Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'landscape'

Dustin Kirkland

Click and drag to rotate, zoom with middle mouse button

It was September of 2009.  I answered a couple of gimme trivia questions and dropped my business card into a hat at a Linux conference in Portland, Oregon.  A few hours later, I received an email...I had just "won" a developer edition HTC Dream -- the Android G1.  I was quite anxious to have a hardware platform where I could experiment with Android.  I had, of course, already downloaded the SDK, compiled Android from scratch, and fiddled with it in an emulator.  But that experience fell far short of Android running on real hardware.  Until the G1.  The G1 was the first device to truly showcase the power and potential of the Android operating system.

And with that context, we are delighted to introduce the Orange Box!


The Orange Box


Conceived by Canonical and custom built by TranquilPC, the Orange Box is a 10-node cluster computer, that fits in a suitcase.

Ubuntu, MAAS, Juju, Landscape, OpenStack, Hadoop, CloudFoundry, and more!

The Orange Box provides a spectacular development platform, showcasing in mere minutes the power of hardware provisioning and service orchestration with Ubuntu, MAAS, Juju, and Landscape.  OpenStack, Hadoop, CloudFoundry, and hundreds of other workloads deploy in minutes, to real hardware -- not just instances in AWS!  It also makes one hell of a Steam server -- there's a charm for that ;-)


OpenStack deployed by Juju, takes merely 6 minutes on an Orange Box

Most developers here certainly recognize the term "SDK", or "Software Development Kit"...  You can think of the Orange Box as a "HDK", or "Hardware Development Kit".  Pair an Orange Box with MAAS and Juju, and you have yourself a compact cloud.  Or a portable big data number cruncher.  Or a lightweight cluster computer.


The underside of an Orange Box, with its cover off


Want to get your hands on one?

Drop us a line, and we'd be delighted to hand-deliver an Orange Box to your office, and conduct 2 full days of technical training, covering MAAS, Juju, Landscape, and OpenStack.  The box is yours for 2 weeks, as you experiment with the industry leading Ubuntu ecosystem of cloud technologies at your own pace and with your own workloads.  We'll show back up, a couple of weeks later, to review what you learned and discuss scaling these tools up, into your own data center, on your own enterprise hardware.  (And if you want your very own Orange Box to keep, you can order one from our friends at TranquilPC.)


Manufacturers of the Orange Box

Gear head like me?  Interested in the technical specs?


Remember those posts late last year about Intel NUCs?  Someone took notice, and we set out to build this ;-)


Each Orange Box chassis contains:
  • 10x Intel NUCs
  • All 10x Intel NUCs contain
    • Intel HD Graphics 4000 GPU
    • 16GB of DDR3 RAM
    • 120GB SSD root disk
    • Intel Gigabit ethernet
  • D-Link DGS-1100-16 managed gigabit switch with 802.1q VLAN support
    • All 10 nodes are internally connected to this gigabit switch
  • 100-240V AC/DC power supply
    • Adapter supplied for US, UK, and EU plug types
    • 19V DC power supplied to each NUC
    • 5V DC power supplied to internal network switch


Intel NUC D53427RKE board

That's basically an Amazon EC2 m3.xlarge ;-)

The first node, node0, additionally contains:
  • A 2TB Western Digital HDD, preloaded with a full Ubuntu archive mirror
  • USB and HDMI ports are wired and accessible from the rear of the box

Most planes fly in clouds...this cloud flies in planes!


In aggregate, this micro cluster effectively fields 40 cores, 160GB of RAM, 1.2TB of solid state storage, and is connected over an internal gigabit network fabric.  A single fan quietly cools the power supply, while all of the nodes are passively cooled by aluminum heat sinks spanning each side of the chassis. All in a chassis the size of a tower PC!

It fits in a suit case, and can travel anywhere you go.


Pelican iM2875 Storm Case

How are we using them at Canonical?

If you're here at the OpenStack Summit in Atlanta, GA, you'll see at least a dozen Orange Boxes, in our booth, on stage during Mark Shuttleworth's keynote, and in our breakout conference rooms.


Canonical sales engineer, Ameet Paranjape,
demonstrating OpenStack on the Orange Box in the Ubuntu booth
at the OpenStack Summit in Atlanta, GA
We are also launching an update to our OpenStack Jumpstart program, where we'll deliver and Orange Box and 2 full days of training to your team, and leave you the box while you experiment with OpenStack, MAAS, Juju, Hadoop, and more for 2 weeks.  Without disrupting your core network or production data center workloads,  prototype your OpenStack experience within a private sandbox environment. You can experiment with various storage alternatives, practice scaling services, destroy and rebuild the environment repeatedly. Safe. Risk free.


This is Cloud, for the Free Man.

:-Dustin

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anthony-c-beckley

We are exhibiting at this year’s CeBIT event on March 5-9th, 2013 in Hannover Germany, in conjunction with our partner in the region, Teuto.net and we’re giving away number of free tickets to selected customers and partners. If you are interested in one of these tickets, please contact me at anthony.beckley@canonical.com for more information.

The Canonical/Teuto.net stand will be in the Open Source Arena (Hall 6, Stand F16, (030) and we will be showcasing two enterprise technology areas:

  • The Ubuntu Cloud Stack – demonstrating end user access to applications via an OpenStack cloud, powered by Ubuntu,
  • Ubuntu Landscape Systems Management – demonstrating ease of management of desktop, server and cloud nodes.

We will be running hourly demonstrations on our stand and attendees have the chance to win a Google Nexus 7 tablet! Simply come to out stand and watch a short demo or your chance to win If you would like to pre-register for a demonstration, email me at anthony.beckley@canonical.com

We look forward to seeing you at the show!

CeBIT draws a live audience of more than 3,000 people from over 100 different countries. In just five days the show delivers a panoramic view of the digital world’s mainstay markets: ICT and Telecommunications, Digital Media also Consumer Electronics.
To learn more about CeBIT click here.

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Mike Milner

In our last blog on Landscape and Puppet, we talked about using Landscape to automatically deploy Puppet on new computers. In this article we’ll dive deeper, and look at how to use Landscape as an External Node Classifier for Puppet.

In a typical Puppet configuration, all your nodes are defined in site.pp under the “node” definitions section. Each node is assigned Puppet classes by manually editing the file. When your number of nodes grows, manually managing the site.pp file becomes tedious and error prone.

An External Node Classifier (ENC) is Puppet’s way of offloading the tedious node maintenance to an external program. The interface is dead simple – puppet executes the external node classifier program with a single full node name as the only argument. The classifier just has to write a YAML blob out to stdout before exiting.

To start, let’s create a simple python ENC in /etc/puppet/landscape_enc – Don’t forget to make the file executable.

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#!/usr/bin/env python
import sys
import yaml

# The node name to be classified is supplied as an argument to the script
node_name = sys.argv[1]

classes = ["basenode"]

# Output must be a YAML document
print(yaml.dump({
    "classes": classes,
    }))

 

It ignores the node name and just puts everything into the “basenode” class. Not very interesting but it’s enough to get started with Puppet.

NOTE: These examples are all using puppet 2.7 which ships on Ubuntu 12.04 Precise LTS. The ENC functionality behaves a bit differently in versions of puppet earlier than 2.65 – See http://docs.puppetlabs.com/guides/external_nodes.html for details.

To test the ENC I put together a minimal puppet configuration with two simple classes and put everything into my site.pp in /etc/puppet/manifests/site.pp

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class basenode {
  notify {"I am a basenode!":}
}

class specialnode {
  notify {"I am a specialnode!":}
}

 

Notice that no nodes are actually defined. That is the ENC’s job. To enable the ENC you need to add two lines to your puppetmaster’s config file /etc/puppet/puppet.conf

Add these lines at the end of the “[master]” section:

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node_terminus = exec
external_nodes = /etc/puppet/landscape_enc

 

You can now test that the puppetmaster is using your new, rather basic, ENC.

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ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ sudo puppet agent --test

info: Caching catalog for ubuntu
info: Applying configuration version '1354824718'
notice: I am a basenode!
notice: /Stage[main]/Basenode/Notify[I am a basenode!]/message: defined 'message' as 'I am a basenode!'
notice: Finished catalog run in 0.06 seconds

 

As you can see, with our trivial ENC everyone is a basenode.

Now we’re going to enhance our ENC to ask Landscape to classify nodes for us.

The Landscape API
To use the Landscape API you need three pieces of information: the Landscape API endpoint URI, the user key, and the secret for your user.

To find your API credentials, log in to the Landscape web interface and click your username on the top right. Your API credentials are in the “API Access” section.

For this example, we’ll use the python API client provided with Landscape (NOTE, you must install the landscape-api package first). Here’s how to query for a computer registered with Landscape using it’s host name:

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from landscape_api.base import API

landscape_uri = "https://landscape.canonical.com/api/"
landscape_key = "43NW6OV71L32CSOPCJGX"
landscape_secret = "agBf3v267DqO8vtVRnzjseWfYdV4ueklj5a81iIT"
api = API(landscape_uri, landscape_key, landscape_secret)

api.get_computers(query="my_hostname_here")
[{u'access_group': u'server',
u'comment': u'',
u'hostname': u'appserv1',
u'id': 1,
u'last_exchange_time': None,
u'last_ping_time': u'2012-09-07T15:19:22Z',
u'reboot_required_flag': False,
u'tags': [u'lucid', u'server', u'puppet-webfarm'],
u'title': u'Application Server 1',
u'total_memory': 1024,
u'total_swap': 1024}]

 

Now if we combine that with our ENC we get the following:

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#!/usr/bin/env python
import sys
import yaml
from landscape_api.base import API

# Create our connection to Landscape
landscape_uri = "https://landscape.canonical.com/api/"
landscape_key = "43NW6OV71L32CSOPCJGX"
landscape_secret = "agBf3v267DqO8vtVRnzjseWfYdV4ueklj5a81iIT"
api = API(landscape_uri, landscape_key, landscape_secret)

# The node name to be classified is supplied as an argument to the script
node_name = sys.argv[1]

# Ask Landscape about the computer
computers = api.get_computers(query=node_name)

# If we don't get back any computers or if we get more than one, error out.
# You could also handle this case by simply giving the node a default class.
if len(computers) != 1:
    sys.stderr.write("Only expecting one computer, instead got this: %s" % computers)
    sys.exit(1)

# Extract the tags from our computer
tags = computer[0]["tags"]

# Now here you can use whatever logic you want to convert
# tags into classes. I'm going to use any tag that starts with "puppet-"
# as a class name. I'm also going to make sure every node gets the
# "basenode" class
classes = ["basenode"]
for tag in tags:
    if tag.startswith("puppet-"):
        class_name = tag.split("-",1)[1]
        classes.append(class_name)

# Output must be a YAML document
print(yaml.dump({
    "classes": classes,
    }))

 

That’s all there is to it. Now if you tag a computer “puppet-database” in Landscape, it will automatically get the “database” class in Puppet.

You can see in the script comments that it’s very easy to customize the behaviour to match your environment. Now tag away and let Landscape and Puppet take over your world!

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Cezzaine Haigh

The cloud is disrupting the enterprise computing world, driven by the growth of open-source software. As a result, new opportunities are emerging; it’s time to exploit them. 

On the 30th October, Canonical will host an Ubuntu Enterprise Summit in Copenhagen. Industry analysts and enterprise users of Ubuntu and open source technologies, will join key figures from Canonical to discuss the opportunities these converging trends present.

The event is designed around three key topics

- How flexibility creates business value
- Choosing which bandwagon to board
- The way ahead, from client to cloud

With a keynotes from Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth and two streams of content – one aimed at business decision-makers and the other at enterprise technologists – it offers an essential briefing on delivering effective IT in a cloud-obsessed world.

Learn more and register your place.

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imlad

As I mentioned yesterday, we ran a webinar on Canonical’s Infrastructure as a Service offering – the Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud.  A wise old man (I am being quite literal here) told me that the secret to any sort of success is persistence – no amount of talent or luck suffices to get you there, wherever “there” happens to be for you.  And so, as marketers, we do things – run webinars, host events, write blog posts (it’s Friday morning and I am feeling all self referential and post modern), publish data sheets, perform market segmentation and competitive analysis, et cetera.  To have success, we need to take an occasional pause, and ask ourselves how useful our various activities are, so that if we are veering off course (away from the “there”), we can take appropriate action.  Otherwise, we end up going through motions that have only appearances behind them (like the business man that the kid wants to keep as a pet in the “Can I keep him” sketch from  Kids in the Hall).

So yesterday we had a morning and an afternoon session of a webinar about our offering for IaaS, our services around it (including  the Landscape system management offering).  We had a very decent turnout and excellent questions (the Q&A sessions were going up to the last second).  At the same time (and I have been told that I have a weakness for giving myself more work) I am pondering breaking the webinar into two – one focused on an overview of cloud computing and the value proposition of our IaaS offering (the “why it is a good idea” in general and “why Canonical’s flavor of this good idea is particularly good” in particular), with a follow-up webinar focused on the services and management tools and how our offering would be executed and managed technically.

I am not talking fluff for the first webinar.  Actually, the challenge here would be to have a clear enough presentation of our vision and offering for someone who is looking askance at the entire “cloud” thing is the latest “buzzword” – all sound and no honey.  So, let me see if I can can produce a presentation deck and demo outline.  If anyone has thoughts on the topic, feel free to pipe up.

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Gerry Carr

Canonical over the last four years or so has brought businesses a growing range of services and software tools to help them make better use of the Ubuntu platform. Many of these services, such as Landscape systems management and technical support, have proven valuable for companies that want to more easily manage and maintain Ubuntu in their business.

Rather than having to decide which tools or services are useful, we decided to make things simple by bringing together all the necessary tools and services into a single offering, Ubuntu Advantage.

Ubuntu Advantage has four service components:

* systems management

* enterprise technical support

* legal assurance

* access to knowledge base

At Canonical, we believe these are they key service areas that help enterprises make successful use of Ubuntu in their business. As new technology features and capabilities are incorporated into the Ubuntu platform, the Ubuntu Advantage service offering will also grow to support those new platform capabilities.

The systems management service category offers Canonical’s Landscape systems management and monitoring tool. Within any enterprise it is crucial for IT departments to have the necessary systems management tool to avoid having to spend copious amounts of time managing and maintaining systems with patches and security upgrades. Although, these tasks are vital for enterprise systems to remain safe, they can also be tedious and unnecessarily time consuming without the right tools. The package management and automation features of Landscape help to remove much of this manual work.

Ubuntu Advantage includes enterprise-level technical support for the desktop and server to give businesses direct backing from the source of Ubuntu, Canonical. This is a valuable service because businesses can deploy Ubuntu with a greater sense of security; should they run into any problems, they have the support from the organisation which released it.

Our aim is to provide comprehensive support, but we also want to give customers flexibility with the type of service they receive as we recognise that different machines will run different workloads and need different levels of support. On the server there are three options ranging from support for basic server workloads to the most complex setups:

* Essential Server – to cover common workloads such as file and print serving

* Standard Server – for more advanced business needs like server virtualisation and integration into existing Windows networks

* Advanced Server – to cover complex configurations such as high-availability and clustering

On the desktop there were two main usage types we want to cover, general business use and developer use:

* Standard Desktop – covers general end users using standard business applications such as email, office suites and web browsing

* Advanced Desktop – covers developers that have more complex desktop configurations, such as desktop virtualisation, and use advanced developer tools

A major aim of Ubuntu Advantage is to ease the adoption of Ubuntu by providing quick and easy access to a definitive answers. The online Knowledge Base gives customers a central repository from which they can quickly reference at any time definitive guides on how to resolve common issues or information about best practices deployments. Canonical’s support engineers create the content in the knowledge base keeping it accurate and up-to-date on the latest releases.

It’s also crucial that staff using Ubuntu feel comfortable with it, because the more confident they feel the more they can take advantage of Ubuntu’s many features and the fewer problems they will come across. So we also included training credits in Ubuntu Advantage. These can be redeemed to train end users on how to make the most of Ubuntu Desktop for their daily job, or they can be redeemed for system administrator training to help them more easily deploy and manage Ubuntu systems.

We know it is important for many organisations to have legal assurance to enable the adoption of an open source platform, which is why we have also included our legal assurance programme, Ubuntu Assurance, with all Ubuntu Advantage service options.

Ubuntu Advantage provides simplicity and an easier way for businesses to purchase the necessary tools and services to manage, support and use their Ubuntu platform more effectively and efficiently. Ultimately, it saves them precious time and money that can be spent elsewhere in their businesses. Initial reception has been very positive and we look forward to getting more feedback on the new services as users become familiar with them and hopefully see the value in them.

The Ubuntu Advantage website is live at: visit http://bit.ly/cOasJ3

Fern Ho, Ubuntu Advantage Product Manager

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Steve George

The new release of Landscape in time for the Ubuntu 10.04 LTS release attracted some nice articles in the Linux press. The majority of the features this time around are designed to help enterprise Ubuntu users who are managing a large number of systems. If you have hundreds of servers in your enterprise then you need to be able to see the “Landscape of your deployment” and react to issues quickly. There’s more detail on the main features in my previous Landscape post.

First up is Sean Michael Kerner at Linux Planet who did a nice write-up titled Canonical Landscape 1.5 Extends Ubuntu Linux Management for Enterprises on the release.  He pays particular attention to the enterprise authentication and the LTS upgrades with a nice quote from Ken Drachnik:

“We find that most enterprises are using LTS’s, so as part of this release, we wanted to have the automated ability to just click a button and say ‘Yes, upgrade me’ and then Landscape would automatically download the packages and do the upgrade”

Over at The Register, Timothy Prickett Morgan focuses talks about the Cloud aspects of the new release in his article Canonical updates Landscape manager. With UEC a key part of our server product and the work we’re doing on Amazon EC2 there’s lots of interesting things that Landscape can do to help users manage Ubuntu in these environments.

Finally, Joe Panettieri at WorksWithU discusses Landscape 1.5: The Implications for Ubuntu Customers and Partners where he summarises the key elements of the release and considers how the Amazon EC2 management might be of interest to partners.   He specifically asks for examples of how Landscape is being successful with corporate customers. And as if by magic we can point him at this case study by PlusServer AG which we just put up, and it’s definitely worth a read!


Tagged: Canonical, landscape, Linux, Ubuntu

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Steve George

We released a new version of Landscape our management service for Ubuntu last week. There’s a slew of new features including server templates, simple upgrades and enterprise authentication support.  Whether you’re managing a few systems or as many as Google the new features make system administration simpler!

Landscape’s objective is to make managing and monitoring hundreds of Ubuntu systems as easy as looking after one. Whether you’re managing some Ubuntu desktops, or looking after a Web server farm Landscape lowers the complexity of administering those systems: no-one wants to apply patches to hundreds of machines manually! For IT managers this means that Landscape makes system administrators more effective and efficient. Landscape also ensures that deployed Ubuntu systems are secure with maintenance patches and upgrades.

Landscape is provided as a software service so every six months Canonical releases a new version that is available to all subscribers. There’s also an on-site version available to customers that have security policies or regulations that prevent them using a SaaS management platform. In line with Ubuntu 10.04 the main features of the new version are:

Package profiles
Many sites have sets of servers that do similar jobs, for example “web serving“. Ideally you want those machines to have the same set-up reducing management overhead.

The ability to create templates of the packages installed on a particular system and then apply those to different machines makes it easy to replicate a standard install. It also ensures that you maintain consistent profiles across your systems as time goes by. Finally, if you need to re-provision or expand resources you can use profiles to ensure it’s a repeatable process. Package Profiles is really great for managing configurations.

Release upgrades
If you’re managing more that a handful of Ubuntu systems then doing upgrades is going to take a lot of time. Whether that’s every six months in time with the standard releases, or every two years for the LTS releases, it’s a significant commitment. To reduce that overhead you can now do upgrades between releases using Landscape.

Upgrades between releases are always complex so this doesn’t remove the need for backups and careful attention. Nonetheless, if you’ve used Package Profiles, it will be easier to test an upgrade on a test system and then when you’re happy apply it to all the deployed systems using the same package profile. Rather than having to access every machine and do the process by hand you can upgrade a group at a time.

Enterprise authentication
Enterprises commonly have a corporate standard for authentication such as LDAP or on a Microsoft Windows network Active Directory. The new version of LDS connects to these systems authenticating administrators from the existing authentication system. This ensures that customers can simplify their authentication set-up and enforce authorisation from a single corporate directory.

There’s more information in the press release and you can read more about it in the Canonical blog post or try it out with a free trial.


Tagged: Canonical, landscape, Linux, Ubuntu

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ken-drachnik

The number of subscribers to the Landscape Systems Management application has grown dramatically over the past year with much of this growth coming from enterprises using the Landscape Dedicated Server which we released just 8 months ago. These users prefer the Dedicated Server because they can keep all of their systems management functions behind their firewall where they update from their own private package repositories. As these also tend to be larger installations, they have asked us for features that apply, typically, to larger organizations that want to automate their work flows so they can be more efficient in managing servers and desktops. Each of the features in the newly released Landscape 1.5 works towards that goal of helping system administrators do more with their limited resources. A complete listing of the new features along with examples can be found on the Landscape Blog. Here is a summary of the major new capabilities released with Landscape 1.5:

We’ve implemented SSO integration so that users can log into Landscape with existing credentials. We ship both LDAP and AD authentication modules with the Landscape Dedicated Server, but it is relatively straightforward to add others.

Package Profiles allows users to define profiles (lists of packages) that constitute a configuration (e.g. a Web server) then deploy that list of packages to a new system. Likewise they can copy a configuration from one system and apply it to another. These profiles allow you to easily install many packages in one go on your servers according to their tags, which means it’s easier than ever to have a machine ready with the software you need.

With Landscape 1.5 being released with Lucid 10.04 we introduce the ability to automate LTS to LTS upgrades. Since many of our enterprise users tend to stick with a LTS version, we’ve made it very easy to upgrade to the next LTS with a single command.

Package pinning is another system wide capability we just released. If you have a legacy application and its dependencies that you don’t want upgraded you can now lock those packages within Landscape and apply that lock to all your similar systems. In the future, if someone tries to upgrade any of the locked packages, they will remain in their current state and you’ll get an error message.

I’ll be hosting a Webinar this Thursday May 27th to demonstrate our new features and answer quesitons. Register here.
Ken Drachnik, Landscape Manager

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Ken Drachnik

Landscape 1.4 Adds UEC Support

Cloud management dominates the theme for Landscape 1.4 with new features that allow you to manage your private Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud (UEC) as easily as you manage your instances on Amazon EC2. Also released are new features that help system administrators be more efficient including time based package updates and role based access. These new features will be available this week on both the Hosted and Dedicated Server Editions of Landscape.

Cloud Computing: UEC Support

Building upon our support for Amazon’s EC2 Cloud, users can now start, stop and manage their private Ubuntu instances on their UEC from within Landscape. Users simply enter their credentials directly through Landscape to start, stop and manage an instance. We’ve designed Landscape to work directly with both Amazon and Eucalyptus console pages so you can manage your instances without having to use any other tools. Landscape securely stores your security credentials making is easy to spin up new instances on UEC or EC2 at anytime. Once the instances are initiated, they all display on the same page allowing you manage all your physical, virtuali and Cloud instances in one place.

New Timed Package Updates

Users can now schedule package updates, system reboots and shutdowns in the future with minute increments. This gives System Administrators the flexibility to schedule activities for systems to occur during planned maintenance windows or low use periods to minimise the impact on the network. Now that we have developed the time / scheduling function, look for us to add this to other areas of Landscape where it it makes sense, like scheduling scripts in the future.

Administrator Roles

As Landscape is deployed in larger enterprises the need to delegate and limit access to systems has become a key need. Now, in addition to having a master admin who can manage all systems within a Landscape account, you can delegate access to systems to other administrators. This builds on our tags function (which allows you to tag computers performing the same function and update them with a single command) to allocate full access to systems by admin. Typically this means sys admins in different areas can be given full access to their local systems, but not to those in another area or country. Like tags, assigning systems to other administrators is completely flexible so you can use what ever criteria you need.

The Landscape 1.4 client is available today and is included with Ubuntu 9.10 server edition. Details are at www.canonical.com/landscape

Ken Drachnik, Landscape Manager

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kendrachnik

Today we are announcing the Landscape Dedicated Server Edition — a stand alone version of Landscape that users can install on-site giving them complete control of their Ubuntu environment. This is one of our most requested features so we modified the Hosted version of landscape, keeping all the management, auditing and monitoring features, packaging it as a software appliance you install on your systems. Now Landscape can operate locally so all your information transfers over your local network and all system configuration, policies and profiles are stored on your infrastructure.

New features available with the Dedicated Server and Hosted edition in the October release include:

  • Manage your Cloud and physical systems in one console – including server, desktop and Amazon EC2 Cloud instances.
  • Scheduled package updates – Now you can schedule package updates and machine restarts for maintenance windows or when network usage is low minimizing the impact to your users.
  • Administrator Delegation – Group your systems to meet your needs then assign permissions to different administrators enforcing work rules and enhancing security.

To be the first to know about availability of the Landscape Server, get informed about upcoming Webinars and download the brochure.

Of course we will continue to offer the Hosted version of Landscape along side the Dedicated Server giving users a choice in how they want to manage their Ubuntu systems. All the new features mentioned above are planned to be available in October when we release the next major update of Landscape and Ubuntu Karmic Koala. The Landscape Dedicated Server is available for order now, but installation will not be available until late September / early October.

Click for detailed information on Landscape, Support and our Training products and services.

Ken Drachnik, Landscape Manager

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kendrachnik

Announcing the release of Landscape 1.3 – the next version of Canonical’s management and monitoring software that lets you manage multiple Ubuntu systems as easily as one. In addition, Landscape enables you to monitor all your systems from a single Web interface reducing the complexity of managing multiple systems. The theme of 1.3 is Cloud and scalability.

Cloud Computing: EC2 Support
Landscape 1.3 introduces support for Amazon’s EC2 Cloud service. Users can now start, stop and manage their Ubuntu instances on Amazon EC2 from within Landscape.  Just enter your EC2 credentials directly through Landscape to start, stop and manage one of our pre-configured versions of Ubuntu that include the Landscape Client.  We have both 32 and 64 bit server versions available in both the US and EU regions. Once you started, you can use Landscape to manage and monitor them as you would your physical systems. Landscape saves you time by allowing you to manage your physical, virtualized and Amazon EC2 instances from one page.

New Custom Graphs
Users can now create and store trends of key system parameters allowing them to view and act on issues before they impact system performance. This gives System Administrators the flexibility of writing a script to monitor any machine readable parameter that is important to them such as temperature, memory and disk usage.

Knowledge Base
We’ve taken the experience our support engineers have gained with Landscape and created a library of articles that are now available in our knowledge base. There are hundreds or articles that you can search through that will save you time by allowing to quickly find and learn about common procedures and fixes.

The Landscape 1.3 client is available today and is included with Ubuntu 9.04 server edition (Jaunty Jackalope). Read more at the Landscape blog or get product details here

Ken Drachnik – Landscape

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