Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'oneiric'

David Planella

I am pleased to announce that our current development release, Ubuntu Precise, is now open for translation:

Translate Ubuntu!

Translate Ubuntu Oneiric!

Some additional information that will be useful for translators:

  • Translation schedule. Remember that according to the release schedule translatable messages might be subject to change until the User Interface Freeze on the week of the 23rd of February.
  • Language packs. During the development cycle, language packs containing translations will be released twice per week except for the freeze periods. This will allow users and translators to quickly see and test the results of translations.
  • Test and report bugs. If you notice any issues (e.g. untranslated strings or applications), do check with the translation team for your language first. If you think it is a genuine bug, please report it.
  • Learn more. Learn how to start translating Ubuntu and enable millions to use it in their language.

Ubuntu 12.04 will be a Long Term Support release, so let’s rally around translations to provide the best translated OS around and go over the mark of nearly 40 languages in which Ubuntu is fully translated!

open image by loop_oh – License: CC by-nd 2.0

Read more
David

Quoting the Ubuntu philosophy, one of our  core values is to provide the ability for every computer user to use Ubuntu in their language of choice. This in turn is made possible by an army of volunteer translators, who throughout the development cycle and beyond, tirelessly put their translation skills to work in an outstanding feat to make a full operating system accessible to millions.

As we’re ramping up to the Ubuntu 11.10 release in a few day’s time, there’s another important milestone for ensuring Ubuntu is available in as many languages as possible: the translations deadline on the 6th of October.

Up until now, and considering the 80% coverage cut-off, Ubuntu 11.10, the Oneiric Ocelot, is translated in 38 languages, lead by the Slovenian team’s heroic effort of becoming the #1 team in the ranking.

Making Oneiric the best translated Ubuntu release ever

Last cycle Ubuntu was fully translated in 43 languages. I think this cycle we should be able to aim for more, and I’m confident that with everyone’s help we could reach the 50 fully translated languages mark.

There are a few languages that are very close to reaching the 80% translation level:

Basque, Latvian, Hebrew, Uyghur, Albanian, Estonian, Bengali, Punjabi

And others which might need an extra push to climb up the 60% to 70% mark to reach 80%:

Serbian Latin, Hindi, Indonesian, Tamil, Thai, Telugu, Slovak, Arabic, Belarusian, Gujarati

So if you speak any of these or other languages, here’s what you can do to help yours reach the 80% level and make it to the list of supported languages:

  1. Go to the Ubuntu 11.10 translation statistics page
  2. Click on your language to find out which packages need attention
  3. Find those packages in the list of Ubuntu translations
  4. Translate them!
    • You’ll want to contact the translation team for your language or check out their documentation to ensure you’re using a consistent terminology
    • They’ll also help you get started with translations and answer your questions

Note: the translations statistics are updated daily at 12:00 UTC.

More on translations

And now for something different

If there is any web guru out there who’d like to lend a hand, help with the CSS and the JS code for the stats page would be greatly appreciated.

One cool thing I’d like to do for instance is for translators to, once they’ve clicked on their language, be able to click on a package that needs attention and be taken to the corresponding Launchpad Translations page. This only needs the corresponding rows in the table to be linkified, which is something I’ve been struggling with and I’m sure would be a five-minute job for an experienced web developer.

So if you want to help translators with your web skills, drop a comment here or feel free to submit a bzr branch. Thanks!

Looking forward to the best translated Ubuntu release ever! :-)


Read more
Iain Farrell

Not that long ago Matt Jones of BERG fame came up with a really lovely idea! In response to the keep calm and carry on posters from the Second World War that had become so popular again he decided that a more positive statement was needed!

“It occurred to me that this was exactly the wrong sentiment for this age …

I started sketching on the paper a contrary statement, where stiff upper lip was replaced by a stiff upper arm from soldering…”

The Get Excited and Make Things poster was born.

Get excited and make things - By Matt Jones

With this in mind I’d like to open up the wallpaper submissions process for the next release of Ubuntu, Oneiric Ocelot! The Flickr group for submissions is now open and can be found at http://www.flickr.com/groups/oneiric-wallpaper-submissions/ and just like last time we’re accepting both photos and rendered/ illustrated wallpapers.

For guidance on what formats are best to submit can I suggest you look at the excellent wiki page on the subject which can be found on the Ubuntu wiki at – wiki.ubuntu.com/Artwork/Documentation/Backgrounds.

We recommend a minimum resolution of 2560 x 1600 and templates for GIMP can be found on the wiki page.

In order for us to make the UI freeze we need just over a week to review and shortlist entries so we will be closing the group for entries on the 11th August at 12pm UK time. From there as with previous cycles the contributors whose images were selected last time will be invited to select a shortlist that will make it into Ubuntu 11.10.

So what are you waiting for?! Get excited and make things!! I am! :)

Get snapping! By Gaetan Lee

Read more
David

After the first language packs have now been generated, I am pleased to announce that our current development release, Ubuntu Oneiric, is now open for translation:

Translate Ubuntu Oneiric!

  • Translation schedule. Remember that according to the release schedule translatable messages might be subject to change until the User Interface Freeze on the week of the 25th of August.
  • Language packs. During the development cycle, language packs containing translations will be released twice per week except for the freeze periods. This will allow users and translators to quickly see and test the results of translations.
  • Test and report bugs. If you notice any issues (e.g. untranslated strings or applications), do check with the translation team for your language first. If you think it is a genuine bug, please report it.
  • Learn More. Learn how to start translating Ubuntu and enable millions to use it in their language.

open 19 image by loop_oh – License: CC by-nd 2.0


Read more
brendandonegan

In my travels around Launchpad looking for bugs to triage, I came across an old one that I noticed (but not before others apparently) in the Alpha 1 release of Oneiric Ocelot. This was a problem with update-manager not ‘seeing’ that network-manager had a connection because the new version of network-manager (0.9) uses different codes to express ‘connected’.

This issue was bugging me, so I decided I’d take it upon myself to patch it up. Someone had done a similar patch in software-center so I already had all of the knowledge needed right there (i.e. what are the new codes). I jumped into my Oneiric VM, branched the update-manager code and hacked away at a couple of Python modules, tweaked, buffed and polished until lo and behold, on starting update-manager it picked up the connection! A few command lines (bzr stat, bzr commit, bzr push) and a few clicks in Launchpad later my merge request was with the update-manager project maintainer (Michael Vogt aka mvo). Minutes later it was merged and the next day with the help of my patched version of update-manager :) I was able to update update-manager with the patch.

Looking at my own name there in update-manager’s description of the change, I couldn’t help but think how awesome it is that I’m able to do this with my favourite operating system. That’s what makes OSS magic for me…


Read more
Iain Farrell

The real life dashboard on our wall in the office

Every 6 months the Ubuntu journey starts anew. Those of us entering yet another cycle assume that this all makes sense to the outside world but I like to post up dates on the wall in the office and write a blog post to give those new to the project, and some not so new, a handy reminder of the major milestones in each cycle.

Each release that we create has a cycle with certain key milestones in it. These milestones are broadly agreed before the previous release is even out the door and are almost always an exact copy of what came in the previous release. The schedule for our next release 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot can be found by following this handy link to the Ubuntu wiki.

Anyone wanting to contribute to Ubuntu needs to be aware of these dates, designers and developers alike, as dates like the feature and UI freezes are your deadlines for getting new goodness into the release. Miss this deadline and you’ve missed the October release. Like a train the Ubuntu release rolls out of town whether you’re on it or not, however, unlike those dreadful windows trains there’s another one along real soon – in another 6 months in fact! :)

For more information on the time based approach to projects head over to the wiki pages on the subject and hit us up in the comments if you have any questions!

Read more
David

Ubuntu Translations TVSo, new Ubuntu cycle and time for a fresh translations videocast!

Join me tomorrow at the Ustream Ubuntu Translations channel, where I’ll give you a summary about the great sessions we had around translations last week at the Ubuntu Developer Summit in Budapest, where we discussed the plans for the next cycle: the Oneiric Ocelot. As usual, feel free to come along, ask your questions and have a chat around translating Ubuntu.

Talk to you all tomorrow!

Note that if you wish to participate in the online chat, you’ll need to sign up for a ustream account (it doesn’t take more than a couple of minutes), but I’ll also be answering your questions on the #ubuntu-translators IRC channel on Freenode.

Ubuntu Translations Videocast


Read more
roaksoax

After the success of the improvements of PowerNap in Ubuntu Natty 11.04, we will be having another session st UDS-O Thursday the 12th at 15:00. In this session we will discuss the following:

  • Second Stage action when running in PowerSave mode.
  • Support for port-ranges in Network Monitors
  • Changing the polling monitoring system to an event based system.
  • Client/Server approach to monitor/manage PowerNap “client machines” over the network for data center wide deployments
  • Server ARP network Monitoring for Automatic Wake-up of Clients.
  • API like approach for Integration with other projects.

Everyone who’s interested are more than welcome to join! For more information, the blueprint can be found HERE.

Read more