Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'iot'

Dustin Kirkland

Mobile World Congress is simply one of the biggest trade shows in the entire world.

It's also, perhaps, the best place in the world to see how encompassing the Ubuntu ecosystem actually is.

Canonical and our partners demonstrated Ubuntu running on dozens of devices -- from robots, to augmented reality headsets, digital signs, vending machines, IoT Gateways, cell tower base stations, phones, tablets, servers, from super computers to tiny, battery powered embedded controllers.

But that was only a tiny fraction of the Ubuntu running at MWC!

We saw Ubuntu at the heart of demos from Dell, AMD, Intel, IBM, Deutsche Telekom, DJI, and hundreds of other booths, running autonomous drones, national telephone networks, self driving cars, smart safety helmets, inflight entertainment systems, and so, so, so much more.

Among the thousands of customers, prospects, fans, competitors, students, and industry executives, we even received a visit from (the somewhat controversial?) King of Spain!

It was an incredible week, with no fewer than 12 hours per day, on our feet, telling the Ubuntu story.
And what a story it is... I hope you enjoy.

Cheers,
Dustin





































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deviceguy

Movin' on...

A year has gone by since I started work with Canonical. As it turns out, I must be on my way. Where to? Not real sure at this moment, there seems plenty of companies using Qt & QML these days. \0/


But saying that, I am open to suggestions. LinkedIn
 
Plenty of IoT and devices using sensors around. Heck, even Moto Z phone has some great uses for sensor gestures similar to what I wrote for QtSensors while I was at Nokia.

But a lack of companies that allow freelance or remote work. The last few years I have worked remotely doing work for Jolla and Canonical. Both fantastic companies to work for, which really have it together for working remotely.

I am still surprised that only a handful of companies regularly allow remote work. I do not miss the stuffy non window opening offices and the long daily commute, which sometimes means riding a motorcycle through hail! (I do not suggest this for anyone)

Of course, I am still maintainer for QtSensors, QtSystemInfo for the Qt Project, and Sensor Framework for Mer, and always dreaming up new ways to use sensors. Still keeping tabs on QtNetwork bearer classes.

Although I had to send back the Canonical devices, I still have Ubuntu on my Nexus 4. I still have my Jolla phones and tablet.

That said, I still have this blog here, and besides spending my time looking for a new programming gig, I am (always) preparing to release a new album. http://llornkcor.com
and always willing to work with anyone needing music/audio/soundtrack work.

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Victor Palau

Ok, ok.. sorry for the click-bait headline – but It is mainly true.. I recently got a Nextcloud box , it was pretty easy to set up and here are some great instructions.

But this box is not just a Nextcloud box, it is  a box of unlimited possibilities. In just a few hours I added to my personal cloud  a WIFI access point and  chat server.   So here are some amazing facts you should know about Ubuntu and snaps:

Amazing fact #1 – One box, many apps

With snaps you can transform you single function device, into a box of tricks. You can add software to extend its functionality after you have made it. In this case I created an WIFI access point and added a Rocketchat server to it.

You can release a drone without autonomous capabilities, and once you are sure that you have nailed, you can publish a new app for it… or even sale a pro-version autopilot snap.

You can add an inexpensive Zigbee and Bluetooth module to your home router, and partner with a security firm to provide home surveillance services.. The possibilities are endless.

Amazing fact #2 – Many boxes, One heart

Maybe an infinite box of tricks is attractive to a geek like me,  but what it is interesting is product makers is :make one hardware, ship many products.

Compute parts (cpu,memory,storage) make a large part of  bill of materials of any smart device. So does validation and integration of this components with your software base… and then you need to provide updates for the OS and the kernel for years to come.

What if I told you could build (or buy) a single multi-function core – pre-integrated with a Linux OS  and use it to make drones, home routers, digital advertisement signs, industrial and home automation hubs, base stations, DSLAMs, top-of-rack switches,…

This is the real power of Ubuntu Core, with the OS and kernel being their own snaps – you can be sure the nothing has changes in them across these devices, and that you can reliably update of them.  You not only are able to share validation and maintenance cost across multiple projects, you would be able to increase the volume of your part order and get a better price.

20160927_101912

How was the box of tricks made:

Ingredients for the WIFI ap:

 

I also installed the Rocketchat server  snap for the store.

 


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Prakash

When Internet of Things devices debut at this year’s CES, one of the biggest questions will be how they’ll connect to all the other smart-home gear on display. But anyone who expects a clear answer to that is like a kid who gets up Thanksgiving morning looking for a bunch of gifts under a tree.

The fact is, it’s too early to say what standard or protocol will become the glue that can turn a pile of cool gadgets into a system that runs your whole house for you. New systems are just starting to emerge, and though they may eventually work with each other and with older platforms, buying one of each and expecting harmony is still wishful thinking.

Connected homes may make life easier eventually. A thermostat linked to a garage-door opener could tell who’s coming home and set the heat or air-conditioning for their preferences. Compatible room lights and an audio system could join in, too.

Read More: http://www.cio.com/article/3018836/internet-of-things/what-you-need-to-know-about-home-iot-standards-at-ces.html

 

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Daniel Holbach

ubucon

I’m very excited about UbuCon Summit which will bring many many Ubuntu people from all parts of its community together in January. David Planella did a great job explaining why this event is going to be just fantastic.

I look forward to meeting everyone and particularly look forward to what we’ve got to show in terms of Snappy Ubuntu Core.

Manik Taneja and Sergio Schvezov

We are going to have Manik Taneja and Sergio Schvezov there who are going to give the following talk:

Internet of Things gets ‘snappy’ with Ubuntu Core

Snappy Ubuntu Core is the new rendition of Ubuntu, designed from the ground up to power the next generation of IoT devices. The same Ubuntu and its vast ecosystem, but delivered in a leaner form, with state-of-the art security and reliable update mechanisms to ensure devices and apps are always up-to-date.

This talk will introduce Ubuntu Core, the technologies of its foundations and the developer experience with Snapcraft. We will also discuss how public and branded stores can kickstart a thriving app ecosystem and how Ubuntu meets the needs of connected device manufacturers, entrepreneurs and innovators.

And there’s more! Sergio Schvezov will also give the following workshop:

Hands-on demo: creating Ubuntu snaps with Snapcraft

Overview the snapcraft features and demo how easily a snap can be created using multiple parts from different sources. We will also show how to create a plugin for unhandled source types.

In addition to that we are going to have a few nice things at our booth, so we can show give you a Snappy experience there as well.

If you want to find out more, like check the entire schedule or register for the event, do it at ubucon.org.

I’m looking forward to seeing you there! </p>
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Prakash

IoT Standards – LMFAO

If you are a company that is interested in connected devices or the Internet of Things (IoT), you better not be waiting for standards to emerge. This will not be happening anytime soon. IoT is a multi-trillion dollar market, and, with so much potential business on the line, the big technology companies are all angling to create their own standard.
Of course these companies all say they want to create common protocols and framework. But let’s face it, there is too much at stake for any of these companies to not try and get the upper hand on the competition. As a result, we have an explosion of consortiums and “open source” projects that are intended to create these standards.

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Hardik Dalwadi

In this edition i will demonstrate how to assemble your own Ubuntu Orange Matchbox: Ubuntu Branded Pibow for Raspberry Pi 2 & PiGlow. As shown below.

Ubuntu Orange Matchbox: Ubuntu Branded Pibow for Raspberry Pi 2 & PiGlow.

Basically, at the end of this blog i will demonstrate how to assemble your own Ubuntu Orange Matchbox: Ubuntu Branded Pibow for Raspberry Pi 2 & PiGlow. Flash it with latest Snappy Ubuntu Core, which has support for  Raspberry Pi 2’s GPIO & I2C. I will also managing Snap packages from Ubuntu Phone Browser & Snappy Scope (Beta). I will also share tips & tricks to enable WiFi on Snappy Ubuntu Core. At the end, i will demonstrate Snappy Ubuntu Core + Raspberry Pi 2 + PiGLow in action. PiGlow will blink LEDs, as per the CPU Resource Utilization by  Snappy Ubuntu Core.

We have divided this post in four different part:

  • Make In India: Ubuntu Orange Matchbox: Ubuntu Branded Pibow for Raspberry Pi 2 & PiGlow
  • Install Snappy Ubuntu Core @ Ubuntu Orange Matchbox: Ubuntu Branded Pibow for Raspberry Pi 2 & PiGlow
  • Tips & Tricks to enable WiFi @ Snappy Ubuntu Core
  • CPU Resource Utilization Demonstration @Snappy Ubuntu Core

Make In India: Ubuntu Orange Matchbox: Ubuntu Branded Pibow for Raspberry Pi 2 & PiGlow:

Here are the list of ingredients which i have used to cook my own Ubuntu Orange Matchbox. I have also share the link from where you can procure those stuffs in India.

  1. Raspberry Pi 2 with USB WiFi Dongle  & 5V, 2A USB Power Adapter
  2. Tangerine Pibow for Raspberry Pi 2
  3. PiGlow, It is small add on for Raspbeery Pi that provides 18 Individually controllable LEDs.
  4. Mixed Ubuntu Stickers

[1] http://www.amazon.in/Raspberry-Pi-Starter-Kit-Basic/dp/B00U7KAG98/

[2] https://shop.pimoroni.com/products/raspberry-pi-2-pibow

[3] https://shop.pimoroni.com/products/piglow

[4] http://shop.canonical.com/product_info.php?products_id=718

 

 

Assemble Raspberry Pi 2 with Tangerine Pibow.  Remove white laminate plastic sheet of closing cover of Tangerine Pibow.  This actions will give you transparent Pibow for Raspberry Pi 2.

 

Now, it’s time to give Ubuntu Branding. Just stick transparent Ubuntu Logo sticker on  transparent Pibow closing cover. You can also install PiGlow before closing the cover.  If you know any laser engraving service provider for metal / plastic, consult them and get your Ubuntu Branding engraving on transparent Pibow closing cover. But my trick will give you Ubuntu Orange Logo 😉

 

Final Version:

 

Install Snappy Ubuntu Core @ Ubuntu Orange Matchbox: Ubuntu Branded Pibow for Raspberry Pi 2 & PiGlow:

Recently, Snappy Ubuntu Core get latest updated for Raspberry Pi 2, which has latest updates & upgrades. Please follow this page Getting Started with Snappy Ubuntu Core for Raspberry Pi 2. It is having latest info and procedure to play with Snappy Ubuntu Core @ Raspberry Pi 2. You can even build your own image.

Here is sort summary to do the same. Get 4 Gb Class 10 micro SDHC Card. Format it and flash it with latest Snappy Ubuntu Core image.

# Note: replace /dev/sdX with the device name of your SD card (e.g. /dev/mmcblk0, /dev/sdg1 ...)
wget http://people.canonical.com/~platform/snappy/raspberrypi2/ubuntu-15.04-snappy-armhf-rpi2.img.xz
xzcat ubuntu-15.04-snappy-armhf-rpi2.img.xz | sudo dd of=/dev/sdX bs=32M
sync

Now, boot your Ubuntu Orange Matchbox with Snappy Ubuntu Core. Default Username / Password is ubuntu / ubuntu. You can manage Snappy Ubuntu Core web store through Webdm, by pointing your browser to Ubuntu Orange Matchbox IP:4200 or webdm.local. Make sure that you are connected to LAN.

Tips & Tricks to enable WiFi @ Snappy Ubuntu Core:

Snappy Ubuntu Core has inbuilt support for Ethernet port, So, connecting your Raspberry Pi 2 to LAN will get LAN IP from Router. Since, this is headless device, you can always do SSH from your host machine if you do not want to connect it with separate monitor.

It does not have support for WiFi. Here are the steps to enable WiFi and add support for USB wi-fi adapter, having Ralink RA5370 chipset. I got this with my Raspberry Pi 2 kit, please check chipset for your USB wi-fi Adapter, you may need different firmware.

Please follow this solution @ Enable WiFi with Snappy Ubuntu Core. You may need to get below package instead of  – wpasupplicant_0.7.3-6ubuntu2.3_armhf.deb

wget -c http://ports.ubuntu.com/pool/main/w/wpasupplicant/wpasupplicant_0.7.3-6ubuntu2.4_armhf.deb

I would also prefer to install nano for better modification of WiFi SSID configuration in future. Get it from here.

http://ports.ubuntu.com/pool/main/n/nano/nano-udeb_2.2.6-3_armhf.udeb

 

CPU Resource Utilization Demonstration @ Snappy Ubuntu Core:

Now, it’s time to demonstrate CPU Resource Utilization through PiGlow.  It is small add on for Raspbeery Pi that provides 18 Individually controllable LEDs. We will feed CPU Resource Utilization such a way that it will glow more when we have more CPU Resource Utilization. As i said erlier, recently we got GPIO & I2C support on Snappy Ubuntu Core, it is possible to do the same. And we have snap package available from the same, called PiGlow Top.

Access your Snappy Ubuntu Core from WebDM or CLI through SSH and install PiGlow Top snap available from Snappy Ubuntu Core Web Store. After installation, we need to grant access to I2C hardware, do the same over SSH.

sudo snappy hw-assign piglowtop.kyrofa /dev/i2c-1

Now it’s time for the demonstration, grab your Ubuntu Phone, access the Snappy Ubuntu Core Webdm from your Ubuntu Phone Browser, Do some activity to increase CPU Utilization, for example Install / Remove any snap from Snappy Ubuntu Core Web Store. I have prepared small video Demonstration for your reference.

 

http://hardik.in/category/canonical/feed/

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Prakash

Open Source key to innovation at Telstra says Frank Arrigo, API evangelist at Telstra.

Telstra is looking to stay ahead of the curve by encouraging technological innovation through collaboration with startups, machine-to-machine (M2M) technology, and the Internet of Things (IoT) — but said that ensuring its network continues to be the best in Australia is still at the core of its business, and the driving force behind being able to deliver these capabilities.

Speaking at Telstra’s Vantage 2015 conference in Melbourne on Tuesday, Telstra CEO Andrew Penn said that IoT is integral to all businesses now, because by 2020, “everything that can be connected will be connected”.

Cisco, which has a long-standing cloud, communications, and collaboration partnership with Telstra, predicted that there will be 50 billion IoT devices by 2020.

Read More: http://www.zdnet.com/article/telstra-ceo-eyes-innovation-through-startups-iot-m2m/

 

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Prakash

Last week, Wired published an account describing how two security researchers, Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek, were able to wirelessly hack into a Jeep Cherokee, first taking control of the entertainment system and windshield wipers, and then disabling the accelerator. Andy Greenberg, the Wired writer who was at the wheel as the self-described “digital crash test dummy” explained what happened next:

Immediately my accelerator stopped working. As I frantically pressed the pedal and watched the RPMs climb, the Jeep lost half its speed, then slowed to a crawl. This occurred just as I reached a long overpass, with no shoulder to offer an escape. The experiment had ceased to be fun.

Miller and Valasek also wirelessly disabled the Jeep Cherokee’s brakes, leaving Greenberg “frantically pumping the pedal as the 2-ton SUV slid uncontrollably into a ditch.” In response, on July 24 Fiat Chrysler Automobiles announced a recall impacting about 1.4 million vehicles, stating, somewhat incongruously, that “no defect has been found.”

This is the one of the most dramatic demonstrations to date of the cybersecurity challenges that will accompany the growth of the Internet of Things (IoT). And, it offers an opportunity to make some broader observations about the changing landscape of cybersecurity as systems become increasingly connected and decentralized.

Here are five takeaways on the Security of Things (SoT) that designers—as well as companies building products for the cybersecurity market—should keep in mind as they build increasingly complex and connected systems:

Read More: http://www.forbes.com/sites/johnvillasenor/2015/07/27/five-lessons-on-the-security-of-things-from-the-jeep-cherokee-hack/

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Daniel Holbach

I have some very exciting news, but wanted to share some thoughts I had earlier today.

Since I joined the Ubuntu community I’ve always had to do with people who want to ship their software in Ubuntu and as I’m a generally excitable guy I always thought “finally, it became so much easier – we’re there”! Over the past years we got better documentation, PPAs in Launchpad, the dh command, bzr-builddeb, daily builds in Launchpad, pkgme, the ARB process, translated documentation and lots of other initiatives which always felt like we made the world a better place for ISVs, third party app developers, upstream developers and whoever else wanted their software to be in Ubuntu.

Fast-forward to Ubuntu on the phone and click. Suddenly it became SUPER easy, even easier to ship software. Write a manifest, run “click build“, upload it to the store where it gets auto-reviewed and you’re golden. This was possible because apparmor and friends were so tightly integrated into the phone experience and confinement fully worked, so we could trust apps to be safe and trust our automatic reviews. Finally!

snappy

snappy, the evolution of click, has a much broader scope and is finally moving into the center of attention of many and will at some stage also get on the phone and elsewhere. It shares the concept of a central software store with confined apps but brings atomic upgrades, rollbacks and lots of other goodness.

From the point of view of somebody who’s shipping software some things were still missing though. How do you easily do repeatable builds, especially if they involve bundling other software?

Enter snapcraft. A thing of beauty. Finally you can specify all relevant meta-data in one file, define which parts make up your app and snapcraft’s plugins (Go, Java, autotools, etc.) will take care of pulling and building sources and binaries, which files to ship exactly and everything else. It’s magic.

We just shipped 0.2 of snapcraft and the amount of new tests, bug fixes and goodness which landed is staggering. Even more importantly: the syntax of snapcraft.yaml is now very likely going to be stable.

I have more good news:

we are going to have our first of many Ubuntu Snappy Clinics brought to you by Sergio Schvezov, Michael Vogt and myself. The topics of these clinics are going to change, but will always be centered around snappy and the technologies around it and will give enough opportunities to ask your questions and work on things together.

Now is a brilliant time to involved with snapcraft.

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Daniel Holbach

snappy

Snappy is evolving, becoming more robust and is getting loads of new users. This week will see a new stable release of Snappy. For us that’s reason enough to invite you all to our first Snappy Open House today.

Starting from 14:00 UTC today (2015-07-07), we are going to be on Ubuntu-on-Air, introducing team, talking about what’s new and talking about testing Snappy. If you want to get involved or wanted to get to know snappy, this is a great opportunity.

Hope to see you later on!

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Dustin Kirkland


In November of 2006, Canonical held an "all hands" event, which included a team building exercise.  Several teams recorded "Ubuntu commercials".

On one of the teams, Mark "Borat" Shuttleworth amusingly proffered,
"Ubuntu make wonderful things possible, for example, Linux appliance, with Ubuntu preinstalled, we call this -- the fridge!"


Nine years later, that tongue-in-cheek parody is no longer a joke.  It's a "cold" hard reality!

GE Appliances, FirstBuild, and Ubuntu announced a collaboration around a smart refrigerator, available today for $749, running Snappy Ubuntu Core on a Raspberry Pi 2, with multiple USB ports and available in-fridge accessories.  We had one in our booth at IoT World in San Francisco this week!










While the fridge prediction is indeed pretty amazing, the line that strikes me most is actually "Ubuntu make(s) wonderful things possible!"

With emphasis on "things".  As in, "Internet of Things."  The possibilities are absolutely endless in this brave new world of Snappy Ubuntu.  And that is indeed wonderful.

So what are you making with Ubuntu?!?

:-Dustin

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Daniel Holbach

snappyIt’d be a bit of a stretch to call UOS Snappy Online Summit, but Snappy definitely was talk of the town this time around. It was also picked up by tech news sites, who not always depicted Ubuntu’s plans accurately. :-)

Anyway… if you missed some of the sessions, you can always go back, watch the videos of the sessions and check the notes. Here’s the links to the sessions which already happened:

Which leaves us with today, 7th May 2015! You can still join these sessions today – we’ll be glad to hear your input and ideas! :-)

  • 14:00 UTC: Ubuntu Core Brainstorm – Calling all Snappy pioneers
    Snappy and Ubuntu Core are still hot off the press, but it’s already clear that they’re going to bring a lot of opportunities and will make the lives of developers a lot easier. Let’s get together, brainstorm and find out where Snappy can be used in the future, which communities/tools/frameworks can be joined by it, which software should be ported to it and which crazy nice tutorials/demos can be easily put together. Anything goes, join us, no matter if on IRC or in the hangout!
  • 16:00 UTC: Snappy Q&A
    Everything you always wanted to know about Snappy and Ubuntu Core. Bring your questions here! Bring your friends as well. We’ll make sure to have all the relevant experts here.
  • 18:00 UTC: Replace ifupdown with networkd on snappy / cloud / server for 16.04
    What the title says. Networkers, we’ll need you here. :-)

The above are just my suggestions, obviously there’s loads of other good stuff on the schedule today! See you later!

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Daniel Holbach

Next week we are going to have another Ubuntu Online Summit (5-7 May 2015). This is (among many other things) a great time for you to get involved with, learn about and help shape Ubuntu Snappy.

As I said in my last blog post I’m very impressed to see the general level of interest in Ubuntu Snappy given how new it is. It’ll be great to see who is joining the sessions and who is going to get involved.

For those of you who are new to it: Ubuntu Online Summit is an open event, where we’ll plan in hangouts and IRC the next Ubuntu release. You can

  • tune in
  • ask questions
  • bring up ideas
  • get to know the team
  • help out :-)

This is the preliminary schedule. Sessions might still move around a bit, but be sure to register for the event and subscribe to the blueprint/session – that way you are going to be notified of ongoing work and discussion.

Tuesday, 5th May 2015

Wednesday, 6th May 2015

Thursday, 7th May 2015

Please note that we are likely going to add more sessions, so you should definitely keep your eyes open and check the schedule every now and then.

I’m looking forward to seeing you all and seeing us shape what Snappy is going to be! See you next week!

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Daniel Holbach

15.04 is out!

ubuntu.com

 

And another Ubuntu release went out the the door. I can’t believe that it’s the 22nd Ubuntu release already.

There’s a lot to be excited about in 15.04. The first phone powered by Ubuntu went out to customers and new devices are in the pipeline. The underpinnings of the various variants of Ubuntu are slowly converging, new Ubuntu flavours saw the light of day (MATE and Desktop next), new features landed, new apps added, more automated tests were added, etc. The future of Ubuntu is looking very bright.

What’s Ubuntu Core?

One thing I’m super happy about is a very very new addition: Ubuntu Core and snappy. What does it offer? It gives you a minimal Ubuntu system, automatic and bulletproof updates with rollback, an app store and very straight-forward enablement and packaging practices.

It has been brilliant to watch the snappy-devel@ and snappy-app-devel@ mailing lists in recent weeks and notice how much interest from enthusiasts, hobbyists, hardware manufacturers, porters and others get interested and get started. If you have a look at Dustin’s blog post, you get a good idea of what’s happening. It also features a video of Mark, who explains how Ubuntu has adapted to the demands of a changing IT world.

One fantastic example of how Ubuntu Snappy is already powering devices you had never thought of is the Erle-Copter. (If you can’t see the video, check out this link.)

It’s simply beautiful how product builders and hobbyists can now focus on what they’re interested in: building a tool, appliance, a robot, something crazy, something people will love or something which might change a small art of the world somewhere. What’s taken out of the equation by Ubuntu is: having to maintain a linux distro.

Maintaining a linux distro

Whenever I got a new device in my home I could SSH into, I was happy and proud. I always felt: “wow, they get it – they’re using open source software, they’re using linux”. This  feeling was replaced at some stage, when I realised how rarely my NAS or my router received system updates. When I checked for changelog entries of the updates I found out how only some of the important CVEs of the last year were mentioned, sometimes only “feature updates” were mentioned.

To me it’s clear that not all product builders or hardware companies collaborate with the NSA and create backdoors on purpose, but it’s hard work to maintain a linux stack and to do it responsibly.

That’s why I feel Ubuntu Core is an offering that “has legs” (as Mark Shuttleworth would say): as somebody who wants to focus on building a great product or solving a specific use case, you can do just that. You can ship your business logic in a snap on top of Ubuntu Core and be done with it. Brilliant!

What’s next?

Next week is Ubuntu Online Summit (5-7 May). There we are going to discuss the plans for the next time and that’s where you can get involved, ask questions, bring up your ideas and get to know the folks who are working on it now.

I’ll write a separate blog post in the coming days explaining what’s happening next week, until then feel free to have a look at:

 

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Dustin Kirkland


Forget about The Year of the Linux Desktop...This is The Year of the Linux Countertop!

I'm talking about Linux on every form of Internet-connected embedded devices.  The Internet-of-Things is already upon us.  Sensors, smart watches, TVs, thermostats, security cameras, drones, printers, routers, switches, robots -- you name it.  

And with that backdrop, we are thrilled to introduce Snappy Ubuntu for Devices.  Ubuntu is now a possibility, on almost any device, anywhere.  Now that's exciting!

This is the same Snappy Ubuntu, with its atomic, transactional updates that we launched on each major public cloud last month -- extended and updated for 64-bit Intel, AMD and ARM devices.


Now, if you want a detailed, developer's look at building a Snappy Ubuntu image and running it on a BeagleBone, you're in luck!  I shot this little instructional video (using Cheese, GTK-RecordMyDesktop, and OpenShot).  Enjoy!


A transcript of the video follows...


  1. What is Snappy Ubuntu?
    • A few weeks ago, we introduced a new flavor of Ubuntu that we call “Snappy” -- an atomically, transactionally updated Operating System -- and showed how to launch, update, rollback, and install apps in cloud instances of Snappy Ubuntu in Amazon EC2, Microsoft Azure, and Google Compute Engine public clouds.
    • And now we’re showing how that same Snappy Ubuntu experience is the perfect operating system for today’s Cambrian Explosion of smart devices that some people are calling “the Internet of Things”!
    • Snappy Ubuntu Core bundles only the essentials of a modern, appstore powered Linux OS stack and hence leaves room both in size as well as flexibility to build, maintain and monetize very own device solution without having to care about the overhead of inventing and maintaining your own OS and tools from scratch. Snappy Ubuntu Core comes right in time for you to put your very own stake into stake into still unconquered worlds of things
    • We think you’ll love Snappy on your smart devices for many of the same reasons that there are already millions of Ubuntu machine instances in hundreds of public and private clouds, as well as the millions of your own Ubuntu desktops, tablets, and phones!
  2. Unboxing the BeagleBone
    • Our target hardware for this Snappy Ubuntu demo is the BeagleBone Black -- an inexpensive, open platform for hardware and software developers.
    • I paid $55 for the board, and $8 for a USB to TTL Serial Cable
    • The board is about the size of a credit card, has a 1GHz ARM Cortex A8 processor, 512MB RAM, and on board ethernet.
    • While Snappy Ubuntu will run on most any armhf or amd64 hardware (including the Intel NUC), the BeagleBone is perhaps the most developer friendly solution.
  3. The easiest way to get your Snappy Ubuntu running on your Beaglebone
    • The world of Devices has so many opportunities that it won’t be possible to give everyone the perfect vertical stack centrally. Hence Canonical is trying to enable all of you and provide you with the elements that get you started doing your innovation as quickly as possible. Since there will be many devices that won’t need a screen and input devices, we have developed “webdm”. webdm gives you the ability to manage your snappy device and consume apps without any development effort.
    • To installl you simply download our prebuilt WEB .img and dd it to your sd card.
    • After that all you ahve to do is to connect your beaglebone to a DHCP enabled local network and power it on.
    • After 1-2 minutes you go to http://webdm.local:8080 and can get onto installing apps from the snappy appstore without any further effort
    • Of course, we are still in beta and will continue give you more features and a greater experience over time; we will not only make the UI better, but also work on various customization options that allow you to deliver your own app store powered product without investing your development resources in something that already got solved.
  4. Downloading Snappy and writing to an sdcard
    • Now we’re going to build a Snappy Ubuntu image to run on our device.
    • Soon, we’ll publish a library of Snappy Ubuntu images for many popular devices, but for this demo, we’re going to roll our own using the tool, ubuntu-device-flash.
    • ls -halF mysnappy.img
    • sudo dd if=mysnappy.img of=/dev/mmblk0 bs=1M oflag=dsync
  5. Hooking up the BeagleBone
    • Insert the microsd card
    • Network cable
    • USB debug
    • Power/USB
  6. Booting Snappy and command line experience
    • Okay, so we’re ready for our first boot of Snappy!
    • Let’s attach to the USB/serial console using screen
    • Now, I’ll attach the power, and if you watch very carefully, you might get to see some a few boot messages.
    • snappy help
    • ifconfig
    • ssh ubuntu@10.0.0.105
  7. WebDM experience
    • snappy info
    • Shows we have the webdm framework installed
    • point browser to http://10.0.0.105:8080
    • Configuration
    • Store
  8. Conclusion
    • Hey how cool is that!  Snappy Ubuntu running on devices :-)
    • I’ve spent plenty of time and money geeking out over my Nest and Dropcam and Netatmo and WeMo lightswitches, playing with their APIs and hooking them up to If-This-Then-That.
    • But I’m really excited about a world where those types of devices are as accessible to me as my Ubuntu servers and desktops!
    • And from what I’ve shown you here, with THIS, I think we can safely say that that we’ve blown right past the year of the Linux desktop.
    • This is the year of the Linux countertop!

Cheers,
Dustin

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