Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'linux'

Michael Hall

A couple of weeks ago I had the opportunity to attend the thirteenth Southern California Linux Expo, more commonly known at SCaLE 13x. It was my first time back in five years, since I attended 9x, and my first time as a speaker. I had a blast at SCaLE, and a wonderful time with UbuCon. If you couldn’t make it this year, it should definitely be on your list of shows to attend in 2016.

UbuCon

Thanks to the efforts of Richard Gaskin, we had a room all day Friday to hold an UbuCon. For those of you who haven’t attended an UbuCon before, it’s basically a series of presentations by members of the Ubuntu community on how to use it, contribute to it, or become involved in the community around it. SCaLE was one of the pioneering host conferences for these, and this year they provided a double-sized room for us to use, which we still filled to capacity.

image20150220_100226891I was given the chance to give not one but two talks during UbuCon, one on community and one on the Ubuntu phone. We also had presentations from my former manager and good friend Jono Bacon, current coworkers Jorge Castro and Marco Ceppi, and inspirational community members Philip Ballew and Richard Gaskin.

I’d like thank Richard for putting this all together, and for taking such good care of those of us speaking (he made sure we always had mints and water). UbuCon was a huge success because of the amount of time and work he put into it. Thanks also to Canonical for providing us, on rather short notice, a box full of Ubuntu t-shirts to give away. And of course thanks to the SCaLE staff and organizers for providing us the room and all of the A/V equipment in it to use.

The room was recorded all day, so each of these sessions can be watched now on youtube. My own talks are at 4:00:00 and 5:00:00.

Ubuntu Booth

In addition to UbuCon, we also had an Ubuntu booth in the SCaLE expo hall, which was registered and operated by members of the Ubuntu California LoCo team. These guys were amazing, they ran the booth all day over all three days, managed the whole setup and tear down, and did an excellent job talking to everybody who came by and explaining everything from Ubuntu’s cloud offerings, to desktops and even showing off Ubuntu phones.

image20150221_162940413Our booth wouldn’t have happened without the efforts of Luis Caballero, Matt Mootz, Jose Antonio Rey, Nathan Haines, Ian Santopietro, George Mulak, and Daniel Gimpelevich, so thank you all so much! We also had great support from Carl Richell at System76 who let us borrow 3 of their incredible laptops running Ubuntu to show off our desktop, Canonical who loaned us 2 Nexus 4 phones running Ubuntu as well as one of the Orange Box cloud demonstration boxes, Michael Newsham from TierraTek who sent us a fanless PC and NAS, which we used to display a constantly-repeating video (from Canonical’s marketing team) showing the Ubuntu phone’s Scopes on a television monitor provided to us by Eäär Oden at Video Resources. Oh, and of course Stuart Langridge, who gave up his personal, first-edition Bq Ubuntu phone for the entire weekend so we could show it off at the booth.

image20150222_132142752Like Ubuntu itself, this booth was not the product of just one organization’s work, but the combination of efforts and resources from many different, but connected, individuals and groups. We are what we are, because of who we all are. So thank you all for being a part of making this booth amazing.

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Prakash

Raspberry Pi 2 is here.

  • A 900MHz quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 CPU
  • 1GB LPDDR2 SDRAM
  • Compatible with Raspberry Pi 1
  • $35

And now runs Snappy Ubuntu Core.

 


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Prakash

WhatsApp on Ubuntu ?

Yes you can install WhatApp on Ubuntu Desktop!

It currently works with Chrome browser only (no Chromium support yet).

In Chrome go to : https://web.whatsapp.com

On your WhatApp on your phone, go to Menu (top left) – WhatsApp Web and add your web client.

That’s all, now all your WhatsApp messages will also show up on your Ubuntu Desktop.

Have fun!

 

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Prakash

8 Free Online Tech Courses

From Introduction to Linux to Web development, CIO magazine covers 8 online courses which are completely free.

Read More: http://www.cio.com/article/2847396/it-skills/8-free-online-courses-to-grow-your-tech-skills.html

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Prakash Advani

2 Billions containers at Google each week!

That tech is called Linux Containerization, and is the latest in a long line of innovations meant to make it easier to package up applications and sling them around data centers. It’s not a new approach – see Solaris Zones, BSD Jails, Parallels, and so on – but Google has managed to popularize it enough that a small cottage industry is forming around it.

Read More: http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/2S0zFm/YAbnLcdp:9a2Vn45F/www.theregister.co.uk/2014/05/23/google_containerization_two_billion/

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Michael Hall

opplanet-tasco-usb-digital-microscope-780200tTwo years ago, my wife and I made the decision to home-school our two children.  It was the best decision we could have made, our kids are getting a better education, and with me working from home since joining Canonical I’ve been able to spend more time with them than ever before. We also get to try and do some really fun things, which is what sets the stage for this story.

Both my kids love science, absolutely love it, and it’s one of our favorite subjects to teach.  A couple of weeks ago my wife found an inexpensive USB microscope, which lets you plug it into a computer and take pictures using desktop software.  It’s not a scientific microscope, nor is it particularly powerful or clear, but for the price it was just right to add a new aspect to our elementary science lessons. All we had to do was plug it in and start exploring.

My wife has a relatively new (less than a year) laptop running windows 8.  It’s not high-end, but it’s all new hardware, new software, etc.  So when we plugged in our simple USB microscope…….it failed.  As in, didn’t do anything.  Windows seemed to be trying to figure out what to do with it, over and over and over again, but to no avail.

My laptop, however, is running Ubuntu 14.04, the latest stable and LTS release.  My laptop is a couple of years old, but classic, Lenovo x220. It’s great hardware to go with Ubuntu and I’ve had nothing but good experiences with it.  So of course, when I decided to give our new USB microsope a try……it failed.  The connection was fine, the log files clearly showed that it was being identified, but nothing was able to see it as a video input device or make use of it.

Now, if that’s where our story ended, it would fall right in line with a Shakespearean tragedy. But while both Windows and Ubuntu failed to “just work” with this microscope, both failures were not equal. Because the Windows drivers were all closed source, my options ended with that failure.

But on Ubuntu, the drivers were open, all I needed to do was find a fix. It took a while, but I eventually found a 2.5 year old bug report for an identical chipset to my microscope, and somebody proposed a code fix in the comments.  Now, the original reporter never responded to say whether or not the fix worked, and it was clearly never included in the driver code, but it was an opportunity.  Now I’m no kernel hacker, nor driver developer, in fact I probably shouldn’t be trusted to write any amount of C code at all.  But because I had Ubuntu, getting the source code of my current driver, as well as all the tools and dependencies needed to build it, took only a couple of terminal commands.  The patch was too old to cleanly apply to the current code, but it was easy enough to figure out where they should go, and after a couple tries to properly build just the driver (and not the full kernel or every driver in it), I had a new binary kernel modules that would load without error.  Then, when I plugged my USB microscope in again, it worked!

Red Onion skin at 120x magnificationPeople use open source for many reasons.  Some people use it because it’s free as in beer, for them it’s on the same level as freeware or shareware, only the cost matters. For others it’s about ethics, they would choose open source even if it cost them money or didn’t work as well, because they feel it’s morally right, and that proprietary software is morally wrong. I use open source because of USB microscopes. Because when they don’t work, open source gives me a chance to change that.

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Prakash Advani

The company has pledged to invest $1 billion in open cloud products and services over the next two years, along with community-driven, open-source cloud technologies.

“Just as the community spread the adoption of Linux in the enterprise, we believe OpenStack will do the same for the cloud,” said Hewlett-Packard CEO and President Meg Whitman, in a webcast announcing Helion Tuesday.

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Prakash Advani

Ubuntu 32-Bit or 64-Bit ?

I often get asked this question 32 or 64-Bit? In the past I have told people to stick to 32-Bit because of compatibility issues but things have changed now. Quoting for Phoronix which recently did a benchmark test between 32-Bit and 64-Bit.

Going back years we have run 32-bit vs. 64-bit Linux benchmarks. While the results seldom change, we keep running them as the question of choosing between a 32-bit and 64-bit Linux distribution image is still a popular question… These tests drive in a surprising amount of traffic and I continue to be flabbergasted by the number of people still asking this question when nearly all modern x86 Intel/AMD hardware fully supports x86_64 and it generally means much better performance. Usually the only caveat in not using a 64-bit Linux image is if running a system with less than 2GB of RAM.

In the past there were issues surrounding the Java and Flash support for 64-bit Linux along with an assortment of other possible problems (e.g. with Wine), but all those major issues are a matter of the past. 64-bit Linux is in great shape and as long as you have a decent amount of RAM you really should be running 64-bit Linux.

If you are still in doubt, read the full article for the benchmark results.

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Prakash Advani

The Short answer is No. Ubuntu was patched on 7th April 2014 and the bug was widely reported on 8th April, 2014. If you are using other operating systems,  you need to worry. Especially if its non-Linux based.

Read More: http://news.softpedia.com/news/Dear-Ubuntu-Users-Stop-Saying-the-Ubuntu-Is-Unprotected-Against-the-Heartbleed-Exploit-437846.shtml

The Heartbleed vulnerability that was discovered just last week took the world by surprise, but most of the affected services and operating systems have been patched. Unfortunately, some of the Ubuntu users haven’t understood how the patching process works and have started to flood the forums and other social media with the message that Ubuntu is vulnerable.

Before the OpenSSL issues has become known to the general public, most of the Linux distributions affected by the issue were patched. Most of the media reported on the problem on April 8, but the patch for the Heartbleed vulnerability was already in place on April 7. This is how the security notification looks like in Ubuntu.

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Prakash Advani

Tesla running Ubuntu ?

There aren’t that many Tesla Model S owners around, but those who are do seem to comprise of people who have a different way of seeing things. Apparently, some Tesla Model S owners have already tried to hack their ride by wiring into the Model S’ communications system. A forum user who goes by the moniker of “nlc” managed to locate a number of ports and tap into the data which flows straight to the center console and navigation screens. It seems that these “hackers” found out that the sub-system actually ran on a version of the Ubuntu operating system, which so happens to be a variant of Linux.
Heck, there was even someone who managed to circumvent this discovery in order to have Firefox up and running on the center console touchscreen, although it does not seem as though there are other more invasive efforts to be made via the Ethernet entry point.

Read More: http://www.ubergizmo.com/2014/04/tesla-model-s-owners-hack-own-cars-discover-ubuntu/

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Prakash Advani

The Communications-Electronics Security Group (CESG), the group within the UK Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) that assesses operating systems and software for security issues, has found that while no end-user operating system is as secure as they’d like it to be, Ubuntu 12.04 is the best of the lot.

In late 2013, the CESG looked at the security of the most popular end-user operating systems for desktops, smartphones, and tablets [PDF Link]. This included: Android 4.2, Android 4.2 on Samsung devices; iOS 6, Blackberry 10.1, Google’s Chrome OS 26, Ubuntu 12.04, Windows 7 and 8; Windows 8 RT, and Windows Phone 8. These were judged for their security suitability for OFFICIAL level use according to the UK Government Security Classifications (PDF Link). This is the UK’s government lowest security level.

 

Read more: http://www.zdnet.com/uks-security-branch-says-ubuntu-most-secure-end-user-os-7000025312/

 

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Prakash Advani

Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is here.  Torrent is the preferred method for me.

Ubuntu 14.04
Torrent Links Direct Downloads
Ubuntu Desktop 14.04 64-Bit Torrent Main Server
Ubuntu Desktop 14.04 32-Bit Torrent Main Server
Ubuntu Server 14.04 64-Bit Torrent Main Server
Ubuntu Server 14.04 32-Bit Torrent Main Server

Other releases.

http://releases.ubuntu.com/14.04/ (Ubuntu Desktop and Server)
http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/14.04/release/ (Ubuntu Cloud Server)
http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/netboot/14.04/ (Ubuntu Netboot)
http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/edubuntu/releases/14.04/release/ (Edubuntu)

As always Have fun :)

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Prakash Advani

If you are still on XP, whats your plans ?

11% of the (admittedly small) 641 companies queried stated they intend to switch to Linux. The low-cost, robust security and growing reputation in enterprise use are likely key factors informing such plans.

Perhaps more shockingly is that 37% of those asked intend to stick with Windows XP past the expiry date. Of those, 40% reason that as ‘it works’ there’s little need to change, while 39% claim software they rely on depends on XP.

Read More: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2014/02/windows-xp-users-may-switch-linux

 

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Prakash Advani

Many schools in Romania today are using proprietary software like Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office — most of which are either unlicenced copies or old unsupported versions, for which the schools may face legal issues, according to the Education Ministry of Romania. To tackle this problem, the Ministry recommends the schools to either purchase newer, licenced copies of these software, or switch to open source solutions like GNU/Linux, particularly Ubuntu and Edubuntu.

Read More: http://www.muktware.com/2014/02/romanian-edu-ministry-recommends-ubuntu-schools/21844

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Prakash Advani

Demand for people with Linux skills is increasing, a trend that appears to follow a shift in server sales.

Cloud infrastructure, including Amazon Web Service, is largely Linux based, and cloud services’ overall growth is increasing Linux server deployments. As many as 30% of all servers shipped this year will be cloud services providers, according to research firm IDC.

This shift may be contributing to Linux hiring trends reported by the Linux Foundation and IT careers website Dice, in a report released Wednesday. The report states that 77% of hiring managers have put hiring Linux talent on their list of priorities, up from 70% a year ago.

Read More: http://www.computerworld.in/news/demand-for-linux-skills-rises

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Prakash

Intel’s solution for next generation wearable technology is Intel’s Edison. SD card size computer is launched at CES.

Features: 

  • Dual-core low-power 22nm 400MHz Intel Quark processor.
  • Integrated Wi-Fi
  • Bluetooth
  • Runs Linux

 

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Alberto Milone

In this Ubuntu release cycle I worked, among other things, on improving user experience with hybrid systems and proprietary graphics drivers. The aim was to make it easier to enable the discrete card when in need of better performance i.e. when the integrated card wouldn’t be enough.

In 13.10 I focused mainly on enablement, making sure that by installing one extra package together with the driver, users would end up with a fully working system with no additional configuration required on their end.

As for 12.04.3, I backported my work from 13.10 and I also made sure that Jockey (the restricted drivers manager in Precise) detects systems with hybrid graphics, recommends the correct driver – hiding any drivers which may support the card but not in a hybrid graphics context – and installs the extra package when users decide to enable the discrete card. The installation process is very straightforward, however, if you’re still using the old kernel/X stack, Jockey won’t show any drivers. The backported stack from Raring (which comes by default with 12.04.3) is required.

There are some known issues, which will be fixed in a near future.

If you would like to try this work on your system, you can find the instructions here.

 

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Prakash

This machine isn’t your standard corporate-issue device, but a machine that from top to bottom is open in its design.

Every component in Huang’s laptop, known as the Novena, is open. Datasheets describing the design and workings of each component – from the motherboard, through to the ports and various processors – is documented and freely available online. Anyone with the expertise can build a complete firmware for each component from source.

The question is why did Huang, former hardware lead on the open source Chumby internet appliance, decide to do it?

Read More: http://www.zdnet.com/building-the-open-source-laptop-how-one-engineer-turned-the-geek-fantasy-to-reality-7000018987/

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Prakash

Intel has shipped its first “open source PC,” a bare-bones computer aimed at software developers building x86 applications and hobbyists looking to construct their own computer.
The PC, called the MinnowBoard, is basically a motherboard with no casing around it. It was codeveloped by Intel and CircuitCo Electronics, a company that specializes in open-source motherboards, and went on sale this month for US$199 from a handful of retailers.
It’s the first open-source PC to be offered with an Intel x86 processor, and the board’s schematics and design files are published and can be replicated under a Creative Commons license.

MinnowBoard includes 1GB of DDR2 memory, an HDMI port, Gigabit Ethernet, USB ports, and a micro-SD slot for expandable storage. The board’s open-source UEFI firmware allows for the development of custom secure boot environments.

The board comes pre-loaded with the Angstrom Linux distribution and is compatible with Yocto Project, which enables the creation of hardware agnostic Linux-based systems.

Read More http://www.computerworld.in/news/intels-first-open-source-pc-sale-199-122852013

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Prakash

Rockchip’s RK3188 processor is one of the fastest ARM Cortex-A9 chips around. The 28nm quad-core processor outperforms the chips found in the Samsung Galaxy S III and Google Nexus 7, for instance. And it’s a relatively inexpensive chip, which explains why it’s proven popular with Chinese tablet and TV box makers.

Most devices featuring the RK3188 processor ship with Android 4.1 or Android 4.2. But soon you may be able to run Ubuntu, Fedora, or other desktop Linux operating systems on an RK3188 device.

Read More.

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