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Posts tagged with 'gtk'

pitti

I was asked to pour some love over autopilot-gtk, a GTK module to provide introspection of widget states to Autopilot. For those who don’t know, Autopilot is a QA tool to write automatic testing of GUI applications, without the race conditions and limitations that previous tools had with using only the ATK level. Please see the documentation and tutorial for more information. There are a lot of community members who do great things with it already, such as automating testing for Ubiquity or writing tests for GNOME applications like evince, gedit, nautilus, or Shotwell. This should now hopefully become easier.

Now autopilot-gtk has a proper testsuite, I triaged all bug reports, wrote reproducers for them, and fixed them all in today’s upload to Saucy. In particular, you can now do the following:

  • Access to the GtkBuilder names: Instead of having to find a particular widgets in terms of class, position, label contents, or other (sometimes) non-unique or unstable properties, you can now pick it by its unique and stable GtkBuilder name, which is the ID that most upstream code uses to manipulate widgets: b = self.app.select_single(BuilderName='entry_searchquery')
  • GtkTextBuffer type GObject properties are now translated into plain strings, which allows you to access the textual contents of a GtkTextView widget with my_textview.buffer (both for simple property access as well as for selecting by buffer contents).
  • GEnum and GFlags properties are now accessible. Enums are translated to strings (self.app.select_many('GtkButton', relief='GTK_RELIEF_HALF') or self.assertEqual(btn_greet.resize_mode, 'GTK_RESIZE_PARENT')), and flags are represented as a simple integer (like my_widget.events)); in theory we could represent them as string like FLAG_FOO | FLAG_BAR, but this becomes too unwieldy; for reliable identity matching one would always need to take care to sort them alphabetically, keep a consistent spacing, etc.
  • Please let me know if you need access to other types of properties, it is now quite easy to support more (as long as there is a reasonable way of mapping them to a standard D-BUS data type). So please report bugs.

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Michael Hall

As part of the Ubuntu App Showdown I started on a small project to provide a nice GUI frontend to Quickly.  While I was able to get it working and submitted before the contest deadline, I unfortunately didn’t have the time to make it do everything I wanted.  Since the end of the contest, however, I was able to spend a little more time adding some nice features to it.

Project Management

The majority of the work has gone into Quickly-Gtk’s project management.  Some of this was implemented already, such as the ability to switch the “current” project. But internally it was all kind of a mess of code to track that.  So I replaced all of that with a ProjectManager class that will store both the list of projects Quickly-Gtk knows about, but also keeps track of which project is “current”.  This class also implements Observer design pattern to let other parts of the code know about changes to both the list of projects and the current project.  This made it easy to, for example, display a notification on the screen whenever the current project was changed, regardless of whether it was changed in the window, the indicator, or from a Zeitgeist event.

Zeitgeist event monitoring

The other big development was integrating Quickly-Gtk with Zeitgeist.  For those that aren’t familiar with it, Zeitgeist is an event log that tracks all kinds of user activities and system events.  Applications can read past events or monitor them as they happen.  I wanted Quickly-Gtk to be smart enough to switch to a project as soon as the user started working on it, without requiring the user to make the switch themselves.  To do that, I set a Zeitgeist monitor to listen for file system events in any of the saved project directories.  I also set it to watch for the user viewing the project’s Launchpad page.  If any of those events happen, Quickly-Gtk will automatically make that the current project.

The future of Quickly-Gtk

While I was able to get a lot done with Quickly-Gtk, the underlying Quickly API and command line really weren’t designed to support this kind of use.  However, as a result of what we learned during the App Showdown, Didier Roche has begun planning a reboot of Quickly, which will improve both it’s command-line functionality, and it’s ability to be used as a callable library for apps like Quickly-Gtk.  If you are interested in the direction of Quickly’s development, I urge you to join in those planning meetings.

 

Launchpad Project: https://launchpad.net/quickly-gtk

 

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mandel

Yesterday I was working on a small UI that uses a WebKit.WebView to show certain information to the user. My idea yesterday was to try and show a native context menu on the view that does not have the default menu items that the WebView has, the only way I’ve found to this is a as follows:

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from gi.repository import GObject, Gdk, Gtk, WebKit
from utils import get_data_file
 
 
class CustomView(Gtk.EventBox):
    """Main window used to show the ui and generate signals."""
 
    def __init__(self):
        """Create a new instance."""
        super(CustomView, self).__init__()
        self.set_events(Gdk.EventMask.BUTTON_PRESS_MASK)
        self._create_context_menu()
        self.scroll = Gtk.ScrolledWindow()
        self.scroll.show()
        self.view = WebKit.WebView()
        self.view.show()
        self.scroll.add(self.view)
        # load the html used for the main window, from that point
        # on we will let the html and js do the work and raise
        # signals via the title
        self.view.open(get_data_file(MAIN_WINDOW_HMTL))
        # lets no use the webkit context menu
        settings = self.view.get_settings()
        settings.set_property('enable-default-context-menu',
                              False)
        self.view.set_settings(settings)
        self.add(self.scroll)
        # connect the on button pressed event of the event box
        # so that we can add a context menu
        self.connect('button_press_event', self._on_button_press_event)
 
    def _create_context_menu(self):
        """Create the context menu."""
        self.menu = Gtk.Menu()
        delete_menu = Gtk.MenuItem("Delete Task")
        self.menu.append(delete_menu)
 
    def _on_button_press_event(self, widget, event):
        """Deal with the button press event."""
        if event.button == 3:
            self.menu.popup(None, None, None, None, event.button, event.time)
            self.menu.show_all()

Does any one out there know a better way to do this. I know that there is a “populate-popup” signal I can listen to but I cannot get my head around on how to do exactly what I want, which is remove all defaul menu items and add my own. And, does it make sense to have to do that for every popup signal?

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pitti

(Update: Link to Tomeu’s blog post, repost for planet.gnome.org)

Last week I was in Prague to attend the GNOME/Python 2011 Hackfest for gobject-introspection, to which Tomeu Vizoso kindly invited me after I started working with PyGI some months ago. It happened at a place called brmlab which was quite the right environment for a bunch of 9 hackers: Some comfy couches and chairs, soldering irons, lots of old TV tubes, chips, and other electronics, a big Pirate flag, really good Wifi, plenty of Club Mate and Coke supplies, and not putting unnecessary effort into mundane things like wallpapers.

It was really nice to get to know the upstream experts John (J5) Palmieri and Tomeu Vizoso (check out Tomeu’s blog post for his summary and some really nice photos). When sitting together in a room, fully focussing on this area for a full week, it’s so much easier to just ask them about something and getting things done and into upstream than on IRC or bugzilla, where you don’t know each other personally. I certainly learned a lot this week (and not only how great Czech beer tastes :-) )!

So what did I do?

Application porting

After already having ported four Ubuntu PyGTK applications to GI before (apport, jockey, aptdaemon, and language-selector),
my main goal and occupation during this week was to start porting a bigger PyGTK application. I picked system-config-printer, as it’s two magnitudes bigger than the previous projects, exercises quite a lot more of the GTK GI bindings, and thus also exposes a lot more GTK annotation and pygobject bugs. This resulted in a new pygi s-c-p branch which has the first 100 rounds of “test, break, fix” iterations. It now at least starts, and you can do a number of things with it, but a lot of functionality is still broken.

As a kind of “finger exercise” and also to check for how well pygi-convert works for small projects now, I also ported computer-janitor. This went really well (I had it working after about 30 minutes), and also led me to finally fixing the unicode vs. str mess for GtkTreeView that you got so far with Python 2.x.

pygobject and GTK fixes

Porting system-config-printer and computer-janitor uncovered a lot of opportunities to improve pygi-convert.sh, a big “perl -e” kind of script to do the mechanical grunt work of the porting process. It doesn’t fix up changed signatures (such as adding missing arguments which were default arguments in PyGTK, or the ubiquitous “user_data” argument for signal handlers), but at least it gets a lot of namespaces, method, and constant names right.

I also fixed three annotation fixes in GTK+. We also collaboratively reviewed and tested Pavel’s annotation branch which helped to fix tons of problems, especially after Steve Frécinaux’s excellent reference leak fix, so if you play around with current pygobject git head, you really also have to use the current GTK+ git head.

Speaking of which, if you want to port applications and always stay on top of the pygobject/GTK development without having to clutter your package system with “make install”s of those, it works very well to have this in your ~/.bashrc:

export GI_TYPELIB_PATH=$HOME/projects/gtk/gtk:$HOME/projects/gtk/gdk
export PYTHONPATH=$HOME/projects/pygobject

Better GVariant/GDBus support

The GNOME world is moving from the old dbus-glib python bindings to GDBus, which is integrated into GLib. However, dbus-python exposed a really nice and convenient way of doing D-Bus calls, while using GDBus from Python was hideously complicated, especially for nontrivial arguments with empty or nested arrays:

from gi.repository import Gio, GLib
from gi._gi import variant_type_from_string

d = Gio.bus_get_sync(Gio.BusType.SESSION, None)
notify = Gio.DBusProxy.new_sync(d, 0, None, 'org.freedesktop.Notifications',
    '/org/freedesktop/Notifications', 'org.freedesktop.Notifications', None)

vb = GLib.VariantBuilder()
vb.init(variant_type_from_string('r'))
vb.add_value(GLib.Variant('s', 'test'))
vb.add_value(GLib.Variant('u', 1))
vb.add_value(GLib.Variant('s', 'gtk-ok'))
vb.add_value(GLib.Variant('s', 'Hello World!'))
vb.add_value(GLib.Variant('s', 'Subtext'))
# add an empty array
eavb = GLib.VariantBuilder()
eavb.init(variant_type_from_string('as'))
vb.add_value(eavb.end())
# add an empty dict
eavb = GLib.VariantBuilder()
eavb.init(variant_type_from_string('a{sv}'))
vb.add_value(eavb.end())
vb.add_value(GLib.Variant('i', 10000))
args = vb.end()

result = notify.call_sync('Notify', args, 0, -1, None)
id = result.get_child_value(0).get_uint32()
print id

So I went to making the GLib.Variant constructor work properly with nested types and boxed variants, adding Pythonic GVariant iterators and indexing (so that you can treat GVariant dictionaries/arrays/tuples just like their Python equivalents), and finally a Variant.unpack() method for converting the return value of a D-Bus call back into a native Python data type. This looks a lot friendlier now:

from gi.repository import Gio, GLib

d = Gio.bus_get_sync(Gio.BusType.SESSION, None)
notify = Gio.DBusProxy.new_sync(d, 0, None, 'org.freedesktop.Notifications',
    '/org/freedesktop/Notifications', 'org.freedesktop.Notifications', None)

args = GLib.Variant('(susssasa{sv}i)', ('test', 1, 'gtk-ok', 'Hello World!',
    'Subtext', [], {}, 10000))
result = notify.call_sync('Notify', args, 0, -1, None)
id = result.unpack()[0]
print id

I also prepared another patch in GNOME#640181 which will provide the icing on the cake, i. e. handle the variant building/unpacking transparently and make the explicit call_sync() unnecessary:

from gi.repository import Gio, GLib

d = Gio.bus_get_sync(Gio.BusType.SESSION, None)
notify = Gio.DBusProxy.new_sync(d, 0, None, 'org.freedesktop.Notifications',
    '/org/freedesktop/Notifications', 'org.freedesktop.Notifications', None)

result = notify.Notify('(susssasa{sv}i)', 'test', 1, 'gtk-ok', 'Hello World!',
            'Subtext', [], {}, 10000)
print result[0]

I hope that I can get this reviewed and land this soon.

Thanks to our sponsors!

Many thanks to the GNOME Foundation and Collabora for sponsoring this event!

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