Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'openstack'

anthony-c-beckley

From our Cloud partner Inktank…

Today marks another milestone for Ceph with the release of Cuttlefish (v0.61), the third stable release of Ceph. Inktank’s development efforts for the Cuttlefish release have been focused around Red Hat support and making it easier to install and configure Ceph while improving the operational ease of integrating with 3rdparty tools, such as provisioning and billing systems. As ever, there have also been a ton of new features we have added to the object and block capabilities of Ceph, as well as with the underlying storage cluster (RADOS), alongside some great contributions from the community.

So what’s new for Ceph users in Cuttlefish?

Ease of installation:

  • Ceph-deploy: a new deployment tool which requires no other tools and allows a user to start running a multi-node Ceph cluster in minutes. Ideal for users who want to do quick proof of concepts with Ceph.
  • Chef recipes: a new set of reference Chef recipes for deploying a Ceph storage cluster, which Inktank will keep authoritative as new features emerge in Ceph. These are in addition to the Puppet scripts contributed by eNovance and Bloomberg, the Crowbar Barclamps developed with Dell, and the Juju charms produced in conjunction by Canonical, ensuring customers can install Ceph using most popular tools.
  • Fully tested RPM packages for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and derivatives, available on both the ceph.com repo and in EPEL (Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux).

Administrative functionality:

  • Admins can now create, delete or modify users and their access keys as well as manipulate and audit users’ bucket and object data using the RESTful API of the Ceph Object Gateway. This makes it easy to hook Ceph into provisioning or billing systems.
  • Administrators can now quickly and easily set a quota for a RADOS pool. This helps with capacity planning management as well as preventing specific Ceph clients from consuming all available data at the expense of other users.
  • In addition, to the pool quotas, administrators can now quickly see the total used and available capacity of a cluster using the ceph df command, very similar to how the generic UNIX df command works with other local file systems.

Ceph Block Device (RBD) Incremental Snapshots

It is now possible to just take a snapshot of the recent changes to a Ceph block image. Not only does this reduce the amount of space needed to store snapshots on a cluster, but forms the foundation for delivering disaster recovery options for volumes, as part of the popular cloud platforms such as OpenStack and CloudStack.

You can see the complete list of features in the release notes are available at  http://ceph.com/docs/master/release-notes/. You can also check out our roadmap page for more information on what’s coming up in future releases of Ceph. If you would like to contribute towards Ceph, you can visit Ceph.com for more information on how you can get started and we invite you to join our online Ceph Development Summit on Tuesday May 7th, more details available at http://wiki.ceph.com.

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Darryl Weaver

Introduction

In this article I will show you how to set up a new WordPress blog on Amazon EC2 public cloud and then migrate it to HP Public Cloud using Juju Jitsu, from Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu.

Prerequisites

  • Amazon EC2 Account
  • HP Public Cloud Account
  • Ubuntu Desktop or Server 12.04 or above with root or sudo access

Juju Environment Setup

First of all we need to install Juju and Jitsu from the PPA archive to make it available for use, so first of all add the PPA to the installation sources:

sudo apt-get -y install python-software-properties
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:juju/pkgs

Now update apt and install juju, charm-tools and juju-jitsu

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install juju charm-tools juju-jitsu

You will now need to set up your ~/.juju/environments.yaml file for Amazon EC2, see here: https://juju.ubuntu.com/get-started/amazon/

and then for HP cloud also, so see here:

https://juju.ubuntu.com/get-started/hp-cloud/

So you should end up with an environments.yaml file that will look something like this:

default: amazon
environments:
amazon:
 type: ec2
 control-bucket: juju-b1bb8e0313d14bf1accb8a198a389eed
 admin-secret:[any-unique-string-shared-among-admins-u-like]
 access-key: [PUT YOUR ACCESS KEY HERE]
 secret-key: [PUT YOUR SECRET KEY HERE]
 default-series: precise
 juju-origin: ppa
 ssl-hostname-verification: true
hpcloud:
 juju-origin: ppa
 control-bucket: juju-hpc-az1-cb
 admin-secret: [any-unique-string-shared-among-admins-u-like]
 default-image-id: [8419]
 region: az-1.region-a.geo-1
 project-name: [your@hp-cloud.com-tenant-name]
 default-instance-type: standard.small
 auth-url: https://region-a.geo-1.identity.hpcloudsvc.com:35357/v2.0/
 auth-mode: keypair
 type: openstack
 default-series: precise
 access-key: [PUT YOUR ACCESS KEY HERE]
 secret-key: [PUT YOUR SECRET KEY HERE]

Deploying WordPress to Amazon EC2

Now we need to bootstrap the Amazon EC2 environment.

juju bootstrap -e amazon

Check it finishes bootstrapping correctly after a few minutes using:

juju status -e amazon

Which should output something like this:

machines:
  0:
    agent-state: running
    dns-name: ec2-50-17-169-153.compute-1.amazonaws.com
    instance-id: i-78d4781b
    instance-state: running
services: {}

To give a good view of what is going on and to also allow modification from a web control panel we can deploy juju-gui to the bootstrap node, using juju-jitsu:

jitsu deploy-to 0 juju-gui -e amazon

juju expose juju-gui -e amazon

This will take a few minutes to deploy.
Once complete you will see this from the output of “juju status -e amazon”, which should output something like:

machines:
  0:
    agent-state: running
    dns-name: ec2-50-17-169-153.compute-1.amazonaws.com
    instance-id: i-78d4781b
    instance-state: running
services:
  juju-gui:
    charm: cs:precise/juju-gui-3
    exposed: true
    relations: {}
    units:
      juju-gui/0:
        agent-state: started
        machine: 0
        open-ports:
        - 80/tcp
        - 443/tcp
        public-address: ec2-50-17-169-153.compute-1.amazonaws.com

Then use the “public-address” entry in your web browser to connect to juju-gui and see what is going on visually.

Juju-gui currently works well on Google Chrome or Chromium, it uses a Self-signed SSL certificate so you will be prompted to connect given a security warning which you can safely ignore and proceed.

Initially you should see the login page, with the username already filled in as “admin” and the password is the same as your password for the admin-secret in your ~/.juju/environments.yaml file.

Once logged in you should see a page that looks like this showing that only juju-gui is deployed to your environment, so far:

Juju-gui screenshot

First login

First we need to deploy a MySQL Database to store your blog’s data:

juju deploy mysql -e amazon

This will take a few minutes to deploy, so go ahead and also deploy a wordpress application server:

juju deploy wordpress -e amazon

While deployment continues you should see them appear in Juju-gui too

Juju gui with wordpress and mysql deployed

Showing MySQL and WordPress deployed

:

Once deployment is complete you can check the name of the new servers with:

juju status -e amazon

Which should output something like this:

machines:
  0:
    agent-state: running
    dns-name: ec2-50-17-169-153.compute-1.amazonaws.com
    instance-id: i-78d4781b
    instance-state: running
  1:
    agent-state: running
    dns-name: ec2-23-22-68-159.compute-1.amazonaws.com
    instance-id: i-3a9bd554
    instance-state: running
  2:
    agent-state: running
    dns-name: ec2-54-234-249-131.compute-1.amazonaws.com
    instance-id: i-f9e56696
    instance-state: running
services:
  juju-gui:
    charm: cs:precise/juju-gui-3
    exposed: true
    relations: {}
    units:
      juju-gui/0:
        agent-state: started
        machine: 0
        open-ports:
        - 80/tcp
        - 443/tcp
        public-address: ec2-50-17-169-153.compute-1.amazonaws.com
  mysql:
    charm: cs:precise/mysql-16
    relations: {}
    units:
      mysql/0:
        agent-state: started
        machine: 1
        public-address: ec2-23-22-68-159.compute-1.amazonaws.com
  wordpress:
    charm: cs:precise/wordpress-11
    exposed: false
    relations:
      loadbalancer:
      - wordpress
    units:
      wordpress/0:
        agent-state: started
        machine: 2
        public-address: ec2-54-234-249-131.compute-1.amazonaws.com

Now we need to add a relationship between the wordpress application server and the MySQL database server. This will set up the SQL backend database for your blog and configure the usernames and passwords and database tables needed, all automatically.

juju add-relation wordpress mysql -e amazon

Finally, we need to expose the wordpress instance so you can connect to it using your web browser:

juju expose wordpress -e amazon

Now your Juju gui should look like this:
Juju Gui showing relations

Setting up WordPress and adding your first post

Then connect to the wordpress server using your web browser, by using the public-address from the status output above, i.e. http://ec2-54-234-249-131.compute-1.amazonaws.com/
This will then show you the initial set up page for your wordpress blog, like this:

You will need to enter some configuration details such as a site name and password:

After you have saved the new details you will get a confirmation page:

Confirmation Page

So, click on Login to login to your new blog on Amazon EC2.

Now in order to make sure we are testing a live blog we need to enter some data. So, let’s post a blog entry.
First click on New Post on the top left menu:

Now, type in the details of your new blog post and click on Publish on the top right:

Now you have a new blog on Amazon EC2 with your first blog entry posted.

Migrating from Amazon EC2 to HP Cloud

So, now we have a live blog running on Amazon EC2 it is now time to migrate to HP Cloud.

We could just run the commands above but using the extension “-e hpcloud” to deploy the services to HP Cloud and then migrate the data.
But a more satisfying way is to use Juju-jitsu again to export the current layout from Amazon EC2 environment and then replicate that on HP Cloud.

So, we can use:

jitsu export -e amazon > wordpress-deployment.json

This will save a file in JSON format detailing the deployed services and their relationships.

First we need to bootstrap our HP Cloud environment:

juju bootstrap -e hpcloud

This will take a few minutes to deploy a new instance and install the Juju bootstrap node.
Once the bootstrap is complete you should be able to check the status by using:

juju status -e hpcloud

The output should be something like this:

machines:
  0:
    agent-state: running
    dns-name: 15.185.102.93
    instance-id: 1064649
    instance-state: running
services: {}

So, let us now deploy the replica of the environment on Amazon to HP:

jitsu import -e hpcloud wordpress-deployment.json

This will then deploy the replicated environment from Amazon EC2. You can check progress with:

juju status -e hpcloud

When completed your output should be as follows:


So we now have a replica of the environment from Amazon EC2 on HP Cloud, but we have no data, yet.
We also need to copy the SQL data from the existing Amazon EC2 MySQL database to the HP Cloud MySQL database to get all your live blog data across to the new environment.
Let’s login to the MySQL DB node on Amazon EC2:

juju ssh mysql/0 -e amazon

Now we are logged in we can get the root password for the Database:

sudo cat /var/lib/juju/mysql.passwd

This will output the root password for the MySQL DB so you can take a copy of the data with:

sudo mysqldump -p wordpress > wordpress.sql

When prompted copy and past the password that you recovered from the previous step.

Now exit the login using:

exit

Now copy the SQL backup file from Amazon EC2 to your local machine:

juju scp mysql/0:wordpress.sql ./ -e amazon

This will download the wordpress.sql file.
You will now need to know your new wordpress server IP address for HP Cloud.
You can find this from juju status:

juju status wordpress -e hpcloud

The output should look like this:

machines:
  3:
    agent-state: running
    dns-name: 15.185.102.121
    instance-id: 1064677
    instance-state: running
services:
  wordpress:
    charm: cs:precise/wordpress-11
    exposed: false
    relations:
      db:
      - mysql
      loadbalancer:
      - wordpress
    units:
      wordpress/0:
        agent-state: started
        machine: 3
        public-address: 15.185.102.121

In order to fix your WordPress server name you will have to replace your Amazon EC2 WordPress public-address with your HP Cloud WordPress server public-address.
So, you will need to do a find and replace in the wordpress.sql file as follows:

sed -e 's/ec2-54-234-249-131.compute-1.amazonaws.com/15.185.102.121/g' wordpress.sql > wordpress-hp.sql

Obviously you will need to customise the command to replace your server addresses from Amazon and HP Cloud in the command above.
NB:This step can be problematic and if you need more detailed information on changing the server name of a wordpress installation and moving servers see this more detailed instructions here:
http://codex.wordpress.org/Moving_WordPress

Now upload to your new HP Cloud MySQL server the database backup file, fixed with the new server public-address:

juju scp wordpress-hp.sql mysql/0: -e hpcloud

Now let’s import the data into your wordpress database on HP Cloud.
First we need to log in to the database server, as before:

juju ssh mysql/0 -e hpcloud

Now let’s get the root password for the Database:

sudo cat /var/lib/juju/mysql.passwd

Now we can import the data using:

sudo mysql -p wordpress < wordpress-hp.sql

And when you are prompted for the password enter the password you retrieved in the previous step, and then exit.

Finally you will still need to expose the wordpress instance on HP Cloud to the outside world using:

juju expose wordpress -e hpcloud

Now connect to your new wordpress blog migrated to HP Cloud from Amazon by connecting to the public-address of the wordpress node.
You can find the address from the output of juju status as follows:

juju status wordpress -e hpcloud

The output should look like this:

machines:
  3:
    agent-state: running
    dns-name: 15.185.102.121
    instance-id: 1064677
    instance-state: running
services:
  wordpress:
    charm: cs:precise/wordpress-11
    exposed: true
    relations:
      db:
      - mysql
      loadbalancer:
      - wordpress
    units:
      wordpress/0:
        agent-state: started
        machine: 3
        open-ports:
        - 80/tcp
        public-address: 15.185.102.121

Now connect to http://15.185.102.121/ and your blog is now hosted on HP Cloud.

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David Duffey

Today we announced a collaborative support and engineering agreement with Dell.  As part of this agreement Canonical will add Dell 11G & 12G PowerEdge models to the Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS Certification List and Dell will add Ubuntu Server to its Linux OS Support Matrix.

In May 2012, Dell launched the OpenStack Cloud Reference Architecture using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS on select PowerEdge-C series servers. Today’s announcement expands upon that offering by combining the benefits of Ubuntu Server Certification, Ubuntu Advantage enterprise support, and Dell Hardware ProSupport across the PowerEdge line.

Dell customers can now deploy with confidence when purchasing Dell PowerEdge servers with Dell Hardware ProSupport and Ubuntu Advantage.  When these customers call into Dell, their service tag numbers will be entitled with ProSupport and Ubuntu Advantage, which will create a seamless support experience via the collaborative Dell and Canonical support and engineering relationship.

In preparation for this announcement, Canonical engineers worked with Dell to enable and validate Ubuntu Server running on Dell PowerEdge Servers.  This work resulted in improved Ubuntu Server on Dell PowerEdge support for PCIe SSD (solid state drives), 4K-block drives, EFI booting, Web Services Management, consistent network device naming, and PERC (PowerEdge RAID Controllers).

Dell hardware systems management can be done out-of-band via ipmi, iDRAC, and the Lifecycle Controller.  Dell OMSA Ubuntu packages are also available but it is recommended to use the supported out-of-band systems management tools.  Dell TechCenter is a good resource for additional technical information about running Ubuntu Server on Dell PowerEdge servers.

If you are interested in purchasing Ubuntu Advantage for your Dell PowerEdge servers, please contact the Dell Solutions team at Canonical.  If your business is already using or thinking about using a supported Ubuntu Server infrastructure in your data-center then be sure to fill out the annual Ubuntu Server and Cloud Survey to provide additional feedback.

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anthony-c-beckley

We are exhibiting at this year’s CeBIT event on March 5-9th, 2013 in Hannover Germany, in conjunction with our partner in the region, Teuto.net and we’re giving away number of free tickets to selected customers and partners. If you are interested in one of these tickets, please contact me at anthony.beckley@canonical.com for more information.

The Canonical/Teuto.net stand will be in the Open Source Arena (Hall 6, Stand F16, (030) and we will be showcasing two enterprise technology areas:

  • The Ubuntu Cloud Stack – demonstrating end user access to applications via an OpenStack cloud, powered by Ubuntu,
  • Ubuntu Landscape Systems Management – demonstrating ease of management of desktop, server and cloud nodes.

We will be running hourly demonstrations on our stand and attendees have the chance to win a Google Nexus 7 tablet! Simply come to out stand and watch a short demo or your chance to win If you would like to pre-register for a demonstration, email me at anthony.beckley@canonical.com

We look forward to seeing you at the show!

CeBIT draws a live audience of more than 3,000 people from over 100 different countries. In just five days the show delivers a panoramic view of the digital world’s mainstay markets: ICT and Telecommunications, Digital Media also Consumer Electronics.
To learn more about CeBIT click here.

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Mark Baker

As clouds for IT infrastructure become commonplace, admins and devops need quick, easy ways of deploying and orchestrating cloud services.  As we mentioned in October, Ubuntu now has a GUI for Juju, the service orchestration tool for server and cloud. In this post we wanted to expand a bit more on how Juju makes it even easier to visualise and keep track of complex cloud environments.

Juju provides the ability to rapidly deploy cloud services on OpenStack, HP Cloud, AWS and other platforms using a library of 100 ‘charms’ which cover applications from node.js to Hadoop. Juju GUI makes the Juju command line interface even easier, giving the ability to deploy, manage and track progress visually as your cloud grows (or shrinks).

Juju GUI is easy and totally intuitive.  To start, you simply search for the service you want on the Juju GUI charm search bar (top right on the screen).  In this case I want to deploy WordPress to host my blog site.  I have the chance to alter the WordPress settings, and with a few clicks the service is ready.  Its displayed as an icon on the GUI.

I then want a mysql service to go alongside.  Again I search for the charm, set the parameter (or accept the defaults) and away we go.

Its even easier to build the relations between these services by point and click. Juju knows that the relationship needs a suitable database link.

I can expose WordPress to users by setting expose flag  - at the bottom of a settings screen – to on. To scale up WordPress I can add more units, creating identical copies of the WordPress deployment, including any relationships.  I have selected ten in total, and this shows in the center of the wordpress icon.

And thats it.

For a simple cloud, Juju or other tools might be sufficient.  But as your cloud grows, Juju GUI will be a wonderful way not only to provision and orchestrate services, but more importantly to validate and check that you have the correct links and relationships.  Its an ideal way to replicate and scale cloud services as you need.

For more details of Juju, go to juju.ubuntu.com.  To try Juju GUI for yourself, go to http://uistage.jujucharms.com:8080/

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Mark Murphy

Ubuntu has long been a favourite with developers – especially in the worlds of web and cloud development. We’re excited that, from today, serious (and not-so-serious) developers will be able to get their hands on the super-sleek Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition, preloaded with and fully optimised for Ubuntu.

The Dell XPS 13 is a top spec, high-end ultramobile laptop, offering developers a complete client-to-cloud experience. It is the result of the Dell’s bold Sputnik initiative, which embraced the community and received terrific response from developers around the world. The community has spoken – and they said, “give us power, give us storage, give us a really ‘meaty’ machine – that also looks GREAT. And Dell has delivered.

The XPS 13 with Ubuntu allows developers to create ??microclouds? on the local drive, simulating a proper, at-scale environment, before deploying seamlessly to the cloud using Juju, Ubuntu’s service orchestration tool. That’s something you simply can’t do with a standard installation of any other OS.

With Juju now supporting 103 charms and counting, it covers the world’s most popular open source cloud services, all from the Ubuntu desktop.

I’d like to call out the drive and energy of Barton George and Michael Cote at Dell for making the XPS 13 launch possible. And of course, the team within Canonical for the fine tuning of this great product (mine ‘cold’ boots to desktop in under 11 seconds!) I’d also like to call out the dev community for their incredible support, helping us getting this from drawing board to factory ship – get buying!

Combining Ubuntu with the power of Dell hardware gives developers the perfect environment for productive software development, whatever their sector. The Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition is available from http://www.dell.com/us/soho/p/xps-13-linux/pd in America and Canada today.

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Sonia Ouarti

You have critical decisions ahead as you take your first steps into cloud computing.

One of them will be whether to build a private cloud infrastructure in your own data centre, make use of one of the public cloud services offered by vendors like Amazon, Rackspace and HP, or combine the two in a ‘hybrid cloud’ approach.

You can get closer to the right decision by considering the right questions now:

  • Budget - How much do you have (or how much don’t you have) to support your cloud strategy?
  • Speed - When do you need this done? Tomorrow, next year, yesterday…
  • Demand - How many users will you need to support? And will they call come at once?
  • Resources - What kind of resources do you have in-house? And how many can you realistically get your hands on?
  • Privacy -How sensitive is your data? Where are you doing business?

This short, sharp checklist takes you through the process that points you in the right direction and ensures your investments pay off from the start. Download it today.

 

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Sonia Ouarti

OpenStack, your foundation for Cloud computing

14 November 2012 at 4pm GMT

 

The open cloud, based on OpenStack, is fast becoming one of the most popular cloud platforms. OpenStack delivers open standards, modularity and scalability, and avoids vendor lock-in.

Join this webinar to find out why OpenStack is surging ahead, learn about the OpenStack technical architecture and the new features of the recent Folsom release. Find out why, to date, all public cloud providers, such as DreamHost and HP, whom are using OpenStack, are deploying it on ubuntu.

You will also learn about investments that Canonical has made into OpenStack such a as our Continuous Integration efforts, the Ubuntu Cloud Archive and Ceilometer.

Register now

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Mark Baker

Hardened sysadmins and operators often spurn graphical user interfaces (GUIs) as being slow, cumbersome, unscriptable and inflexible. GUIs are for wimps, right?

Well, I’m not going to argue – and certainly, command line interfaces (CLIs) have their benefits, for those comfortable using them. But we are seeing a pronounced change in the industry, as developers start to take a much greater interest in the deployment and operation of flexible, elastic services in scale out or cloud environments. Whilst many of these new ‘devops’ are happy with a CLI, others want to be able to visualise their environment. In the same way that IDEs are popular, being able to see a representation of the services that are running and how they are related can prove extremely valuable. The same goes for launching new services or removing existing ones.

This is why, last week, as part of the new Ubuntu 12.10 release, we announced a GUI for Juju, the Ubuntu service orchestration tool for server and cloud.
The new Juju GUI does all these things and more. For those of you unfamiliar with it, Juju uses a service definition file know as a ‘charm’. Much of the magic in Juju comes from the collective expertise that has gone into developing this the charm. It enables you to deploy complex services without intimate knowledge of the best practice associated that service. Instead, all that deployment expertise is encapsulated in the charm.
Now, with the Juju GUI, it gets even easier. You can select services from a library of nearly 100 charms, covering applications from node.js to Hadoop. And you can deploy them live on any of the providers that Juju supports – OpenStack, HP Cloud, Amazon Web Services and Ubuntu’s Metal-as-a-Service. You can add relations between services while they are running, explore the load on them, upgrade them or destroy them. At the OpenStack Summit in San Diego this year, Mark Shuttleworth even used it to upgrade a running* OpenStack Cloud from Essex to Folsom.
Since the Juju GUI was first shown, the interest and feedback has been tremendous. It certainly seems to make the magic of Juju – and what it can do for people – easier to see. If you haven’t seen it already, check out the screen shots below or visit http://uistage.jujucharms.com:8080/

Because as we’ve always known, a picture really is worth a 1000 words.

 

Juju Gui Image

The Juju GUI

 

 

*Running on Ubuntu Server, obviously.

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Prakash

Boris Renski is co-founder of OpenStack integration consultancy Mirantis and he says every enterprise he’s worked with so far has been interested in OpenStack because they view it as an alternative to VMware. The board’s vote earlier this month has now muddled the differences, he says. “If OpenStack isn’t an alternative to VMware, then what the hell is it?” Renski says.

VMware’s entrance into OpenStack has been part of a whirlwind of news during the past few months for the virtualization company and Renksi’s comments may reflect some tension between the two camps.

Read More.

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  2. If AWS is the Walmart of cloud, is OpenStack the Soviet Union? The Cloud Faceoff! The stage was set for a lively...
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Kyle MacDonald

Today is the official launch of the OpenStack Foundation, which is leading the cloud industry in developing the most cutting-edge open enterprise-class cloud platform available. The OpenStack Foundation aims to promote the development, distribution and adoption of OpenStack. As a founding platinum member, Canonical is involved by contributing to the project’s governance, technical development and strategy. We’re helping service providers and enterprises, as well as their customers and users, benefit from the open technologies that are making the cloud more powerful, simple and ubiquitous.

Canonical was the first company to commercially distribute and support OpenStack – and Ubuntu has remained the reference operating system for the OpenStack project since the beginning – making it the easiest and most trusted route to an OpenStack cloud, whether for private use or as a commercial public cloud offering. We include it in every download of Ubuntu Server, one of the world’s most popular Linux server distributions, giving us a huge interest in its continuing development.

OpenStack developers are building and testing on Ubuntu every single day, which is why Ubuntu can fairly claim to be the most tightly integrated OS with OpenStack – and the most stringently tested. In short, if you want to run OpenStack then you really ought to run it on Ubuntu! Since 2009 we’ve been committed to the open cloud, and the creation of the OpenStack Foundation is a huge step in making it better.

Widely certified and supported for the long term, Ubuntu 12.04 LTS is the most reliable platform on which to move from a pilot or proof of concept to a large-scale production deployment. It offers the robustness and agility you need for rapid scaling of the underlying cloud, with first-class support for the key virtualization technologies that underpin successful OpenStack deployments.

Already thousands of global enterprises and service providers are deploying their cloud infrastructures on Ubuntu and OpenStack. Organisations like Mercadolibre, Internap and Nectar are running their mission critical applications on their Ubuntu OpenStack clouds. Ubuntu and OpenStack are also powering clouds at the likes of HP, AT&T, Rackspace and Dell. We are seeing strong global demand from leading enterprises worldwide and can’t wait to share their stories in the coming months. Service providers are rapidly adopting Ubuntu and OpenStack; we see this in our engagements with every one of the world’s largest service providers.

OpenStack and Ubuntu share the same six-monthly release schedule. But, while OpenStack is still young and developing fast, Ubuntu Server is a mature enterprise OS. In fact, most large companies choose to stay on our long-term support releases, which come out once every two years and are supported for five. So what about the majority of companies that need the stability and support of the latest LTS release of Ubuntu, alongside all the new OpenStack features and fixes that are released every six months?

That’s where our new Ubuntu Cloud Archive comes in. Unique to Ubuntu, it gives users the chance to run new versions of OpenStack as they are released, with full maintenance and support from Canonical, in the Ubuntu OS, even if they want to stay on the last LTS release.

Over recent months, other technology vendors have recognised the lead and impact that OpenStack is making in the market and have announced their commitment to the project. We should see even more of them joining the party and coming up with OpenStack offerings in the months to come. But in the meantime, the best way to build your OpenStack cloud is through the proven, rock-solid combination of OpenStack and Ubuntu.

You can read about the OpenStack Foundation news here.

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Mark Baker

Have you ever wanted to experiment with the latest cutting-edge cloud software, but run it on the same long-term support release of Ubuntu that you have all your other apps and services working on?

Well, now you can. Today, Canonical has released the Cloud Archive for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Server, an online software repository from which administrators can download the latest versions of OpenStack, for use with the latest long-term support (LTS) release of Ubuntu. This is hugely significant step for OpenStack users, because it means they can now access the latest OpenStack releases and betas on a stable and supported platform that is certified with many of the leading server vendors.

As many people know, the tradition of Ubuntu Server is to release every six months, with every fourth release (or two years) being a Long Term Support (LTS) version supported for five years. The interim releases are supported for 18 months. This generally works well: businesses that require a solid infrastructure for a long period of time normally use the most recent LTS, rather than upgrading every 6-18 months.

Users often find that this predictable release schedule allows all areas of a workload lifecycle (from requirement, design, develop to deploy) to work well.  However, sometimes a key piece of the stack is needed. This leaves users in a quandary: jump to a later (non-LTS) Ubuntu release, or find something that helps solve the problem, building on the LTS release.

One way to try and address this problem is via backports. Over the years, there has been attempts to use the Ubuntu Backports repository, and also ‘blessed’ PPA’s (Personal Package Archives) or private in-house archives to provide access to later technologies backported from upstream.

With OpenStack, which underpins Ubuntu Cloud Infrastructure, we needed to think about how we would deliver the new OpenStack releases on 12.04 LTS without backporting, as using the Backports Archive would restrict the number of versions we could support concurrently (unless we opted for multiple Backport archives). OpenStack made the early decision to implement their development processes around the Ubuntu development process and to follow our release cadence. This has helped OpenStack deliver features with pace and on a deadline but crucially, it has allowed us to put continuous integration testing in place to integrate and test OpenStack code as soon as it is committed.

So with OpenStack we are now building, integrating, testing and publishing all the OpenStack milestones and stable releases on 12.04 LTS. This is a departure from our previous policy but the process for updates getting into the Ubuntu Cloud Archive has been designed to closely align with the processes that the normal Ubuntu Archive would have for Stable Release Updates.

With a fast moving technology such as OpenStack, this is hugely significant, as we see many customers testing the milestones and building seed clouds with the latest code. All this helps us find bugs and improve the code for all – which can only be a good thing.

To get access to the Ubuntu Cloud archive, please add the following entries to your /etc/apt/sources.list:

 

/etc/apt/sources.list entries:

# Public -proposed archive mimicking the SRU process, packages should bake here for at least 7 days.

#  This is also where extended testing is performed

deb  http://ubuntu-cloud.archive.canonical.com/ubuntu precise-proposed/folsom main


# The primary updates archive that users should be using

deb http://ubuntu-cloud.archive.canonical.com/ubuntu precise-updates/folsom main


# Upstream milestone archive, this example is pinned to Folsom-1 upstream, then an example of Folsom-2.

#   This, being a snapshot, will not receive further updates.

deb http://ubuntu-cloud.archive.canonical.com/ubuntu precise-updates/folsom/snapshots/milestone-1 main

deb http://ubuntu-cloud.archive.canonical.com/ubuntu precise-updates/folsom/snapshots/milestone-2 main


* “To have your cake and eat it [too]” is an old English saying that is sometimes used to imply the desire for two incompatible things.

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Prakash

Market research firm IDC says that data from a new survey shows that “open cloud is key for 72 percent of customers.”

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Prakash

Rackspace one of the key founders of OpenStack, has finally switched to OpenStack.

These products will be provided to customers in limited amounts over a period of time to ensure a smooth ramp-up.

- Cloud Servers, powered by OpenStack – based on the latest OpenStack compute release, this solution is fast, reliable, scalable and is accessible via the new OpenStack API as well as via an easy-to-use, intuitive control panel. Limited availability sign-ups are open now and Rackspace will begin providing access on May 1.

- Cloud Control Panel – the new Control Panel was built from the ground up and with the customer in mind.  It is simple, fast, intuitive and flexible. The new control panel also features multiple enhancements, including server tagging and multi-region capabilities.

The following products are in “early access”, as they are production workload ready but have limited support available, no service commitments and no billing.

- Cloud Databases, powered by OpenStack –gives customers API access to massively scalable, high availability MySQL database that is based on SAN storage for high performance and provides automated management of common database tasks.

- Cloud Monitoring –helps customers easily monitor their infrastructure and applications proactively, including OpenStack Clouds.

The following products are in “preview”, as we are currently inviting customers to test the early version of these products.

- Cloud Block Storage, powered by OpenStack – this new solution is designed to give customers highly elastic raw storage and a choice between a high performance (leveraging solid state disks) or a standard lower-cost block storage solution.

- Cloud Networks, powered by OpenStack – this solution is designed to allow customers to manage logically abstracted network services programmatically. Software-defined virtual networks provide flexibility and agility in addition to enhanced security via network isolation and port filtering.

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Susan Wu

Open-source software is increasingly at the heart of the biggest changes happening in enterprise computing all over the world. For me, open cloud is a perfect way to illustrate the benefits open source is bringing businesses and this is the major theme being discussed by some of the biggest names in the industry at the 2012 OpenStack APAC Conference in Beijing right now.

The business case for switching to or adopting cloud computing – and in particular, the open cloud – has never been stronger. Enterprises are realising reduced costs and increased flexibility without the risk of vendor lock-in. Open clouds let organisations move critical workloads to the cloud with the confidence that they can move from one vendor to another or onto a private cloud as they demand. This is because open source technology complies with established open standards.

As well as these business benefits, software like Ubuntu 12.04 LTS is helping devops massively reduce the complexity of cloud projects with deployment and service orchestration tools like Juju and MAAS. These sorts of technologies are streamlining the deployment process, making it quicker and simpler than ever to get applications running in the cloud.

The combination of Ubuntu and OpenStack has rapidly become the platform of choice for businesses building private cloud infrastructure.

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Cezzaine Haigh

The cloud is disrupting the enterprise computing world, driven by the growth of open-source software. As a result, new opportunities are emerging; it’s time to exploit them. 

On the 30th October, Canonical will host an Ubuntu Enterprise Summit in Copenhagen. Industry analysts and enterprise users of Ubuntu and open source technologies, will join key figures from Canonical to discuss the opportunities these converging trends present.

The event is designed around three key topics

- How flexibility creates business value
- Choosing which bandwagon to board
- The way ahead, from client to cloud

With a keynotes from Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth and two streams of content – one aimed at business decision-makers and the other at enterprise technologists – it offers an essential briefing on delivering effective IT in a cloud-obsessed world.

Learn more and register your place.

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Prakash

OpenStack has the potential to become as widely used in cloud computing as Linux in servers, according to Rackspace’s chief executive Lanham Napier.

Napier noted that OpenStack has more code contributors than Linux did when it started: it had 206 code contributors by its 84th week, whereas Linux took 615 weeks to get to that level. Similarly, OpenStack had 166 companies adding to it by its 84th week, whereas Linux reached 180 companies by its 828th week.

OpenStack is already well on the way to building that community, given the broad adoption the technology has seen since its launch two years ago. At the moment, more than 100 companies have put OpenStack into production, including AT&T, Korea Telecom, the San Diego Supercomputer Centre, HP and the US Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory.

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Mark Baker

On Monday, Calxeda, one of the leading innovators bringing revolutionary efficiency to the datacenter, unveiled their new EnergyCore reference server live onstage with Mark Shuttleworth at the Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) in Oakland California.

 

Calxeda CTO and Founder Larry Wikelius with Mark Shuttleworth at UDS

The choice of UDS at the venue to unveil the new hardware to the world was flattering and underlines how the innovators in next generation computing are building out a compelling platform together. Ubuntu and Calxeda have been working together for several years to bring Ubuntu on Calxeda to market in the form now being shown at UDS. The collaboration of Canonical and the Ubuntu community with Calxeda has been vital to be able to deliver a solution that can very easily deploy OpenStack based cloud using MAAS and Juju on hardware that is so innovative.

The EnergyCore reference server unveiled at UDS can house up to 48 Quadcore nodes at under 300 Watts with up to 24 SATA drives. In this configuration it is possible to house 1000 server instances in a single rack and other server form factors being developed by OEMs may enable several times this volume. It is precisely this type of power efficient technology that will accelerate the adoption of next generation hyperscale services such as cloud and we are proud to be at the very core of it.

So congratulations to Calxeda on the arrival of the EnergyCore and congratulations to Canonical and the Ubuntu Community for providing the platform that will power it.

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Cezzaine Haigh

The first Ubuntu Cloud Summit, hosted by Canonical and Redmonk, takes place in Oakland, California on May 8th and the speakers are now confirmed. It promises to be a riveting day for anyone interested in cloud strategy. If you haven’t secured your ticket yet, there’s still time – but hurry. They are disappearing fast.

Presenting on the day will be:

- Mark Shuttleworth, Founder of Ubuntu

- Kyle MacDonald, Director of Cloud, Canonical

- Stephen O’Grady, Principal Analyst & Co-founder, RedMonk

- John Purrier, Vice President of Cloud Infrastructure, HP

- Randy Bias, CTO, CloudScaling

- Patrick Chanezon, Senior Director of Developer Relations, VMware

- Robbie Williamson, Director of Ubuntu Server Engineering, Canonical

The day will cover the role of open-source software in cloud computing, some lessons from real world cloud deployments and an examination of how the cloud technologies in Ubuntu – including OpenStack, MAAS and Juju – come together to form an open cloud.

We’d love the chance to meet you there. To find out more and to book your place, go to  http://uds.ubuntu.com/cloud-summit/

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Cezzaine Haigh

Canonical is proud to be one of the headline sponsors of the OpenStack Design Summit & Conference next week in San Francsico.

Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth will be presenting at the conference on April 19th. Mark’s presentation, From Blue Skies to Big Deployments, will outline how we can deliver the robustness, scale and innovation that will turn pilots and prototypes into mission critical infrastructure. Practices and processes that build quality, governance and innovation while preserving the flexibility and passion of contributors will be a focus, as will some of the lessons learned from large scale deployments of Ubuntu in government and corporate environments.

Canonical will also host a Juju Charm school on Thursday, April 19th from 5:30pm to 8:30pm in the Marina Room. Juju provides shareable, re-usable, and repeatable expressions of devops best practices in the form of charms. The school is for anyone who writes or deploys software in distributed environments. Though not required, we recommend that attendees have Juju installed and configured prior to the event. Places are available on a first come, first served basis. Pizza and drinks will be provided.

And if that’s not enough, a number of Canonical employees will be in attendance so you can be sure to have a chance to network during the Summit, or visit the Canonical demo area on Thursday and Friday to learn more about OpenStack deployments.

You can find out more about the event here.

See you there!

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