Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'mozilla'

Sidnei

Due to some unplanned traveling I ended up near the Bay Area last week, more specifically Canonical was holding an internal Cloud Sprint in Oakland, CA, and Martin asked me to participate and push our agenda for the upcoming click packages upload and download services, which need to be live by October at least on its simplest form. But I’ll tell you more about that in a separate post.

What I want to share with you today is the joy of being able to connect with old friends and recollect memories, as I mentioned I was longing for in my last post. In those few days I was in California I managed to catch up with Limi and Philipp, said an en passant hi to Rob Miller at the Mozilla SF office, had dinner with Gustavo, walked around the city with Fernando, Alberto, and Geoff, ending up at an amazing Chinese restaurant pretty much by accident, paid a visit to Marlon, who took me on a guided tour of the Facebook HQ followed by lunch at The Cheesecake Factory which I couldn’t refuse. It was exausting, but really great catching up with everyone!

A recurring topic between all of us was the general issues that all of our companies (Mozilla, Canonical, Facebook) have with general public perception. Most interestingly perhaps is the similarity between Canonical and Facebook when it comes down to privacy matters, how there seems to be a disconnect between the internal and external messaging on those matters, and how much the public perception is biased by the media and the very loud minority of privacy tinfoil hat zealots. I wish I could do more to help with solving that. Perhaps pushing for more transparency, better communication at least from the technical side of things could be a way to improve that.

Tech talks aside, I was simply overwhelmed by how much my kids’ pictures and videos are popular amongst friends. Every single person that I talked to was quick to mention that as the very first thing. Oddly, that generally does not reflect in likes and comments on those Facebook posts, which is an interesting observation. Are people generally afraid of clicking that Like link or is it too much effort for them? I’m sure it would do for a great usability study.

I hope to explore a bit more on the outcome of the sprint on a later post. Suffice to say that I was really glad to be present and contribute some feedback to all the planning that’s going into the next cycle, and the opportunity to meet some old friends while at it was invaluable. Looking forward to be doing more of that in the coming months, at FISL and PythonBrasil.

As an article I’ve read yesterday mentioned, we tech heads seem to live on a bubble that mostly bounces between social networks and having post work hours drinks with colleagues, usually from the same company. I wish we could all be more social in the physical world, and talk more about things that are not so tech-related. About life, and family, and non-work things, and enjoy ourselves more.

And headed straight into the shining sun.

Read more

Allison Randall has blogged about her new role in Ubuntu; working at Canonical as the Technical Architect for Ubuntu. One thing which I think is awesome is how she mentions people who encouraged her:

To give credit where credit is due, there have been 4 great influences on my career over the years, mentors, friends, people who believed in me, encouraged me to dream big dreams and try big things, who taught me that I’m better, smarter, wiser, more dynamic, and resilient than I ever imagined. In alphabetical order: Damian Conway, Greg Kroah-Hartman, Mark Shuttleworth, and Nathan Torkington. Thanks guys, I wouldn’t be here without you!

Everyone has mentors in Free Software, so Allison’s post inspired me to talk about mine. People who made you who you are. I hope this encourages you to talk about the people who inspired you.

While Allison’s post motivated me, this next month I get to celebrate 3 years at Canonical and I would like to thank people who have motivated me to do what I do. Think of them as the root of me:

  • Dave Camp - Dave is one of the older Ximian folk, a former co-maintainer of Nautilus, and later he worked on Mozilla. He taught me to ignore the haters, and rock on by your bad self. He’s a hacker’s hacker, a dude who puts his head down and skates. He doesn’t care about fame, fortune, or any of that jazz, he’s just a dude. He is also an amazing guitar player.
  • Luis Villa - Not much to say here, he’s brought so many of us here that I have no words that could ever be kind enough to explain what Luis has done for so many of us.
  • Jeff Waugh and Benjamin “Mako” Hill - I am going to mush them together, since at the time they were the collective first “Ubuntu Community managers”. Jeff for being the spark plug of motivation and getting me to a UDS, and Mako for being the Free Software advocate who leads by example, not by shoving the GPL down people’s throat. I would love to hear much more from both of you. Both of you believed in me from the beginning, and I will always be grateful.
  • Asa Dotzler - many years ago when I first started wondering what Mozilla was he took the time to explain open source to me. I also love that he flames Linux for what it is, maybe someday we’ll get our act together. :) I’m not even sure if he’s looking at Linux these days but I’ll always appreciate his first interaction with me.

These people pointed me in the right direction, and these are the ones who focused me into a fine instrument of Ubuntu laser-destruction. If you hate me, then it’s probably these people’s fault:

  • Luke Kanies from Puppet Labs (at the time from Reductive Labs), who convinced me to think about applying for my current job at Canonical.
  • Oliver Grawert, who made me actually do that or he promised to punch me in the face.
  • Daniel Holbach. The name mentioned by Jono Bacon when he said “I am starting a new team” that made me apply for the job on the spot and totally not care what the consequences are. He has that effect on people.
  • … and of course the rest of you on the community team (and I just don’t mean Canonical folk) who have been supportive of me over the years, even when I quit the team and had a temper tantrum a few years ago.)

And on top of that I’ve got the old folks, the mentors who are just awesome by being there, they’re all good friends and good mentors. I am pretty sure that everyone who has worked with these people are not surprised:

  • Chris Blizzard - old school GNOME, now at Mozilla. He builds airplanes ffs.
  • Vincent Untz - old school GNOME, now at Novell. He builds ice cream ffs.
  • Miguel de Icaza - old school GNOME, now at Novell. He builds stack exchanges ffs.
  • Ryan Lortie - old school GNOME, now at Codethink. He builds dconf ffs.

I’d also like to take a moment to thank the new people — those of you who are new here and want to rock. Spend some time researching my generation’s heroes, and learn from what they have to say.

Hah, I just thought “Some day this entire mess will all be yours”, but I don’t know if that’s a nice thing to say or not, so heh to you.

Read more
Sidnei

Just a quick post to get me started at blogging again.

Over the last year (wow, time flies by!) I’ve been working at Canonical, as part of the Landscape team. This is a very diverse team with lots of different skills, and somehow I found myself naturally gravitating towards working more closely on frontend-related issues, of which I could highlight writing YUI3 widgets, speeding up page loading experience and creating a nice testing infrastructure. There’s a ton of things I could write about that, and I really plan to. But today’s entry will be pretty short.

As part of a brain-break task I fixed some of our Javascript tests today so that they would run on Google Chrome. We haven’t been targeting Chrome so far, but that might change soon, driven by Google Analytics stats of people using Landscape.

But, the thing that really caught my attention was the difference in speed between Chrome and Firefox.

For comparison:

Google Chrome 5.0.307.7 beta

$ BROWSER=google-chrome ./bin/test -1vpc --layer=JsTestDriverLayer
Running tests at level 1
Running canonical.testing.javascript.JsTestDriverLayer tests:
Set up canonical.testing.javascript.JsTestDriverLayer in 1.020 seconds.
Running:

Ran 318 tests with 0 failures and 0 errors in 9.545 seconds.
Tearing down left over layers:
Tear down canonical.testing.javascript.JsTestDriverLayer in 0.366 seconds.

Firefox 3.6.3pre

$ BROWSER=firefox ./bin/test -1vpc --layer=JsTestDriverLayer
Running tests at level 1
Running canonical.testing.javascript.JsTestDriverLayer tests:
  Set up canonical.testing.javascript.JsTestDriverLayer in 1.014 seconds.
  Running:
                                                                                                                             
  Ran 318 tests with 0 failures and 0 errors in 15.032 seconds.
Tearing down left over layers:
  Tear down canonical.testing.javascript.JsTestDriverLayer in 0.349 seconds.

Firefox 3.7a3pre

$ BROWSER=firefox-3.7 ./bin/test -1vpc --layer=JsTestDriverLayer
Running tests at level 1
Running canonical.testing.javascript.JsTestDriverLayer tests:
  Set up canonical.testing.javascript.JsTestDriverLayer in 0.804 seconds.
  Running:
                                                                                                                           
  Ran 318 tests with 0 failures and 0 errors in 13.433 seconds.
Tearing down left over layers:
  Tear down canonical.testing.javascript.JsTestDriverLayer in 0.379 seconds.

Disclaimer: Both instances of Firefox were started with the “-safe-mode” flag, which disables all plugins and extensions. Also, as they say around here at Canonical: NOT A METRIC. But interesting still.

If you look closely at this post you might find some hints about things we’ve been working on and which I hope to write about, in addition to general tips and tricks about page speed optimization from experiences in both Landscape and Launchpad.

Read more