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Posts tagged with 'openstack'

Dustin Kirkland


This little snippet of ~200 lines of YAML is the exact OpenStack that I'm deploying tonight, at the OpenStack Austin Meetup.

Anyone with a working Juju and MAAS setup, and 7 registered servers should be able to deploy this same OpenStack setup, in about 12 minutes, with a single command.


$ wget http://people.canonical.com/~kirkland/icehouseOB.yaml
$ juju-deployer -c icehouseOB.yaml
$ cat icehouseOB.yaml

icehouse:
overrides:
openstack-origin: "cloud:trusty-icehouse"
source: "distro"
services:
ceph:
charm: "cs:trusty/ceph-27"
num_units: 3
constraints: tags=physical
options:
fsid: "9e7aac42-4bf4-11e3-b4b7-5254006a039c"
"monitor-secret": AQAAvoJSOAv/NRAAgvXP8d7iXN7lWYbvDZzm2Q==
"osd-devices": "/srv"
"osd-reformat": "yes"
annotations:
"gui-x": "2648.6688842773438"
"gui-y": "708.3873901367188"
keystone:
charm: "cs:trusty/keystone-5"
num_units: 1
constraints: tags=physical
options:
"admin-password": "admin"
"admin-token": "admin"
annotations:
"gui-x": "2013.905517578125"
"gui-y": "75.58013916015625"
"nova-compute":
charm: "cs:trusty/nova-compute-3"
num_units: 3
constraints: tags=physical
to: [ceph=0, ceph=1, ceph=2]
options:
"flat-interface": eth0
annotations:
"gui-x": "776.1040649414062"
"gui-y": "-81.22811031341553"
"neutron-gateway":
charm: "cs:trusty/quantum-gateway-3"
num_units: 1
constraints: tags=virtual
options:
ext-port: eth1
instance-mtu: 1400
annotations:
"gui-x": "329.0572509765625"
"gui-y": "46.4658203125"
"nova-cloud-controller":
charm: "cs:trusty/nova-cloud-controller-41"
num_units: 1
constraints: tags=physical
options:
"network-manager": Neutron
annotations:
"gui-x": "1388.40185546875"
"gui-y": "-118.01156234741211"
rabbitmq:
charm: "cs:trusty/rabbitmq-server-4"
num_units: 1
to: mysql
annotations:
"gui-x": "633.8120727539062"
"gui-y": "862.6530151367188"
glance:
charm: "cs:trusty/glance-3"
num_units: 1
to: nova-cloud-controller
annotations:
"gui-x": "1147.3269653320312"
"gui-y": "1389.5643157958984"
cinder:
charm: "cs:trusty/cinder-4"
num_units: 1
to: nova-cloud-controller
options:
"block-device": none
annotations:
"gui-x": "1752.32568359375"
"gui-y": "1365.716194152832"
"ceph-radosgw":
charm: "cs:trusty/ceph-radosgw-3"
num_units: 1
to: nova-cloud-controller
annotations:
"gui-x": "2216.68212890625"
"gui-y": "697.16796875"
cinder-ceph:
charm: "cs:trusty/cinder-ceph-1"
num_units: 0
annotations:
"gui-x": "2257.5515747070312"
"gui-y": "1231.2130126953125"
"openstack-dashboard":
charm: "cs:trusty/openstack-dashboard-4"
num_units: 1
to: "keystone"
options:
webroot: "/"
annotations:
"gui-x": "2353.6898193359375"
"gui-y": "-94.2642593383789"
mysql:
charm: "cs:trusty/mysql-1"
num_units: 1
constraints: tags=physical
options:
"dataset-size": "20%"
annotations:
"gui-x": "364.4567565917969"
"gui-y": "1067.5167846679688"
mongodb:
charm: "cs:trusty/mongodb-0"
num_units: 1
constraints: tags=physical
annotations:
"gui-x": "-70.0399979352951"
"gui-y": "1282.8224487304688"
ceilometer:
charm: "cs:trusty/ceilometer-0"
num_units: 1
to: mongodb
annotations:
"gui-x": "-78.13333225250244"
"gui-y": "919.3128051757812"
ceilometer-agent:
charm: "cs:trusty/ceilometer-agent-0"
num_units: 0
annotations:
"gui-x": "-90.9158582687378"
"gui-y": "562.5347595214844"
heat:
charm: "cs:trusty/heat-0"
num_units: 1
to: mongodb
annotations:
"gui-x": "494.94012451171875"
"gui-y": "1363.6024169921875"
ntp:
charm: "cs:trusty/ntp-4"
num_units: 0
annotations:
"gui-x": "-104.57728099822998"
"gui-y": "294.6641273498535"
relations:
- - "keystone:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "nova-cloud-controller:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "nova-cloud-controller:amqp"
- "rabbitmq:amqp"
- - "nova-cloud-controller:image-service"
- "glance:image-service"
- - "nova-cloud-controller:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "glance:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "glance:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "cinder:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "cinder:amqp"
- "rabbitmq:amqp"
- - "cinder:cinder-volume-service"
- "nova-cloud-controller:cinder-volume-service"
- - "cinder:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "neutron-gateway:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "neutron-gateway:amqp"
- "rabbitmq:amqp"
- - "neutron-gateway:quantum-network-service"
- "nova-cloud-controller:quantum-network-service"
- - "openstack-dashboard:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "nova-compute:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "nova-compute:amqp"
- "rabbitmq:amqp"
- - "nova-compute:image-service"
- "glance:image-service"
- - "nova-compute:cloud-compute"
- "nova-cloud-controller:cloud-compute"
- - "cinder:storage-backend"
- "cinder-ceph:storage-backend"
- - "ceph:client"
- "cinder-ceph:ceph"
- - "ceph:client"
- "nova-compute:ceph"
- - "ceph:client"
- "glance:ceph"
- - "ceilometer:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "ceilometer:amqp"
- "rabbitmq:amqp"
- - "ceilometer:shared-db"
- "mongodb:database"
- - "ceilometer-agent:container"
- "nova-compute:juju-info"
- - "ceilometer-agent:ceilometer-service"
- "ceilometer:ceilometer-service"
- - "heat:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "heat:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "heat:amqp"
- "rabbitmq:amqp"
- - "ceph-radosgw:mon"
- "ceph:radosgw"
- - "ceph-radosgw:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "neutron-gateway:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "ceph:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "keystone:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "nova-compute:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "nova-cloud-controller:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "rabbitmq:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "glance:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "cinder:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "ceph-radosgw:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "openstack-dashboard:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "mysql:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "mongodb:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "ceilometer:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "heat:juju-info"
series: trusty

:-Dustin

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Dustin Kirkland

What would you say if I told you, that you could continuously upload your own Software-as-a-Service  (SaaS) web apps into an open source Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) framework, running on top of an open source Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud, deployed on an open source Metal-as-a-Service provisioning system, autonomically managed by an open source Orchestration-Service… right now, today?

“An idea is resilient. Highly contagious. Once an idea has taken hold of the brain it's almost impossible to eradicate.”

“Now, before you bother telling me it's impossible…”

“No, it's perfectly possible. It's just bloody difficult.” 

Perhaps something like this...

“How could I ever acquire enough detail to make them think this is reality?”

“Don’t you want to take a leap of faith???”
Sure, let's take a look!

Okay, this looks kinda neat, what is it?

This is an open source Java Spring web application, called Spring-Music, deployed as an app, running inside of Linux containers in CloudFoundry


Cloud Foundry?

CloudFoundry is an open source Platform-as-a-Service (PAAS) cloud, deployed into Linux virtual machine instances in OpenStack, by Juju.


OpenStack?

Juju?

OpenStack is an open source Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IAAS) cloud, deployed by Juju and Landscape on top of MAAS.

Juju is an open source Orchestration System that deploys and scales complex services across many public clouds, private clouds, and bare metal servers.

Landscape?

MAAS?

Landscape is a systems management tool that automates software installation, updates, and maintenance in both physical and virtual machines. Oh, and it too is deployed by Juju.

MAAS is an open source bare metal provisioning system, providing a cloud-like API to physical servers. Juju can deploy services to MAAS, as well as public and private clouds.

"Ready for the kick?"

If you recall these concepts of nesting cloud technologies...

These are real technologies, which exist today!

These are Software-as-a-Service  (SaaS) web apps served by an open source Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) framework, running on top of an open source Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud, deployed on an open source Metal-as-a-Service provisioning system, managed by an open source Orchestration-Service.

Spring Music, served by CloudFoundry, running on top of OpenStack, deployed on MAAS, managed by Juju and Landscape!

“The smallest seed of an idea can grow…”

Oh, and I won't leave you hanging...you're not dreaming!


:-Dustin

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Dustin Kirkland



In case you missed the recent Cloud Austin MeetUp, you have another chance to see the Ubuntu Orange Box live and in action here in Austin!

This time, we're at the OpenStack Austin MeetUp, next Wednesday, September 10, 2014, at 6:30pm at Tech Ranch Austin, 9111 Jollyville Rd #100, Austin, TX!

If you join us, you'll witness all of OpenStack Ice House, deployed in minutes to real hardware. Not an all-in-one DevStack; not a minimum viable set of components.  Real, rich, production-quality OpenStack!  Ceilometer, Ceph, Cinder, Glance, Heat, Horizon, Keystone, MongoDB, MySQL, Nova, NTP, Quantum, and RabbitMQ -- intelligently orchestrated and rapidly scaled across 10 physical servers sitting right up front on the podium.  Of course, we'll go under the hood and look at how all of this comes together on the fabulous Ubuntu Orange Box.

And like any good open source software developer, I generally like to make things myself, and share them with others.  In that spirit, I'll also bring a couple of growlers of my own home brewed beer, Ubrewtu ;-)  Free as in beer, of course!
Cheers,Dustin

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Dustin Kirkland



I hope you'll join me at Rackspace on Tuesday, August 19, 2014, at the Cloud Austin Meetup, at 6pm, where I'll use our spectacular Orange Box to deploy Hadoop, scale it up, run a terasort, destroy it, deploy OpenStack, launch instances, and destroy it too.  I'll talk about the hardware (the Orange Box, Intel NUCs, Managed VLAN switch), as well as the software (Ubuntu, OpenStack, MAAS, Juju, Hadoop) that makes all of this work in 30 minutes or less!

Be sure to RSVP, as space is limited.

http://www.meetup.com/CloudAustin/events/194009002/

Cheers,
Dustin

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Prakash Advani

The company has pledged to invest $1 billion in open cloud products and services over the next two years, along with community-driven, open-source cloud technologies.

“Just as the community spread the adoption of Linux in the enterprise, we believe OpenStack will do the same for the cloud,” said Hewlett-Packard CEO and President Meg Whitman, in a webcast announcing Helion Tuesday.

Read More

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Dustin Kirkland

Click and drag to rotate, zoom with middle mouse button

It was September of 2009.  I answered a couple of gimme trivia questions and dropped my business card into a hat at a Linux conference in Portland, Oregon.  A few hours later, I received an email...I had just "won" a developer edition HTC Dream -- the Android G1.  I was quite anxious to have a hardware platform where I could experiment with Android.  I had, of course, already downloaded the SDK, compiled Android from scratch, and fiddled with it in an emulator.  But that experience fell far short of Android running on real hardware.  Until the G1.  The G1 was the first device to truly showcase the power and potential of the Android operating system.

And with that context, we are delighted to introduce the Orange Box!


The Orange Box


Conceived by Canonical and custom built by TranquilPC, the Orange Box is a 10-node cluster computer, that fits in a suitcase.

Ubuntu, MAAS, Juju, Landscape, OpenStack, Hadoop, CloudFoundry, and more!

The Orange Box provides a spectacular development platform, showcasing in mere minutes the power of hardware provisioning and service orchestration with Ubuntu, MAAS, Juju, and Landscape.  OpenStack, Hadoop, CloudFoundry, and hundreds of other workloads deploy in minutes, to real hardware -- not just instances in AWS!  It also makes one hell of a Steam server -- there's a charm for that ;-)


OpenStack deployed by Juju, takes merely 6 minutes on an Orange Box

Most developers here certainly recognize the term "SDK", or "Software Development Kit"...  You can think of the Orange Box as a "HDK", or "Hardware Development Kit".  Pair an Orange Box with MAAS and Juju, and you have yourself a compact cloud.  Or a portable big data number cruncher.  Or a lightweight cluster computer.


The underside of an Orange Box, with its cover off


Want to get your hands on one?

Drop us a line, and we'd be delighted to hand-deliver an Orange Box to your office, and conduct 2 full days of technical training, covering MAAS, Juju, Landscape, and OpenStack.  The box is yours for 2 weeks, as you experiment with the industry leading Ubuntu ecosystem of cloud technologies at your own pace and with your own workloads.  We'll show back up, a couple of weeks later, to review what you learned and discuss scaling these tools up, into your own data center, on your own enterprise hardware.  (And if you want your very own Orange Box to keep, you can order one from our friends at TranquilPC.)


Manufacturers of the Orange Box

Gear head like me?  Interested in the technical specs?


Remember those posts late last year about Intel NUCs?  Someone took notice, and we set out to build this ;-)


Each Orange Box chassis contains:
  • 10x Intel NUCs
  • All 10x Intel NUCs contain
    • Intel HD Graphics 4000 GPU
    • 16GB of DDR3 RAM
    • 120GB SSD root disk
    • Intel Gigabit ethernet
  • D-Link DGS-1100-16 managed gigabit switch with 802.1q VLAN support
    • All 10 nodes are internally connected to this gigabit switch
  • 100-240V AC/DC power supply
    • Adapter supplied for US, UK, and EU plug types
    • 19V DC power supplied to each NUC
    • 5V DC power supplied to internal network switch


Intel NUC D53427RKE board

That's basically an Amazon EC2 m3.xlarge ;-)

The first node, node0, additionally contains:
  • A 2TB Western Digital HDD, preloaded with a full Ubuntu archive mirror
  • USB and HDMI ports are wired and accessible from the rear of the box

Most planes fly in clouds...this cloud flies in planes!


In aggregate, this micro cluster effectively fields 40 cores, 160GB of RAM, 1.2TB of solid state storage, and is connected over an internal gigabit network fabric.  A single fan quietly cools the power supply, while all of the nodes are passively cooled by aluminum heat sinks spanning each side of the chassis. All in a chassis the size of a tower PC!

It fits in a suit case, and can travel anywhere you go.


Pelican iM2875 Storm Case

How are we using them at Canonical?

If you're here at the OpenStack Summit in Atlanta, GA, you'll see at least a dozen Orange Boxes, in our booth, on stage during Mark Shuttleworth's keynote, and in our breakout conference rooms.


Canonical sales engineer, Ameet Paranjape,
demonstrating OpenStack on the Orange Box in the Ubuntu booth
at the OpenStack Summit in Atlanta, GA
We are also launching an update to our OpenStack Jumpstart program, where we'll deliver and Orange Box and 2 full days of training to your team, and leave you the box while you experiment with OpenStack, MAAS, Juju, Hadoop, and more for 2 weeks.  Without disrupting your core network or production data center workloads,  prototype your OpenStack experience within a private sandbox environment. You can experiment with various storage alternatives, practice scaling services, destroy and rebuild the environment repeatedly. Safe. Risk free.


This is Cloud, for the Free Man.

:-Dustin

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Greg Lutostanski

We (the Canonical OIL dev team) are about to finish the production roll out of our OpenStack Interoperability Lab (OIL). It’s been an awesome time getting here so I thought I would take the opportunity to get everyone familiar, at a high level, with what OIL is and some of the cool technology behind it.

So what is OIL?

For starters, OIL is essentially continuous integration of the entire stack, from hardware preparation, to Operating System deployment, to orchestration of OpenStack and third party software, all while running specific tests at each point in the process. All test results and CI artifacts are centrally stored for analysis and monthly report generation.

Typically, setting up a cloud (particularly OpenStack) for the first time can be frustrating and time consuming. The potential combinations and permutations of hardware/software components and configurations can quickly become mind-numbing. To help ease the process and provide stability across options we sought to develop an interoperability test lab to vet as much of the ecosystem as possible.

To accomplish this we developed a CI process for building and tearing down entire OpenStack deployments in order to validate every step in the process and to make sure it is repeatable. The OIL lab is comprised of a pool of machines (including routers/switches, storage systems, and computer servers) from a large number of partners. We continually pull available nodes from the pool, setup the entire stack, go to town testing, and then tear it all back down again. We do this so many times that we are already deploying around 50 clouds a day and expect to scale this by a factor of 3-4 with our production roll-out. Generally, each cloud is composed of about 5-7 machines each but we have the ability to scale each test as well.

But that’s not all, in addition to testing we also do bug triage, defect analysis and work both internally and with our partners on fixing as many things as we can. All to ensure that deploying OpenStack on Ubuntu is as seamless a process as possible for both users and vendors alike.

Underlying Technology

We didn’t want to reinvent the wheel so, we are leveraging the latest Ubuntu technologies as well as some standard tools to do all of this. In fact the majority of the OIL infrastructure is public code you can get and start playing with right away!

Here is a small list of what we are using for all this CI goodness:

  • MaaS — to do the base OS install
  • Juju — for all the complicated OpenStack setup steps — and linking them together
  • Tempest — the standard test suite that pokes and prods OpenStack to ensure everything is working
  • Machine selections & random config generation code — to make sure we get a good hardware/software cross sections
  • Jenkins — gluing everything together

Using all of this we are able to manage our hardware effectively, and with a similar setup you can easily too. This is just a high-level overview so we will have to leave the in-depth technological discussions for another time.

More to come

We plan on having a few more blog posts cover some of the more interesting aspects (both results we are getting from OIL and some underlying technological discussions).

We are getting very close to OIL’s official debut and are excited to start publishing some really insightful data.

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pitti

Our current autopkgtest machinery uses Jenkins (a private and a public one) and lots of “rsync state files between hosts”, both of which have reached a state where they fall over far too often. It’s flakey, hard to maintain, and hard to extend with new test execution slaves (e. g. for new architectures, or using different test runners). So I’m looking into what it would take to replace this with something robust, modern, and more lightweight.

In our new Continuous Integration world the preferred technologies are RabbitMQ for doing the job distribution (which is delightfully simple to install and use from Python), and OpenStack’s swift for distributed data storage. We have a properly configured swift in our data center, but for local development and experimentation I really just want a dead simple throw-away VM or container which gives me the swift API. swift is quite a bit more complex, and it took me several hours of reading and exercising various tutorials, debugging connection problems, and reading stackexchange to set it up. But now it’s working, and I condensed the whole setup into a single setup-swift.sh shell script.

You can run this in a standard ubuntu container or VM as root:

sudo apt-get install lxc
sudo lxc-create -n swift -t ubuntu -- -r trusty
sudo lxc-start -n swift
# log in as ubuntu/ubuntu, and wget or scp setup-swift.sh
sudo ./setup-swift.sh

Then get swift’s IP from sudo lxc-ls --fancy, install the swift client locally, and talk to it:

$ sudo apt-get install python-swiftclient
$ swift -A http://10.0.3.134:8080/auth/v1.0 -U testproj:testuser -K testpwd stat

Caveat: Don’t use this for any production machine! It’s configured to maximum insecurity, with static passwords and everything.

I realize this is just poor man’s juju, but juju-local is currently not working for me (I only just analyzed that). There is a charm for swift as well, but I haven’t tried that yet. In any case, it’s dead simple now, and maybe useful for someone else.

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Prakash

The company has been advertising to hire an engineering director who will “lead GoDaddy’s internal infrastructure-as-a-service project by adopting and contributing to OpenStack,” according to an ad posted to LinkedIn and the OpenStack Foundation website.

The ad doesn’t offer much more detail and GoDaddy did not reply to a request for comment so it’s hard to know how extensively it plans to use OpenStack. But adopting OpenStack to run internal operations would be in line with recent comments made by the company’s CIO, who told a publication called Business Cloud News just last week that the company is planning a big internal shift to the cloud and will use open source software to execute this vision.

Read More:  http://www.itworld.com/cloud-computing/401451/godaddy-goes-openstack

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Prakash

PayPal has spoken publicly and regularly about its private OpenStack implementation and recently said that 20 percent of its infrastructure runs on OpenStack.

But it’s only a matter of time before PayPal starts running some of its operations on public clouds, said James Barrese, CTO of PayPal.

“We have a few small apps that aren’t financial related where we’re doing experiments on the public cloud,” he said. “We’re not using it in a way that’s a seamless hybrid because we’re a financial system and have very stringent security requirements.”

Read More: http://www.itworld.com/cloud-computing/400964/private-cloud-poster-child-paypal-experimenting-public-cloud

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Prakash

Blueshift is the cool speakers that charges in 5 minutes and plays for 6 hours.

Sam Beck is the guy behind Blueshift, an open source sustainable electronics business that is all about building cool stuff. Helium speakers are the company’s first product to market and will be the world’s the first supercapacitor-powered portable speakers. Not to mention the design files are open source.

In this interview, Sam shares with me his unique business mindset and why he’s not afraid anyone will steal his thunder, even while they might have access to his design.

If we build stuff that’s cool enough, we’ll find a way to make money.

Read More: https://opensource.com/life/13/12/interview-blueshift-sam-beck

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Prakash

You gotta love it when one vendor helpfully announces what another vendor’s plans. That’s what apparently happened Monday when Rackspace Chairman and co-founder Graham Weston was quoted in the Wall Street Journal’s CIO blog  saying that Salesforce.com would start running OpenStack’s open-source cloud technology.

Read More: http://gigaom.com/2013/12/17/salesforce-com-will-adopt-openstack-says-rackspace/

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Prakash

OpenStack, a non-profit organization promoting open source cloud computing software, wants to increase its presence in India.

The organization has formed a three -pronged strategy—launching new products and features, tapping organizations deploying cloud computing, and training the vast channel base of its alliance partners who have a strong presence in the country.

Mark Collier, COO, OpenStack, affirmed, “After the US, India and China are the most important countries for us. We will target the large organizations that are either in the process of deploying, or have a cloud computing strategy in place. And cloud computing requires a lot of business transformation because of the cultural shift and dramatic changes in processes.”

 

Read More: http://www.crn.in/news/software/2013/11/15/openstack-keen-on-indian-market

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Dustin Kirkland

Last week, I posed a question on Google+, looking for suggestions on a minimal physical format, x86 machine.  I was looking for something like a Raspberry Pi (of which I already have one), but really it had to be x86.

I was aware of a few options out there, but I was very fortunately introduced to one spectacular little box...the Intel NUC!

The unboxing experience is nothing short of pure marketing genius!



The "NUC" stands for Intel's Next Unit of Computing.  It's a compact little device, that ships barebones.  You need to add DDR3 memory (up to 16GB), an mSATA hard drive (if you want to boot locally), and an mSATA WiFi card (if you want wireless networking).

The physical form factor of all models is identical:

  • 4.6" x 4.4" x 1.6"
  • 11.7cm x 11.2cm x 4.1cm

There are 3 different processor options:


And there are three different peripheral setups:

  • HDMI 1.4a (x2) + USB 2.0 (x3) + Gigabit ethernet
  • HDMI 1.4a (x1) + Thunderbolt supporting DisplayPort 1.1a (x1) + USB 2.0 (x3)
  • HDMI 1.4a (x1) + Mini DisplayPort 1.1a (x2) + USB 2.0 (x2); USB 3.0 (x1)
I ended up buying 3 of these last week, and reworked my audio/video and baby monitoring setup in the house last week.  I bought 2 of these (i3 + Ethernet) , and 1 of these (i3 + Thunderbolt)

Quite simply, I couldn't be happier with these little devices!

I used one of these to replace the dedicated audio/video PC (an x201 Thinkpad) hooked up in my theater.  The x201 was a beefy machine, with plenty of CPU and video capability.  But it was pretty bulky, rather noisy, and drew too much power.

And the other two are Baby-buntu baby monitors, as previously blogged here, replacing a real piece-of-crap Lenovo Q100 (Atom + SiS307DV and all the horror maligned with that sick chip set).

All 3 are now running Ubuntu 13.10, spectacularly I might add!  All of the hardware cooperated perfectly.




Here are the two views that I really wanted Amazon to show me, as I was buying the device...what the inside looks like!  You can see two mSATA ports and red/black WiFi antenna leads on the left, and two DDR3 slots on the right.


On the left, you can now see a 24GB mSATA SSD, and beneath it (not visible) is an Intel Centrino Advanced-N 6235 WiFi adapter.  On the right, I have two 8GB DDR3 memory modules.

Note, to get wireless working properly I did have to:

echo "options iwlwifi 11n_disable=1" | sudo tee -a /etc/modprobe.d/iwlwifi.conf


The BIOS is really super fancy :-)  There's a mouse and everything.  I made a few minor tweaks, to the boot order, assigned 512MB of memory to the display adapter, and configured it to power itself back on at any power loss.


Speaking of power, it sustains about 10 watts of power, at idle, which costs me about $11/year in electricity.


Some of you might be interested in some rough disk IO statistics...

kirkland@living:~⟫ sudo hdparm -Tt /dev/sda
/dev/sda:
Timing cached reads: 11306 MB in 2.00 seconds = 5657.65 MB/sec
Timing buffered disk reads: 1478 MB in 3.00 seconds = 492.32 MB/sec

And the lshw output...

    description: Desktop Computer
product: (To be filled by O.E.M.)
width: 64 bits
capabilities: smbios-2.7 dmi-2.7 vsyscall32
configuration: boot=normal chassis=desktop family=To be filled by O.E.M. sku=To be filled by O.E.M. uuid=[redacted]
*-core
description: Motherboard
product: D33217CK
vendor: Intel Corporation
physical id: 0
version: G76541-300
serial: [redacted]
*-firmware
description: BIOS
vendor: Intel Corp.
physical id: 0
version: GKPPT10H.86A.0025.2012.1011.1534
date: 10/11/2012
size: 64KiB
capacity: 6336KiB
capabilities: pci upgrade shadowing cdboot bootselect socketedrom edd int13floppy1200 int13floppy720 int13floppy2880 int5printscreen int14serial int17printer acpi usb biosbootspecification uefi
*-cache:0
width: 32 bits
clock: 66MHz
capabilities: storage msi pm ahci_1.0 bus_master cap_list
configuration: driver=ahci latency=0
resources: irq:40 ioport:f0b0(size=8) ioport:f0a0(size=4) ioport:f090(size=8) ioport:f080(size=4) ioport:f060(size=32) memory:f6906000-f69067ff
*-serial UNCLAIMED
description: SMBus
product: 7 Series/C210 Series Chipset Family SMBus Controller
vendor: Intel Corporation
physical id: 1f.3
bus info: pci@0000:00:1f.3
version: 04
width: 64 bits
clock: 33MHz
configuration: latency=0
resources: memory:f6905000-f69050ff ioport:f040(size=32)
*-scsi
physical id: 1
logical name: scsi0
capabilities: emulated
*-disk
description: ATA Disk
product: BP4 mSATA SSD
physical id: 0.0.0
bus info: scsi@0:0.0.0
logical name: /dev/sda
version: S8FM
serial: [redacted]
size: 29GiB (32GB)
capabilities: gpt-1.00 partitioned partitioned:gpt
configuration: ansiversion=5 guid=be0ab026-45c1-4bd5-a023-1182fe75194e sectorsize=512
*-volume:0
description: Windows FAT volume
vendor: mkdosfs
physical id: 1
bus info: scsi@0:0.0.0,1
logical name: /dev/sda1
logical name: /boot/efi
version: FAT32
serial: 2252-bc3f
size: 486MiB
capacity: 486MiB
capabilities: boot fat initialized
configuration: FATs=2 filesystem=fat mount.fstype=vfat mount.options=rw,relatime,fmask=0022,dmask=0022,codepage=437,iocharset=iso8859-1,shortname=mixed,errors=remount-ro state=mounted
*-volume:1
description: EXT4 volume
vendor: Linux
physical id: 2
bus info: scsi@0:0.0.0,2
logical name: /dev/sda2
logical name: /
version: 1.0
serial: [redacted]
size: 25GiB
capabilities: journaled extended_attributes large_files huge_files dir_nlink recover extents ext4 ext2 initialized
configuration: created=2013-11-06 13:01:57 filesystem=ext4 lastmountpoint=/ modified=2013-11-12 15:38:33 mount.fstype=ext4 mount.options=rw,relatime,errors=remount-ro,data=ordered mounted=2013-11-12 15:38:33 state=mounted
*-volume:2
description: Linux swap volume
vendor: Linux
physical id: 3
bus info: scsi@0:0.0.0,3
logical name: /dev/sda3
version: 1
serial: [redacted]
size: 3994MiB
capacity: 3994MiB
capabilities: nofs swap initialized
configuration: filesystem=swap pagesize=4095

It also supports: virtualization technology, S3/S4/S5 sleep states, Wake-on-LAN, and PXE boot.  Sadly, it does not support IPMI :-(

Finally, it's worth noting that I bought the model with the i3 for a specific purpose...  These three machines all have full virtualization capabilities (KVM).  Which means these little boxes, with their dual-core hyper-threaded CPUs and 16GB of RAM are about to become Nova compute nodes in my local OpenStack cluster ;-)  That will be a separate blog post ;-)

Dustin

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Mark Baker

To paraphrase from Mark Shuttleworth’s keynote at the OpenStack Developer Summit last week in Hong Kong, building clouds is no longer exciting. It’s easy. That’s somewhat of an exaggeration, of course, as clouds are still a big choice for many enterprises, but there is still a lot of truth in Mark’s sentiment. The really interesting part about the cloud now is what you actually do with it, how you integrate it with existing systems, and how powerful it can be.

OpenStack has progressed tremendously in its first few years, and Ubuntu’s goal has been to show that it is just as stable, production-ready, easy-to-deploy and manage as any other cloud infrastructure. For our part, we feel we’ve done a good job, and the numbers certainly seem to support that. More than 3,000 people from 50 countries and 480 cities attended the OpenStack Summit in Hong Kong, a new record for the conference, and a recent IDG Connect survey found that 84 percent of enterprises plan to make OpenStack part of their future clouds.

Clearly OpenStack has proven itself. And, now, the OpenStack community’s aim is making it work even better with more technologies, more players and more platforms to do more complex things more easily. These themes were evident from a number of influential contributors at the event and require an increased focus amongst the OpenStack community:

Global Collaboration

OpenStack’s collaborative roots were exemplified early on with the opening address by Daniel Lai, Hong Kong’s CIO, who talked about how global the initially U.S.-founded project has become. There are now developers in more than 400 cities around the world with the highest concentration of developers located in Beijing.

Focus on the Core

One of the first to directly hit on the theme of needing more collaboration, though, was Mark Shuttleworth with a quote from Albert Einstein: “Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius — and a lot of courage — to move in the opposite direction.” OpenStack has grown fantastically, but we do, as a community, need to ensure we can support that growth rate. OpenStack should focus on the core services and beyond that, provide a mechanism to let many additional technologies plug in, or “let a thousand flowers bloom,” as Mark eloquently put it.

HP’s Monty Taylor also called for more collaboration between all of OpenStack’s players to really continue enhancing the core structure and principle of OpenStack. As he put it, “If your amazing plug-in works but the OpenStack core doesn’t, your plug-in is sitting on a pile of mud.” A bit blunt, but it gets to the point of needing to make sure that the core benefits of OpenStack – that an open and interoperable cloud is the only cloud for the future – are upheld.

Greasing the Wheels of Interoperability

And, that theme of interoperability was at the core of one of Ubuntu’s own announcements at the Hong Kong summit: the Ubuntu OpenStack Interoperability Lab, or Ubuntu OIL. Ubuntu has always been about giving companies choice, especially in the cloud. Our contributions to OpenStack so far have included new hypervisors, SDN stacks and the ability to run different workloads on multiple clouds.

We’ve also introduced Juju, which is one step up from a traditional configuration management tool and is able to distil functions into groups – we call them Charms – for rapid deployment of complex infrastructures and services.

Will all the new capabilities being added to OpenStack, Ubuntu OIL will test all of these options, and other non-OpenStack-centric technologies, to ensure Ubuntu OpenStack offers the broadest set of validated and supported technology options compatible with user deployments.

Collaboration and interoperability testing like this will help ensure OpenStack only becomes easier to use for enterprises, and, thus, more enticing to adopt.

For more information on Ubuntu OIL, or to suggest components for testing in the lab, email us at oil@ubuntu.com or visit http://www.ubuntu.com/cloud/ecosystem/ubuntu-oil

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Prakash

  • US Number 1 Country, India Number 2!
  • Ubuntu No 1 OS.
  • KVM Number 1 Hypervisor.

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Prakash

Netflix has developed s Asgard, a web interface that lets engineers and developers manage their AWS infrastructure using a GUI rather than a command line.

Netflix Asgard is open source.

Paypal a big user of OpenStack has ported Asgard to OpenStack.

Read More: http://gigaom.com/2013/10/02/paypal-has-rebuilt-netflixs-cloud-management-system-for-openstack/

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Mark Baker

When it comes to using Linux on an enterprise server, Ubuntu is generally seen as the new challenger in a market dominated by established vendors specifically targeting enterprises. However, we are seeing signs that this is changing. The W3Techs data showing Ubuntu’s continued growth as a platform for online scale-out infrastructure is becoming well known, but a more recent highlight is a review published by Network World of five commercial Linux-based servers (note registration required to read the whole article).

The title of the review “Ubuntu impresses in Linux enterprise test” is encouraging right from the start, but what may surprise some readers are the areas in which the reviewers rated Ubuntu highly:

 

1. Transparency (Free and commercially supported versions are the same.)

This has long been a key part of Ubuntu and we are pleased that its value is gaining broader recognition. From an end user perspective this model has many benefits, primarily the zero migration cost of moving between an unsupported environment (say, in development) and a supported one (in production). With many organisations moving towards models of continuous deployment this can be extremely valuable.

2. Management tools

The reviewers seemed particularly impressed with the management tools that come with Ubuntu, supported with Ubuntu Advantage: Metal as a Service (MAAS), for rapid bare metal provisioning; Juju for service deployment and orchestration; and Landscape for monitoring, security and maintenance management. At Canonical we have invested significantly in these tools over the last few years, so it is good to know that the results have been well received.

Landscape Cloud Support

Landscape Cloud Support

3. Cloud capability

The availability of cloud images that run on public clouds is called out as being valuable, as is the inclusion of OpenStack to be able to create an OpenStack Cloud. Cloud has been a key part of Ubuntu’s focus since 2008, when we started to create and publish images onto EC2. With the huge growth of Amazon and the more recent rapid adoption of OpenStack, having cloud support baked into Ubuntu and instantly available to end users is valuable.

4. Virtualisation support

It is sometimes thought that Ubuntu is not a great virtualisation platform, mainly because it is not really marketed as being one. The reality, as recognised by the Network World reviewers, is that Ubuntu has great hypervisor support. Like some other vendors we default to KVM for general server virtualisation, but when it comes to hypervisor support for Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Ubuntu is far more hypervisor agnostic than many others, supporting not only KVM, but VMware ESXi, and Xen as well. Choice is a good thing.

Of course there are areas of Ubuntu that the reviewers believed to be weak – installation being the primary one. We’ll take this onboard and are confident that future releases will deliver an improved installation experience. There are areas that you could suggest are important to an enterprise that are not covered in the review – commercial application support being one – but the fact remains that viewed as a platform in its own right, with a vast array of open source applications available via Juju, Ubuntu seems to be on the right path. If it continues this way, soon it could well cease to be the challenger and become the leader.

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Robbie

20130722092922-edge-1-large

So I’m partially kidding…the Ubuntu Edge is quickly becoming a crowdfunding phenomena, and everyone should support it if they can.  If we succeed, it will be a historic moment for Ubuntu, crowdfunding, and the global phone industry as well. 

But I Don’t Wanna Talk About That Right Now

While I’m definitely a fan of the phone stuff, I’m a cloud and server guy at heart and what’s gotten me really excited this past month have been two significant (and freaking awesome) announcements.

#1 The Juju Charm Championship

easy_money_board_game_1974_121011_1

First off, if you still don’t know about Juju, it’s essentially our attempt at making Cloud Computing for Human Beings.  Juju allows you to deploy, connect, manage, and scale web services and applications quickly and easily…again…and again…AND AGAIN!  These services are captured in what we call charms, which contain the knowledge of how to properly deploy, configure, connect, and scale the services and applications you will want to deploy in the cloud.  We have 100′s of charms for every popular and well-known web service and application in use in the cloud today.  They’ve been authored and maintained by the experts, so you don’t have to waste your time trying to become one.  Just as Ubuntu depends on a community of packagers and developers, so does Juju.  Juju goes only as far as our Charm Community will take us, and this is why the Charm Championship is so important to us.

So….what is this Charm Championship all about?  We took notice of the fantastic response to the Cloud-Prize contest ran by our good friends (and Ubuntu Server users) over at Netflix.  So we thought we could do something similar to boost the number of full service solutions deployable by Juju, i.e. Charm Bundles.  If charms are the APT packages of the cloud, bundles are effectively the package seeds, thus allowing you to deploy groups of services, configured and interconnected all at once.  We’ve chosen this approach to increase our bundle count because we know from our experience with Ubuntu, that the best approach for growth will be by harvesting and cultivating the expertise and experience of the experts regularly developing and deploying these solutions.  For example, we at Canonical maintain and regularly deploy an OpenStack bundle to allow us to quickly get our clouds up for both internal use and for our Ubuntu Advantage customers.  We have master level expertise in OpenStack cloud deployments, and thus have codified this into our charms so that others are able to benefit.  The Charm Championship is our attempt to replicate this sharing of similar master level expertise across more service/application bundles…..BY OFFERING $30,000 USD IN PRIZE MONEY! Think of how many Ubuntu Edge phones that could buy you…well, unless you desperately need to have one of the first 50 :-).

#2 JujuCharms.com

Ironman JARVIS technologyFrom the very moment we began thinking about creating Juju years ago…we always envisioned eventually creating an interface that provides solution architects the ability to graphically create, deploy, and interact with services visually…replicating the whiteboard planning commonly employed in the planning phase of such solutions.

The new Juju GUI now integrated into JujuCharms.com is the realization of our vision, and I’m excited as hell at the possibilities opened and the technical roadblocks removed by the release of this tool.  We’ve even charmed it, so you can  ’juju deploy juju-gui’ into any supported cloud, bare metal (MAAS), or local workstation (via LXC) environment.  Below is a video of deploying OpenStack via our new GUI, and a perfect example of the possibilities that are opened up now that we’ve released this innovative and f*cking awesome tool:

The best part here, is that you can play with the new GUI RIGHT NOW by selecting the “Build” option on jujucharms.com….so go ahead and give it a try!

Join the Championship…Play with the GUI…then Buy the Phone

Cause I will definitely admit…it’s a damn sexy piece of hardware. ;)


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Prakash

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