Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'loco'

Being able to find each other is a key part of building community. I mean, what’s the point of having a release party if no one knows where to go? This is why we have tools for bringing people together. We call it the LoCo Team Portal. It’s a portal where local community teams can claim their space, list their events and meetings, as well as allowing people to show their interest, check out where events will be, register their interest, and so on.

It’s got nice map integration too, tell me this isn’t nice:

Nice huh? It’s all in Python and django, and Chris Johnston’s looking to see if anyone is interesting hacking on it with him. You can find their info here: http://loco.ubuntu.com/about/

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Michael Hall

This past weekend was Ubuntu Global Jam, where Ubuntu users and contributors all over the world get together to work on improving the project.  Jams come in many forms, code hacking, bug triaging, translating, documenting, or even just promoting Ubuntu in their community.  In my own corner of the Ubuntu community, a few of us got to together to work on improving the Summit project

This is the code behind http://summit.ubuntu.com, which provides the UDS scheduler and sponsorship application forms.  Summit is a Django application, released under the AGPLv3 license, and is primarily developed by community members.  Joining me were Chris Johnston,  a frequent community contributor who I’ve also worked with in LoCo Directory and other projects, and Elliot Murphy, my 3rd-level boss as Canonical (no pressure there!).

Here’s a list of what we managed to accomplish:

Switch to the new ubuntu-community-webthemes, which will give us the “mothership” top-navigation links as seen on planet.ubuntu.com and wiki.ubuntu.com

Started work on integrating Summit with Django testing framework.

Bug #643012: Register Interest should only show currently available tracks

Currently when you register your interest in a track, the form shows tracks for previous summits.  This will restrict it to just the tracks for the summit you’re registering for.

Bug #668532: /today page to display current day’s schedule

A new, permanent URL which will show the current day’s schedule, so you can bookmark it once and re-use it for each day of the summit, and even future summits!

Bug #745378: Empty sub-nav exists on sponsorship page

Removes the gray sub-navigation bar from pages where there aren’t any linkes in it.

Bug #462793: Add slots for videographers

Up to two videographers can not be assigned to a UDS session and their names will appear on the schedule.

Bug #747296: Add plenary flag to iCal feed for conventionist.com

We have been working with the makers of Conventionist, a convention management application, which will allow you to track your session schedule on your Android or iPhone, even getting directions to the correct room.  This fix was necessary for them to distinguish plenary sessions from regular ones.

Bug #747301: Add daily Crew list

Allows Summit to schedule which UDS attendees are willing to act as event crew, with the current day’s crew assignments listed on the daily schedule which is displayed on the large monitors during the event.

Bug #747303: Auto-add slots to schedule

This solved an administrative headache for those organizing the summit.  For past events, every available time slot had to be entered manually, which was a very time consuming task.  This provides them a quick way to pre-populate the time slots, with the ability to fine-tune just the ones that need it.

Bug #747419: Fix login redirect

Several features of Summit require that you log in using your SSO/Launchpad account.  However, after login you are currently redirected back to the main Summit page instead of the page you left.  This sends your current page URL as the path to redirect to after a successful login, so you no longer have to go find that page again.

 

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Daniel Holbach

At UDS Natty in one session we talked about our current team reporting infrastructure in the Ubuntu community. Some participants explained that they found it hard to use and set up and that it required the user to be familiar with the wiki markup, etc.

There were lots of ideas kicking around like

  • have a nice and small web app that had some kind of wysiwyg editor
  • allow sorting by month/year, team, team category
  • have public and private reports (for boards that report to another governance board)
  • have irc bots feed actions into the web app
  • etc.

Some time ago I started a project together with the unstoppable Nathan Handler to do all of the above and more. Unfortunately we ran out of time.

If you like working on web stuff and would like the Ubuntu community to be even more transparent and to rock harder, please consider helping out. It’s half-way there.

Launchpad project, the code, its bugs.

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Daniel Holbach

During my holidays I made it, among other beautiful stops, to the wonderful city of Esfahan.

While I was there, Software Freedom Day was being celebrated at the University of Esfahan. I met Ehsan Shahrokhi a day earlier and he gave me the opportunity to give a brief talk at SFD.

Like all the other experiences I made in the country, it was absolutely fantastic. Everybody was incredibly welcoming, everybody was extremely friendly, very helpful and just wonderful.

I loved the atmosphere there. Everybody was trying hard to contribute something good to the Open Source world. There was a large Ubuntu following and there were people of other parts of the wider community, but there was no bickering, complaining or distro, flavour, editor, or desktop environment wars going on.

Apart from that dedication there were two other things that really impressed me:

  1. The percentage of women. There were at least 40%-50% of women in the audience. It was just fantastic to see much more women participating than in any other places as I had seen up until now.
  2. How the event in Esfahan attracted people from all over the country. There were people who drove there from Mashhad, from Tehran and other places. Take a look at a map and see how far it is.

In just one day I made lots of new friends in Esfahan who are all determined to bring something good to the world. People who welcomed me in an incredibly friendly, hospitable way and with lots of good humour. Thanks a lot everybody!

It was easy to promise to come back one day again. :-)

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Daniel Holbach

What I do

In the first weeks when I started contributing to the Ubuntu community about six years ago, I was constantly amazed at a number of things:

  • how friendly, encouraging and motivating people were: in a very short time I made lots of friends, people who are always there for me and I’d always be there for (extended family :-) – kind of)
  • how much I learned in a very short period of time (a state of constant “a-ha! moments”)
  • the incredibly strong sense of opportunity: “if I fix this bug, I not only fix it for myself, but for millions of users”

After a few months I helped out new contributors myself, answered questions and tried to give them a similar experience as I had. Learning to do something great by experiencing it first hand. The great thing is that a lot of contributors already went ahead and became involved in upstream projects and Debian.

I’m extremely grateful I’m in a position where I can do this as part of my job.

I’ve been working on a few things in the last time that will hopefully give even more people that sense of opportunity and that sense of achievement soon. Please note that all of the items below are just happening because of “a little help from my friends”, I couldn’t have possibly pulled this off all on my own.

  • Daily Builds documentation and testing: with Jorge Castro and others I went through the process of getting Daily Builds up and running, we documented it, found issues, reported them and thought about how it would make most sense to package maintainers, upstreams and users. So we set up a knowledge base as well, that should help upstreams and package maintainers to figure out when a daily builds makes sense, how to sell it to their users and what kind of preparation ios necessary.
  • Harvest: I had the extreme pleasure of working with Dylan McCall on Harvest this cycle. It was an awesome experience. He chose Harvest as his Summer of Code project and directly dived into the hardest things first: instead of fixing small things here and there, he implemented a great user interface that’ll be great to use. I did quite a bit of code-review and fixed a bunch of bugs myself. It’s soon in a state where it can be deployed. With Harvest out there, it will be a lot easier to find things that need doing, get a good overview of outstanding work regarding a few packages you might care about and coordination/cooperation might actually be easier too.
  • LoCo Directory: Starting from a vague idea we first just set up a place where LoCo teams could register themselves, then we added team events and then started making it pretty. At times I was hacking a lot on it, at other times doing lots of code reviews, but I’m very glad to see that more and more people are starting to help out and implementing their ideas and visions into it. It’s an amazing project and hopefully helps LoCo teams to coordinate their work and make people interested in Linux and Ubuntu open source enthusiasts and contributors by giving them that great first experience.
  • Lots of Sponsoring/Code Review: I still feel this is the best way to help out new contributors on their way. By explaining how things are done (also when to better get stuff upstream first), how to do them better and guide them on their way to commit access/upload rights, you do Ubuntu and Open Source a great service. Make people feel welcome, help them out, by having a good experience with the process of fixing problems for millions of people you get contributors hooked up forever. :-)
  • Operation Cleansweep: Speaking of patches and code review: we have a huge backlog of patches that didn’t follow the process and need to be reviewed and forwarded to Debian and Upstream. The team reviewed heaps of patches and I was glad to be part of the initiative. I helped with the documentation, organisation of events and reviewed a couple of bugs myself. This is an awesome way to get involved and immediately make the whole open source world benefit. :-)

There’s quite a lot of other things where I could be helpful too to keep the ball in the Ubuntu community rolling: as member of the Community Council I do bits of organisation here and there, within Canonical I often answer questions about Ubuntu development processes to new starters and development-unrelated teams, I helped organising the Ubuntu Global Jam, Ubuntu Developer Week and other events, thankfully found a team to take over the “Behind MOTU” interviews, helped with the organisation of Ubuntu’s participation in Google’s Summer of Code, that plus calls, heaps of mails, small and big arguments keep me quite busy.

I feel very privileged being in this position and hope I’m instrumental to the open source world at large. One thing’s for sure: I still immensely enjoy it.

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Daniel Holbach

If you have followed my blog and what I’ve said elsewhere you might have noticed, I’m TOTALLY looking forward to the Ubuntu Global Jam. :-D

The Ubuntu Berlinians will meet in Berlin’s c-base on 29th August from 12:00 to 18:00. Please come and join us!

Original announcement below:

Freie Software lebt vom Mitmachen und das ist gar nicht so schwer, wie
man vielleicht erwartet. Zum vierten Mal ruft Ubuntu zum "Global Jam",
bei der weltweit helfende Hände an einem Tag gemeinsam an der
Verbesserung der freien Linux-Distribution Ubuntu arbeiten. Gesucht
werden dafür nicht nur technisch versierte Entwickler, sondern alle
Nutzer, die Fehler aufspüren, melden und prüfen wollen, Übersetzer, die
Software in andere Sprachen übertragen oder die Dokumentation
überarbeiten möchten.

Für alle diese Schritte gibt es einfache Softwarelösungen, die einem
viel Arbeit abnehmen und den Einstieg erleichtern. Alles was man braucht
ist also: etwas Zeit, die Fähigkeit, englische Texte zu verstehen und
Lust, einmal etwas an die Gemeinschaft zurückzugeben.

Bei einem Jam arbeitet man gemeinsam an einem Ort, hilft sich
gegenseitig bei offenen Fragen und Einstiegshürden und hat dabei
übrigens nicht wenig Spaß.

Der Berliner Teil des Ubuntu Global Bug Jams wird am 29. August von
12 bis 18 Uhr in der c-base stattfinden.

Da die c-base im Moment keine Desktoprechner zur Verfügung stellt,
sollten ein Notebook mitgebracht werden. Weitere Informationen gibt es
auf http://loco.ubuntu.com/events/team/265/detail/.

Adresse der c-base:
Rungestraße 20, 10179 Berlin
U-/S-Bahnhof Jannowitzbrücke

Anfahrt zur c-base:
http://wiki.c-base.org/coredump/AnfahrtsSkizze
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bild:C-Base_Map_1.png
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bild:C-Base_Map_2.png

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Daniel Holbach

If you haven’t registered your Ubuntu Global Jam event yet, do it now!

Definitely going!

Definitely going!

As you all know loads of teams around the globe meet this weekend and do great Ubuntu and Open Source work together. Ubuntu Jams are all about making Ubuntu and the open source world in general rock even harder. No matter which part of it you’re interested, be it Translations, Testing, QA work, Packaging, Docs or anything else, we want you to have fun with your local team!

I personally will join in on the fun in Berlin (announcement coming up soon) and will try to put a bit of work into Operation Cleansweep, a great initiative to get our backlog of patches under control. As you can see from this week’s report, it could do with getting some love:

Total bugs with patches: 2196 (-37)
Reviewed patches: 420 (+11)
---
Bugs with 'patch-needswork': 99 (+5)
Bugs with 'patch-forwarded-upstream': 177 (+3)
Bugs with 'patch-forwarded-debian': 62 (0)
Bugs with 'indicator-application': 39 (-2)
Bugs with 'patch-accepted-upstream': 56 (-1)
Bugs with 'patch-accepted-debian': 10 (0)
Bugs with 'patch-rejected-upstream': 18 (0)
Bugs with 'patch-rejected-debian': 3 (0)

If you’re interested in reviewing patches, check out the review guide and help the reviewers team out.

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Daniel Holbach

Guess who has all registered for the fun already:

  • Berkeley, California, USA
  • Birmingham, UK
  • Novosibirsk, Russia
  • Cape Town, South Africa
  • Caldes de Montbui, Spain
  • Dublin, Ireland
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Managua, Nicaragua

Lots of other teams are discussing their events right now. We in Berlin will definitely be part of the fun.

András Bognár also worked on new Ubuntu Global Jam badges:

Awesome! Let your friends know! Get planning! This will be a weekend full of awesomeness!

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Daniel Holbach

I wanted to follow up on Jorge’s great blog post for a longer while already. He said:

Lately I think we’ve gotten in a collective funk of “here’s what I think about this.” followed by “Oh yeah, well here’s what I think of that”, and “Allow me to retort!” and then getting stuck in a rabbit hole of distractions.

So screw that, let’s share some stories[…]

Needless to say: Jorge is spot on!

A lot of people have been doing ROCKing work in the last few weeks and I never took the time to thank them:

  • Dylan McCall has been doing amazing work on Harvest. (Dylan wrote about it too.) Harvest came a long way from a nice idea about aggregating packaging/fixing opportunities in Ubuntu and thanks to Dylan’s great work as part of his Google Summer of Code project arrived in the 21st century. We had lots of ideas at the last UDS (spec1, spec2) but instead of fixing small bits and pieces here and there, Dylan took on the harder job: giving Harvest a nice, consistent and usable interface. I’ll be a very happy man once we deployed it and it’s in active use. Dylan is great to work with: a great attention to detail, still pragmatic and a great sense of humour.
  • The LoCo Directory hackers! It’s just amazing to see what people who are excited about the LoCo world manage to pull off. Lots of bugs fixed, lots of nice fixes got in. It’s a pleasure to work with everybody. Every time I reviewed a piece of code I learneed something new.
  • Sponsors! A big big hug to people who review code for newcomers who can’t directly commit to Ubuntu themselves yet. The Hall of Fame currently lists these folks, who did a lot of sponsoring: Stefano Rivera, Benjamin Drung, Sebastien Bacher, Didier Roche, Timo Aaltonen, Jonathan Riddell, Martin Pitt. If you can, help out!

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Daniel Holbach

UGJ - I'm going!

UGJ - I'm going!

I’m SO looking forward to the Ubuntu Global Jam. Up until now we have 4 events registered:

  • Berkeley, California, USA
  • Dublin, Ireland
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Caldes de Montbui, Catalonia, Spain

and I talked to a number of people already who are planning additional events. This will be SWEET!

While there’s numerous activities you can dive into on a Jam event, I’d love to see a lot of work being put into Operation Cleansweep. If dealing with patches is nothing new to you, you’d do Ubuntu and the broader open source community a huge favour.

Here the Cleansweep stats of last week:

Total bugs with patches: 2313 (+30)
Reviewed patches: 388 (+10)
---
Bugs with 'patch-needswork': 93 (+3)
Bugs with 'patch-forwarded-upstream': 168 (+4)
Bugs with 'patch-forwarded-debian': 53 (+2)
Bugs with 'indicator-application': 42 (0)
Bugs with 'patch-accepted-upstream': 52 (+2)
Bugs with 'patch-accepted-debian': 11 (-1)
Bugs with 'patch-rejected-upstream': 15 (-1)
Bugs with 'patch-rejected-debian': 2 (0)

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Daniel Holbach

… also known as Ubuntu Global Jam is coming up swiftly, so make sure you put 27th-29th August into your calendar and talk your local Ubuntu friends into participating.

Ubuntu Global JamOk, so it’s Ubuntu Global Jam. What does that mean? What’s going to happen?

Simple. It’s going to happen what you make happen. Whatever your team enjoys doing is great. The only requirements are: it needs to be fun and it should make Ubuntu better somehow.

Ok. What does that mean?

We had loads of different jams around the world already: events where people get together locally and make Ubutnu better by working on bugs, packaging, translations, documentation, testing, upgrading or whatever else they enjoy doing.

In the past we had events all around the globe, where new friends met for the first time, people learned from each other, people from other open source projects were invited and where everybody (most importantly) had a fantastic time.

If your LoCo team already knows when and where it’s going to happen, add the event to the LoCo Directory. We set up the event on loco.ubuntu.com already.

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Jams has lots of information on how to to organise the event properly, and what kind of preparation your team mates should look into depending on what your team wants to do. Stay tuned for tuition sessions where you can ask all your questions. A good place for getting that information is of course loco-contacts or ubuntu-event-planners.

If you’re part of a LoCo team, please bring it up with your team, talk to them, find out what they like, meet and make Ubuntu rock even harder.

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Daniel Holbach

If you haven’t seen loco.ubuntu.com yet, click here.

It’s what we call the LoCo Directory and where more and more data of our Local Community teams goes. In the beginning we started with just a simple list of LoCo teams and additional data they can put there. After some time we added the functionality to put events in there too. It’s awesome and the work the whole team put into it is just amazing. The good thing is that we all hang out in #ubuntu-locoteams, do code reviews together and learn from each other. It’s a fantastic project.

To continue the great story and plan our next steps a bit, we’ll meet in #ubuntu-meeting (irc.freenode.net) on July 8th, 14:00 UTC.

Topics we’d like to talk about:

If you know a bit about Django, Python, Web development or are keen to learn about it and be part of a fantastic project that powers a great and fantastic part of our community, be there and talk to us.

(Also if you microblog about this and other LoCo stuff, use the #locoteams hashtag.)

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David

?Hi all,

It’s translations announcements day today! ;)

We’ve got some more content that would be very interesting for LoCos to have translated. Check this out:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LoCoCouncil/LoCoTeamsBestPracticesandGuidelines

The Ubuntu LoCo Council developed a series of best practices and guidelines to help all LoCos to be more successful, and it would be awesome to have it in YOUR language to allow everyone contribute making your LoCo rock even harder.

Here’s how you can help:

  • Add your language and a link to the page where you want to put the translation to the table on top of   https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LoCoCouncil/LoCoTeamsBestPracticesandGuidelines. I’ve added some few languages already for your convenience, and some folks have even already started translating!
  • I recommend creating a subpage named after the two-letter or threee-letter code for your language (e.g. LoCoTeamsBestPracticesandGuidelines/de for German). You’ll find a list of codes here.
  • Copy the content of the page in English to your new page
  • Translate!
  • Save your translation and you’re done

Check out the Spanish or Italian translations for an example:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LoCoCouncil/LoCoTeamsBestPracticesandGuidelines/es
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LoCoCouncil/LoCoTeamsBestPracticesandGuidelines/it

Thanks!


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David

Hi all,

The Loco Directory hackers have asked for some more help in getting the directory translated and thus more usable for your Ubuntu LoCo.

You can contribute to it the usual way by going to:

https://translations.launchpad.net/loco-directory

And leaving your suggestions or translations there.

We’ve got 7 languages which are nearly completed, and it would really be awesome if also Catalan, Finnish, French, Czech, Asturian, Serbian, Bengali, Greek, Ukrainian, Russian, Romanian, English (United Kingdom), Dutch, Swedish, Galician, Hebrew, Chinese (Traditional), Chinese (Simplified), Vietnamese, Irish, Thai, Arabic, Tamil, Turkish, Welsh, Portuguese, Slovak, Polish, Persian, Danish, Belarusian, and more! would get some translation love.

The LoCo Directory has continuous releases, although there are generally not big string changes, so remember to check it out and translate new strings from time to time.

Thanks!


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David

Catalan LoCo Team at the Lucid Release Party in L'octubre

Last weekend the Catalan LoCo team reunited again to celebrate yet another unforgettable Ubuntu release party in València, at the emblematic Octubre Culture Centre in the heart of the city.

They were two days packed with activities, presentations, conferences, unconferences, installs, excellent food and even better company. In summary, good fun for everyone, of which here’s just a taste:

Catalan Lucid Release Party

Day 0: Friday – the ubuntaires are coming

As most of the LoCo team members come from different parts of the Catalonia region, they were traveling on Friday to be fresh for the big day on Saturday. Be it with car, train or motorbike, everyone had arrived by the evening and some of us met for a nice  dinner and enjoyed the warm Valencian night.

Apart from seeing the crew again, the highlight for me was to finally meet the great Cubells and Giorgio in person, with whom I collaborate online, but never had the chance to hang out with yet.

Day 1: Saturday – octubre, install, conferences, random number generators, 61

The first day started early in the morning, and those who managed to wake up soon enough were able to leave their testimonial in the early bird photo. The first thing we all contemplated in awe was the venue:

Hall at the OctubreOffices and conference rooms at the Octubre

The current building is a reform from the 1879 original, and the adaptation in 2004 nicely marries the contemporary needs with the original style. The Centre itself and the organizations it is home to are a reference when talking about culture in the Valencian Community, and I think I can speak for the whole team in thanking Vicent Cubells for making the Lucid release party in L’octubre possible.

Moving on to more geeky matters, the party kicked off with Alex‘s presentation and the Maverick UDS video, with obligatory cheer when the picture with the Catalan team was featured. After that, workshops, presentations and the install party were ready to roll, many of them running in parallel.

Later lunch, short break, back to more awesome sessions and a final draw in which number 61 was repeatedly featured in our “random” number generator. Then fast forward to a well-deserved after work beer, a nice dinner in the city, some er… hacking, and last drinks.

Day 2: Sunday – unconference, ???, cava

As it is to expect with a Sunday morning, the last day started slower than the first, but Alex and Rafael managed to quickly sort that out by energizing everyone with cool topics for the unconference, to which people responded equally well volunteering for presentations.

While all interesting, the ones I would personally highlight were the ones from Josep Gallart, in which he explained the golden ratio applied to photography, and the session on Tai Chi at the terrace by Rafael Carreras, which constituted a very nice and pleasant finale.

Following that, we all went for dinner, enjoyed good food at L’octubre once more and were kindly invited to cava by Giorgio’s parents. That marked the closure of the event, after which people started the long journey back home, thinking already on how to make the next release party even more awesome.

Everything was very well documented by our very own reporters, and it seems that everyone took pictures, pictures, pictures, pictures, pictures and pictures.

Thanks to everyone and see you all soon!

UPDATE: I forgot to add that you can also read a report in Catalan from Sisco’s blog post

The pictures in this post are Copyright (c) 2010 all rights reserved to crazyserver, Copyright (c) 2008 all rights reserved octubre and



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David

??I’ve been working with Laura Czajkowski to set up the main LoCo Council page for translations on the wiki, and I’m pleased to announce that you can start translating it to your own language, so that it is also useful for everyone in your LoCo whose mother tongue is not English:

The LoCo Council is at the heart of the governance of the Ubuntu LoCo community, and with such a diverse community as ours, it just makes sense to reflect this diversity in a set of translations for everyone.

Here’s how you can translate the LoCo Council page to your language:

  • Add your language and a link to the page where you want to put the translation to the table on top of https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LoCoCouncil I’ve added some few languages already for your convenience.
  • I recommend creating a subpage named after the two-letter or threee-letter code for your language (e.g. LoCoCouncil/th for Thai).
  • Copy the content of the original English page to your new page
  • Translate!
  • Save your translation and you’re done :)

I’ve also created the Catalan translation to give you an example:

Remember that we’ve got other LoCo Council pages which can be translated. In particular the LoCo team reapproval one would be quite interesting to have available in everyone’s own language to read:

Thanks!


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