Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'nuc'

Dustin Kirkland



I hope you'll join me at Rackspace on Tuesday, August 19, 2014, at the Cloud Austin Meetup, at 6pm, where I'll use our spectacular Orange Box to deploy Hadoop, scale it up, run a terasort, destroy it, deploy OpenStack, launch instances, and destroy it too.  I'll talk about the hardware (the Orange Box, Intel NUCs, Managed VLAN switch), as well as the software (Ubuntu, OpenStack, MAAS, Juju, Hadoop) that makes all of this work in 30 minutes or less!

Be sure to RSVP, as space is limited.

http://www.meetup.com/CloudAustin/events/194009002/

Cheers,
Dustin

Read more
Dustin Kirkland

Click and drag to rotate, zoom with middle mouse button

It was September of 2009.  I answered a couple of gimme trivia questions and dropped my business card into a hat at a Linux conference in Portland, Oregon.  A few hours later, I received an email...I had just "won" a developer edition HTC Dream -- the Android G1.  I was quite anxious to have a hardware platform where I could experiment with Android.  I had, of course, already downloaded the SDK, compiled Android from scratch, and fiddled with it in an emulator.  But that experience fell far short of Android running on real hardware.  Until the G1.  The G1 was the first device to truly showcase the power and potential of the Android operating system.

And with that context, we are delighted to introduce the Orange Box!


The Orange Box


Conceived by Canonical and custom built by TranquilPC, the Orange Box is a 10-node cluster computer, that fits in a suitcase.

Ubuntu, MAAS, Juju, Landscape, OpenStack, Hadoop, CloudFoundry, and more!

The Orange Box provides a spectacular development platform, showcasing in mere minutes the power of hardware provisioning and service orchestration with Ubuntu, MAAS, Juju, and Landscape.  OpenStack, Hadoop, CloudFoundry, and hundreds of other workloads deploy in minutes, to real hardware -- not just instances in AWS!  It also makes one hell of a Steam server -- there's a charm for that ;-)


OpenStack deployed by Juju, takes merely 6 minutes on an Orange Box

Most developers here certainly recognize the term "SDK", or "Software Development Kit"...  You can think of the Orange Box as a "HDK", or "Hardware Development Kit".  Pair an Orange Box with MAAS and Juju, and you have yourself a compact cloud.  Or a portable big data number cruncher.  Or a lightweight cluster computer.


The underside of an Orange Box, with its cover off


Want to get your hands on one?

Drop us a line, and we'd be delighted to hand-deliver an Orange Box to your office, and conduct 2 full days of technical training, covering MAAS, Juju, Landscape, and OpenStack.  The box is yours for 2 weeks, as you experiment with the industry leading Ubuntu ecosystem of cloud technologies at your own pace and with your own workloads.  We'll show back up, a couple of weeks later, to review what you learned and discuss scaling these tools up, into your own data center, on your own enterprise hardware.  (And if you want your very own Orange Box to keep, you can order one from our friends at TranquilPC.)


Manufacturers of the Orange Box

Gear head like me?  Interested in the technical specs?


Remember those posts late last year about Intel NUCs?  Someone took notice, and we set out to build this ;-)


Each Orange Box chassis contains:
  • 10x Intel NUCs
  • All 10x Intel NUCs contain
    • Intel HD Graphics 4000 GPU
    • 16GB of DDR3 RAM
    • 120GB SSD root disk
    • Intel Gigabit ethernet
  • D-Link DGS-1100-16 managed gigabit switch with 802.1q VLAN support
    • All 10 nodes are internally connected to this gigabit switch
  • 100-240V AC/DC power supply
    • Adapter supplied for US, UK, and EU plug types
    • 19V DC power supplied to each NUC
    • 5V DC power supplied to internal network switch


Intel NUC D53427RKE board

That's basically an Amazon EC2 m3.xlarge ;-)

The first node, node0, additionally contains:
  • A 2TB Western Digital HDD, preloaded with a full Ubuntu archive mirror
  • USB and HDMI ports are wired and accessible from the rear of the box

Most planes fly in clouds...this cloud flies in planes!


In aggregate, this micro cluster effectively fields 40 cores, 160GB of RAM, 1.2TB of solid state storage, and is connected over an internal gigabit network fabric.  A single fan quietly cools the power supply, while all of the nodes are passively cooled by aluminum heat sinks spanning each side of the chassis. All in a chassis the size of a tower PC!

It fits in a suit case, and can travel anywhere you go.


Pelican iM2875 Storm Case

How are we using them at Canonical?

If you're here at the OpenStack Summit in Atlanta, GA, you'll see at least a dozen Orange Boxes, in our booth, on stage during Mark Shuttleworth's keynote, and in our breakout conference rooms.


Canonical sales engineer, Ameet Paranjape,
demonstrating OpenStack on the Orange Box in the Ubuntu booth
at the OpenStack Summit in Atlanta, GA
We are also launching an update to our OpenStack Jumpstart program, where we'll deliver and Orange Box and 2 full days of training to your team, and leave you the box while you experiment with OpenStack, MAAS, Juju, Hadoop, and more for 2 weeks.  Without disrupting your core network or production data center workloads,  prototype your OpenStack experience within a private sandbox environment. You can experiment with various storage alternatives, practice scaling services, destroy and rebuild the environment repeatedly. Safe. Risk free.


This is Cloud, for the Free Man.

:-Dustin

Read more
Dustin Kirkland

and bought 3 more with the i5-3427u CPU!



A couple of weeks ago, I waxed glowingly about Ubuntu running on a handful of Intel NUCs that I picked up on Amazon, replacing some aging PCs serving various purposes around the house.  I have since returned all three of those...and upgraded to the i5 version!!!  Read on to find out why...
Whenever I publish an article here, the Blogger/G+ integration immediately posts a link to my G+ feed.  In that thread, Mark Shuttleworth asked if these NUCs supported IPMI or a similar technology, such that they could be enabled in MAAS.  I responded in kind, that, sadly, no, they only support tried-and-trusty-but-dumb-old-Wake-on-LAN.

Alas, an old friend, fellow homebrewer, and new Canonicaler, Ryan Harper, noted that the i5-3427u version of the NUC (performance specs here) actually supports Intel AMT, which is similar to IPMI.  Actually, it's an implementation of WBEM, which itself is fundamentally an implementation of the CIM standard.

That's a health dose of alphabet soup for you.  MAAS, NUC, AMT, IPMI, WEBM, CIM.  What does all of this mean?

Let's do a quick round of introductions for the uninitiated!
  • NUC - Intel's Next Unit of Computing.  It's a palm sized computer, probably intended to be a desktop, but actually functions quite well as a Linux server too.  Drawing about 10W, it's has roughly the same power of an AWS m1.xlarge, and costs about as much as 45 days of an m1.xlarge's EC2 bill.
  •  MAAS - Metal as a Service.  Installing Ubuntu servers (or desktops, for that matter), one by one, with a CD/DVD/USB-key is so 2004.  MAAS is your PXE/DHCP/TFTP/DNS (shit, more alphabet soup...) solution, all-in-one, ready to install Ubuntu onto lots of systems at scale!  Oh, and good news...  Juju supports MAAS as one of its environments, which is cool, in that you can deploy any charmed Juju workload to bare metal, in addition to AWS and OpenStack clouds.
  • AMT - Intel's Asset Management Technology.  This is a feature found on some Intel platforms (specifically, those whose CPU and motherboard support vPro technology), which enables remote management of the system.  Specifically, if you can authenticate successfully to the system, you can retrieve detailed information about the hardware, power cycle it on and off, and modify the boot sequence.  These are the essential functions that MAAS requires to support a system.
  • IPMI - Intelligent Platform Management Interface.  Also pioneered by Intel, this is a more server focused remote network management of systems, providing power on/off and other capabilities.
  • WBEM - Web Based Enterprise Management.  Remote system management technology available through a web browser, based on some internet standards, including CIM.
  • CIM - Common Information Model.  An open open standard that defines how systems in an IT environment are represented and managed.  Does that sound meta to you?  Well, yes, yes it is.
Okay, we have our vocabulary...now what?

So I actually returned all 3 of my Intel NUCs, which had the i3 processor, in favor of the more powerful (and slightly more expensive) i5 versions.  Note that I specifically bought the i5 Ivy Bridge versions, rather than the newer i5 Haswell, because only the Ivy Bridge actually supports AMT (for reasons that I cannot explain).  In fact, in comparison to Haswell, the Ivy Bridge systems:
  1. have AMT
  2. are less expensive
  3. have a higher maximum clock speed
  4. support a higher maximum memory
The only advantage I can see of the newer Haswells is a slightly lower energy footprint, and a slightly better video processor.

When 3 of my shiny new NUCs arrived, I was quite excited to try out this fancy new AMT feature.  In fact, I had already enabled it and experimented with it on a couple of my development i7 Thinkpads, so I more or less knew what to expect.

At this point, I split this post in two.  You're welcome to read on, to learn what you need to know about Intel AMT + Ubuntu + the i5-3427u NUC...

:-Dustin

Read more
Dustin Kirkland


A couple of weeks ago, I waxed glowingly about Ubuntu running on a handful of Intel NUCs that I picked up on Amazon, replacing some aging PCs serving various purposes around the house.  I have since returned all three of those, and upgraded to the i5-3427u version, since it supports Intel AMT.  Why would I do that?  Read on...
When my shiny new NUCs arrived, I was quite excited to try out this fancy new AMT feature.  In fact, I had already enabled it and experimented with it on a couple of my development i7 Thinkpads, so I more or less knew what to expect.

But what followed was 6 straight hours of complete and utter frustration :-(  Like slam your fist into the keyboard and shout obscenities into cheese.
Actually, on that last point, I find it useful, when I'm mad, to open up cheese on my desktop and get visibly angry.  Once I realize how dumb I look when I'm angry, its a bit easier to stop being angry.  Seriously, try it sometime.
Okay, so I posted a couple of support requests on Intel's community forums.

Basically, I found it nearly impossible (like 1 in 100 chances) of actually getting into the AMT configuration menu using the required Ctrl-P.  And in the 2 or 3 times I did get in there, the default password, "admin", did not work.

After putting the kids to bed, downing a few pints of homebrewed beer, and attempting sleep (with a 2-week-old in the house), I lay in bed, awake in the middle of the night and it crossed my mind that...
No, no.  No way.  That couldn't be it.  Surely not.  That's really, really dumb.  Is it possible that the NUC's BIOS...  Nah.  Maybe, though.  It's worth a try at this point?  Maybe, just maybe, the NumLock key is enabled at boot???  It can't be.  The NumLock key is effin retarded, and almost as dumb as its braindead cousin, the CapsLock key.  OMFG!!!
Yep, that was it.  Unbelievable.  The system boots with the NumLock key toggled on.  My keyboard doesn't have an LED indicator that tells me such inane nonsense is the case.  And the BIOS doesn't expose a setting to toggle this behavior.  The "P" key is one of the keys that is NumLocked to "*".


So there must be some incredibly unlikely race condition that I could win 1 in 100 times where me pressing Ctrl-P frantically enough actually sneaks me into the AMT configuration.  Seriously, Intel peeps, please make this an F-key, like the rest of the BIOS and early boot options...

And once I was there, the default password, "admin", includes two more keys that are NumLocked.  For security reasons, these look like "*****" no matter what I'm typing.  When I thought I was typing "admin", I was actually typing "ad05n".  And of course, there's no scratch pad where I can test my keyboard and see that this is the case.  In fact, I'm not the only person hitting similar issues.  It seems that most people using keyboards other than US-English are quite confused when they type "admin" over and over and over again, to their frustration.

Okay, rant over.  I posted my solution back to my own questions on the forum.  And finally started playing with AMT!

The synopsis: AMT is really, really impressive!

First, you need to enter bios and ensure that it's enabled.  Then, you need to do whatever it takes to enter Intel's MEBx interface, using Ctrl-P (NumLock notwithstanding).  You'll be prompted for a password, and on your first login, this should be "admin" (NumLock notwithstanding).  Then you'll need to choose your own strong password.  Once in there, you'll need to enable a couple of settings, including networking/dhcp auto setup.  You can, at your option, also install some TLS certificates and secure your communications with your device.

AMT has a very simple, intuitive web interface.  Here are a comprehensive set of screen shots of all of the individual pages.

Once AMT is enabled on the target system, point a browser to port 16992, and click "Log On..."

The username is always "admin".  You'll set this password in the MEBx interface, using Ctrl-P just after BIOS post.

Here's the basic system status/overview.

The System Information page contains basic information about the system itself, including some of its capabilities.

The processor information page gives you the low down on your CPU.  Search ark.intel.com for your Intel CPU type to see all of its capabilities.

Check your memory capacity, type, speed, etc.

And your disk type, size, and serial number.

NUCs don't have battery information, but my Thinkpad does.

An event log has some interesting early boot and debug information here.

Arguably the most useful page, here you can power a system on, off, or hard reboot it.

If you have wireless capability, you choose whether you want that enabled/disabled when the system is off, suspended, or hibernated.

Here you can configure the network settings.  Unlike a BMC (Board Management Controller) on most server class hardware, which has its own dedicated interface, Intel AMT actually shares the network interface with the Operating System.

AMT actually supports IPv6 networking as well, though I haven't played with it yet.

Configure the hostname and Dynamic DNS here.

You can set up independent user accounts, if necessary.

And with a BIOS update, you can actually use Intel AMT over a wireless connection (if you have an Intel wireless card)
So this pointy/clicky web interface is nice, but not terribly scriptable (without some nasty screenscraping).  What about the command line interface?

The amttool command (provided by the amtterm package in Ubuntu) offers a nice command line interface into some of the functionality exposed by AMT.  You need to export an environment variable, AMT_PASSWORD, and then you can get some remote information about the system:

kirkland@x230:~⟫ amttool 10.0.0.14 info
### AMT info on machine '10.0.0.14' ###
AMT version: 7.1.20
Hostname: nuc1.
Powerstate: S0
Remote Control Capabilities:
IanaOemNumber 0
OemDefinedCapabilities IDER SOL BiosSetup BiosPause
SpecialCommandsSupported PXE-boot HD-boot cd-boot
SystemCapabilitiesSupported powercycle powerdown powerup reset
SystemFirmwareCapabilities f800

You can also retrieve the networking information:

kirkland@x230:~⟫ amttool 10.0.0.14 netinfo
Network Interface 0:
DhcpEnabled true
HardwareAddressDescription Wired0
InterfaceMode SHARED_MAC_ADDRESS
LinkPolicy 31
MACAddress 00-aa-bb-cc-dd-ee
DefaultGatewayAddress 10.0.0.1
LocalAddress 10.0.0.14
PrimaryDnsAddress 10.0.0.1
SecondaryDnsAddress 0.0.0.0
SubnetMask 255.255.255.0
Network Interface 1:
DhcpEnabled true
HardwareAddressDescription Wireless1
InterfaceMode SHARED_MAC_ADDRESS
LinkPolicy 0
MACAddress ee-ff-aa-bb-cc-dd
DefaultGatewayAddress 0.0.0.0
LocalAddress 0.0.0.0
PrimaryDnsAddress 0.0.0.0
SecondaryDnsAddress 0.0.0.0
SubnetMask 0.0.0.0

Far more handy than WoL alone, you can power up, power down, and power cycle the system.

kirkland@x230:~⟫ amttool 10.0.0.14 powerdown
host x220., powerdown [y/N] ? y
execute: powerdown
result: pt_status: success

kirkland@x230:~⟫ amttool 10.0.0.14 powerup
host x220., powerup [y/N] ? y
execute: powerup
result: pt_status: success

kirkland@x230:~⟫ amttool 10.0.0.14 powercycle
host x220., powercycle [y/N] ? y
execute: powercycle
result: pt_status: success

I was a little disappointed that amttool's info command didn't provide nearly as much information as the web interface.  However, I did find a fork of Gerd Hoffman's original Perl script in Sourceforge here.  I don't know the upstream-ability of this code, but it worked very well for my part, and I'm considering sponsoring/merging it into Ubuntu for 14.04.  Anyone have further experience with these enhancements?

kirkland@x230:/tmp⟫ ./amttool 10.0.0.37 hwasset data BIOS
## '10.0.0.37' :: AMT Hardware Asset
Data for the asset 'BIOS' (1 item):
(data struct.ver. 1.0)
Vendor: 'Intel Corp.'
Version: 'RKPPT10H.86A.0028.2013.1016.1429'
Release date: '10/16/2013'
BIOS characteristics: 'PCI' 'BIOS upgradeable' 'BIOS shadowing
allowed' 'Boot from CD' 'Selectable boot' 'EDD spec' 'int13h 5.25 in
1.2 mb floppy' 'int13h 3.5 in 720 kb floppy' 'int13h 3.5 in 2.88 mb
floppy' 'int5h print screen services' 'int14h serial services'
'int17h printer services'

kirkland@x230:/tmp⟫ ./amttool 10.0.0.37 hwasset data ComputerSystem
## '10.0.0.37' :: AMT Hardware Asset
Data for the asset 'ComputerSystem' (1 item):
(data struct.ver. 1.0)
Manufacturer: ' '
Product: ' '
Version: ' '
Serial numb.: ' '
UUID: 7ae34e30-44ab-41b7-988f-d98c74ab383d

kirkland@x230:/tmp⟫ ./amttool 10.0.0.37 hwasset data Baseboard
## '10.0.0.37' :: AMT Hardware Asset
Data for the asset 'Baseboard' (1 item):
(data struct.ver. 1.0)
Manufacturer: 'Intel Corporation'
Product: 'D53427RKE'
Version: 'G87971-403'
Serial numb.: '27XC63723G4'
Asset tag: 'To be filled by O.E.M.'
Replaceable: yes

kirkland@x230:/tmp⟫ ./amttool 10.0.0.37 hwasset data Processor
## '10.0.0.37' :: AMT Hardware Asset
Data for the asset 'Processor' (1 item):
(data struct.ver. 1.0)
ID: 0x4529f9eaac0f
Max Socket Speed: 2800 MHz
Current Speed: 1800 MHz
Processor Status: Enabled
Processor Type: Central
Socket Populated: yes
Processor family: 'Intel(R) Core(TM) i5 processor'
Upgrade Information: [0x22]
Socket Designation: 'CPU 1'
Manufacturer: 'Intel(R) Corporation'
Version: 'Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-3427U CPU @ 1.80GHz'

kirkland@x230:/tmp⟫ ./amttool 10.0.0.37 hwasset data MemoryModule
## '10.0.0.37' :: AMT Hardware Asset
Data for the asset 'MemoryModule' (2 items):
(* No memory device in the socket *)
(data struct.ver. 1.0)
Size: 8192 Mb
Form Factor: 'SODIMM'
Memory Type: 'DDR3'
Memory Type Details:, 'Synchronous'
Speed: 1333 MHz
Manufacturer: '029E'
Serial numb.: '123456789'
Asset Tag: '9876543210'
Part Number: 'GE86sTBF5emdppj '

kirkland@x230:/tmp⟫ ./amttool 10.0.0.37 hwasset data VproVerificationTable
## '10.0.0.37' :: AMT Hardware Asset
Data for the asset 'VproVerificationTable' (1 item):
(data struct.ver. 1.0)
CPU: VMX=Enabled SMX=Enabled LT/TXT=Enabled VT-x=Enabled
MCH: PCI Bus 0x00 / Dev 0x08 / Func 0x00
Dev Identification Number (DID): 0x0000
Capabilities: VT-d=NOT_Capable TXT=NOT_Capable Bit_50=Enabled
Bit_52=Enabled Bit_56=Enabled
ICH: PCI Bus 0x00 / Dev 0xf8 / Func 0x00
Dev Identification Number (DID): 0x1e56
ME: Enabled
Intel_QST_FW=NOT_Supported Intel_ASF_FW=NOT_Supported
Intel_AMT_FW=Supported Bit_13=Enabled Bit_14=Enabled Bit_15=Enabled
ME FW ver. 8.1 hotfix 40 build 1416
TPM: Disabled
TPM on board = NOT_Supported
Network Devices:
Wired NIC - PCI Bus 0x00 / Dev 0xc8 / Func 0x00 / DID 0x1502
BIOS supports setup screen for (can be editable): VT-d TXT
supports VA extensions (ACPI Op region) with maximum ver. 2.6
SPI Flash has Platform Data region reserved.

On a different note, I recently sponsored a package, wsmancli, into Ubuntu Universe for Trusty, at the request of Kent Baxley (Canonical) and Jared Dominguez (Dell), which provides the wsman command.  Jared writes more about it here in this Dell technical post.  With Kent's help, I did manage get wsman to remotely power on a system.  I must say that it's a bit less user friendly than the equivalent amttool functionality above...

kirkland@x230:~⟫  wsman invoke -a RequestPowerStateChange -J request.xml http://schemas.dmtf.org/wbem/wscim/1/cim-schema/2/CIM_PowerManagementService?SystemCreationClassName="CIM_ComputerSystem",SystemName="Intel(r)AMT",CreationClassName="CIM_PowerManagementService",Name="Intel(r) AMT Power Management Service" --port 16992 -h 10.0.0.14 --username admin -p "ABC123abc123#" -V -v

I'm really enjoying the ability to remotely administer these systems.  And I'm really, really looking forward to the day when I can use MAAS to provision these systems!

:-Dustin

Read more
Dustin Kirkland

Last week, I posed a question on Google+, looking for suggestions on a minimal physical format, x86 machine.  I was looking for something like a Raspberry Pi (of which I already have one), but really it had to be x86.

I was aware of a few options out there, but I was very fortunately introduced to one spectacular little box...the Intel NUC!

The unboxing experience is nothing short of pure marketing genius!



The "NUC" stands for Intel's Next Unit of Computing.  It's a compact little device, that ships barebones.  You need to add DDR3 memory (up to 16GB), an mSATA hard drive (if you want to boot locally), and an mSATA WiFi card (if you want wireless networking).

The physical form factor of all models is identical:

  • 4.6" x 4.4" x 1.6"
  • 11.7cm x 11.2cm x 4.1cm

There are 3 different processor options:


And there are three different peripheral setups:

  • HDMI 1.4a (x2) + USB 2.0 (x3) + Gigabit ethernet
  • HDMI 1.4a (x1) + Thunderbolt supporting DisplayPort 1.1a (x1) + USB 2.0 (x3)
  • HDMI 1.4a (x1) + Mini DisplayPort 1.1a (x2) + USB 2.0 (x2); USB 3.0 (x1)
I ended up buying 3 of these last week, and reworked my audio/video and baby monitoring setup in the house last week.  I bought 2 of these (i3 + Ethernet) , and 1 of these (i3 + Thunderbolt)

Quite simply, I couldn't be happier with these little devices!

I used one of these to replace the dedicated audio/video PC (an x201 Thinkpad) hooked up in my theater.  The x201 was a beefy machine, with plenty of CPU and video capability.  But it was pretty bulky, rather noisy, and drew too much power.

And the other two are Baby-buntu baby monitors, as previously blogged here, replacing a real piece-of-crap Lenovo Q100 (Atom + SiS307DV and all the horror maligned with that sick chip set).

All 3 are now running Ubuntu 13.10, spectacularly I might add!  All of the hardware cooperated perfectly.




Here are the two views that I really wanted Amazon to show me, as I was buying the device...what the inside looks like!  You can see two mSATA ports and red/black WiFi antenna leads on the left, and two DDR3 slots on the right.


On the left, you can now see a 24GB mSATA SSD, and beneath it (not visible) is an Intel Centrino Advanced-N 6235 WiFi adapter.  On the right, I have two 8GB DDR3 memory modules.

Note, to get wireless working properly I did have to:

echo "options iwlwifi 11n_disable=1" | sudo tee -a /etc/modprobe.d/iwlwifi.conf


The BIOS is really super fancy :-)  There's a mouse and everything.  I made a few minor tweaks, to the boot order, assigned 512MB of memory to the display adapter, and configured it to power itself back on at any power loss.


Speaking of power, it sustains about 10 watts of power, at idle, which costs me about $11/year in electricity.


Some of you might be interested in some rough disk IO statistics...

kirkland@living:~⟫ sudo hdparm -Tt /dev/sda
/dev/sda:
Timing cached reads: 11306 MB in 2.00 seconds = 5657.65 MB/sec
Timing buffered disk reads: 1478 MB in 3.00 seconds = 492.32 MB/sec

And the lshw output...

    description: Desktop Computer
product: (To be filled by O.E.M.)
width: 64 bits
capabilities: smbios-2.7 dmi-2.7 vsyscall32
configuration: boot=normal chassis=desktop family=To be filled by O.E.M. sku=To be filled by O.E.M. uuid=[redacted]
*-core
description: Motherboard
product: D33217CK
vendor: Intel Corporation
physical id: 0
version: G76541-300
serial: [redacted]
*-firmware
description: BIOS
vendor: Intel Corp.
physical id: 0
version: GKPPT10H.86A.0025.2012.1011.1534
date: 10/11/2012
size: 64KiB
capacity: 6336KiB
capabilities: pci upgrade shadowing cdboot bootselect socketedrom edd int13floppy1200 int13floppy720 int13floppy2880 int5printscreen int14serial int17printer acpi usb biosbootspecification uefi
*-cache:0
width: 32 bits
clock: 66MHz
capabilities: storage msi pm ahci_1.0 bus_master cap_list
configuration: driver=ahci latency=0
resources: irq:40 ioport:f0b0(size=8) ioport:f0a0(size=4) ioport:f090(size=8) ioport:f080(size=4) ioport:f060(size=32) memory:f6906000-f69067ff
*-serial UNCLAIMED
description: SMBus
product: 7 Series/C210 Series Chipset Family SMBus Controller
vendor: Intel Corporation
physical id: 1f.3
bus info: pci@0000:00:1f.3
version: 04
width: 64 bits
clock: 33MHz
configuration: latency=0
resources: memory:f6905000-f69050ff ioport:f040(size=32)
*-scsi
physical id: 1
logical name: scsi0
capabilities: emulated
*-disk
description: ATA Disk
product: BP4 mSATA SSD
physical id: 0.0.0
bus info: scsi@0:0.0.0
logical name: /dev/sda
version: S8FM
serial: [redacted]
size: 29GiB (32GB)
capabilities: gpt-1.00 partitioned partitioned:gpt
configuration: ansiversion=5 guid=be0ab026-45c1-4bd5-a023-1182fe75194e sectorsize=512
*-volume:0
description: Windows FAT volume
vendor: mkdosfs
physical id: 1
bus info: scsi@0:0.0.0,1
logical name: /dev/sda1
logical name: /boot/efi
version: FAT32
serial: 2252-bc3f
size: 486MiB
capacity: 486MiB
capabilities: boot fat initialized
configuration: FATs=2 filesystem=fat mount.fstype=vfat mount.options=rw,relatime,fmask=0022,dmask=0022,codepage=437,iocharset=iso8859-1,shortname=mixed,errors=remount-ro state=mounted
*-volume:1
description: EXT4 volume
vendor: Linux
physical id: 2
bus info: scsi@0:0.0.0,2
logical name: /dev/sda2
logical name: /
version: 1.0
serial: [redacted]
size: 25GiB
capabilities: journaled extended_attributes large_files huge_files dir_nlink recover extents ext4 ext2 initialized
configuration: created=2013-11-06 13:01:57 filesystem=ext4 lastmountpoint=/ modified=2013-11-12 15:38:33 mount.fstype=ext4 mount.options=rw,relatime,errors=remount-ro,data=ordered mounted=2013-11-12 15:38:33 state=mounted
*-volume:2
description: Linux swap volume
vendor: Linux
physical id: 3
bus info: scsi@0:0.0.0,3
logical name: /dev/sda3
version: 1
serial: [redacted]
size: 3994MiB
capacity: 3994MiB
capabilities: nofs swap initialized
configuration: filesystem=swap pagesize=4095

It also supports: virtualization technology, S3/S4/S5 sleep states, Wake-on-LAN, and PXE boot.  Sadly, it does not support IPMI :-(

Finally, it's worth noting that I bought the model with the i3 for a specific purpose...  These three machines all have full virtualization capabilities (KVM).  Which means these little boxes, with their dual-core hyper-threaded CPUs and 16GB of RAM are about to become Nova compute nodes in my local OpenStack cluster ;-)  That will be a separate blog post ;-)

Dustin

Read more