering if this would work with any other computer using Intel video cards?

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roaksoax

My plans to work over the holidays were affected because I ended up not having my laptop available. Fortunately for me I got it back few days ago, which means I can now get back to do the Ubuntu related stuff I wanted to do (TestDrive, PowerNap, Update the Cluster Stack to the latest).

However, after getting my laptop back, I dropped my Nexus One into the water…(yeah boomer). Fortunately, it was turned off. I removed the battery, Memory Card, SIM Card, and dry it as fast as I could… I haven’t turned it up yet since I’m waiting for it to dry completely; but, to help with that, I put it into a bowl with rice. It is sitting there for the last couple of days, since rice is supposed to absorb moisture and humidity. Hopefully it works again!

UPDATE: After leaving my N1 to dry for a couple of days in rice, I decided to give it a try today and see if it works… and IT DOES!! Nothing seems to be malfunctioning… I guess I was just lucky then!!

Anyway, good thing is that I had an old phone so I’m not totally incommunicated (Just no twitting, facebook, irc from the phone when I’m not at home… I guess I’ll prolly be suffering from the abstinence syndrome…or not :) ).

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roaksoax

So, today I tried to connect my laptop to the TV using HDMI. Surprisingly, it does not work correctly. The image in the TV comes for a couple of seconds and then goes again for a few more seconds, and the process repeats. Any ideas of what might be going wrong? (It is not cable cause it works well with Windows). So, I’m guessing it is either the Nvidia graphics driver or some configuration error.

My graphics card is an NVidia Geforce G 105M.

UPDATE: So, a user post a comment here that might be related to the audio output and indeed. Now, the HDMI output works, I can see my screen from the tv, the only issue is that there’s no Audio.

How was it fixed? I Went to System > Preferences > Sound, and  in Profile I selected “Digital Stereo (HDMI) Output” instead of “Analog Stereo Output”. This, however, shows me the screen but there’s no audio from the TV nor from the Laptop Speakers.

UPDATE 2: Well after trying to figure out what is going wrong with this, I finally was able to get sound out of my TV connected to the computer through HDMI. For this I had to unmute a setting using alsamixer. This setting was S/SPDIF 1. So, now I have both, picture and sound coming out of my TV. However, the picture comes *only* when there’s something using the sound cards. i.e.When music player is on. When music is off, the TV screen will be turning off/on constantly, as described above.

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