Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'linux'

Dustin Kirkland

Introducting the Canonical Livepatch Service

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS’s 4.4 Linux kernel includes an important new security capability in Ubuntu -- the ability to modify the running Linux kernel code, without rebooting, through a mechanism called kernel livepatch.

Today, Canonical has publicly launched the Canonical Livepatch Service -- an authenticated, encrypted, signed stream of Linux livepatches that apply to the 64-bit Intel/AMD architecture of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial) Linux 4.4 kernel, addressing the highest and most critical security vulnerabilities, without requiring a reboot in order to take effect.  This is particularly amazing for Container hosts -- Docker, LXD, etc. -- as all of the containers share the same kernel, and thus all instances benefit.

I’ve tried to answer below some questions that you might have. As you have others, you’re welcome
to add them to the comments below or on Twitter with hastag #Livepatch.

Retrieve your token from

Q: How do I enable the Canonical Livepatch Service?

A: Three easy steps, on a fully up-to-date 64-bit Ubuntu 16.04 LTS system.
  1. Go to and retrieve your livepatch token
    1. Install the canonical-livepatch snap
      $ sudo snap install canonical-livepatch 
    2. Enable the service with your token
      $ sudo canonical-livepatch enable [TOKEN] 
    And you’re done! You can check the status at any time using:

    $ canonical-livepatch status --verbose

      Q: What are the system requirements?

      A: The Canonical Livepatch Service is available for the generic and low latency flavors of the 64-bit Intel/AMD (aka, x86_64, amd64) builds of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial) kernel, which is a Linux 4.4 kernel. Canonical livepatches work on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Servers and Desktops, on physical machines, virtual machines, and in the cloud. The safety, security, and stability firmly depends on unmodified Ubuntu kernels and network access to the Canonical Livepatch Service (  You also will need to apt update/upgrade to the latest version of snapd (at least 2.15).

      Q: What about other architectures?

      A: The upstream Linux livepatch functionality is currently limited to the 64-bit x86 architecture, at this time. IBM is working on support for POWER8 and s390x (LinuxOne mainframe), and there’s also active upstream development on ARM64, so we do plan to support these eventually. The livepatch plumbing for 32-bit ARM and 32-bit x86 are not under upstream development at this time.

      Q: What about other flavors?

      A: We are providing the Canonical Livepatch Service for the generic and low latency (telco) flavors of the the Linux kernel at this time.

      Q: What about other releases of Ubuntu?

      A: The Canonical Livepatch Service is provided for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS’s Linux 4.4 kernel. Older releases of Ubuntu will not work, because they’re missing the Linux kernel support. Interim releases of Ubuntu (e.g. Ubuntu 16.10) are targeted at developers and early adopters, rather than Long Term Support users or systems that require maximum uptime.  We will consider providing livepatches for the HWE kernels in 2017.

      Q: What about derivatives of Ubuntu?

      A: Canonical livepatches are fully supported on the 64-bit Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Desktop, Cloud, and Server operating systems. On other Ubuntu derivatives, your mileage may vary! These are not part of our automated continuous integration quality assurance testing framework for Canonical Livepatches. Canonical Livepatch safety, security, and stability will firmly depend on unmodified Ubuntu generic kernels and network access to the Canonical Livepatch Service.

      Q: How does Canonical test livepatches?

      A: Every livepatch is rigorously tested in Canonical's in-house CI/CD (Continuous Integration / Continuous Delivery) quality assurance system, which tests hundreds of combinations of livepatches, kernels, hardware, physical machines, and virtual machines.  Once a livepatch passes CI/CD and regression tests, it's rolled out on a canary testing basis, first to a tiny percentage of the Ubuntu Community users of the Canonical Livepatch Service. Based on the success of that microscopic rollout, a moderate rollout follows.  And assuming those also succeed, the livepatch is delivered to all free Ubuntu Community and paid Ubuntu Advantage users of the service.  Systemic failures are automatically detected and raised for inspection by Canonical engineers.  Ubuntu Community users of the Canonical Livepatch Service who want to eliminate the small chance of being randomly chosen as a canary should enroll in the Ubuntu Advantage program (starting at $12/month).

      Q: What kinds of updates will be provided by the Canonical Livepatch Service?

      A: The Canonical Livepatch Service is intended to address high and critical severity Linux kernel security vulnerabilities, as identified by Ubuntu Security Notices and the CVE database. Note that there are some limitations to the kernel livepatch technology -- some Linux kernel code paths cannot be safely patched while running. We will do our best to supply Canonical Livepatches for high and critical vulnerabilities in a timely fashion whenever possible. There may be occasions when the traditional kernel upgrade and reboot might still be necessary. We’ll communicate that clearly through the usual mechanisms -- USNs, Landscape, Desktop Notifications, Byobu, /etc/motd, etc.

      Q: What about non-security bug fixes, stability, performance, or hardware enablement updates?

      A: Canonical will continue to provide Linux kernel updates addressing bugs, stability issues, performance problems, and hardware compatibility on our usual cadence -- about every 3 weeks. These updates can be easily applied using ‘sudo apt update; sudo apt upgrade -y’, using the Desktop “Software Updates” application, or Landscape systems management. These standard (non-security) updates will still require a reboot, as they always have.

      Q: Can I rollback a Canonical Livepatch?

      A: Currently rolling-back/removing an already inserted livepatch module is disabled in Linux 4.4. This is because we need a way to determine if we are currently executing inside a patched function before safely removing it. We can, however, safely apply new livepatches on top of each other and even repatch functions over and over.

      Q: What about low and medium severity CVEs?

      A: We’re currently focusing our Canonical Livepatch development and testing resources on high and critical security vulnerabilities, as determined by the Ubuntu Security Team.  We'll livepatch other CVEs opportunistically.

      Q: Why are Canonical Livepatches provided as a subscription service?

      A: The Canonical Livepatch Service provides a secure, encrypted, authenticated connection, to ensure that only properly signed livepatch kernel modules -- and most importantly, the right modules -- are delivered directly to your system, with extremely high quality testing wrapped around it.

      Q: But I don’t want to buy UA support!

      A: You don’t have to! Canonical is providing the Canonical Livepatch Service to community users of Ubuntu, at no charge for up to 3 machines (desktop, server, virtual machines, or cloud instances). A randomly chosen subset of the free users of Canonical Livepatches will receive their Canonical Livepatches slightly earlier than the rest of the free users or UA users, as a lightweight canary testing mechanism, benefiting all Canonical Livepatch users (free and UA). Once those canary livepatches apply safely, all Canonical Livepatch users will receive their live updates.

      Q: But I don’t have an Ubuntu SSO account!

      A: An Ubuntu SSO account is free, and provides services similar to Google, Microsoft, and Apple for Android/Windows/Mac devices, respectively. You can create your Ubuntu SSO account here.

      Q: But I don’t want login to!

      A: You don’t have to! Canonical Livepatch is absolutely not required maintain the security of any Ubuntu desktop or server! You may continue to freely and anonymously ‘sudo apt update; sudo apt upgrade; sudo reboot’ as often as you like, and receive all of the same updates, and simply reboot after kernel updates, as you always have with Ubuntu.

      Q: But I don't have Internet access to!

      A: You should think of the Canonical Livepatch Service much like you think of Netflix, Pandora, or Dropbox.  It's an Internet streaming service for security hotfixes for your kernel.  You have access to the stream of bits when you can connect to the service over the Internet.  On the flip side, your machines are already thoroughly secured, since they're so heavily firewalled off from the rest of the world!

      Q: Where’s the source code?

      A: The source code of livepatch modules can be found here.  The source code of the canonical-livepatch client is part of Canonical's Landscape system management product and is commercial software.

      Q: What about Ubuntu Core?

      A: Canonical Livepatches for Ubuntu Core are on the roadmap, and may be available in late 2016, for 64-bit Intel/AMD architectures. Canonical Livepatches for ARM-based IoT devices depend on upstream support for livepatches.

      Q: How does this compare to Oracle Ksplice, RHEL Live Patching and SUSE Live Patching?

      A: While the concepts are largely the same, the technical implementations and the commercial terms are very different:

      • Oracle Ksplice uses it’s own technology which is not in upstream Linux.
      • RHEL and SUSE currently use their own homegrown kpatch/kgraft implementations, respectively.
      • Canonical Livepatching uses the upstream Linux Kernel Live Patching technology.
      • Ksplice is free, but unsupported, for Ubuntu Desktops, and only available for Oracle Linux and RHEL servers with an Oracle Linux Premier Support license ($2299/node/year).
      • It’s a little unclear how to subscribe to RHEL Kernel Live Patching, but it appears that you need to first be a RHEL customer, and then enroll in the SIG (Special Interests Group) through your TAM (Technical Account Manager), which requires Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server Premium Subscription at $1299/node/year.  (I'm happy to be corrected and update this post)
      • SUSE Live Patching is available as an add-on to SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Priority Support subscription at $1,499/node/year, but does come with a free music video.
      • Canonical Livepatching is available for every Ubuntu Advantage customer, starting at our entry level UA Essential for $150/node/year, and available for free to community users of Ubuntu.

      Q: What happens if I run into problems/bugs with Canonical Livepatches?

      A: Ubuntu Advantage customers will file a support request at where it will be serviced according to their UA service level agreement (Essential, Standard, or Advanced). Ubuntu community users will file a bug report on Launchpad and we'll service it on a best effort basis.

      Q: Why does canonical-livepatch client/server have a proprietary license?

      A: The canonical-livepatch client is part of the Landscape family of tools available to Canonical support customers. We are enabling free access to the Canonical Livepatch Service for Ubuntu community users as a mark of our appreciation for the broader Ubuntu community, and in exchange for occasional, automatic canary testing.

      Q: How do I build my own livepatches?

      A: It’s certainly possible for you to build your own Linux kernel live patches, but it requires considerable skill, time, computing power to produce, and even more effort to comprehensively test. Rest assured that this is the real value of using the Canonical Livepatch Service! That said, Chris Arges has blogged a howto for the curious a while back:

      Q: How do I get notifications of which CVEs are livepatched and which are not?

      A: You can, at any time, query the status of the canonical-livepatch daemon using: ‘canonical-livepatch status --verbose’. This command will show any livepatches successfully applied, any outstanding/unapplied livepatches, and any error conditions. Moreover, you can monitor the Ubuntu Security Notices RSS feed and the ubuntu-security-announce mailing list.

      Q: Isn't livepatching just a big ole rootkit?

      A: Canonical Livepatches inject kernel modules to replace sections of binary code in the running kernel. This requires the CAP_SYS_MODULE capability. This is required to modprobe any module into the Linux kernel. If you already have that capability (root does, by default, on Ubuntu), then you already have the ability to arbitrarily modify the kernel, with or without Canonical Livepatches. If you’re an Ubuntu sysadmin and you want to disable module loading (and thereby also disable Canonical Livepatches), simply ‘echo 1 | sudo tee /proc/sys/kernel/modules_disabled’.

      Keep the uptime!

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      Dustin Kirkland

      I hope you'll enjoy a shiny new 6-part blog series I recently published at
      1. The first article is a bit of back story, perhaps a behind-the-scenes look at the motivations, timelines, and some of the work performed between Microsoft and Canonical to bring Ubuntu to Windows.
      2. The second article is an updated getting-started guide, with screenshots, showing a Windows 10 user exactly how to enable and run Ubuntu on Windows.
      3. The third article walks through a dozen or so examples of the most essential command line utilities a Windows user, new to Ubuntu (and Bash), should absolutely learn.
      4. The fourth article shows how to write and execute your first script, "Howdy, Windows!", in 6 different dynamic scripting languages (Bash, Python, Perl, Ruby, PHP, and NodeJS).
      5. The fifth article demonstrates how to write, compile, and execute your first program in 7 different compiled programming languages (C, C++, Fortran, Golang).
      6. The sixth and final article conducts some performance benchmarks of the CPU, Memory, Disk, and Network, in both native Ubuntu on a physical machine, and Ubuntu on Windows running on the same system.
      I really enjoyed writing these.  Hopefully you'll try some of the examples, and share your experiences using Ubuntu native utilities on a Windows desktop.  You can find the source code of the programming examples in Github and Launchpad:

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      Dustin Kirkland

      We at Canonical have conducted a legal review, including discussion with the industry's leading software freedom legal counsel, of the licenses that apply to the Linux kernel and to ZFS.

      And in doing so, we have concluded that we are acting within the rights granted and in compliance with their terms of both of those licenses.  Others have independently achieved the same conclusion.  Differing opinions exist, but please bear in mind that these are opinions.

      While the CDDL and GPLv2 are both "copyleft" licenses, they have different scope.  The CDDL applies to all files under the CDDL, while the GPLv2 applies to derivative works.

      The CDDL cannot apply to the Linux kernel because zfs.ko is a self-contained file system module -- the kernel itself is quite obviously not a derivative work of this new file system.

      And zfs.ko, as a self-contained file system module, is clearly not a derivative work of the Linux kernel but rather quite obviously a derivative work of OpenZFS and OpenSolaris.  Equivalent exceptions have existed for many years, for various other stand alone, self-contained, non-GPL kernel modules.

      Our conclusion is good for Ubuntu users, good for Linux, and good for all of free and open source software.

      As we have already reached the conclusion, we are not interested in debating license compatibility, but of course welcome the opportunity to discuss the technology.


      EDIT: This post was updated to link to the supportive position paper from Eben Moglen of the SFLC, an amicus brief from James Bottomley, as well as the contrarian position from Bradley Kuhn and the SFC.

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      A few days before Thanksgiving, George Hotz, a 26-year-old hacker, invites me to his house in San Francisco to check out a project he’s been working on. He says it’s a self-driving car that he had built in about a month. The claim seems absurd. But when I turn up that morning, in his garage there’s a white 2016 Acura ILX outfitted with a laser-based radar (lidar) system on the roof and a camera mounted near the rearview mirror. A tangle of electronics is attached to a wooden board where the glove compartment used to be, a joystick protrudes where you’d usually find a gearshift, and a 21.5-inch screen is attached to the center of the dash. “Tesla only has a 17-inch screen,” Hotz says.

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      If you purchased your computer in the last decade, it probably has a 64-bit-capable processor. The transition to 64-bit operating systems has been a long one, but Google is about to give Linux users another push. In March 2016, Google will stop releasing Chrome for 32-bit Linux distributions.

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      Users who are running licensed versions of Windows 7 or 8.1 on their PCs get a free upgrade to Windows 10, but those running Windows XP or Vista will have to buy Windows 10. Well, Ubuntu is a free user-friendly Linux based operating system. Yes, absolutely free, including future updates.

      Secondly , it is extremely light on PC hardware, so you can even install it on computers that are 3-4 years old, and it will run smoothly . Besides, if you buy a brand new PC without an OS, you could consider running Ubuntu on that too. Ubuntu lets you do everything you can do on Windows, and just as easily…

      You can edit documents, work on spreadsheets, create presentations and more with LibreOffice – a fully functional productivity suite. It comes with the Ubuntu installation and supports Microsoft file formats.

      You can play music files on its Rhythmbox player and install software like VLC Player from the Ubuntu Software Center to watch movies.

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      Last month, and the Linux Foundation’s community website sponsored a 10-day SurveyMonkey survey that asked readers of both sites to choose their favorite three Linux- or Android-based open-spec single-board computers. This year, 1,721 respondents — more than twice the number from the 2014 survey — selected their favorites from a list of 53 SBCs, compared to last year’s 32.


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      I had been thinking of my Touch Table project for a long time. My research on existing solutions was a bit disappointing: mostly insanely expensive, large, or platform locked, they did not fit my vision of a [Android or Linux-powered] ‘desktop’ that would allow me to fit it into my existing workflow, rather than hope that applications would support it (like the Microsoft Surface).



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      We’re setting up a new production web server for our own site and as it’s a chance to start fresh, the thought of course turned to “what’s the best web server for our site?” After looking around at various benchmarks and reviews of the more common web servers, none of the benchmarks seemed to have been run in the last few years or focussed on thousands of connections with static content. This wasn’t the scenario I wanted to see data on.

      So, I set about running a few benchmarks on what I considered to be the top 3 Linux based web servers for a moderately busy site. This is why I’ve labelled the article “Part 1”, as I want to cover multiple scenarios in a few follow-up articles to encompass a variety of scenarios. For this test we’ll be using WordPress, however I’ll be testing other platforms in the follow-up articles as well.

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      Benchmarks show Linux beats OSX on a MacMini:

      All of the benchmarks under both OS X and Linux were facilitated using the open-source Phoronix Test Suite benchmarking software. All of the hardware was the same throughout testing: the reported differences on the automated table above just come down to differences in what the OS reports, such as the difference between the CPU base frequency and turbo frequency, etc. On the following pages are the initial results with more interesting data points to come shortly.

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      Michael Hall

      A couple of weeks ago I had the opportunity to attend the thirteenth Southern California Linux Expo, more commonly known at SCaLE 13x. It was my first time back in five years, since I attended 9x, and my first time as a speaker. I had a blast at SCaLE, and a wonderful time with UbuCon. If you couldn’t make it this year, it should definitely be on your list of shows to attend in 2016.


      Thanks to the efforts of Richard Gaskin, we had a room all day Friday to hold an UbuCon. For those of you who haven’t attended an UbuCon before, it’s basically a series of presentations by members of the Ubuntu community on how to use it, contribute to it, or become involved in the community around it. SCaLE was one of the pioneering host conferences for these, and this year they provided a double-sized room for us to use, which we still filled to capacity.

      image20150220_100226891I was given the chance to give not one but two talks during UbuCon, one on community and one on the Ubuntu phone. We also had presentations from my former manager and good friend Jono Bacon, current coworkers Jorge Castro and Marco Ceppi, and inspirational community members Philip Ballew and Richard Gaskin.

      I’d like thank Richard for putting this all together, and for taking such good care of those of us speaking (he made sure we always had mints and water). UbuCon was a huge success because of the amount of time and work he put into it. Thanks also to Canonical for providing us, on rather short notice, a box full of Ubuntu t-shirts to give away. And of course thanks to the SCaLE staff and organizers for providing us the room and all of the A/V equipment in it to use.

      The room was recorded all day, so each of these sessions can be watched now on youtube. My own talks are at 4:00:00 and 5:00:00.

      Ubuntu Booth

      In addition to UbuCon, we also had an Ubuntu booth in the SCaLE expo hall, which was registered and operated by members of the Ubuntu California LoCo team. These guys were amazing, they ran the booth all day over all three days, managed the whole setup and tear down, and did an excellent job talking to everybody who came by and explaining everything from Ubuntu’s cloud offerings, to desktops and even showing off Ubuntu phones.

      image20150221_162940413Our booth wouldn’t have happened without the efforts of Luis Caballero, Matt Mootz, Jose Antonio Rey, Nathan Haines, Ian Santopietro, George Mulak, and Daniel Gimpelevich, so thank you all so much! We also had great support from Carl Richell at System76 who let us borrow 3 of their incredible laptops running Ubuntu to show off our desktop, Canonical who loaned us 2 Nexus 4 phones running Ubuntu as well as one of the Orange Box cloud demonstration boxes, Michael Newsham from TierraTek who sent us a fanless PC and NAS, which we used to display a constantly-repeating video (from Canonical’s marketing team) showing the Ubuntu phone’s Scopes on a television monitor provided to us by Eäär Oden at Video Resources. Oh, and of course Stuart Langridge, who gave up his personal, first-edition Bq Ubuntu phone for the entire weekend so we could show it off at the booth.

      image20150222_132142752Like Ubuntu itself, this booth was not the product of just one organization’s work, but the combination of efforts and resources from many different, but connected, individuals and groups. We are what we are, because of who we all are. So thank you all for being a part of making this booth amazing.

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      Raspberry Pi 2 is here.

      • A 900MHz quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 CPU
      • 1GB LPDDR2 SDRAM
      • Compatible with Raspberry Pi 1
      • $35

      And now runs Snappy Ubuntu Core.


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      WhatsApp on Ubuntu ?

      Yes you can install WhatApp on Ubuntu Desktop!

      It currently works with Chrome browser only (no Chromium support yet).

      In Chrome go to :

      On your WhatApp on your phone, go to Menu (top left) – WhatsApp Web and add your web client.

      That’s all, now all your WhatsApp messages will also show up on your Ubuntu Desktop.

      Have fun!


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      8 Free Online Tech Courses

      From Introduction to Linux to Web development, CIO magazine covers 8 online courses which are completely free.

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      Prakash Advani

      2 Billions containers at Google each week!

      That tech is called Linux Containerization, and is the latest in a long line of innovations meant to make it easier to package up applications and sling them around data centers. It’s not a new approach – see Solaris Zones, BSD Jails, Parallels, and so on – but Google has managed to popularize it enough that a small cottage industry is forming around it.

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      Michael Hall

      opplanet-tasco-usb-digital-microscope-780200tTwo years ago, my wife and I made the decision to home-school our two children.  It was the best decision we could have made, our kids are getting a better education, and with me working from home since joining Canonical I’ve been able to spend more time with them than ever before. We also get to try and do some really fun things, which is what sets the stage for this story.

      Both my kids love science, absolutely love it, and it’s one of our favorite subjects to teach.  A couple of weeks ago my wife found an inexpensive USB microscope, which lets you plug it into a computer and take pictures using desktop software.  It’s not a scientific microscope, nor is it particularly powerful or clear, but for the price it was just right to add a new aspect to our elementary science lessons. All we had to do was plug it in and start exploring.

      My wife has a relatively new (less than a year) laptop running windows 8.  It’s not high-end, but it’s all new hardware, new software, etc.  So when we plugged in our simple USB microscope…….it failed.  As in, didn’t do anything.  Windows seemed to be trying to figure out what to do with it, over and over and over again, but to no avail.

      My laptop, however, is running Ubuntu 14.04, the latest stable and LTS release.  My laptop is a couple of years old, but classic, Lenovo x220. It’s great hardware to go with Ubuntu and I’ve had nothing but good experiences with it.  So of course, when I decided to give our new USB microsope a try……it failed.  The connection was fine, the log files clearly showed that it was being identified, but nothing was able to see it as a video input device or make use of it.

      Now, if that’s where our story ended, it would fall right in line with a Shakespearean tragedy. But while both Windows and Ubuntu failed to “just work” with this microscope, both failures were not equal. Because the Windows drivers were all closed source, my options ended with that failure.

      But on Ubuntu, the drivers were open, all I needed to do was find a fix. It took a while, but I eventually found a 2.5 year old bug report for an identical chipset to my microscope, and somebody proposed a code fix in the comments.  Now, the original reporter never responded to say whether or not the fix worked, and it was clearly never included in the driver code, but it was an opportunity.  Now I’m no kernel hacker, nor driver developer, in fact I probably shouldn’t be trusted to write any amount of C code at all.  But because I had Ubuntu, getting the source code of my current driver, as well as all the tools and dependencies needed to build it, took only a couple of terminal commands.  The patch was too old to cleanly apply to the current code, but it was easy enough to figure out where they should go, and after a couple tries to properly build just the driver (and not the full kernel or every driver in it), I had a new binary kernel modules that would load without error.  Then, when I plugged my USB microscope in again, it worked!

      Red Onion skin at 120x magnificationPeople use open source for many reasons.  Some people use it because it’s free as in beer, for them it’s on the same level as freeware or shareware, only the cost matters. For others it’s about ethics, they would choose open source even if it cost them money or didn’t work as well, because they feel it’s morally right, and that proprietary software is morally wrong. I use open source because of USB microscopes. Because when they don’t work, open source gives me a chance to change that.

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      Prakash Advani

      The company has pledged to invest $1 billion in open cloud products and services over the next two years, along with community-driven, open-source cloud technologies.

      “Just as the community spread the adoption of Linux in the enterprise, we believe OpenStack will do the same for the cloud,” said Hewlett-Packard CEO and President Meg Whitman, in a webcast announcing Helion Tuesday.

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      Prakash Advani

      Ubuntu 32-Bit or 64-Bit ?

      I often get asked this question 32 or 64-Bit? In the past I have told people to stick to 32-Bit because of compatibility issues but things have changed now. Quoting for Phoronix which recently did a benchmark test between 32-Bit and 64-Bit.

      Going back years we have run 32-bit vs. 64-bit Linux benchmarks. While the results seldom change, we keep running them as the question of choosing between a 32-bit and 64-bit Linux distribution image is still a popular question… These tests drive in a surprising amount of traffic and I continue to be flabbergasted by the number of people still asking this question when nearly all modern x86 Intel/AMD hardware fully supports x86_64 and it generally means much better performance. Usually the only caveat in not using a 64-bit Linux image is if running a system with less than 2GB of RAM.

      In the past there were issues surrounding the Java and Flash support for 64-bit Linux along with an assortment of other possible problems (e.g. with Wine), but all those major issues are a matter of the past. 64-bit Linux is in great shape and as long as you have a decent amount of RAM you really should be running 64-bit Linux.

      If you are still in doubt, read the full article for the benchmark results.

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      Prakash Advani

      The Short answer is No. Ubuntu was patched on 7th April 2014 and the bug was widely reported on 8th April, 2014. If you are using other operating systems,  you need to worry. Especially if its non-Linux based.

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      The Heartbleed vulnerability that was discovered just last week took the world by surprise, but most of the affected services and operating systems have been patched. Unfortunately, some of the Ubuntu users haven’t understood how the patching process works and have started to flood the forums and other social media with the message that Ubuntu is vulnerable.

      Before the OpenSSL issues has become known to the general public, most of the Linux distributions affected by the issue were patched. Most of the media reported on the problem on April 8, but the patch for the Heartbleed vulnerability was already in place on April 7. This is how the security notification looks like in Ubuntu.

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      Prakash Advani

      Tesla running Ubuntu ?

      There aren’t that many Tesla Model S owners around, but those who are do seem to comprise of people who have a different way of seeing things. Apparently, some Tesla Model S owners have already tried to hack their ride by wiring into the Model S’ communications system. A forum user who goes by the moniker of “nlc” managed to locate a number of ports and tap into the data which flows straight to the center console and navigation screens. It seems that these “hackers” found out that the sub-system actually ran on a version of the Ubuntu operating system, which so happens to be a variant of Linux.
      Heck, there was even someone who managed to circumvent this discovery in order to have Firefox up and running on the center console touchscreen, although it does not seem as though there are other more invasive efforts to be made via the Ethernet entry point.

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