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Posts tagged with 'graphics'

kevin gunn

1)Put the latest ubuntu-core image for dragonboard on boot (you’ll want a screen and keyboard at least)

You can find the image here http://releases.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-core/16/

Make sure you’re on the latest with the following


ssh$ snap refresh core

 

2)Then install the mir-libs and mir-kiosk

 

ssh$ snap install mir-libs --channel=edge
ssh$ snap install mir-kiosk --channel=edge
ssh$ snap install ubuntu-app-platform

 

 

3)Using the snap built from this branch

https://code.launchpad.net/~osomon/webbrowser-app/mirkiosk-snap  

This particular snap

https://code.launchpad.net/~osomon/+snap/webbrowser-mirkiosk/+build/16501

Seemed to work find, download copy over and install


ssh$ snap install webbrowser-app*.snap --devmode --dangerous

 

4) NOTE: because of bug  you have to do the following, hopefully the pull request will get merged soon and this step we can remove

 

ssh$ snap disconnect webbrowser-app:mir
ssh$ snap disconnect webbrowser-app:platform
ssh$ snap connect webbrowser-app:mir mir-kiosk:mir
ssh$ snap connect webbrowser-app:platform ubuntu-app-platform:platform
ssh$ snap disable webbrowser-app
ssh$ snap enable webbrowser-app

 

5) Now launch and use


$ webbrowser-app

 

If you should experience a crash of the web browser, just restart with the same command. Also, you will see some spew at the console you may ignore from the browser launching related to audio and Qt stuff.

 

Debugging: if you should find things aren’t working as expected, as in you do not see the web browser. Try rebooting first, which should auto launch mir-kiosk, then repeat the connection process and launching the browser. If that still doesn’t work, inspect all the connections via ssh$ snap interfaces and make sure mir-kiosk:mir-libs, webbrowser-app:mir-kiosk, webbrowser-app:ubuntu-app-platform, webbrowser-app:mir-libs are all connected as expected. Feel free to ping me or others on freenode at #snappy or #ubuntu-unity or #ubuntu-mir

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kevin gunn

more sample client updates

I can’t even remotely take credit for this. Alberto from the Mir team took the mir-client snap and updated to utilize the mir-libs snap through the content interface. This is helpful as a guide for others who want to avoid making useless copies of libraries in a mir-client app snap. He also added some additional example client applications to run on the mir-kiosk, along with using the snap set command to dynamically change those from the command line. I’ve updated the mir-snaps wiki on how to utilize this. enjoy! If you wanna discuss or have issues, find me (kgunn) on freenode #ubuntu-mir

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kevin gunn

If you’ve been following along, you’ll know that we’ve put some snap work in to show how you might use Mir as a framework to build a kiosk style product. This post touches on a couple of recent evolutions.

First, there’s been recent work in improving Mir’s API stability at the server level, to be a true toolkit for shells through Miral which you can read about here. And you can read about the latest Miral 0.3 release here. Part of Miral provides 2 default shell implementations. One is miral-shell and the other is miral-kiosk. Miral-kiosk, as the name suggests, is a very minimal shell, keeping the footprint and complexity low. Hence it’s perfect for targeting products requiring simple, single application user interfaces. So we’ve created a snap utilizing this, named “mir-kiosk”.

Eventually Miral will become part of Mir itself, we just need to work through supported trusted prompts in more complex shell use cases (which is happening as I type). But the point of this post, is demonstrating miral-kiosk in a snap. If anyone reading this is considering using Mir snaps for production in a kiosk style product, I would recommend miral-kiosk as the preferred method. The same confinement achieve before still exists and you can run the same example applications.

Second, with the advent of the content interface available in the latest snapd release we are moving out the Mir libraries into their own snap that can be leveraged by the shell and mir-clients. This will make sure the Mir libraries stay in sync with one another and there’s a little deduplication gain so there’s not a lot of snaps with copies of Mir libraries as stage packages. This snap’s name is “mir-libs”.

Both the mir-kiosk & mir-libs snaps are available in the snap store. It can be demonstrated using the same mir-client snap that’s been used before in other posts.

Now, to experience this you need to download the latest ubuntu-core image, which is Release Candidate 2 (RC2). Download the appropriate architecture of the mir-client snap and then copy that over to your running ubuntu-core image. You can then ssh into your device/VM and install in this particular order.

$ snap install mir-libs --channel=edge --devmode
$ snap install mir-kiosk --channel=edge --devmode
$ snap install mir-client_0.24.1_amd64.snap --devmode --dangerous

 

At this point you should witness PhotoViewer running on mir-kiosk using mir-libs via content interface on your device or VM.

One last note, you might notice I’ve added –devmode to the installation steps here, that is due to a small regression in the RC2 image, it’s a bug that’s actively being worked. Confinement is still maintained with the the mir-kiosk snap.

 

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kevin gunn

a better kiosk demo

Hey just having more fun snapping on dragonboard. I’ve updated the mir-client snap to use a Qt demo that is probably a bit more like what a kiosk style application might be. It’s the photoviewer on dragonboard as an example. Which improved not only the demo experience but provides developers a better guide since it actually uses the qmake plugin of snapcraft to build the demo from source. I can’t emphasize how easy it was to modify my snapcraft project to add this to the demo. Again, good ‘ol mir-snaps wiki can be used as a guide. And if you don’t want to build, you can grab my personal builds of these snaps for arm64 for mir-server snap and mir-client-snap respectively.

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kevin gunn

hey just a very quick update. Had some more time to play around today and touch is working after all (only difference is I left my usb keyboard disconnected today so maybe it was getting confused)

Anyhow, here’s videos of Qt clocks with touch and Qt samegame with touch

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kevin gunn

OK, I’m really overdue on posting something about this as I’ve had _something_ running on the dragonboard 410c for a while. If you don’t know about dragonboard you can check out dragonboard from 96boards .

So dragonboard is targeted to be a supported reference board by our Snappy team and they’re in the process of pushing out beta images to play with in the 16 series. I had been concerned that we I was going to have to go and build the graphics drivers into our Ubuntu core snap. When I started I wasn’t even sure of the state of the freedreno drivers vs closed source vendor drivers. But as luck would have it, someone quite recently had turned on the gallium drivers to be built and package as part of the Ubuntu distro, which means I got the freedreno drivers with no effort! Lots of love to Rob Clark for all the work he’s done on freedreno (if your interested in learning more  check out freedreno on github ).

So getting a devmode mir snap demo up and running was relatively painless. However, I do want to say I found a little difference in my runs amd64 VM vs the native arm64. This resulted in some tweaks to the mir interface in snapd (which had already landed and should be in the next snapd release). Also, never use setterm when developing with Mir, that create all sorts of chaos for me 🙂 I had used setterm for convenience to prevent the screen from blanking, ended up causing failures when I was working on making sure the mir snaps could run confined.

If you follow the good ol’ mir snaps wiki, you can easily duplicate this – running the mir snaps fully confined on dragonboard core snap. Also, I wanted to point out again there are other Qt demos you can try besides the clock app – simply modify the helper file in the client example (client-start) to be something besides “clock”, for example “maroon” or “samegame”. You can do this with an HDMI monitor and mouse attached  like in this  video of various Qt apps as mir-client snaps running on dragonboard . Still need to investigate some mouse oddities that seem to only occur with apps other than clock.

And lastly, I got new toy over the weekend. I ordered a 7″ touch screen from adafruit. Here’s a quick video of the 7″ display attached. I need to tinker with it to see about getting the touch to work, but it was nice to just hook it together and the display come up.

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kevin gunn

So first, if you didn’t catch it, series 16 Ubuntu Core beta images are available here http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-snappy/16.04/current/

I just verified the Mir snaps are functioning and made some small updates to match here https://developer.ubuntu.com/en/snappy/build-apps/mir-snaps/

One of which being a command line switch for installing the snaps locally… –dangerous, what a great flag name 🙂

Also, I made some updates to the snaps themselves to check for the architecture from $SNAP_ARCH and then set up all the correct paths. So this means the scripts will work properly on the various archs without having to tinker. I’ve also changed the mir-client snap specifically to pull the demos from the archive, this way you’ll also get the right binary for the right arch as well.

Enjoy!

 

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Colin Ian King

The Ubuntu Kernel Team has uploaded a new kernel (3.2.0-17.27) which contains an additional fix to resolve the remaining issues seen with the RC6 power saving enabled. For users with Sandy Bridge based hardware we would appreciate them to run the tests described on https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Kernel/PowerManagementRC6 and add their results to that page.

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Colin Ian King

The Ubuntu Kernel Team has released a call for testing for a set of RC6 power saving patches for Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin LTS. Quoting Leann Ogasawara's email to the ubuntu kernel team and ubuntu-devel mailing lists:

"Hi All,

RC6 is a technology which allows the GPU to go into a very low power consumption state when the GPU is idle (down to 0V). It results in considerable power savings when this stage is activated. When comparing under idle loads with machine state where RC6 is disabled, improved power usage of around 40-60% has been witnessed [1].

Up until recently, RC6 was disabled by default for Sandy Bridge systems due to reports of hangs and graphics corruption issues when RC6 was enabled. Intel has now asserted that RC6p (deep RC6) is responsible for the RC6 related issues on Sandy Bridge. As a result, a patch has recently been submitted upstream to disable RC6p for Sandy Bridge [2].

In an effort to provide more exposure and testing for this proposed patch, the Ubuntu Kernel Team has applied this patch to 3.2.0-17.26 and newer Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin kernels. We have additionally enabled plain RC6 by default on Sandy Bridge systems so that users can benefit from the improved power savings by default.

We have decided to post a widespread call for testing from Sandy Bridge owners running Ubuntu 12.04. We hope to capture data which supports the the claims of power saving improvements and therefore justify keeping these patches in the Ubuntu 12.04 kernel. We also want to ensure we do not trigger any issues due to plain RC6 being enabled by default for Sandy Bridge.

If you are running Ubuntu 12.04 (Precise Pangolin) and willing to test and provide feedback, please refer to our PowerManagementRC6 wiki for detailed instructions [3]. Additionally, instructions for reporting any issues with RC6 enabled are also noted on the wiki. We would really appreciate any testing and feedback users are able to provide.

Thanks in advance,
The Ubuntu Kernel Team"

So please contribute to this call for testing by visiting https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Kernel/PowerManagementRC6 and follow the instructions.  Thank you!

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