Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'meetups'

Michael Hall

Well, we did it.  The six members of the Canonical Community Team stayed awake and (mostly) online for 24 straight hours, all for your entertainment and generous donations.  A lot of people gave a lot over the last week, both in terms of money and time, and every one of you deserves a big round of applause.

Team Insanity

First off, I wanted to thank (blame) our fearless leader, Jono Bacon, for bringing up this crazy idea in the first place.  He is the one who thought we should do something to give back to other organizations, outside of our FLOSS eco-system.  It’s good to remind us all that, as important as our work is, there are still things so much more important.  So thanks, Jono, for giving us a chance to focus some of our energy on the things that really matter.

I also need to thank the rest of my team, David Planella, Jorge Castro, Nick Skaggs and Daniel Holbach, for keeping me entertained and awake during that long, long 24 hours.  There aren’t many people I could put up with for that long, I’m glad I work in a team full of people like you.  And most importantly, thanks to all of our families for putting up with this stunt without killing us on-air.

Upstream Awesomeness

Before we started this 24-hour marathon, I sent a challenge to the Debian community.  I said that if I got 5 donations from their community, I would wear my Debian t-shirt during the entire broadcast.  Well, I should have asked for more, because it didn’t take long before I had more than that, so I was happily sporting the Debian logo for 24 hours (that poor shirt won’t ever be the same).

I wasn’t the only one who put a challenge to the Debian community.  Nick made a similar offer, in exchange for donations he would write missing man pages, and Daniel did the same by sending patches upstream.  As a result, the Debian community made an awesome showing in support of our charities.

All of our donors

The biggest thanks, of course, go out to all of those who donated to our charities.  Because of your generosity we raised well over £5000, with the contributions continuing to come in even after we had all finally gone to bed.  As of right now, our total stands at £ 5295.70 ($8486).  In particular, I would like to thank those who helped me raise £739.13 ($1184) for the Autism Research Trust:

And a very big thank you to my brother, Brian Hall, who’s donation put us over £5000 when we only had about an hour left in the marathon.  And, in a particularly touching gesture of brotherly-love, his donation came with this personal challenge to me:

So here it is.  The things I do for charity.

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Michael Hall

My big focus during the week of UDS will be on improving our Application Developer story, tools and services.  Ubuntu 12.04 is already an excellent platform for app developers, now we need to work on spreading awareness of what we offer and polishing any rough edges we find.  Below are the list of sessions I’ll be leading or participating in that focus on these tasks.

And if you’re curious about what else I’ll be up to, my full schedule for the week can be found here: http://summit.ubuntu.com/uds-q/participant/mhall119/

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Michael Hall

The Ubuntu Florida LoCo Team is my home team, and this cycle I will once again be meeting up with Chris Johnston to participate in the Ubuntu Global Jam.  Since Chris is the one organizing this event again, I asked him a few questions about it.

Tell me about yourself and how you are involved in Ubuntu

My name is Chris Johnston. I got involved in Ubuntu about 3 years ago. I started by attending a Florida LoCo Team event at Michael Hall’s house. I got involved with the Ubuntu Beginners Team, the Classroom Team, and the BugSquad. I was one of the original planners of Ubuntu User Days and I got involved in developing for what is now the LoCo Team Portal. After attending my first UDS I saw a need and started coding on the Summit Scheduler. Now days I spend most of my time developing on Summit or the LoCo Team Portal.

Have you organized a Global Jam event before, and if so what was your experience? How did you choose a venue and select activities?

I organized a Global Jam event last cycle. We ended up with only 3 people participating, but we had a productive day hacking on summit.ubuntu.com and even got a new developer involved.

What kinds of activities do you plan of doing as part of your upcoming jam?

During this Global Jam, we will again be working on some of the community supported websites, including Summit and the LoCo Team Portal.

How do you spread the word about your event to get more people to participate?

Through the LoCo Team Portal and talking to people about it.

 

Now it’s time for you all to share your stories about past and future Global Jam events!

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Michael Hall

As part of an ongoing series of blogs about LoCo Team Jams, I spoke with Benjamin Kerensa (bkerensa), the team contact for Ubuntu Oregon about their Global Jam activities.

 

Tell me about yourself and how you are involved in Ubuntu

My name is Benjamin Kerensa and I’m Team Lead for Ubuntu Oregon and also actively contribute to  the Ubuntu Weekly News, Ubuntu Developer News, Ubuntu Documentation, Ubuntu BugSquad and I write for OMG! Ubuntu!. I have been involved mostly behind the scenes for a number of years providing community support.

 

Have you organized a Global Jam event before, and if so what was your experience? How did you choose a venue and select activities?

I have organized a Global Jam before in fact I organized our event last year and I feel it turned out really nice however I did not fully take into account the amount of time needed to get people contributing at an event so our Jam last year was mostly social in nature but this year we are planning for a whole day from morning till late night. Last year I chose PuppetLabs to be our venue because I knew that the folks there shared a very common love for Free Open Source Software and also had facilities that were very accommodating for a crowd of our size. I selected documentation and bugs last cycle however due to the limited time we really didnt get to work on any tasks but we did however get to do a general overview of how to contribute in those areas.

 

What kinds of activities do you plan of doing as part of your upcoming jam?

This cycle we hope to focus on Bug Triaging and Bitesize Fixes with the help of Ubuntu BugMaster Brian Murray and potentially have a talk on packaging by
Steve Langasek. It is my hope that these focuses will not only benefit the LTS but also gear our community towards accelerated contributions in the area of    development and continue to lay a foundation for future contributors in Oregon to be involved in more technical focused contributions.

Our LoCo is lucky to have the opportunity to work with Western Oregon University this year in a Mentorship Project for their students in which they have chosen to learn how to contribute to Ubuntu as such we anticipate a number of those students to be in attendance.

 

How do you spread the word about your event to get more people to participate?

I announce via our mailing list and the loco directory and then cross post those announcements to other LUG and Tech focused mailing lists in our region and then I use a mix of social media and IRC to encourage our existing Ubuntu LoCo folks and others to come and check out what we have going on.

Thanks Ben and the entire Ubuntu Oregon team!

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Michael Hall

We’re coming up on the next Ubuntu Global Jam, the point in every cycle where the community gets together for a weekend of contributing to the next release of Ubuntu.  And this time we’re shaking things up a little bit.

Every cycle we help people organize their jams, and suggest the same generic topics: Bug triaging, packaging, translations, documentation, testing, etc.  This time, in addition to these topics, we will be reaching out to the various teams both in Canonical and the Community, and picking some very specific activities that will directly help them make the Precise Pangolin the best release of Ubuntu ever.

Another change this cycle is a focus on bringing all of the global jam activities together so that we can all see, in real time, the work being done by contributors around the world.  To that end, we’ve added a Global Jam Dashboard to the LoCo Teams Portal, which features an integrated webchat, updating twitter/identi.ca stream, and photo feed.  So while you are jamming locally, be sure to tweet about it using the #ubuntu hashtag, and upload photos to Flickr, Picasa or pix.ie, again using the #ubuntu hashtag.

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Michael Hall

It’s late, I’m tired, so this is going to be brief.  But if I didn’t put something up now, chances are I’d procrastinate to the point where it didn’t matter anymore, so something is better than nothing.

JuJu

So the buzz all week was about Juju and Charms.  It’s a very cool technology that I think is really going to highlight the potential of cloud computing.  Until now I always had people comparing the cloud to virtual machines, telling me they already automate deploying VMs, but with Juju you don’t think about machines anymore, virtual of otherwise.  It’s all about services, which is really what you want, a service that is doing something for you.  You don’t need to care where, or on what, or in combination with some other thing, Juju handles all that automatically.  It’s really neat, and I’m looking forward to using it more.

Summit

Summit worked this week.  In fact, this is the first time in my memory where there wasn’t a problem with the code during UDS.  And that’s not because we left it alone either.  IS actually moved the entire site to a new server the day before UDS started.  We landed several fixes during the week to fix minor inconveniences experienced by IS or the admins.  And that’s not even taking into consideration all the last-minute features that were added by our Linaro developers the week prior.  But through it all, Summit kept working.  That, more than anything else, is testament to the work the Summit developers put in over the last cycle to improve the code quality and development processes, and I am very, very proud that.  But we’re not taking a break this cycle.  In fact, we had two separate sessions this week about ways to improve the user experience, and will be joined by some professional designers to help us towards that goal.

Ubuntu One eBook syncing

So what started off as an casual question to Stuart Langridge turned into a full blown session about how to sync ebook data using Ubuntu One.  We brainstormed several options of what we can sync, including reading position, bookmarks, highlights and notes, as well as ways to sync them in an application agnostic manner.  I missed the session on the upcoming Ubuntu One Database (U1DB), but we settled on that being the ideal way of handling this project, and that this project was an ideal test case for the U1DB.  For reasons I still can’t explain, I volunteered to develop this functionality, at some point during the next cycle.  It’s certainly going to be a learning experience.

Friends

Friends!  It sure was good to catch up with all of you.  Both friends from far-away lands, and those closer to home.  Even though we chat on IRC almost constantly, there’s still nothing quite like being face to face.  I greatly enjoyed working in the same room with the Canonical ISD team, which has some of the smartest people I’ve ever had the pleasure of working with.  It was also wonderful to catch up with all my friends from the community.  I don’t know of any other product or project that brings people together the way Ubuntu does, and I’m amazed and overjoyed that I get to be a part of it.

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Michael Hall

This past weekend was Ubuntu Global Jam, where Ubuntu users and contributors all over the world get together to work on improving the project.  Jams come in many forms, code hacking, bug triaging, translating, documenting, or even just promoting Ubuntu in their community.  In my own corner of the Ubuntu community, a few of us got to together to work on improving the Summit project

This is the code behind http://summit.ubuntu.com, which provides the UDS scheduler and sponsorship application forms.  Summit is a Django application, released under the AGPLv3 license, and is primarily developed by community members.  Joining me were Chris Johnston,  a frequent community contributor who I’ve also worked with in LoCo Directory and other projects, and Elliot Murphy, my 3rd-level boss as Canonical (no pressure there!).

Here’s a list of what we managed to accomplish:

Switch to the new ubuntu-community-webthemes, which will give us the “mothership” top-navigation links as seen on planet.ubuntu.com and wiki.ubuntu.com

Started work on integrating Summit with Django testing framework.

Bug #643012: Register Interest should only show currently available tracks

Currently when you register your interest in a track, the form shows tracks for previous summits.  This will restrict it to just the tracks for the summit you’re registering for.

Bug #668532: /today page to display current day’s schedule

A new, permanent URL which will show the current day’s schedule, so you can bookmark it once and re-use it for each day of the summit, and even future summits!

Bug #745378: Empty sub-nav exists on sponsorship page

Removes the gray sub-navigation bar from pages where there aren’t any linkes in it.

Bug #462793: Add slots for videographers

Up to two videographers can not be assigned to a UDS session and their names will appear on the schedule.

Bug #747296: Add plenary flag to iCal feed for conventionist.com

We have been working with the makers of Conventionist, a convention management application, which will allow you to track your session schedule on your Android or iPhone, even getting directions to the correct room.  This fix was necessary for them to distinguish plenary sessions from regular ones.

Bug #747301: Add daily Crew list

Allows Summit to schedule which UDS attendees are willing to act as event crew, with the current day’s crew assignments listed on the daily schedule which is displayed on the large monitors during the event.

Bug #747303: Auto-add slots to schedule

This solved an administrative headache for those organizing the summit.  For past events, every available time slot had to be entered manually, which was a very time consuming task.  This provides them a quick way to pre-populate the time slots, with the ability to fine-tune just the ones that need it.

Bug #747419: Fix login redirect

Several features of Summit require that you log in using your SSO/Launchpad account.  However, after login you are currently redirected back to the main Summit page instead of the page you left.  This sends your current page URL as the path to redirect to after a successful login, so you no longer have to go find that page again.

 

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