Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'illustration'

Marcus Haslam

Mark Shuttleworth’s keynote this week at the Ubuntu Developer Summit includes introducing Juju, including a big slide showing off the new Juju logo. Below is the story of how that logo it came into being. The Juju project is done. We asked the Juju community to help, and out of out of love for the brand they responded:

Juju logo

Juju was finally released to all the Dev-Ops out there, and so it’s time for a little look back on how the Juju logo come into being. Four months ago in the middle of July 2011 the Design Team received a request for some help with a new logo. This was for a project what was just on the edge of the RADAR and nobody was quite sure how big it would get!

Abi R had a number of ideas for logos, the most interesting where the wavey “magic carpet” designs. After that Robbie introduces some ideas around the letter ‘e’ as the project has still called Ensemble at the time, and Abi had a couple of further goes at developing that into a cuboid concept to go with the atoms. These all got collected up and attached to the bug report that you can read.

Ensemble was about to get a rebrand, to become Juju. Juju is a west-African system of beliefs, and has the ‘u’ sound much more akin to the other ‘Ubuntu’ and “Unity’ words that the family projects working within Ubuntu tend to get. This is when the call went out to the Design blog for some new ideas. Martin Owens did a sun/shield design making use of the circle concept seen in the Ubuntu Circle of Friends, and the other suggestion from “Birdy” was for a concept around a flying bird.

Mark Shuttleworth also suggested something around the topic of “connections”. So with everything in the basket, from Flying Carpets to Flying birds when it was time to sit down and play with the designs. What you can see here is the first concept presented to Mark for review.

This didn’t really have the “connections” aspects (Juju is about magically plugging components together to semi-automatically build a bigger system). The other things that didn’t seem to work was the dots on the ‘j’s in the word ‘juju’, so what you see is a slightly modified version of the Ubuntu Font Family. There’s the circle, there’s the connections, and also the Canonical/Ubuntu “dots” at the joins. It’s spells “juju” in the logo if you unwrap it in the right way, and spells “WW” in morse code!

After all Juju can only do two thirds of the server configuration site to make a website for you, you still have to do the other third! Thanks all for the juju designs. I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about this as much as I enjoyed trying to put everyone’s ideas together into one pot.

To read more about Juju visit juju.ubuntu.com and learn how you can ‘charm’ even the largest cloud or cluster deployments.

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Iain Farrell

Last night I watched “Press Pause Play” which in it’s own words is a film about fear, hope and digital culture. If you’ve not heard the talk surrounding the movie one of the trailers is below and we’ll catch up once you’ve … well … caught up :)

Good huh? The interesting thing about Press Pause Play is that it speaks to people who are out in the world creating interesting things and discusses what the brave new world of powerful computers, amazing tools for creation and sharing of content and ideas instantly means for the creative arts. For better or worse anyone can be a film maker now or a photographer or web designer or musician. Install Ubuntu from a USB key, plug that computer into an internet connection and “Ta-Dahhh!” you’ve got instant access to tools which allow you to create amazing things. Or functional things. Or mundane things. Or robots … seriously … people are making robots and they’re using Ubuntu to do it.

The film is extremely good and I’d urge anyone interested how people make stuff today, music, art, film all that “stuff” to watch it. I also think there’s a lot in there for people passionate about free and open source software. The way that we create software, these tools, this approach, it’s helping people who’ve never met to collaborate and produce all sorts of things.

I found it an inspiring watch and best of all it’s available for free from www.presspauseplay.com just download, grab a cup of tea and enjoy. I had jelly babies too but don’t eat too many, you’ll be sick.

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Iain Farrell

 

First of all a big thank you to everyone who submitted a wallpaper to our collection for the Oneiric release and to all our previous selected contributors who went through the images and selected the fine selection for this release! We had almost 2000 submissions this cycle and managed to whittle that down to 45 shortlisted pictures. We will aim to get as many as we can into the final release.

I’ve attached the images to a bug in launchpad which is how the images will get into the release and we’ll keep an eye on this listing until release day on the 13th October to make sure everything’s in place.

With so many images it’s not surprising that our shortlisters couldn’t pick out every great image so I’ve been through and made a gallery of my favourites and would encourage everyone to do the same and let the creators of this content know how much you appreciate their effort!

 

Thanks again and I look forward to seeing what we create next time around!

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Paul Sladen

The BBC just put up a five-minute audio slideshow “The story of how we got our alphabets” about the development of western writing, starting in 3,000 BC in Mesopotamia with various attempts at proto-writing systems and then Cuneiform script.

It shows the history of the alphabet, stemming from the Phoenician alphabet and continuing to the Semitic alphabets based around consonants (Arabic and Hebrew) and those derived further via Greek and its addition of vowel sounds (Latin and Cyrillic).

With the development of the Ubuntu Font Family we’re getting to the stage where it’s possible to demonstrate some the similarity using the font itself. The diagram on the right shows Hebrew on the left, Arabic on the right and Greek, Cyrillic and Latin in the centre columns. As Dr James Clackson notes in the slideshow, things are fairly consistent up until T/?/?, after which the additions and expansions of letters diverge in each alphabet system.

The term Alphabet comes from the first two letters in the Greek—and other similar—alphabets: ??, ??, AB, ??, ??.

The diagram in this first cut can likely be improved with input from a knowledgeable linguist/palaeolinguist. Please get in contact, or leave suggestions and corrections below if you know how to improve it!

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Paul Sladen

UbuntuBetaArabicF in print,

A beta of Ubuntu Font Family Arabic, in print as part of the testing and debugging process for the Arabic coverage. The Arabic script support will cover Arabic, Urdu, Pashto, Kashmiri and other written languages using the base Arabic script.

The magazine is an intriguing tri-lingual production published by the Cultural Office of Saudi Arabia in Germany with the layout prepared by Professor Rayan Abdullah’s team at Markenbau. The magazine starts with German and English articles using Latin script at one cover (reading left-to-right) and articles written in Arabic from the other cover (reading right-to-left).

Ubuntu Arabic, now has horizontal, instead of diagonal dots

Following on from the recent posts about adding Kashmiri/Pashto ringed characters and the Arabic update from the start of 2011, the most significant change to highlight is the that the diagonal dots (?i???m / ??????) have been changed to a horizontal layout.

The resulting arrangement is now closer to an equilateral triangle, and the dots closer to a circle.

(Thank you to Abdallah, Björn Ali Göransson, Chamfay, Masoud, Muhammad Negm, Nizarus, Reda Lazr and others who each took the time to comment and give feedback about the earlier diagonal dot angle).

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Iain Farrell

Not that long ago Matt Jones of BERG fame came up with a really lovely idea! In response to the keep calm and carry on posters from the Second World War that had become so popular again he decided that a more positive statement was needed!

“It occurred to me that this was exactly the wrong sentiment for this age …

I started sketching on the paper a contrary statement, where stiff upper lip was replaced by a stiff upper arm from soldering…”

The Get Excited and Make Things poster was born.

Get excited and make things - By Matt Jones

With this in mind I’d like to open up the wallpaper submissions process for the next release of Ubuntu, Oneiric Ocelot! The Flickr group for submissions is now open and can be found at http://www.flickr.com/groups/oneiric-wallpaper-submissions/ and just like last time we’re accepting both photos and rendered/ illustrated wallpapers.

For guidance on what formats are best to submit can I suggest you look at the excellent wiki page on the subject which can be found on the Ubuntu wiki at – wiki.ubuntu.com/Artwork/Documentation/Backgrounds.

We recommend a minimum resolution of 2560 x 1600 and templates for GIMP can be found on the wiki page.

In order for us to make the UI freeze we need just over a week to review and shortlist entries so we will be closing the group for entries on the 11th August at 12pm UK time. From there as with previous cycles the contributors whose images were selected last time will be invited to select a shortlist that will make it into Ubuntu 11.10.

So what are you waiting for?! Get excited and make things!! I am! :)

Get snapping! By Gaetan Lee

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Iain Farrell

Some of you out there may have already seen that funky print shop MOO.com just launched a new product, round stickers. This means that you can now upload round images and make lovely bespoke stickers in a pack of 52. Full disclosure before I start to say that I used to work at MOO.com which is why it appealed to me to play with their product. Anyway, as soon as I saw these new stickers I thought of one thing and that thing was pictograms!

Our pictograms are a beautiful library of icons that help us illustrate the Ubuntu world and they’re all round.

“Perfect-o!”

I thought, I’ll grab the PNGs from design.canonical.com/brand, upload them and be handing out stickers around the office in no time!

But … horror of horrors … the pictograms we’ve made and put online are all 113 x 113 px and MOO recommend at least 472 x 472 px and their uploading tool doesn’t yet accept SVGs which left me with a big problem. I wanted to print 52 stickers and didn’t really want to manually open 52 images and scale them in Inkscape and resave them.

“I need to automate this!”

So here’s what I did to get my lovely pack of stickers made and what you can do to make your own pack of pictogram stickers.

What you will need …

Got it all? Right! Let’s get cracking!

So unzip your pictograms and open up Inkscape. Then select all the ones you’re going to want to resize and drag them from the folder window into Inkscape.

Dragging SVGs into Innkscape

Next you want to make these tiny little objects bigger so to do this select Object from the top menu bar and choose Transform from that drop down. Make sure you have all the pictograms selected and click on the scale tab.

Because we want to give MOO some nice big images let’s make them massive. I’ve made mine scale proportionally by 1500% and make sure you apply this to each object. Hit apply and zoom out because your screen is now filled with big orange shapes.

Next up we want to add a bit of space around our objects. Whenever you print something you need to provide an area around the image known as bleed. This will allow for the fact that your small item is being printed on a large piece of paper or card and being cut out and you want your image to go right up to the edge. This will become clearer when you upload your PNGs.

To add the bleed around mine I’ve cheated and added an invisible stroke to each object – there may well be a better way to do this but I’m excited and this is how I’ve made it work. You can do it my way by right clicking on your selection of all your pictograms and choosing Fill and Stroke.

First of all select the last tab Stroke style and enter a width of say 200px .Then select the second tab Stroke paint and click the second box in to choose Flat colour. This will immediately cover your lovely pictograms in a thick black line, not at all what we’re after, so reduce the alpha channel, the fourth bar in that pane to 0 to make our stroke transparent.

SAVE! You never know!

Now we need to be able to see all our lovely pictograms before we export them as PNGs. To do this click again on Object in the top menu and choose Align and Distribute from the bottom of that menu. This will bring up another panel with a section called Remove overlaps. I entered 100 into the vertical and horizontal just to give a little room around each object. Then click the icon next to these boxes and behold in amazement as all your pictograms sort themselves into an orderly group!

AMAZING!

Now we’re ready to export our pictogram PNGs. To do this click on File and choose Export Bitmap from the menu. You want to export each object individually so check that box at the bottom of the export window and click Export.

This will export your PNGs to the same folder you saved your inkscape file in earlier. We’re not done yet though! There’s no such thing as transparent ink and MOO will turn our strokes black again so there’s one last step we must go through and that means firing up Gimp.

If you’ve never installed a Gimp plugin before – and I hadn’t – there are plenty of guides to get you going. It’s as simple as typing make in the correct directory from a terminal window. If you get stuck drop me a line but for now I’ll assume you have the batch processing plugin installed.

Once you’re in Gimp head over to the Filters menu in the top bar and select Batch Process.

This tool will pop up, in the input tab choose to add files and select the PNGs that Inkscape made for you. Then select the Rename tab and select a new output directory – we don’t want to overwrite and mess up the originals. Also select to flatten the images, this will remove the transparency for you. Lastly on the output tab choose PNG from the dropdown of file types. The Default should be fine. Hit start and you should fill your new folder with lovely print ready pictogram PNGs.

Try saying that three times fast!

The end is in sight! All that remains is to head over to MOO’s sticker page and make your own stickers. Upload your PNGs, crop, rotate and generally play and in no time at all you’ll have some lovely stickers in your house, on your laptop, on your friend’s laptop, on your cat, basically anywhere you put them!

Enjoy!

Look out for a follow up post when mine arrive! :)

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Paul Sladen

It’s been five years since people spotted the last Ubuntu billboards in the wild. This time Mauricio Pretto sent a set of photographs of driving between the airport in Porto Alegre, Brazil and the Fórum Internacional Software Livre (International Free Software Forum) venue where Canonical and Ubuntu have a stand for FISL 2011:
Venha visitar a Canonical e conhecer as novidades do Ubuntu
Designing for a surface 7 metres × 3.6 metres is a little different than for on-screen or a brochure, especially as the Ubuntu/Canonical Brand Guidelines don’t have a dedicated section for billboards yet! The design here was originally sketched by David Cotter for the Computex Show, and updated by Emily Maher for the FISL request.

Mauricio noted that the billboard guides people to “Come visit Canonical and learn more about Ubuntu” in Portuguese:

Venha visitar a Canonical e conhecer as novidades do ubuntu!

FISL, Centro de Eventos da PUC, de 29 Junho até 2 Julho

Emily gave a bit of background about the further work that needs exploring before the brand guidelines (they are guidelines after all, not hard policy) can be extended to cover super large formats:

I had been discussing this with Marcus Haslam, the Lead Brand Designer at Canonical … we want to work a few more things out before creating a dedicated piece in the guidelines and we need to make some adjustments, for example, the large format dots do not translate well on to such a large format. The dots were almost invisible when viewed from below, so we need to run some more tests at various sizes of the dots next to text and get proofs so we know how best to advise people.

Emily felt it was perhaps a little soon to lay down definite guidelines; but on the branding side the guidelines still translate, with the photograph angle, colours and border-style still applying directly.

Has anyone in Brazil spotted the billboards yet, or would you like to see billboard templates covered as part of the resources in the The Brand Toolkit?

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Iain Farrell

At UDS in Budapest we held a session on the idea of a toolkit for community members. It would allow anyone excited enough to show off and celebrate their use and love of Ubuntu. As you can see from the notes there were a lot of ideas and one of the first activities was to create a YouTube channel celebrating Ubuntu.

Last week we did exactly that and you can now head over to www.youtube.com/celebrateubuntu right now! Go on, head over. I’ll be here when you get back … that was quick ;)

Related to this as part of the 11.04 release I worked on a video for Ubuntu.com with our web team. Intended for the features page it shows off some of the new goodness that has made it into this release. I should also say a special thanks to Jason from the Novacut project who stepped in and helped right at the end. We couldn’t have done it without you chap! Thanks!

This video and the toolkit conversation got us thinking. Everyone has their own favourite aspect of Ubuntu. The thing that makes it great for them. The thing that makes them smile when they use their computer. The thing that makes them wonder why anyone would use anything else!

So make us a video that tells the world what your favourite part of Ubuntu is.

Step 1: Come up with your ultimate Ubuntu feature and how you might make a video of it. What’s the story? Will a viewer “get it”?

Step 2: Make your video and post it up on your favourite video sharing website/ Ubuntu One/ anywhere you can put the file send it to me!

Step 3: Just like any internal design project we’ll get our Brand Lead Marcus Haslam to have a look and the ones we think make the grade will be posted on our channel for the world to see!

We’ll be looking at these throughout the Oneiric cycle, blogging and promoting the ones we think are great so there’s no deadline as such.

Get creative, enjoy and together let’s celebrate Ubuntu!

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Iain Farrell

Two weeks into our wallpaper contest we’re seeing lots of really interesting entries for the photographic part. As those of you who read the previous post about the contest will know we’re also reserving at least three places this release for non photographic wallpapers. The plan _was_ to use another site to manage these entries. Unfortunately the dedicated community team working on this site have hit some issues with keeping it running and so we’ve decided to move all entries to Flickr. I’d like to take this opportunity to thank them for their hard work and we’ll explore this solution again next cycle.

Metal & Bolts Sculpture SW 6th 1 of 3 by Orb9220

Metal & Bolts Sculpture SW 6th 1 of 3 by Orb9220

In the meantime we’ve a Narwhal who simply has to look Natty and we need something robust and reliable so that you can all focus more on creating and getting your entries to our judging panel and less on trying to upload. As before with the photographic entries simply tag your image NattyWallpaper so we can easily find it when judging time comes.

While you’re hard at it snapping, sketching and creating our future desktops we’ll be contacting previous winners and asking them to prepare to look through all your entries. Good luck and have fun!

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Iain Farrell

That’s what we want the Ubuntu desktops in Natty to feel like. We’re changing things a little bit for the coming release too. We’ll still feature some fantastic photography sourced from our Flickr group but this time we’re reserving at least 3 places for non photographic wallpapers, so things that are rendered or drawn.

Maverick wallpapers

The wallpapers from the last cycle were one of the finest collections we’ve ever had and we’re excited to see what you’ve all got to share with us in 2011. If you’ve got an amazing photo you’d like to submit simply head over to the Ubuntu Artwork group on Flickr, join up and add your photo(s) to the group. Please tag anything you’d like us to consider with the tag NattyWallpaper so that we know to look at it when judging comes around.

If you have a rendering or drawing you’d like to submit we have a new site set up for handling submissions. It can be found at http://art.ubuntu-owl.org/. As with the Flickr group images should be tagged NattyWallpaper so we can review them more easily.

For guidance on what formats are best to submit can I suggest you look at the excellent wiki page on the subject which can be found on the Ubuntu wiki at – wiki.ubuntu.com/Artwork/Documentation/Backgrounds.

We recommend a minimum resolution of 2560 x 1600 and templates for GIMP can be found on the wiki page.

Lastly we have to have selections made and a package accepted into the distro in time for the UI Freeze on the 24th March so we’ll stop accepting entries after 13th March 2011 so get snapping, sketching and thinking and we’ll look forward to seeing what you all come up with!

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Iain Farrell

It’s _almost_ there. Happy “so close to release I can almost taste the Ubuntinis” Day everyone! And if you’ve not tried an Ubuntini, well you should. The next release of Ubuntu releases on the 10th October but the release candidate is out there now and as I write this the final release meeting of the cycle is happening on Freenode in #ubuntu-meeting.

It’s been two weeks since your last update from the design team, so what have we been up to?

smiley face emoticon

Well, for one thing the smiley fella above was born and has started appearing on the design blog. More on him and his siblings from Otto in a later post ;)

Probably the biggest news is that the new Ubuntu font family have made their first appearance in our desktop release and those of you running Maverick will now also notice that the Ubuntu and Canonical websites make use of the regular font as well as this very blog.

The new type face at work in the desktop

You can also read some more thoughts on the type face in Mark’s Blog.

It’s very exciting to see this in the wild and it seems like a good time to say thanks to the people who’ve helped us get here. Thanks to Bruno, Lukas, Amelie, Malcolm and Shiraaz at Dalton Maag who’ve designed the font, Paul Sladen for managing the bugs and liaising with the community and also Ken Vandine and Dan Holbach for helping us package the files, Robbie Williamson for approving exceptions that meant we could get it in after deadlines had passed and finally Scott Kitterman for finally hitting the approval button.

We hope you like it, it’s part of your desktop so get involved over on the project launchpad page. More enhancements are coming so stay tuned for more in the coming months.

So now that our Meerkat is grown up our attention turns to a particularly Natty Narwhal that will need our love and attention before they’re released into the wild about 7 months from now. That’s what we’ll be focusing on and we’ll be sharing more of our ideas in the coming weeks as we prepare for UDS.

And finally, a video treat for you to the end the week with. Those lovely people over at OMG! Ubuntu! reminded me that the Blender Foundation have been working on a new short film called Sintel and they’ve released it online for you to enjoy.

A scene from Sintel

The particularly exciting thing about the work they’re doing is that once it’s finished they’ll share their output with the world not only as a video but also all the source files will be released under a creative commons license meaning that they can be used by others to learn from. You can find out more about the project and the Blender Foundation on their website.

Have a fantastic weekend and here’s to our launch parties in the next week or so!

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