Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'news'

Canonical

Have you submitted your app for the App Showdown contest? With just under one week to go, there’s still time to enter and have the opportunity to win a Nexus/Meizu device with your app running on the handset. Deadline for submissions is Wednesday 9th April, 2014.

Here are the details once again:

The contest is open to everyone. The four dedicated categories that you can enter:

  1. QML: original apps written in QML or those with a combination of QML and JavaScript/C++

  2. HTML5: original apps written using web technologies, be it pure HTML (and CSS/JavaScript) or with platform access using Apache Cordova

  3. Ported: apps ported from another platform, regardless of the technology used

  4. Chinese apps: apps in this category will have to be original and specific to China and the Chinese culture. They will be judged by three native experts in our jury.

To enter the competition and get further information click here.

Winning entries will be announced by Canonical once the judging process has been completed – anticipated to be end of April 2014.  Good luck!

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John Zannos

Canonical and Cisco share a common vision around the direction of the cloud and the application-driven datacentre.  We believe both need to quickly respond to an application’s needs and be highly elastic.

Cisco’s announcement of an open approach with OpFlex is a great step towards to an application centric cloud and datacenter. Cisco Application Centric Infrastructure policy engine (APIC) makes the policy model APIs and documentation open to the marketplace. These policies will be freely usable by an emerging ecosystem that is adopting an open policy model. Canonical and Cisco are aligned in efforts to leverage open models to accelerate innovation in the cloud and datacenter.

Cisco’s ACI operational model will drive multi-vendor innovation, bringing greater agility, simplicity and scale.  Opening the ACI policy engine (APIC) to multi-vendor infrastructure is a positive step to open source cloud and datacenter operations.  This aligns with the Canonical open strategy for the cloud and datacenter.  Canonical is a firm believer in a strong and open ecosystem.  We take great pride that you can build an OpenStack cloud on Ubuntu from all the major participants in the OpenStack ecosystem (Cisco, Dell, HP, Mirantis and more).  The latest OpenStack Foundation survey of production OpenStack deployments found 55% of them on Ubuntu – that’s over twice the number of deployments than the next operating system. We believe a healthy and open ecosystem is the best way to ensure great choice for our collective customers.

Canonical is pleased to be a member of Cisco’s OpFlex ecosystem.  Canonical and Cisco intend to collaborate in the standards process. As the standard is finalised, Cisco and Canonical will integrate their company’s technology to improve the customer experience. This includes alignment of Canonical’s Juju and KVM with Cisco’s ACI model.

Cisco and Canonical believe there are opportunities to leverage Ubuntu, Ubuntu OpenStack and Juju, Canonical’s service orchestration, with Cisco’s ACI policy-based model.  We see many companies moving to Ubuntu and Ubuntu OpenStack that use Cisco network and compute technology. The collaboration of Canonical with Cisco towards an application centric cloud and datacenter is an opportunity for our mutual customers.

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Maarten Ectors

A few months ago, Canonical started to work with a set of partners to address the challenges around single sign-on for new services within an organisation. We created a committee to develop a solution that would ensure service authentication could happen instantaneously, saving organisations often months in the roll out of new services.

Today, we’re announcing that two of our partners, Gluu and ForgeRock, will lead the Committee to develop the standards which will enable organisations to integrate any enterprise-grade security infrastructure in minutes with any compliant application. The Committee will define the relationships needed to enable orchestration between applications and common security components, like user provisioning systems, authentication services, and API access management. Where possible, we’ll use existing standards and best practices. For example, OpenID Connect could be adopted for authentication, the Simple Cloud Identity Management (SCIM) API for user provisioning, and the User Managed Access protocol (UMA) for API access management.

Juju is already saving enterprises time by enabling rapid deployment, integration and scaling of sophisticated applications across a number of different platforms. With the work of the Committee, Juju  could have a significant impact on how organisations design and deploy a cloud infrastructure that scales to meet modern security requirements, making it easier for developers to move away from managing user accounts and for domains to offer stronger authentication and trust elevation.

“By providing a standard Juju framework for application security, we can reduce the ‘last mile’ cost that organisations face when securing an ever-expanding array of  websites and mobile applications.” said Lasse Andresen CTO at ForgeRock. “Driving down the deployment and operational costs are essential for improving security on the Internet.”

“The Juju labs project will enable businesses of all sizes to implement an enterprise-grade security infrastructure,” said Mike Schwartz, CEO at Gluu. “Our vendor agnostic and interoperable approach will support open source, SaaS and commercial applications. We want to give domains as much flexibility as possible to choose a security solution that makes sense for their requirements, and to integrate a wide array of applications quickly and easily. Canonical is a clear industry leader in orchestration, which is key to driving down the cost and complexity of domain security.”

More information

Gluu
Juju Labs

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Sally Radwan

A few years ago, the cloud team at Canonical decided that the future of cloud computing lies not only in what clouds are built on, but what runs on it, and how quickly, securely, and efficiently those services can be managed. This is when Juju was born; our service orchestration tool built for the cloud and inspired by the way IT architects visualise their infrastructure: boxes representing services, connected by lines representing interfaces or relationships. Juju’s GUI simplifies searching, dragging and dropping a ‘Charm’ into a canvas to deploy services instantly.

Today, we are announcing two new features for DevOps seeking ever faster and easier ways of deploying scalable infrastructure. The first are Juju Charm bundles that allow you to deploy an entire cloud environment with one click. Secondly we are announcing Quickstart which spins up an entire Juju environment and deploys the necessary services to run Juju, all with one command. Juju Bundles and Quickstart are powerful tools on their own but offer enormous value comes when they are used together: Quickstart can be combined with bundles to rapidly launch Juju, start-up the environment, and deploy an entire application infrastructure, all in one action.

Already there are several bundles available that cover key technology areas: security, big data, SaaS, back office workloads, web servers, content management and the integration of legacy systems. New Charm bundles available today include:

Bundles for complex services:

  • Instant Hadoop: The Hadoop cluster bundle is a 7-node starter cluster designed to deploy Hadoop in a way that’s easily scalable. The deployment has been tested with up to 2,000 nodes on AWS.

  • Instant Mongo: Mongodb, a 13-node (over three shards) starter MongoDB cluster and has the capability to horizontally scale all of the three shards.

  • Instant Wiki: Two Mediawiki deployments; a simple example mediawiki deployment with just mediawiki and MySQL; and a load balanced deployment with HAProxy and memcached, designed to be horizontally scalable.

  •  A new bundle from import.io allows their SaaS platform to be instantly integrated inside Juju. Navigate to any website using the import.io browser, template the data and then test your crawl. Finally, use the import.io charm to crawl your data directly into ElasticSearch.
  • Instant Security: Syncope + PostgreSQL, developed by Tirasa, is a bundle providing Apache Syncope with the internal storage up and running on PostreSQL. Apache Syncope is an open source system for managing digital identities in enterprise environments.

  • Instant Enterprise Solutions: Credativ, experts in Open Source consultancy, are showing with their OpenERP bundle how any enterprise can instantly deploy an enterprise resource planning solution.

  • Instant High Performance Computing: HPCC (High Performance Computing Cluster) is a massive parallel-processing computing platform that solves Big Data problems. The platform is Open Source and can now be instantly deployed via Juju.

Francesco Chicchiriccò, CEO Tirasa / VP Apache Syncope comments; “The immediate availability of an Apache Syncope Juju bundle dramatically shortens the product evaluation process and encourages adoption. With this additional facility to get started with Open Source Identity Management, we hope to increase the deployments of Apache Syncope in any environment.”

 

Bundles for developers:

These bundles provide ‘hello world’ blank applications; they are designed as templates for application developers. Simply, they provide templates with configuration options to an application:

  • Instant Django: A Django bundle with gunicorn and PostgreSQL modelled after the Django ‘Getting Started’ guide is provided for application developers.

  • Instant Rails: Two Rails bundles, one is a simple Rails/Postgres deployment, the ‘scalable’ bundle adds HAProxy, Memcached, Redis, Nagios (for monitoring), and a Logstash/Kibana (for logging), providing an application developer with an entire scalable Rails stack.

  • Instant Wildlfy (The Community JBoss): The new Wildfly bundle from Technology Blueprint, provides an out-of-the-box Wildfly application server in a standalone mode running on openjdk 7. Currently MySQL as a datasource is also supported via a MySQL relation.

Technology Blueprint, creators of the Wildfly bundle, also uses Juju to build its own cloud environments. The company’s system administrator, Saurabh Jha comments; “Juju bundles are really beneficial for programmers and system administrators. Juju saves time, efforts as well as cost. We’ve used it to create our environment on the fly. All we need is a quick command and the whole setup gets ready automatically. No more waiting for installing and starting those heavy applications/servers manually; a bundle takes care of that for us. We can code, deploy and host our application and when we don’t need it, we can just destroy the environment. It’s that easy.”

You can browse and discover all new bundles on jujucharms.com.

Our entire ecosystem is hard at work too, charming up their applications and creating bundles around them. Upcoming bundles to look forward to include a GNU Cobol bundle, which will enable instant legacy integration, a telecom bundle to instantly deploy and integrate Project Clearwater – an open source IMS, and many others. For sure you have some ideas about a bundle that gives an instant solution to some common problems. It has never been easier to see your ideas turn into reality.

==

If you would like to create your own charm or bundle, here is how to get started: http://developer.ubuntu.com/cloud/ or see a video about Charm Bundles:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYpnQI6GZTA.

And if you’ve never used Juju before, here is an excellent series of blog posts that will guide you through spinning up a simple environment on AWS: http://insights.ubuntu.com/resources/article/deploying-web-applications-using-juju-part-33/.

Need help or advice? The Juju community is here to assist https://juju.ubuntu.com/community.

Finally, for the more technically-minded, here is a slightly more geeky take on things by Canonical’s Rick Harding, including a video walkthrough of Quickstart.

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Canonical

Today we announce the launch of our third Ubuntu App Showdown contest! We are excited to bring you yet another engaging developer competition, where the Ubuntu app developer community brings innovative and interesting new apps for Ubuntu on mobile devices.

Contestants will have six weeks to build and publish their apps using the new Ubuntu SDK and Ubuntu platform starting today. Both original apps and ported apps, QML and HTML5, and apps specifically for the Chinese market will qualify for this competition.

We have taken a step further with this App Showdown, we have four dedicated categories that you can enter:

  1. QML: original apps written in QML or with a combination of QML and JavaScript/C++

  2. HTML5: original apps written using web technologies, be it pure HTML (and CSS/JavaScript) or with platform access using Apache Cordova

  3. Ported: apps ported from another platform, regardless of the technology used

  4. Chinese apps: apps in this category will have to be original and specific to China and the Chinese culture. They will be judged by two native experts in our jury.

Prizes are up for grabs, each category (QML, HTML5, ported) will win a Nexus 7 pre-loaded with Ubuntu. The top two Chinese app winners will receive a Meizu branded device.

To find out more details and to enter the competition, click here.  Good luck and get  developing! We look forward to seeing your apps on Ubuntu.

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Canonical

The latest development of Ubuntu for phones and tablets is on show at this year’s Mobile World Congress – including the visually stunning “scopes”, a new mobile UI paradigm.

Ubuntu has announced partnerships with Meizu, a hot manufacturer of phones in China, and BQ, a specialist European phone manufacturer, to bring the first range of Ubuntu devices to market in 2014. The industrial design of those devices is on show at MWC for the first time.

Ubuntu’s scopes are at the heart of its content-centric interface. They enable users to find content directly in the home screen.  This gives industry partners extensive opportunities to customise the core interface of Ubuntu around their services and content.

Ubuntu’s tablet experience has also made substantial progress, its amazing multitasking fluidity has come to the fore and makes a great impression on devices between 7” and 10”.

Interested developers can join the GSMA’s WIPJam for a Web Tech Hack session on writing HTML5 apps for Ubuntu, and on integrating them with native devices using Apache Cordova. Look out for the Nexus 7 prize Canonical is giving away as part of the associated hackathon.

Ubuntu is in the App Planet Hall 8.1, on stand 8.1E49. (http://mwc.eventfloorplans.co.uk/hall-8-1)

Explore further:

Canonical announces first partners to ship Ubuntu phones around the globe

Growing app ecosystem for Ubuntu phones

Vodafone joins Ubuntu Carrier Advisory Group

Smart joins Ubuntu Carrier Advisory Group

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mandel

I the last few months I have been working on the Ubuntu Download Manager, one of The Big Rocks of August. The u-d-m provide a dbus service that allows applications to request downloads to be performed, to such download requests it adds some nice features that a user on a mobile phone, and probably a desktop, is interested to have. Some of those features are:

  • Apparmor isolation per download. That means that only you application can interact with its downloads.
  • Pause/Resume downloads
  • Autodetect network connection.
  • WIFI only downloads.
  • Hash check support.
  • Allow downloads to be performed while an application has been paused or killed.
  • Group downloads, where a bunch of files are provided and the different downloads are performed as a single atomic operation.

A download might seem a simple action to perform, right? Well, as soon as you start supporting all the above a single download operation becomes a fairly complicated matter. The following is a state machine that identifies the states of a download that would support such features:

Download

As you can see, it is a complicated matter and all these has to be tested and check by the QA team. By providing u-d-m (and later a client library to use approach in C and in the Ubuntu SDK, I’m terribly sorry but I did not have the time to finish it on time for the release) we are helping developers to perform simple downloads with robust code and do not worry about all the corner cases. Performing a download is as simple as requesting it and listen to the different signals. This kind of service is also provided by FirefoxOs, WEbOs and Tizan (but no in IOS or SailFish) but I believe we are doing a better job at exposing a richer API. Of course all this is open source and at least our friend at Jolla (and I really mean friends, I think they are doing an awesome work!!! and competition + collaboration is great).

In the following days I’ll be posting on hot to use the API via C, C++ and DBus.

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John Pugh

Unity Technologies announced Monday that the next version of Unity will support publishing to Ubuntu. This is fantastic news because it will enable developers to deliver their new and existing games to Ubuntu users very easily.

The Unity 4 game engine delivers new features like the Mecanim animation technology and a boost in game fidelity to everyone from the independent developer to a major studio. For game developers the gaming engine provides the majority of the technologies required to deliver a game – including things like sound, graphics and physics. Game studios standardise on using an engine so they can spend their time on the aspects of their game that will be unique. For Ubuntu to be supported by game developers the gaming engines are a critical dependency – without them developers cannot port or target new games.

Unity Technologies made their name with independent developers who often target alternative platforms where they can stand out from the crowd of games created by the major studios. Unity Technologies is well known for their deep technology ability and for targeting alternative platforms such as Android. We have been in discussions with Unity Technologies since last summer as there is a lot of developer demand for a market ripe for awesome games. We are delighted to see Unity commit to publishing to Ubuntu – a significant commitment for a team handling so many platforms.

Following on from EA publishing games to the Software Center in May and the Humble Indie Bundle supporting Ubuntu in June – the past several months have been fantastic for gaming on Ubuntu, and Unity 4 support of Ubuntu promises to make next year even better.

If you would like to get involved developing or porting games to Ubuntu with Unity during the beta you can pre-order Unity 4 Pro. In the meantime there are lots of resources available on The Ubuntu Developer site. This month we are running the Ubuntu App Showdown contest with fantastic prizes for the best apps developed.

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Martin Pool

Jelmer writes:

bzr-builddeb 2.8.1 has just landed on Debian Sid and Ubuntu Precise. This version contains some of my improvements from late last year for the handling of quilt patches in packaging branches. Most of these improvements depend on bzr 2.5 beta 5, which is also in Sid/Precise.

The most relevant changes (enabled by default) are:

  • ‘bzr merge-package’ is now integrated into ‘bzr merge’ (it’s just a hook that fires on merges involving packages)
  • patches are automatically unapplied in relevant trees before merges
  • before a commit, bzr will warn if you have some applied and some unapplied quilt patches

Furthermore, you can now specify whether you would like bzr to automatically apply all patches for stored data and whether you would like to automatically have them applied in your working tree by setting ‘quilt-tree-policy‘ and ‘quilt-commit-policy‘ to either ‘applied‘ or ‘unapplied‘. This means that you can have the patches unapplied in the repository, but automatically have them applied upon checkout or update. Setting these configuration options to an empty string causes bzr to not touch your patches during commits, checkout or update.

We’ve done some testing of it, as well as running through a package merge involving patches with Barry, but none of us do package merges regularly. If you do run into issues or if you think there are ways we can improve the quilt handling further, please comment here or file a bug report against the UDD project.

Caveats:

  • If there are patches to unapply for the OTHER tree, bzr will currently create a separate checkout and unapply the patches there. This may have performance consequences for big packages. The best way to prevent this is to set ‘quilt-commit-policy = unapplied‘.
  • bzr merge‘ will now fail if you are merging in a packaging tree that is lacking pristine tar metadata; I’m submitting a fix for this, but it’s not in 2.8.1.
  • if you set ‘quilt-commit-policy‘ and ‘quilt-tree-policy‘ but have them set to a different value, bzr will consider the tree to have changes.

To disable the automatic unapplying of patches and fall back to the previous behaviour, set the following in your builddeb configuration:

quilt-smart-merge = False

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Daniel Holbach

I have been writing weekly Ubuntu development updates for about one cycle now. As many seem to like these updates, it’s time to raise the bar a bit. As I can’t do this just on my own, I need your help.

After some discussion with the Ubuntu News team, we agreed that development news can now be submitted to the ubuntu-news-team mailing list by simply sending a mail there with “[dev]” in the subject. To get a better idea of which kind of news we are looking for, check out the development news wiki page.

This is a very important service, as it will help us all to stay informed in our huge development community, it will make our efforts more transparent and inspire others to help out or get involved in similar efforts, so if you have just a few news bits, send them there. If you want to thank somebody for their work, tell us about it.

Also if you have ideas for additional topics we should write about, either send a mail or add a comment below.

Also am I looking for contributors, who would like to get involved in writing and collecting information about Ubuntu development. It’s not a huge amount of work, but should be pretty fun. If you are interested, please leave a comment below or drop me an email.

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mandel

At the moment we are working on providing support for proxy on Ubuntu One. In order to test this correctly I have been setting up a LAN in my office so that I can test as many scenarion as possible. On of those scenarios is the one in which the auth if the proxy uses Active Directory.

Because I use bind9 to set one of my boxed for the DNS I had to dig out how to configure it to work with AD. In order to do that I did the following:

  1. Edited named.conf.local to add a subdomain for the AD machine:

    zone "ad.example.com" {
            type master;
            file "/etc/bind/db.ad.example.com";
            allow-update { 192.168.1.103; };
    };
    
  2. Configured the subzone to work with AD.

    ; BIND data file for local loopback interface
    ;
    $TTL    604800
    @       IN      SOA     ad.example.com. root.ad.example.com. (
                                  2         ; Serial
                             604800         ; Refresh
                              86400         ; Retry
                            2419200         ; Expire
                             604800 )       ; Negative Cache TTL
    ;
    @       IN      NS      ad.marvel.
    @       IN      A       127.0.0.1
    @       IN      AAAA    ::1
    ;
    ; AD horrible domains
    ;
    dc1.ad.example.com.    A       192.168.1.103
    _ldap._tcp.ad.example.com.     SRV     0 0 389  dc1.ad.example.com.
    _kerberos._tcp.ad.example.com.    SRV     0 0 88   dc1.ad.example.com.
    _ldap._tcp.dc._msdcs.ad.example.com.   SRV     0 0 389  dc1.ad.example.com.
    _kerberos._tcp.dc._msdcs.ad.example.com.    SRV     0 0 88   dc1.ad.example.com.
    gc._msdcs.ad.example.com.      SRV     0 0 3268 dc1.ad.example.com.
    

    Note:Is important to remember that the computer name of the server that has the AD role is dc1, if we used a diff name we have to change the configuration accordingly.

  3. Restart the bind9 service:

    sudo /etc/init.d/bind9 restart
    
  4. Install the AD server and specify that you DO NOT want to set that server as a DNS server too.
  5. Set the AD server to use your Ubuntu with your bind9 as the DNS server.

There are lots of things missing if you wanted to use this a set up for a corporate network, but it does the trick in my LAN since I do not have AD duplication or other fancy things. Maybe is useful for you home, who knows..

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Martin gz

Last week was the Bazaar sprint, which was fantastic and tiring. Somehow even the people who’d been at UDS just before made it through five packed days of fixing bugs, preparing releases, and debugging package imports. We were most hospitably hosted at the Canonical offices a long way up Millbank tower. But even those who couldn’t be there in person to enjoy the view were part of the experience. At home in the Ukraine Alexander wore his Bazaar shirt in support during the first day. On IRC larstiq and santagada ran the test suite on pypy and investigated incompatibilities. And all week we had a small robot John sitting in the middle of the table on the line from the Netherlands, working on performance bugs and offering helpful advice.

There were two new faces introduced. Max has been a stalwart maintaining the ~bzr PPAs and getting daily builds working. Jonathan is joining the Bazaar team on rotation from Kubuntu, which is very exciting for fans of qbzr. He started getting to know bzrlib by taking on some bugs tagged ‘easy’ and pair programming on harder ones. It was a bit tough to keep track of everything going on, but good progress was made on the Ubuntu Distributed Development front, the translation framework branches Naoki put together were landed, and lots of pet bugs were fixed. Download bzr 2.4b3 now to see the rest of the results for yourself.

After these long days in front of screens a nice meal out was a welcome treat. Over dinner we even managed to get on to topics other than code on occasion. On Thursday evening everyone went to As You Like It at the Globe as groundlings. Even with the language barrier to overcome for some of the sprinters, the comedy lived up to the categorisation. Trying to use the cycle hire scheme to travel there and back proved more of an obstacle. The bikes themselves were fine, provided you could get past the terrible computer interface and persuade the system to let you rent them. Now, if only they took patches for that…

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mandel

Some of you might know that I’m a rugby nutter. I love watching it, playing it, training… this has had the following consequence:

image

Unfortunately this will slow me down the following 4 weeks which will affect those people that wanted to see the new code coming to Ubuntu One on Windows. Sorry for that, I hope you can understand :)

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mandel

As most of you know, the Windows files system does not support a number of special characters. To be precise does characters are

:”/\\|?*. As you can imaging this is a problem when syncing between far superior Unix system and Windows. Knowing this, can you please let me know what is wrong/right in this image:

Got it? Lets look closer:

Well, the genius behind this was not me but it was Chipaca, I can tell you, I’m far less imaginative. But this little trick will allow you to sync between Windows and Ubuntu in a far better user friendly way that other sync services do :)

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mandel

As some of you may know I am the person that is currently working on the port of Ubuntu One to Windows. Recently a colleague asked me how to install Ubuntu One in its current alpha state on Windows, and I though that posting the instructions for the adventurous would be a nice thing to do (I might get someone interested to help me too ;) ).

Setting the build environment

Because the .msi that we generate does not have the digital signature of Canonical we do not distribute it yet. But you shall not worry since all the code is open source are you are more than able to compile, test and create the installer by yourself. To do that you have to set up your environment (I should create an msi or script for this….). In order to set everything, follow this steps:

  1. Install python 2.6 for windows and extensions (installer)
  2. Install py2exe
  3. Patch py2exe with this
  4. Add the following implementation of XDG for windows.
  5. Install this python packages:

    • twisted
    • oauth
    • ubuntuone-storage-protocol

    It is important that if you use easy_install to install the packages you need to use the -Z option so that the dependecies are not isntalled as eggs. Py2exe cannot work with eggs and by using the -Z option the egss will be automatically extracted for you.

Creating the .msi

As usual everything in the build process has been automated. To automate the process we have used Nant which will build, test and create the .msi to be used.

A list of the commands can be found in the ubuntu wiki, nevertheless here they are:

bootstrapper
Creates a bootstrapper that will allow to install in the users machine the Ubuntu One solution plus a number of useful applications (Tomboy + GtkSharp)
build
Compiles the different projects that are part of the solution.
clean
Removes the different results from the last compilation/task .
installer
Compiles the application using the build task, runs the unit tests usint the tests task and creates a msi installer that can be used to install Ubuntu One in the users machine (do not confuse with the bootstrapper, it only installes Ubuntu One)
tests
Compiles the solution using the build task and runs the different unit tests. The output of the tests can be found in the test-results dir.

In order to build the msi you will have to execute the following from the root of the directory:

tools\Nant\bin\nant.exe installer

Once you have done that you will be able to find the msi in the install directory that you will be able to use to install the app in your machine.

Installing

Well it is an .msi, so double click ;)

Using

As I mentioned, this is an alpha, an very very early alpha and it means that there is some work to get it running. Currently the most blocking issue is the fact that we do not have an implementation of Ubuntu SSO on windows an therefore we cannot retrieve the OAuth tokens required by Ubuntu One. Here are the instructions to get them:

1. Get credentials from Linux

The first step is to get your credentials from a machine that you already have paired. To do so, launch seahorse (the image might help)

Once you have opened seahorse you should be able to find an UbuntuOne token (if not, you will need to pair your machine to Ubuntu One). Right click on it and selected the properties options which should open a dialog like the following:

At this point simple click on the + sign and select “Show password” so that you can copy paste the Oauth tokens.

2. Set you OAuth in Windows

Currently the OAuth in Windows are read from an env variable. To be able to start syncing in your Windows machine you will have to set the env variable with the tokens you just retrieved from your Linux box. This example will be using Windows XP but it should be the same in other Windows versions.

To access to the env vars in Windows XP right click in “My Computer” and select “Properties”:

This will launch the system properties dialog. Select the “Advance” tab where you will find the option of “Enviroment Variables”:

Once the “Enviroment Variables” dialog is launched you will have to create a new env variable in the “User Variables” section:

The data to be used in the following:

Variable Name
UbuntuOne
Variable value
Your OAuth token from Linux.
Sync
If you did not restart your machine after the installer, do it. In the next boot time you will have the following:

Not all the actions of the menu are yet there, but for sure you can use the “Synchronize Now” option.

How can I help

Well the easiest way to help is to file bugs, secondly join #ubuntuone on freenode and look for mandel (me :D ) and I will happily explain the C# code as well as the python code and the work we have to do. This is not an easy project so do not get scared by the amount of code done so far or were to start, I’m here for that

Happy syncing!

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