Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'linux'

The Ubuntu Developer Summit was held in Copenhagen last week, to discuss plans for the next six-month cycle of Ubuntu. This was the most productive UDS that I've been to — maybe it was the shorter four-day schedule, or the overlap with Linaro Connect, but it sure felt like a whirlwind of activity.

I thought I'd share some details about some of the sessions that cover areas I'm working on at the moment. In no particular order:

Improving cross-compilation

Blueprint: foundations-r-improve-cross-compilation

This plan is a part of a mutli-cycle effort to improve cross-compilation support in Ubuntu. Progress is generally going well — the consensus from the session was that the components are fairly close to complete, but we still need some work to pull those parts together into something usable.

So, this cycle we'll be working on getting that done. While we have a few bugfixes and infrastructure updates to do, one significant part of this cycle’s work will be to document the “best-practices” for cross builds in Ubuntu, on wiki.ubuntu.com. This process will be heavily based on existing pages on the Linaro wiki. Because most of the support for cross-building is already done, the actual process for cross-building should be fairly straightforward, but needs to be defined somewhere.

I'll post an update when we have a working draft on the Ubuntu wiki, stay tuned for details.

Rapid archive bringup for new hardware

Blueprint: foundations-r-rapid-archive-bringup

I'd really like for there to be a way to get an Ubuntu archive built “from scratch”, to enable custom toolchain/libc/other system components to be built and tested. This is typically useful when bringing up new hardware, or testing rebuilds with new compiler settings. Because we may be dealing with new hardware, doing this bootstrap through cross-compilation is something we'd like too.

Eventually, it would be great to have something as straightforward as the OpenEmbedded or OpenWRT build process to construct a repository with a core set of Ubuntu packages (say, minbase), for previously-unsupported hardware.

The archive bootstrap process isn't done often, and can require a large amount of manual intervention. At present, there's only a couple of folks who know how to get it working. The plan here is to document the bootstrap process in this cycle, so that others can replicate the process, and possibly improve the bits that are a little too janky for general consumption.

ARM64 / ARMv8 / aarch64 support

Blueprint: foundations-r-aarch64

This session is an update for progress on the support for ARMv8 processors in Ubuntu. While no general-purpose hardware exists at the moment, we want to have all the pieces ready for when we start seeing initial implementations. Because we don't have hardware yet, this work has to be done in a cross-build environment; another reason to keep on with the foundations-r-improve-cross-compilation plan!

So far, toolchain progress is going well, with initial cross toolchains available for quantal.

Although kernel support isn’t urgent at the moment, we’ll be building an initial kernel-headers package for aarch64. There's also a plan to get a page listing the aarch64-cross build status of core packages, so we'll know what is blocked for 64-bit ARM enablement.

We’ve also got a bunch of workitems for volunteers to fix cross-build issues as they arise. If you're interested, add a workitem in the blueprint, and keep an eye on it for updates.

Secure boot support in Ubuntu

Blueprint: foundations-r-secure-boot

This session covered progress of secure boot support as at the 12.10 Quantal Quetzal release, items that are planned for 13.04, and backports for 12.04.2.

As for 12.10, we’ve got the significant components of secure boot support into the release — the signed boot chain. The one part that hasn't hit 12.10 yet is the certificate management & update infrastructure, but that is planned to reach 12.10 by way of a not-too-distant-future update.

The foundations team also mentioned that they were starting the 12.04.2 backport right after UDS, which will bring secure boot support to our current “Long Term Support” (LTS) release. Since the LTS release is often preferred Ubuntu preinstall situations, this may be used as a base for hardware enablement on secure boot machines. Combined with the certificate management tools (described at sbkeysync & maintaining uefi key databases), and the requirement for “custom mode” in general-purpose hardware, this will allow for user-defined trust configuration in an LTS release.

As for 13.04, we're planning to update the shim package to a more recent version, which will have Matthew Garrett's work on the Machine Owner Key plan from SuSE.

We're also planning to figure out support for signed kernel modules, for users who wish to verify all kernel-level code. Of course, this will mean some changes to things like DKMS, which run custom module builds outside of the normal Ubuntu packages.

Netboot with secure boot is still in progress, and will require some fixes to GRUB2.

And finally, the sbsigntools codebase could do with some new testcases, particularly for the PE/COFF parsing code. If you're interested in contributing, please contact me at jeremy.kerr@canonical.com.

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Prakash

Ubuntu 12.10 is here. With this release there is no CD image only DVD image which is 800 MB in size. Torrent is preferred method for me.

Ubuntu 12.10
Torrent Links Direct Downloads
Ubuntu Desktop 64-Bit Edition Torrent Main Server
Ubuntu Desktop 32-Bit Edition Torrent Main Server
Ubuntu Server Edition 64-Bit Torrent Main Server
Ubuntu Server Edition 32-Bit Torrent Main Server

Have fun :)

Ubuntu Unleashed 2012 Edition: Covering 11.10 and 12.04 (7th Edition) (7th Edition)

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sfmadmax

So I use Xchat daily and connect to a private IRC server to talk with my colleagues. I also have a BIP server in the office to record all of the IRC transcripts, this way I never miss any conversations regardless of the time of day. Because the BIP server is behind a firewall on the companies network I can’t access it from the outside.  For the past year I’ve been working around this by connecting to my companies firewall via ssh and creating a SOCKS tunnel then simply directing xchat to talk through my local SOCKS proxy.

To do this ,  open a terminal and issue:

ssh -CND <LOCAL_IP_ADDRESS>:<PORT> <USER>@<SSH HOST>

Ex: ssh -CND 192.168.1.44:9999 sfeole@companyfirewall.com

Starting ssh with -CND:

‘D’ Specifies a local “dynamic” application-level port forwarding. This works by allocating a socket to listen to port on the local side, optionally bound to the specified bind_address. It also adds compression to the datastream ‘C’ and the ‘N’ is a safeguard which protects the user from executing remote commands.

192.168.1.44 is my  IPv4 address

9999 is the local port i’m going to open and direct traffic through

After the SSH tunnel is open I now need to launch xchat, navigate to Settings -> Preferences -> Network Setup and configure xchat to use my local IP (192.168.1.44) and local port (9999) then press OK then Reconnect.

I should now be able to connect to the IRC server behind the firewall. Usually I run through this process a few times a day, so it becomes somewhat of a tedious annoyance after a while.

Recently I finished a cool python3 script that does all of this in quick command.

The following code will do the following:

1.) identify the ipv4 address of the interface device you specify

2.) configure xchat.conf to use the new ipv4 address and port specified by the user

3.) open the ssh tunnel using the SSH -CND command from above

4.) launch xchat and connect to your server (assuming you have it set to auto connect)

To use it simply run

$./xchat.py -i <interface> -p <port>

ex: $./xchat.py -i wlan0 -p 9999

the user can select wlan0 or eth0 and of course their desired port. When your done with the tunnel simply issue <Ctrl-C> to kill it and wala!

https://code.launchpad.net/~sfeole/+junk/xchat

#!/usr/bin/env python3
#Sean Feole 2012,
#
#xchat proxy wrapper, for those of you that are constantly on the go:
#   --------------  What does it do? ------------------
# Creates a SSH Tunnel to Proxy through and updates your xchat config
# so that the user does not need to muddle with program settings

import signal
import shutil
import sys
import subprocess
import argparse
import re
import time

proxyhost = "myhost.company.com"
proxyuser = "sfeole"
localusername = "sfeole"

def get_net_info(interface):
    """
    Obtains your IPv4 address
    """

    myaddress = subprocess.getoutput("/sbin/ifconfig %s" % interface)\
                .split("\n")[1].split()[1][5:]
    if myaddress == "CAST":
        print ("Please Confirm that your Network Device is Configured")
        sys.exit()
    else:
        return (myaddress)

def configure_xchat_config(Proxy_ipaddress, Proxy_port):
    """
    Reads your current xchat.conf and creates a new one in /tmp
    """

    in_file = open("/home/%s/.xchat2/xchat.conf" % localusername, "r")
    output_file = open("/tmp/xchat.conf", "w")
    for line in in_file.readlines():
        line = re.sub(r'net_proxy_host.+', 'net_proxy_host = %s'
                 % Proxy_ipaddress, line)
        line = re.sub(r'net_proxy_port.+', 'net_proxy_port = %s'
                 % Proxy_port, line)
        output_file.write(line)
    output_file.close()
    in_file.close()
    shutil.copy("/tmp/xchat.conf", "/home/%s/.xchat2/xchat.conf"
                 % localusername)

def ssh_proxy(ProxyAddress, ProxyPort, ProxyUser, ProxyHost):
    """
    Create SSH Tunnel and Launch Xchat
    """

    ssh_address = "%s:%i" % (ProxyAddress, ProxyPort)
    user_string = "%s@%s" % (ProxyUser, ProxyHost)
    ssh_open = subprocess.Popen(["/usr/bin/ssh", "-CND", ssh_address,
                 user_string], stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stdin=subprocess.PIPE)

    time.sleep(1)
    print ("")
    print ("Kill this tunnel with Ctrl-C")
    time.sleep(2)
    subprocess.call("xchat")
    stat = ssh_open.poll()
    while stat is None:
        stat = ssh_open.poll()

def main():
    """
    Core Code
    """

    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
    parser.add_argument('-i', '--interface',
                        help="Select the interface you wish to use",
                        choices=['eth0', 'wlan0'],
                        required=True)
    parser.add_argument('-p', '--port',
                        help="Select the internal port you wish to bind to",
                        required=True, type=int)
    args = parser.parse_args()

    proxyip = (get_net_info("%s" % args.interface))
    configure_xchat_config(proxyip, args.port)
    print (proxyip, args.port, proxyuser, proxyhost)

    ssh_proxy(proxyip, args.port, proxyuser, proxyhost)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    sys.exit(main())

Refer to the launchpad address above for more info.


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Prakash

From the article:

 

“You’d be a fool to use anything but Linux.” :)

Most Linux people know that Google uses Linux on its desktops as well as its servers. Some know that Ubuntu Linux is Google’s desktop of choice and that it’s called Goobuntu. But almost no one outside of Google knew exactly what was in it or what roles Ubuntu Linux plays on Google’s campus, until now.

Read More.

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Prakash

Apple — one of the most closed companies in the world — is actually using lot of open source and software. Licensing information in the Apple iPhone proves this. Go to the legal section on the iPhone and it cites Linux Kernel developer Ted Ts’o for his code. Linux Suse is there, too.

Zemlin made the point that Apple has hundreds of billions of dollars in cash, which is enough to buy HP, Intel and Dell combined. Instead, Apple purchased the copyright to the Common Unix Printing System (CUPS), which now is on every Linux and Apple system.

The list of companies using Linux does not stop at Apple. Microsoft, which once equated open source with communism, is now a top contributor to the Linux Kernel project. And VMware is getting on the bandwagon.

Read More.

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Most of the components of the 64-bit ARM toolchain have been released, so I've put together some details on building a cross compiler for aarch64. At present, this is only binutils & compiler (ie, no libc), so is probably not useful for applications. However, I have a 64-bit ARM kernel building without any trouble.

Update: looking for an easy way to install a cross-compiler on Ubuntu or debian? Check out aarch64 cross compiler packages for Ubuntu & Debian.

pre-built toolchain

If you're simply looking to download a cross compiler, here's one I've built earlier: aarch64-cross.tar.gz (.tar.gz, 85MB). It's built for an x86_64 build machine, using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, but should work with other distributions too.

The toolchain is configured for paths in /opt/cross/. To install it, do a:

[jk@pecola ~]$ sudo mkdir /opt/cross
[jk@pecola ~]$ sudo chown $USER /opt/cross
[jk@pecola ~]$ tar -C /opt/cross/ -xf aarch64-x86_64-cross.tar.gz

If you'd like to build your own, here's how:

initial setup

We're going to be building in ~/build/aarch64-toolchain/, and installing into /opt/cross/aarch64/. If you'd prefer to use other paths, simply change these in the commands below.

[jk@pecola ~]$ mkdir -p ~/build/arm64-toolchain/
[jk@pecola ~]$ cd ~/build/arm64-toolchain/
[jk@pecola ~]$ prefix=/opt/cross/aarch64/

We'll also need a few packages for the build:

[jk@pecola ~]$ sudo apt-get install bison flex libmpfr-dev libmpc-dev texinfo

binutils

I have a git repository with a recent version of ARM's aarch64 support, plus a few minor updates at git://kernel.ubuntu.com/jk/arm64/binutils.git (or browse the gitweb view). To build:

Update: arm64 support has been merged into upstream binutils, so you can now use the official git repository. The commit 02b16151 builds successfully for me.

[jk@pecola arm64-toolchain]$ git clone git://gcc.gnu.org/git/binutils.git
[jk@pecola arm64-toolchain]$ cd binutils
[jk@pecola binutils]$ ./configure --prefix=$prefix --target=aarch64-none-linux
[jk@pecola binutils]$ make
[jk@pecola binutils]$ make install
[jk@pecola binutils]$ cd ..

kernel headers

Next up, the kernel headers. I'm using Catalin Marinas' kernel tree on kernel.org here. We don't need to do a full build (we don't have a compiler yet..), just the headers_install target.

[jk@pecola arm64-toolchain]$ git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/cmarinas/linux-aarch64.git
[jk@pecola arm64-toolchain]$ cd linux-aarch64
[jk@pecola linux-aarch64]$ git reset --hard b6fe1645
[jk@pecola linux-aarch64]$ make ARCH=arm64 INSTALL_HDR_PATH=$prefix headers_install
[jk@pecola linux-aarch64]$ cd ..

gcc

And now we should have things ready for the compiler build. I have a git tree up at git://kernel.ubuntu.com/jk/arm64/gcc.git (gitweb), but this is just the aarch64 branch of upstream gcc.

[jk@pecola arm64-toolchain]$ git clone git://kernel.ubuntu.com/jk/arm64/gcc.git
[jk@pecola arm64-toolchain]$ cd gcc/aarch64-branch/
[jk@pecola aarch64-branch]$ git reset --hard d6a1e14b
[jk@pecola aarch64-branch]$ ./configure --prefix=$prefix \
    --target=aarch64-none-linux --enable-languages=c \
    --disable-threads --disable-shared --disable-libmudflap \
    --disable-libssp --disable-libgomp --disable-libquadmath
[jk@pecola aarch64-branch]$ make
[jk@pecola aarch64-branch]$ make install
[jk@pecola aarch64-branch]$ cd ../..

That's it! You should have a working compiler for arm64 kernels in /opt/cross/aarch64.

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Steve George

Someone recently remarked to me that you can think of hardware as software that’s developed really slowly. While the software space has been going wild over cloud computing it’s been pretty quiet on the hardware side of the equation. But, that’s going to change as we see a new class of server hardware that helps businesses take advantage of the power and density savings possible through new CPU architectures and software stacks.

As an illustration IDC reported on the server market recently and it shows the start of the next wave of change. As you’d expect the general server market is pretty poor, growing at just 2.7%. But, blade servers which are commonly used for Web workloads is growing at 7%. Finally, the hyperdense form-factor is growing at 29% – which is an astounding amount.

In some ways the drivers for this change are just the continuation of a long-running story where everything is (has?) moved into a Web infrastructure set-up which enables the horizontal scaling of services. Implicitly this favours buying a lot of cheaper systems and building in redundancy at the software level. But the Cloud accelerates this trend further since it’s stateless and you no longer care about the specifics of the hardware layer in the same way.

The challenge for infrastructure managers is that continually adding more servers means you’re incurring ongoing costs for electricity, space and management. So anything that can drive better performance per watt in a denser arrangement is interesting. As you can see from the diagram below the expected growth in this space is really significant.

At a CPU architecture level ARM chips have been getting more powerful and this year they’re going to enter into the mix for servers. The first reason for this is that they’re relatively low-power which means lower running costs. Since they’re low power they also give off less heat so another advantage is they can be put into a ‘hyperdense’ arrangement that also saves money in terms of space. You’ll see systems this year from both Dell and HP (see Moonshot). It’s pretty astounding to think that the same chip that’s powering your phone could be powering Facebook!

If we’re truly going to get the benefit from the new hyperdense form-factor then the software layer will also need to reflect the capabilities of these systems. So for Ubuntu we’re continuing our work on ARM and recently announced the availability of 12.04 LTS as an ARM server – the first commercial Linux to come to the platform. We’re also exploring how these hardware systems unique strengths are expressed and how this impacts the software stack. For example if you’ve got a few hundred systems in a half-rack then the problem of managing those systems is far more significant – so service orchestration (such as Juju) is really critical. It’s exciting times in this space and a really interesting project.

If you’re interested in a quick summary of ARM server check out this Prezi by Victor Palau.


Tagged: arm chips, enterprise-it

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Prakash

OpenStack has the potential to become as widely used in cloud computing as Linux in servers, according to Rackspace’s chief executive Lanham Napier.

Napier noted that OpenStack has more code contributors than Linux did when it started: it had 206 code contributors by its 84th week, whereas Linux took 615 weeks to get to that level. Similarly, OpenStack had 166 companies adding to it by its 84th week, whereas Linux reached 180 companies by its 828th week.

OpenStack is already well on the way to building that community, given the broad adoption the technology has seen since its launch two years ago. At the moment, more than 100 companies have put OpenStack into production, including AT&T, Korea Telecom, the San Diego Supercomputer Centre, HP and the US Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory.

Read More.

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Prakash

The Chinese, who also developed the Loongson MIPS CPU, were looking to order at least ten million graphics processors. The problem is that the GeForce / Quadro driver from NVIDIA is only available for Linux x86 and x86_64 architectures, not MIPS or even ARM (only the Tegra driver is for ARMv7). NVIDIA refused to release the source-code to their high-performance feature-complete cross-platform driver to the Chinese, and it would cost them millions of dollars to port the code-base, so they went to AMD for their GPU order.

The order was at least for ten million GPUs, which given the current low-end parts, would value the order at least 250 to 350 million dollars (USD).

Read More.

A few days back, Linux founder Linus Torvalds was unhappy with NVidia because of their Linux drivers are binary only. In the talk he called NVIDIA “the single worst company we have ever dealt with” and he said a few other nice words too. :) Hope NVidia open sources it drivers.

 

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Prakash

After Dell and HP, now MiTAC has announced that they are doing an ARM server.

  • 1.6 GHz
  • 4 Cores
  • Ubuntu 12.04
  • 4U Rack server with 64 CPU and 256 Cores
  • 32-Bit processor

Read More.

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Prakash

In the battle of the desktop operating systems (OS), there are only three dominant players left – Windows, Mac and Linux. At some point, Windows was cast as the platform for the common man, Mac as the one for the artist, and Linux as the geek’s playground.

Linux found favour in powering servers, supercomputers, large businesses and even stock exchanges. And Google even used it as the platform to build its popular Android mobile operating system. But in the desktop and notebook space, it still failed to gain traction.

There’s an image associated with Linux that can be frightening for a normal user, invoking pictures of command lines and terminal windows. But over the past 20 years, some massive steps have been taken to make the OS more accessible.

Read More.

The same was also published on Economic Times.

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Michael Hall

My big focus during the week of UDS will be on improving our Application Developer story, tools and services.  Ubuntu 12.04 is already an excellent platform for app developers, now we need to work on spreading awareness of what we offer and polishing any rough edges we find.  Below are the list of sessions I’ll be leading or participating in that focus on these tasks.

And if you’re curious about what else I’ll be up to, my full schedule for the week can be found here: http://summit.ubuntu.com/uds-q/participant/mhall119/

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Prakash

Ubuntu 12.04 LTS is here. This is the first time Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Desktop) will be supported for 5 years.

Torrent is preferred method for me.

Ubuntu 12.04 LTS
Torrent Links Direct Downloads
Ubuntu Desktop 64-Bit Edition Torrent Main Server
Ubuntu Desktop 32-Bit Edition Torrent Main Server
Ubuntu Server Edition 64-Bit Torrent Main Server
Ubuntu Server Edition 32-Bit Torrent Main Server

Other Links:

CD images + Alternative CD.

Ubuntu Core – Just 35 MB  of pure Ubuntu.

Have fun :)

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Prakash

The recently acquired Instagram is powered by Ubuntu! Instagram was recently acquired by Facebook for $1 Billion. Its a 13 people company almost all of them in their 20s and just 2 years old.

It is not just Ubuntu, the site is completely built on Open Source: Apache Solr, PostgreSQL, Redis and Django.

Read more on the technology underneath.

 

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Prakash

Linux is today powering Android phones, TVs, set-top boxes, enterprise data centers, cloud and supercomputers. Here are some stats.

The Linux Foundation has released its  Annual Linux Development Report, here are the excerpts:

 

  • More than 7,800 developers from almost 800 different companies have contributed to the Linux kernel since tracking began in 2005. Just since the last report, more than 1,000 developers representing nearly 200 companies have contributed to the kernel.
  • Seventy-five percent of all kernel development is done by developers who are being paid for their work. Long believed to be a basement community of developers, the Linux community is a worldwide, professional network of the best software talent in the world. This army of developers together builds the foundation from which innovations such as Android, cloud computing, KVM, Xen, and more are born and succeed.
  • The top 10 organizations sponsoring Linux kernel development since the last report (or Linux kernel 2.6.36) are Red Hat, Intel, Novell, IBM, Texas Instruments, Broadcom, Nokia, Samsung, Oracle and Google.[1] Mobile and embedded companies have been increasing their participation in recent years, not only adding more hardware support to the kernel but also taking responsibility for the advancement of core kernel areas.
  • For the first time, Microsoft appears on list of companies that are contributing to the Linux kernel. Ranking at number 17, the company that once called Linux a “cancer,” today is working within the collaborative development model to support its virtualization efforts and its customers. Because Linux has reached a state of ubiquity, in which both the enterprise and mobile computing markets are relying on the operating system, Microsoft is clearly working to adapt.
  • The rate of change since the last report is high and increasing, with between 8,000 and 12,000 patches going into each recent kernel release every two to three months. That’s nearly 6 new patches per hour since the last release of this report.

Read the full report.

 

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Michael Hall

Hello Unity is now open for translations!

Please help me make this technology showcase is available to application developers in your native language.  Translations are done through Launchpad, and will be built into the Hello Unity package.

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Prakash

Android so far has been maintaining its separate kernel from the mainline Linux kernel.  The android kernel forked out of the mainline because of differences in accepting the changes which the android developers were working on.

The good news is now with Kernel 3.3 the android specific changes are accepted in the mainline kernel.

Ubuntu 12.04 scheduled to release next month, will be on Linux kernel 3.2, expect 12.10 to benefit from this.

 

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Prakash

Ubuntu Cloud Day is coming to Bangalore on April 4th 2012.

If you are interested you can register here. http://ubuntucloudday.in

Here is a discount code to get you 20 percent off. Have Fun :)

LNKD20

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sfmadmax

So looking for new ways to extend your laptop battery life??  Just recently I found a great combo that involves using a very cool application called “Jupiter

You can grab Jupiter from the launchpad PPA @ https://launchpad.net/~webupd8team/+archive/jupiter

I have yet to find a good application that handles “On Demand” mode relatively well. This app clocks down your processors when on battery to their lowest setting and kicks them back up once A/C power is restored. I have used other linux power mgmt tools but haven’t had a great experience. I have a system76 Pangolin and it’s pretty power hungry, it’s pretty much a mobile desktop and during the Natty / Oneiric releases of Ubuntu I was lucky to get 40 minutes on the beast. But that was because everything was running full power, After installing Jupiter and making some additional changes I managed to turn 40 minutes into 2 hours. Not bad eh?

Some of the additional changes I made involved the following:

Taking /var/log and completely mounting it to tmpfs. This way we are writing straight to memory, not needing to bother the disk constant reads/writes. Take note that this causes your logs to clear out at the end of every reboot/shutdown, but I’ve seen improvement.

So first we need to make some modifications in /etc/fstab

tmpfs /tmp tmpfs defaults,noatime,mode=1777 0 0
tmpfs /var/log tmpfs defaults,noatime,mode=1777 0 0
tmpfs /var/tmp tmpfs defaults,noatime,mode=1777 0 0

Save that off

Then lets carry out the following.

$ sudo service rsyslog status // to check if it’s up and running
$ sudo service rsyslog stop
$ sudo rm -rf /tmp/*
$ sudo rm -rf /var/log/*
$ sudo rm -rf /var/tmp/*
$ sudo mount -a
$ sudo service rsyslog start

Now you will notice all system logs will be directed to /tmp. Give it a try for a week or two and see if you notice any difference in your battery life.


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Prakash

Epson L200 is a low cost multi-function device which is good for bulk printing. It offers Printing/Scanning and Copying. A similar model L100 is a stand along printer.

First this model works on Ubuntu 11.04 with these instructions. However on Ubuntu 11.10 you require some tweaking.

First go to Epson Linux Download Center.

These instructions work for L100 and L200.

Search for N11, L200 is not yet officially supported hence you search for similar model. The OS drop down below should show Linux.

Download the printer driver. For 32-bit systems the file is

epson-inkjet-printer-n10-nx127_1.0.1-1lsb3.2_i386.deb

It will require some LSB files which it should download on its own.

Now reboot your system and plug on USB, your printer will get auto-detected and it will install the driver. You will not be able to print yet.

On your browser, type localhost:631  this will bring up cups front end where you need to change a few things.

Click on printers tab on the right, select L200 under Queue Name, you will see two drop down menus.

Select Maintenance in the first one and Modify Printer, Now select the printer and say continue.

It would show Make Generic and Current Driver Generic ESC/P Dot Matrix

Click on Select Another Make/Manufacturer

Select Epson and Click on Continue

Now Select Epson Stylus N10 N11 Series

Now click on the Link below that says Modify Printer

Now if you print a test page you should see it printed.

To install the scanner, This is for L200.

Now  go back to Epson Linux Download Center.

Now search for L200

The OS drop down below should show Linux.

Now accept and download these files for 32-bit systems

iscan_2.28.1-3.ltdl7_i386.deb

iscan-data_1.14.0-1_all.deb

Install them and now you can scan from Any application like SimpleScan or use the ImageScan application installed.

My first comments on this printer for Linux/Ubuntu users.

This printer was a pain to install on Ubuntu and to print in the best photo quality you need Windows, on Ubuntu I was able to print in colour but not get the best quality.

Secondly to setup the printer you need Windows, to enter the ink tank codes, you will need this everytime you re-fill the tanks.I have seen some hacks around this on Youtube, yet to try it and those hacks are also Windows only :)

If you have Linux only, you won’t be able to setup this printer and even if you have Windows, its a pain to setup on Linux.

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