Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'life'

I recently finished reading "All Art is Propaganda" by George Orwell, a collection of some of his critical essays. It was a fascinating read, and would recommended it. Each of the essays is thought-provoking and enlightening, and the topics covered are numerous and varied.

The most interesting feature of the book though wasn't the subject matter of the essays, but the organisation of them. The editor decided to put them in chronological order, meaning that you see some development of ideas over the essays, and different topics rise and fall in prominence.

While that's certainly not novel, the effect of structuring the book in this way was very noticeable in this case for me. I saw a lot of parallels to the impressions I've had from following @RealTimeWWII on twitter. This account is "live tweeting" the Second World War as if it were happening today (currently in 1940).

This artifice brings a whole fresh appreciation of this period that I have learnt so much about. Consuming the events at the pace they occured gives time to reflect on each one, and forgetting that I know the events that followed allows one to get a greater understanding of what it would have been like to live at that time. The time-compressing effect of looking back tends to obscure the uncertainty and fear of that time, the slowness with which some events were unfolding accentuating it. Consuming this via twitter, with its headline-like format mixing in with the news of today, heightens this effect.

While it's something of a loss that we aren't able to know what Orwell would say about the events of today, or what he would have changed in these essays with the addition of hindsight, there's an undeniable value in reading this primary source. While hindsight adds, it also takes away, blurring memories and changing perspectives. Reading the essays allows you to pick up on the thinking of those living through the events that we think we know so well.

For instance Orwell seemed to believe that Soviet Russia was a greater threat than Nazism. The essays in the book run from 1940 to 1949, and there are many more words devoted to the Soviets than the Nazis throughout. His writing suggests that he thought the techniques the Soviets used to achieve and maintain power were less well known and understood, and would be more effective over a long period.

After better understanding these benefits I plan to redouble my efforts to choose books from a varied set of sources, including from different times, and avoid falling in to a trap of thinking that more recent must be better as knowledge is always on the increase.

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I recently finished reading "All Art is Propaganda" by George Orwell, a collection of some of his critical essays. It was a fascinating read, and would recommended it. Each of the essays is thought-provoking and enlightening, and the topics covered are numerous and varied.

The most interesting feature of the book though wasn't the subject matter of the essays, but the organisation of them. The editor decided to put them in chronological order, meaning that you see some development of ideas over the essays, and different topics rise and fall in prominence.

While that's certainly not novel, the effect of structuring the book in this way was very noticeable in this case for me. I saw a lot of parallels to the impressions I've had from following @RealTimeWWII on twitter. This account is "live tweeting" the Second World War as if it were happening today (currently in 1940).

This artifice brings a whole fresh appreciation of this period that I have learnt so much about. Consuming the events at the pace they occured gives time to reflect on each one, and forgetting that I know the events that followed allows one to get a greater understanding of what it would have been like to live at that time. The time-compressing effect of looking back tends to obscure the uncertainty and fear of that time, the slowness with which some events were unfolding accentuating it. Consuming this via twitter, with its headline-like format mixing in with the news of today, heightens this effect.

While it's something of a loss that we aren't able to know what Orwell would say about the events of today, or what he would have changed in these essays with the addition of hindsight, there's an undeniable value in reading this primary source. While hindsight adds, it also takes away, blurring memories and changing perspectives. Reading the essays allows you to pick up on the thinking of those living through the events that we think we know so well.

For instance Orwell seemed to believe that Soviet Russia was a greater threat than Nazism. The essays in the book run from 1940 to 1949, and there are many more words devoted to the Soviets than the Nazis throughout. His writing suggests that he thought the techniques the Soviets used to achieve and maintain power were less well known and understood, and would be more effective over a long period.

After better understanding these benefits I plan to redouble my efforts to choose books from a varied set of sources, including from different times, and avoid falling in to a trap of thinking that more recent must be better as knowledge is always on the increase.

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Daniel Holbach

Morocco

Aït Ben Haddou [HDR]

Aït Ben Haddou (Photo by Oscar Gomez - CC-BY-NC-ND)

See you back on 9th January 2012. :-)

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Daniel Holbach

Midnight Sun

See you in two weeks! I’m off to the North of Norway from tomorrow on, so if you have anything urgent you want to discuss, I’m sure one of these fine gentlemen should be able to help you out.

Midnight Sun

Picture by Oddbjørn Steffensen (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

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Daniel Holbach

Remarkable people

You don’t see me blogging about things outside the Ubuntu world very often. OK, an occasional mixtape every now and then or some holiday pictures, but I generally try to stay away from topics such as politics or things that happen in the world elsewhere. This is not because I don’t care or don’t have an opinion – it’s quite the opposite. I just prefer to not get drawn into huge arguments about who’s right and I try to avoid writing about and singling out particular events and miss to mention others.

By now most of you will have heard about the horrible events in Oslo. As my girlfriend is from Norway, I paid even more attention to the news. The reason I’m writing about this is that among all the usual suspicions and noise in the news a few people stood out and truly impressed me.

We will stand by our democracy. The answer to violence is more democracy, more humanity.

Jens Stoltenberg, Norwegian PM

I don’t think security can solve problems. We need to teach greater respect.”

Oslo Mayor Stang when asked whether Oslo needs greater security

We had been discussing on the island, how to tackle extremism and racism. We will continue this.

Youth leader who escaped Utøya

If you haven’t read much about Oslo and Utøya in the last days, read these two chilling first-hand accounts of people who survived Utøya: from Khamshajiny Gunaratnam and Debian contributor Tore Sinding Bekkedal.

After all of this, it would have been very much understandable to show any signs of knee-jerk reactions. The people I mentioned above reacted remarkably to the situation. It’s very inspiring how they chose to stand with their humanitarian values. It’s unfortunately very uncommon nowadays, especially for politicians, who in situations like this are under a lot of pressure. These leaders have my deep respect for choosing to do otherwise.

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Daniel Holbach

I’ve been slacking a bit when it comes to DJing land picked it up this year again. Some of my mixtapes are on a part of my blog that’s not syndicated, but I set up a page with all the posts. I just posted a new one today.

If you have no plans tonight and you’re in Berlin, come to the GNOME3 Launch Lounge (Facebook event page) in c-base tonight. I’ll be playing there as well. :-)

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Hardik Dalwadi

First i would like to thanks all UDD attendees & Canonical, Ubuntu Community for making UDD successful event. we had around 350 attendees @ Hotel Leela, Grand Ball Room.

So, let me  share some behind the scene pictures.

 

This is how we started @ 1:30 PM, 26th Jnauary, 2011

 

Time to make seprate Ubuntu Cotton bags with T-shirts.

Final Goodies: Notepad, Pens, sticker, Products Sheets, Mavercik T-Shirts and Ubuntu Cotton Bags

 

Finally three containers with all goodies, according to their t-shirts size @ 2:30 PM, 26th January, 2011

Registration Counter @ 7:00 PM, 26th January, 2011

Agenda @ 9:10 PM, 26th January, 2011

UDD Presentation Hall @ 11:00 PM, 26th January, 2011

UDD Demonstration Room @ 3:00 AM 27 January, 2011

It was very interesting and busy day for all, packing bags to preparing demo room, shaping final presentations. We were very excited to see all Ubuntuers on UDD. And, OMG!!! that dream came true. Here is a picture taken 15 minutes before the UDD started. And, I believe Picture Speaks Louder Then The Words, OMG!!! It is!

 

Fronte-Right-Corner: A picture taken 15 minutes before the UDD started.

 

REAR-Right-Corner: A picture taken 15 minutes before the UDD started.

 

Though,  i was busy @ UDD Demonstration Counter, organized by Canonical and OEMs and LOEMs, showing their devices with Ubuntu, so i would not write much about UDD Presentation, later in this blog i will cover UDD Presentation source and community blog, covering whole UDD Presentation  part.  Again coming back to demo part, We demoed Wipro Machines (Netbook, Notebook, Tablet, Desktops), Lenovo All-In-One M90Z with Ubuntu 10.10, Dell Zino and Dell Latitude Netbook with Ubuntu Light. Most of the attendees were interested in getting list of Machine pre-installed with Ubuntu and available in Indian market. And that was one of the common need of all. And we surprised by seeing huge demand for that. In past, i have covered in my blog with picture of some LOEM brand with Ubuntu showcasing in CROMA. I got huge demand from attendees to generate and promote list of LOEMs and OEMs shipping machines with Pre-installed Ubuntu in Indian Consumer / Retail Market. We are already doing this for enterprise and corporates. I am sure i will cover that list in future blog. We had given 1 hour for UDD Demonstration Counter,  combined with UDD Break in UDD Agenda.  But personally,  i was much more  busy during the day  for demonstration ;) Here are few pictures from Demonstration Counter.

UDD Demonstartion Room @ 1:00 PM, 27th January, 2011

UDD Demonstration Counter @ 3:00 PM, 27th January, 2011

Overall it was amazing event. During the day, i had great meeting with Nigel Babu and Sreekanth. Nigel also covered detailed report of UDD. Sreekanth had given nice demo on preparing and running customized Ubuntu AMI on Amazon EC2 Cloud Services. We had given separate counter for community. Thanks a lot Sreekanth.

Finally, Closing keynote  by Prakash thanking  all UDD attendees and Canonical Employee for making UDD successful. Here is a snip from Nigel’s Blog Post.

Closing keynote by Prakash and Thanks to all UDD attendees and Canonical Employee for making UDD successful.

Though, We have finished the UDD, but still we are hearing from attendees. Personally, i got lot of e-Mails from attendees.  There was common request to do it again. And, of-course i will update you more in future. Here few words from one of e-Mail, i received. Personal thanks to Mr. Girish


Dear Hardik,
It was a great experience at Leela palace in Bangalore on Ubuntu Developer Day.
I had very good opportunity to meet many people to from open source.
Please keep on organising such events in India.

My Canonical colleagues also got the similar kind of e-Mails after UDD. It was great satisfaction for us. Here is few links around the web covering UDD, bit commercially, but that is not offensive :) .


http://www.mymobile.co.in/index.php/national-news/312-ubuntu-developer-day-counts-over-350-in-attendance

http://www.efytimes.com/e1/57794/fullnews.htm

http://press-releases.techwhack.com/

http://tweetmeme.com/story/3872838340/ubuntu-developer-day-in-india-a-resounding-success-with-over-350-in-attendance

http://friendfeed.com/techwhack/29e6af84/ubuntu-developer-day-in-india-resounding

To going at more commercial part, there was very nice coverage by Beyond Beat, Evening new paper.

I like the title most, i will close this blog with that one | UBUNTU STORY: STAFF OF TWO, LAKHS OF USERS | Big thanks to strong Ubuntu Community and Canonical. Now? Let’s make it billion….

UDD Coverage by Beyond Beat, Evening New Paper of Bangalore

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Daniel Holbach

275 invitations to tea later…

… I must say I had a fantastic holidays. I had a fantastic time, met supersuperfriendly people and was generally constantly surprised.

Pictures are available over here.

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Daniel Holbach

Who are your mentors?

Jorge and Allison blogged about their mentors and start into the Open Source world and I thought it would be a great way to thank at least some of the people who helped me get started. So I started thinking about who all helped me out in one way or the other in the last few years and I realised that there’s incredibly many people I should’ve been thanking years ago already.

  • One person has constantly been there for me in the last 6 years: Michael Vogt. I got to know him in Dortmund, the city where we both studied. We quickly became good friends and although we now almost live 700km apart we stayed in touch and talk on the phone every second day. What I love about Michael is that he’s pragmatic, modest, thoughtful and generally a lot of fun. I’m incredibly glad he helped me out like he did.
  • Sébastien Bacher was the first person I worked with on a daily basis. Luckily he was very patient with me and explained lots of packaging details to me. We both grew up close to the Franco-Allemande border, which probably was the reason why we instantly got on very well. We laughed a lot when working together.

There’s dozens of other people who helped me out, got me thinking and changed how I saw things, but I’ll probably save them for future blog posts. :-)

Today it’s been almost exactly five years since I’ve been with Canonical and six years in the Ubuntu community. Everybody was fantastic to me and still is. Thanks a lot also to other folks who were there for me in the early days (Oliver Grawert, James Blackwell, Jane Fraser, and loads and loads of others).

You know who you are and thanks a lot for the time with you. :-)

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Daniel Holbach

Holidays

Visa, finally got it

Visa, finally got it

Tuesday next week is my last working day and I’ll be gone for three weeks, without laptop. If you have anything really urgent, talk to any members of my team, Michael or Ara, they know how to get in touch with me.

I’m very much looking forward to this one and happy to meet Mehdi of the LoCo team there! :-)

I’ll be back on 29th September.

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Daniel Holbach

Berlin

Earlier today I went to a goodbye party of a friend who’s going to Australia for a few months. Great things that happened:

  1. Party was outdoors, a few DJs played, great atmosphere, 100+ people at peak times
  2. Some of my awesome office mates were there, my sister too
  3. The police showed up and instead of shutting the party down, they told us where it was “OK” to have the party
  4. We moved all the equipment, the generator, drinks and everything else to the new place, which was nearby, everybody helped
  5. I played a 4 hour Drum’n'Bass set, which I (and others) were very happy with, they even collected money for the DJ – glad it was dark, so nobody could see if I was blushing
  6. I watched the sunrise by the riverside while the party was still going on
  7. I drove home on my bicycle
  8. A few guys stopped me to take a picture of them and as a thanks offered me their last beer

Oh how I love this city!

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Daniel Holbach

Photo Story (for Robert Collins)

So Robert doesn't believe me...

So Robert doesn't believe me...

there's only little barriers

there's only little barriers

too far to walk over to the bridge and cross that

too far to walk over to the bridge and cross that

TADAAAAA!

TADAAAAA!

dunno how these got here

dunno how these got here

I wasn't the only one who had the idea

I wasn't the only one who had the idea

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Daniel Holbach

Iceland pictures

It took a bit, but I uploaded pictures of the Iceland trip a few days ago.

One photo I wanted to share here: Seems like Reykjvavík loves Ubuntu! :-)

Von Iceland

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