Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'linux'

Prakash

Ubuntu 11.10 is here, The 64-bit version offers multi-arch support, so you can install 32-bit applications and libraries on 64-bit systems.

Ubuntu 11.10 Torrent Links Direct Downloads
Ubuntu Desktop 64-Bit Edition Torrent Main Server
Ubuntu Desktop 32-Bit Edition Torrent Main Server
Ubuntu Server Edition 64-Bit Torrent Main Server
Ubuntu Server Edition 32-Bit Torrent Main Server

Other Links:

CD images + Alternative CD.

Ubuntu Core – Just 34 MB ISO of pure Ubuntu.

Have fun :)

 

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brendandonegan

Preparing for UDS P

With the release of Oneiric Ocelot just around the corner and the archives firmly in freeze mode, my main focus has turned to preparing topics for UDS P which is taking place in Orlando at the end of this month. As you might know by reading my blog one of my main roles within the team is co-ordinating testing of SRU kernels by Hardware Certification. The next cycle of development is going to take on a strong flavor of SRU testing. Personally I’ll be hosting two sessions at UDS,

The first one is titled ‘Improving automated certification testing of Kernel SRUs‘ and is based around increasing the overall scope and coverage of the test suite used when testing the SRU kernels. Recently I took the time to document the test suite we use during SRU testing, and if you read through it you can see that it’s really quite basic and hasn’t been especially good at picking up regressions so far. I’m quite excited at the prospect of doing this and my definition of success here will be a test suite that starts detecting real problems early. Linked at the bottom of the blueprint are some notes that were brainstormed together on the #ubuntu-kernel channel on FreeNode last week which will form a foundation for the discussion. If you’re interested in ensuring that kernel updates don’t break your system and will be at UDS P then feel free to subscribe to the blueprint (of course you’re free to send your feedback via this blog as well).

The second topic is titled ‘Image creation and publishing for kernel SRU testing‘ and has a less broadly interesting premise but will be important for us nonetheless. At the moment we use quite a complicated lab infrastructure to install all the necessary pieces for SRU testing over the network and it prevents us from easily allowing external parties to perform the same testing themselves. If we can easily automated the creation of images which include everything required for testing then we can get rid of this barrier. If the subject matter interests you then, again, either subscribe or leave feedback here.


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Prakash

Ubuntu on CNN/CNBC

Ubuntu has received coverage on CNBC TV18 and CNN-IBN.

Ubuntu review

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Prakash

In June this year, Eclipse, a popular IDE, published the results of a global survey of its community, which aims to show how people are using Eclipse and other open source software (OSS), and participating in open source communities. The purpose was to create a  profile of how open source developers interact with the community. Incidentally, the Eclipse developer survey had the fourth highest number of respondents from India.

The results showed that 28 percent of developers use Linux as their primary developer workstation and Ubuntu was the most popular among them. Linux was also the most popular deployment platform with almost 42 percent deploying their applications on Linux.

The findings support the fact that Ubuntu is being increasingly used by many developers in the high tech industry. It is also popular amongst the mobile developer community. The android SDK, for example, can be easily installed on Ubuntu. Web developers also find Ubuntu very powerful as it has all the tools that they need to develop and test applications using the latest web development standards such as HTML5.

Being open source in nature means developers  get access to millions of lines of code, which can be used in any developer’s application.  However, the licensing of the application needs to be checked, as some of them may require the application to be open source  as well. Developers can also look at the source code to understand some of the applications.

So what makes Ubuntu popular among developers?

Easy to get developer tools

With Ubuntu it’s easy to get development tools, IDEs, debuggers, libraries, sources and more.  The Ubuntu Software Center or apt-get, offers a whole range of developer applications and tools with ease. Apt-get also works very well in resolving dependencies, for example if Eclipse is installed, it will install all the Java libraries, plugins and documentation required by the application automatically.

Powerful editors

Ubuntu has powerful editors which are developer friendly, offer code beautifications and syntax highlighting and code to make it easy for for developers to  read t their code. Ubuntu has easy to use editors apart from Vi and Emacs for hardcore developers.

Easy scripting

Linux has powerful scripting capabilities such as Bash, this makes it easy to automate tasks. It is very useful for  developers, because it helps save a lot of time by writing simple scripts for repetitive tasks.

Ubuntu has built-in virtualisation

Ubuntu has KVM built-in and VirtualBox, VMWare can be installed with ease. Virtualisation is a developer’s friend because it allows them to test their application on different versions of different operating systems on their workstations.

Easy integration with revision control 

Ubuntu has easy integration with code version control systems such as CVS, sub-version and Bazaar.

Ubuntu is secure and stable

Ubuntu is secure and doesn’t suffer from virus problems, this protects the developer from security worries, so they can focus on developing. Once  Ubuntu is installed, it just works.

Ubuntu is free

Users don’t need to pay any license fees for using Ubuntu, and  all the development tools on Ubuntu are also free.  These include popular ones such as Java, GCC, Python, Perl and Ruby. This saves a lot of money for the organisation. The savings are even more evident when there are lots of developers.

Eclipse a popular IDE, today is very actively developed with over 1,000 active developers, 170 companies and 200 open source projects. What started as a Java IDE, it has now become a full fledged development platform with plugins for several popular languages such as Perl, Python, C, C++ and many others.

This article was first published on Digit.

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Prakash

Nice video created by Linux Foundation to celebrate 20 years of Linux.

20 Years of Linux

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Prakash

After KDE announced that they will support Wayland in 2012, Google Crome browser will also support Wayland, which means you could run Google Crome directly on Wayland without X? Sounds like fun.

2012 looks exciting if the world doesn’t come to an end :)

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Prakash

Linux in 20 years

Image by Linux Foundation

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John Pugh

We’ve recently added a few titles to the Ubuntu Software Center and have been hard at work on getting more diverse applications landed there. BEEP! by Big Fat Alien and Heileen from Hanako Games have recently landed in the Software Center.

BEEP!

BEEP! by Big Fat Alien allows the player to take control of a “precision robot vehicle” to explore a diverse system of planets and uncover their terrible fate. BEEP! has been a rather popular download since it hit the Ubuntu Software Center.

Kiaran of Big Fat Alien wrote up a stellar blog post about the Software Center and his experience in submitting an application using the MyApps portal currently in beta.

Check out the trailer.

Now fire up the Ubuntu Software Center and buy it today!

Heileen

The Ubuntu Software Center’s newest addition is Heileen from Hanako Games. This is a anime adventure game where you guide a young woman through her adventures in exploring the New World. You must solve puzzles and explore the surroundings in order to proceed through the game.

This game does not have a trailer, but you can view screenshots at the Hanako Games website.

Now fire up the Ubuntu Software Center and buy it today!

As always…if you want to list your paid application in the Software Center please contact John Pugh at john dot pugh at canonical dot com!

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Prakash

During my interview with Hindu Business Line, they also took a video about Ubuntu.

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Steve George

Raspberry Pi is a project to spark exploration, innovation and to create a new generation of programmers by putting a computer into the hands of every British child. That was the passionate vision presented by David Braben of Frontier Development at Develop in a talked labelled “Giving something back”. There are some interesting parallels with the vision One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) had. The radical difference is that with the effects of Moores Law since the OLPC project the Raspberry Pi vision is for a device that costs 15 GBP – that makes it realistic to put one into the hands of every child in the UK!

They showed an alpha last year which got lots of attention – watch it and then we’ll continue:

Raspberry Pi: Elite writer David Braben’s 15 computer

The starting point for this endeavour is that children aren’t excited by Computer Science in the UK any more and that this has meant a radical drop in the number of University applications. There’s a shortage of precise figures, said David, but it could be as much as a 51% drop since the mid-90′s. He cites a lot of reasons for this, from changes in life-style, curriculum and the mass-media. His conclusion is that a key shortage is a computing environment for kids that encourages programming – a BBC B for a newer generation. The team aims to create a small (phone sized) computer, powered by an ARM chip, which you can plug a TV/keyboard into and a software load with educational software on it. The long-term mission being to provide these free to groups of children with appropriate content, along with management capabilities for teachers.

The bottom line for me is that encouraging experimentation, exploration and creation is a good thing in and of itself. If you want to create programmers they have to start along the journey of realising that you can create as well as consume in the digital world. When I was in school computers were all the rage from an educational perspective and certainly while we mostly played games we also created small programs. Like many others I spent long hours typing out program listings that came in magazines, and learnt rudimentary concepts in BASIC. While I personally took an indirect path into computers I do think these experiences were formative in accepting what was possible and sparking an inherent interest.

Raspberry Pi running Ubuntu

Creating a complete computing environment for children and teachers is a hugely ambitious goal. You have to solve hardware, software, content and distribution problems along the way. At the moment the Raspberry Pi team is focusing on the hardware, with an initial developer version due this year. I see the software stack as being a critical portion – you’ll be glad to know that Ubuntu is the OS! It has to be said that although I got into computing with BASIC and a manual I don’t think that’s going to cut it for kids these days: it certainly wouldn’t have cut it for me if there’d been anything like the Net! Moreover, I think we have to accept that the Web is the platform and that the elements of sharing, socialising and interacting are all part of what makes up computing now. So any software stack has to look forward and encompass new elements even when trying to be simple. That said I think the software and languages we have today are a lot stronger and more compelling: whether that’s languages like Python or some of the OLPC environment! Of course, it’s easy for a technical audience to focus on the technology stack but this changes all the time, what’s more important is the content and education contacts.

Clearly, the content will need to address childrens needs at different ages, and working with the education sector so that it fits their needs and understanding is going to be very important. David noted that managing groups of machines was a key need for educators who aren’t technicians. I was struck by the passion and willingness to get involved throughout the room – if that passion can be harnessed it will hold the project in good stead. I’ve love to see Raspberry Pi develop into a full charity with funding from the industry and efforts to work with the education sector.

If you’re like to find out more about Raspberry Pi, and perhaps sign-up for one of their dev boards, then see their site. What do you think about this initiative and on a more general level how can we help get kids involved in experimenting with technology?


Tagged: Free Software, Linux, Ubuntu

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brendandonegan

Every well seasoned tester knows the advantages and disadvantages that manual/semi-manual and automatic tests have when compared to each other. A manual test is easy to create, just a few simple words and you have your test. Automatic tests allow you to (almost) fire and forget about them with your only concern being the PASS/FAIL at the end. A semi-manual test is a funny hybrid of the two, usually only used in a situation where a fully automated test is almost physically impossible (e.g. verifying screenshots and tests involving peripherals). Manual tests are not good in situations where the same test must be run many times across a large number of configurations. This is exactly what we have in hardware certification, where we must run tests across ~100 systems on a very regular basis. To this end we’ve been taking the opportunity this development cycle to update some of our older tests to be more automated.

One of the tests that I updated was one which would cycle through available resolutions on the system (using the xrandr tool) and request the tester to verify that they all looked okay with no graphical corruption. This is the sort of test that is fine when someone is running the tests on a one-off basis, it’s not so good when one tester needs to supervise 50+ systems during a certification run. One of the main problems is that it causes too much context switching, with the tester constantly needing to keep an eye on all the systems to see if they’ve reached this test yet. Obviously, it being a graphical test, it’s difficult to do fully automated verification so a compromise needed to be reached. The solution I came up with was to integrate screen capture into the test and then upload these screens in a tgz file as an attachment with the test submission. Everything going well, the tester can sit down at their own computer and go through the screens and confirm they’re okay. In fact the person verifying the screens doesn’t even need to be in the lab! The task can be distributed amongst any number of people, anywhere in the world.

Another test that looked like a prime candidate for automation was one for testing the functioning of the wireless card before and after suspending the system. Previously the test case was:

- Disconnect the wireless interface.
- Reconnect and ensure you’re online.
- Suspend the system.
- Repeat the first two steps

This was all specified to be done manually. I am currently updating this test to use nmcli to make sure a connection can be made, then disconnect and reconnect just as would happen if the tester did the steps manually using nm-applet. The one thing I haven’t got down pat yet is connecting to a wireless network where a connection didn’t exist before. This step may be optional as it could be expected that the tester will do this manually at some point during the setup of the tests and we can trust a connection to be available already. This will mean this test has gone from manual to fully automated and hopefully should shave potentially some significant number of minutes off the whole test run!

Saving time on our existing tests will allow us to introduce new tests where appropriate, so we’re able to provide even more thorough certification testing.


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John Pugh

The Ubuntu Software Center welcomes it’s newest title, SpaceChem! A top rated, highly acclaimed game is now ready for you to purchase and play through the Ubuntu Software Center.

SpaceChem is an obscenely addictive, design-based puzzle game about building machines and fighting monsters in the name of science! Take on the role of a Reactor Engineer working for SpaceChem, the leading chemical synthesizer for frontier colonies. Construct elaborate factories to transform raw materials into valuable chemical products! Streamline your designs to meet production quotas and survive encounters with the sinister threats that plague SpaceChem.

This is one game that I have not been able to play yet so please post your reviews!!!

Check out the trailer below:

Now go purchase the game! I must go play this game now.

Join the ranks of the fast growing population of paid applications on the Ubuntu Software Center. Contact john dot pugh at canonical dot com for more information!

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brendandonegan

My favourite aliases…

Something I recently (embarrassingly) discovered is that bash supports the concept of aliases, which are like shorthand for commonly used commands. Ubuntu comes with a few as default already in your .bashrc, e.g. ‘ll’ for ‘ls -alF’ (long listing). You’re free of course to add your own in .bashrc, so here I present some of the ones I use:

alias chx='chmod +x'
alias rvim='sudo vim' (if you use VIM that is ;) )
alias sagi='sudo apt-get install -y'
alias sagr='sudo apt-get remove'
alias sagu='sudo apt-get update'
alias saar='sudo add-apt-repository'

I find that especially the apt ones save a lot of typing. Hope you find them useful!

(oh yeah, just put the lines in your ~/.bashrc and run ‘source ~/.bashrc’)


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brendandonegan

As discussed at last months Ubuntu Developer Summit in the session ‘ARM and other architectures certification program‘, there’s a plan to start certifying ARM hardware, or at least start investigating how we’ll do it. To this end I’ve received on loan a TI OMAP4 Pandaboard from Canonical’s ARM QA team. I’ve actually had it here in the office for quite a few weeks now but for some reason or another I haven’t got around to blogging about it yet!

So, without further adieu – here are a couple of shots of my setup:

I like it because it’s really compact and smacks of geekiness, with all the exposed circuits, yet is really quite easy to use in a lot of ways. The monitor is plugged in via the HDMI port on the right hand side (because of an issue with my monitor I can only get 640×480 out of it, so everything is very squeezed on the screen) and the wireless desktop receiver which handles my mouse and keyboard plugs right in to one of the two full sized USB 2.0 ports. The whole thing is powered by my laptop (even when it’s suspended) via USB-AC 5v connector, also on the right-hand side.

It’s running Natty/Unity 2D installed on the 8GB SDHC card on the left of the board. This means that the whole setup cost (if I had have payed for rather than borrowed it) just under $200. The white labeled chip on the top left hand side of the board is the WiFi/Bluetooth chip and that works *perfectly* out of the box – often picking up a better signal than the laptop sitting right next to it. I also have the option of plugging in my USB headset in the the same USB hub as the wireless receiver (it’s a tight squeeze but it just about fits) and that too works perfectly.

Cons are that I don’t have a USB HDD so Ubuntu is running on flash memory (notoriously bad performance) and that if I decide to power down my laptop but forget the Pandaboard has some task running on it then all is lost :( Overall though it’s a really nice piece of equipment and because of all the good work that has been done around it, I could recommend one to anyone with a bit of technical know-how (no ARM experience required!)


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brendandonegan

In my travels around Launchpad looking for bugs to triage, I came across an old one that I noticed (but not before others apparently) in the Alpha 1 release of Oneiric Ocelot. This was a problem with update-manager not ‘seeing’ that network-manager had a connection because the new version of network-manager (0.9) uses different codes to express ‘connected’.

This issue was bugging me, so I decided I’d take it upon myself to patch it up. Someone had done a similar patch in software-center so I already had all of the knowledge needed right there (i.e. what are the new codes). I jumped into my Oneiric VM, branched the update-manager code and hacked away at a couple of Python modules, tweaked, buffed and polished until lo and behold, on starting update-manager it picked up the connection! A few command lines (bzr stat, bzr commit, bzr push) and a few clicks in Launchpad later my merge request was with the update-manager project maintainer (Michael Vogt aka mvo). Minutes later it was merged and the next day with the help of my patched version of update-manager :) I was able to update update-manager with the patch.

Looking at my own name there in update-manager’s description of the change, I couldn’t help but think how awesome it is that I’m able to do this with my favourite operating system. That’s what makes OSS magic for me…


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Prakash

At times I am not able to print, on typing lpq it gives and error message “Printer not ready”.

I don’t know why this happens, but created a simple script which just resets the print and then its ready to print.

This is what the script looks like:

sudo sed -i -e ‘/StateMessage .*lpd failed/d’ -e ‘s/State Stopped/State Idle/’ /etc/cups/printers.conf

service cups restart

Happy printing !

 

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Prakash

.

Raspberry Pi Foundation is offering a $25 Ubuntu PC. Its very tiny, has an HDMI port at one end and USB at the other. This brings in a very low cost computing solution to the market. Its also low power consumption due to the ARM processor.

Vital Stats!

  • 700MHz ARM11
  • 128MB of SDRAM
  • OpenGL ES 2.0
  • 1080p30 H.264 high-profile decode
  • Composite and HDMI video output
  • USB 2.0
  • SD/MMC/SDIO memory card slot
  • General-purpose I/O
  • Open software (Ubuntu, Iceweasel, KOffice, Python)

 

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Steve George

We added two classic games, Darwinia and Uplink, to the Ubuntu Software Center this week. It’s been a great journey working with the Introversion team to bring this software to Ubuntu and it’s great to see this result!

Hacking game Uplink

I first spoke to Mark Morris, Introversion MD, last summer explaining the concepts around the Software Center and our intent to bring a wider range of applications to Ubuntu users. It was great to explore how this system would work for commercial developers and Mark gave us great perspective on the mechanics of software publishing in the gaming industry.

We used the Introversion example internally when we were working through many of the complexities of the commercial system. And I staid in touch with Mark keeping him up to date on our progress and reflecting on his commentary.

As an Indie developer Introversion has to focus on the future, particularly their current project Subversion. So it was by no means a given that they’d be willing to take on the additional attention cost and effort of a new publishing platform. Sowe were really happy when he agreed to publish Darwinia and Uplink through our platform. And they were fully committed as we worked through putting their software into Ubuntu Software Center.

Both Darwinia and Uplink are great titles that show the quality and range of commercial games and applications that are available for Ubuntu. I hope you support them by buying and enjoying them!


Tagged: Linux, Ubuntu

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Steve George

Why wasn’t Google invented in the UK? Where are all the great British software start-ups? Why isn’t there more Open Source in the UK?

That last question may not have come up in the Chancellors budget speech, but it should have. This was my central argument to The Register this week -  to move from an economy whose value is “the loan was created in Britain”, to one where it’s “invented, designed and built in Britain” then we need to unleash innovation through Open Source.

You might think it a bit self-serving for me to be pushing Open Source as the answer to the UK’s ills. In fact, as I far too passionately made my points to Lucy Sherriff, it crossed my mind that I could fully conform to my own stereotype of “special pleading corporate PR” by next asking for special tax breaks and complaining about unspecified (but nonetheless burdensome) “red-tape”! Nonetheless, I believe that technology and Open Source have to be key elements in the rebalancing of the UK’s economy.

First, lets put back into the box the idea that the UK cannot do technology, and that we should just leave it to Silicon Valley. The funny thing is that when you pull up the covers on successful valley technology companies you’ll find plenty of Brits. That shouldn’t be a surprise, the education system in the UK is strong, we have a fantastic tradition in science and engineering, and the language/culture compatibility helps. Finally, it completely ignores the evidence of the technology companies we do have, from successful start-ups such as Last.fm through to majors like ARM.

Perhaps it’s that cultural contrarianism that makes us unable to dwell on the positive or accentuate the good. A national character of, you say “tomato”, I say “no, it’s a squashed, bruised, fruit that tastes anaemic and who knows the long-term effects of the pesticides”. So, lets not waste any more bits on this – the UK has great technology capabilities and we should celebrate them!

So why is Open Source an important element in creating an environment that can create success for our technologists and economy? Because, it’s a leveller and a remover of locked-in de-facto networks. Open source releases innovation and provides ways for companies of all sizes to compete, bringing greater competition and delivering more value to everyone.

First, government wants to encourage start-ups and small business. There’s lots of policy options, but a big (perhaps the biggest) lever is government procurement. Our tax money should be used to buy great value technology, provided by local companies if at all possible. Governments know this, but they’re often concerned that small suppliers will fail – it’s a real concern because it happens. Mandating that the technology be Open Source removes that concern. That way if the supplier fails it can be supported and maintained by an alternative supplier. And, in the long-run you create a competitive national set of technology companies that will be employing locally and providing services far more efficiently than a small number of multi-national conglomerates (yes, looking at you Oracle).

Second, Open Source enables a local (ie national) supplier ecosystem to be created. Fundamentally, if our technology companies just resell proprietary software that’s developed by the large multinationals they will lack the skills to innovate and create on their own. Open Source is customisable and enables the suppliers to develop the same skills that will be needed to create products. There’s no black-boxes in Open Source, so if someone spots an opportunity or a gap they can understand it and innovate from there.

Third, Open Source provides more flexible and capable systems for end-users. My biggest fear about proprietary software is that it destroys enquiry in our children and students – it’s a curiosity trap. How many of the stories about great inventors (whether software or not) start with them taking apart everything they could get their hands on, from clocks to cars. They had a spirit of enquiry, a curiosity to understand and then improve.

In this era Open Source is the biggest library of software on the planet. In any domain, sphere or software idea there’s an Open Source project and some of the most skilled developers on the planet out there working on it. And everyone can read, understand and enquire – how short a step is it for the imagination to be fed and the idea of improving to occur? It’s terrible to anaesthetise our children and students with the idea that they shouldn’t look under the hood or understand what’s happening. That’s exactly what proprietary software does. And we risk missing the next Steve Jobs or Bill Gates because of it.

So really George (Osbourne in this case), stop throwing tax dollars at bribing multi-national banks to keep taking space in Canary Wharf. Unleash the UK into the forefront of the global technology revolution by adopting an industrial policy that develops technology as a key area, and for goodness sake make Open Source part of that mix. You know I’m right!


Tagged: Canonical, innovation, Linux, Ubuntu

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mandel

Sometimes the Moirae (lovely three women, aren’t they?) decide that your project is going to have a complicated live, and this is what I have been facing so far with the port of Ubuntu One to Windows. This means that things that I do not anticipate to go wrong will go wrong. As an example of this is what has currently broken the nightlies of Ubuntu One on any platform (at least we have the same features in all platforms now ;) ). The issue has happened due to some changed that added in Ubuntu SSO Client that would allow to use pykeyring on windows and the COM to detect network changes.

In Ubuntu SSO Client there was an error in the setup.py that would have the following trace

ERROR: Python module pythoncom not found
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "setup.py", line 105, in <module>
    'clean' : SSOClean})
  File "/usr/lib/python2.6/dist-packages/DistUtilsExtra/auto.py", line 95, in setup
    __requires(attrs, src_all)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.6/dist-packages/DistUtilsExtra/auto.py", line 392, in __requires
    __add_imports(imports, s, attrs)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.6/dist-packages/DistUtilsExtra/auto.py", line 341, in __add_imports
    if __external_mod(node.module, attrs):
  File "/usr/lib/python2.6/dist-packages/DistUtilsExtra/auto.py", line 317, in __external_mod
    path = __import__(module).__file__
  File "/usr/lib/python2.6/ctypes/wintypes.py", line 23, in <module>
    class VARIANT_BOOL(_SimpleCData):
ValueError: _type_ 'v' not supported

Well that is little odd, isn’t it? Why would Distutils-extra have an issue with wintypes, shouldn’t it just return an error to the stderr and leave it like that?. Well interestingly enough, the following returns a ValueError on Linux:

import ctypes.wintypes

He, interesting (I can assure you I was not this polite when I saw the error). So why is distutils extra raising this? Well the main reason resides in the __add_imports method in distutils extra that uses the ast module to find all the modules that you import and tries to import them to see if they are in the system. All of this is wrap by a try statement, but unfortunately the except clause looks for the common exceptions for error hen importing, and ValueError is not one of them. I have sent a patch to disutils-extra to work around this and sent a mail to python-dev asking where is the best place to submit a patch for ctypes…. Who said this project would not help open-source?

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