Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'globaljam'

Nicholas Skaggs

It's time for a testing jam!

Ubuntu Global Jam, Vivid edition is a few short weeks away. It's time to make your event happen. I can help! Here's my officially unofficial guide to global jam success.

Steps:

  1. Get your jam pack! Get the request in right away so it gets to you on time. 
  2. Pick a cool location to jam
  3. Tell everyone! (be sure to mention free swag, who can resist!?)
But wait, what are you going to do while jamming? I've got that covered too! Hold a testing jam! All you need to know can be found on the ubuntu global jam wiki. The wiki even has more information for you as a jam host in case you have questions or just like details.

Ohh and just in case you don't like testing (seems crazy, I know), there are other jam ideas available to you. The important thing is you get together with other ubuntu aficionados and celebrate ubuntu! 

P.S. Don't forget to share pictures afterwards. No one will know you had the coolest jam in the world unless you tell them :-)

P.P.S. If I'm invited, bring cupcakes! Yum!

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Michael Hall

For a long time now Canonical has provided Ubuntu LoCo Teams with material to use in the promotion of Ubuntu. This has come in the form of CDs and DVDs for Ubuntu releases, as well as conference packs for booths and shows.

We’ve also been sent several packages, when requested by an Ubuntu Member, to LoCo Teams for their own events, such as release parties or global jams.

Ubuntu Mauritius Team 14.10 Global Jam

This cycle we are extending this offer to any LoCo team that is hosting an in-person Global Jam event. It doesn’t matter how many people are going, or what you’re planning on doing for your jam. The Jam Packs will include DVDs, stickers, pens and other giveaways for your attendees, as well as an Ubuntu t-shirt for the organizers (or as a giveaway, if you choose).

Since there is only a few weeks before Global Jam weekend, and these will be shipped from London, please take your country’s customs process into consideration before ordering. Countries in North America and Europe shouldn’t have a problem, but if you’ve experienced long customs delays in the past please consider waiting and making your request for the next Global Jam.

To get an Ubuntu Global Jam Pack for your event, all you need to do is the following:

  • Register you Global Jam event on the LoCo Team Portal
    • Your event must be in-person, and have a venue associated with it
  • Fill out the community donation request form
    • Include a link to your LoCo Team Portal event in your request
  • Promote your event, before and after
    • Blog about it, post pictures, and share your excitement on social media
      • Use the #ubuntu hashtag when available

You can find all kinds of resources, activities and advice for running your Global Jam event on the Ubuntu Wiki, where we’ve collected the cumulative knowledge from all across the community over many years. And you can get live help and advice any time on the #ubuntu-locoteams IRC channel on Freenode.

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Nicholas Skaggs

Jamming Quality Style

It's that time of year again! Time to get your jam on (I like mine on a bagel).
  

While you are making plans for Ubuntu Global Jam, don't forget you can contribute to quality as well. There's a separate subpage of the global jam wiki dedicated to it.

We love new test contributions, and there's a collection of wiki tutorials and videos to help you contribute them. You don't have to be technical to write tests -- we need manual testcases also which are written in plain English :-)

More interested in submitting your results for tests? We've also got you covered. We have tests for the default applications of ubuntu as well as the images of ubuntu. Download an image and run it on your machine. Try running through some default testcases for ubuntu or your favorite flavor. An image and a pc or laptop is all you need to get started. Happy Jamming!

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Nicholas Skaggs

Ubuntu Global Jam is just a few short weeks away. I trust you've seen the posts announcing and asking you to plan your events. Maybe you are confused about what type of session to plan or how the event could go. I will echo my friend Daniel Holbach in saying just do it! Grab a buddy (even an online one!) and plan to jam together. If your confused about what to jam with, check out the testing page.

It's got everything you need to run a session, and the documentation has all been done for you. Folks can choose what they are interested in testing (packages, images, or hardware), or even do some hacking on testcases. No need to be a programmer, manual tests can be written by anyone! Participants don't need anything besides there laptop and an image of ubuntu on a cd or usb stick (assuming of course they aren't already running ubuntu raring :-) ).

If your curious about wanting to host a testing event, checkout the testing page on the global jam site. Feel free to get in touch with me as well if you wish to share your stories or ask questions. Let's jam, quality style!

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Michael Hall

After all the terrific feedback and contributions we received from community contributors as a result of my Quicklists article, I’ve been asked to talk about how to contribute to improving another feature of Unity, the Applications Lens.

Search is the heart of the Unity Dash, and making search better is great way to contribute to the overall quality and usability of Ubuntu.  And just like Quicklists, there are ways you can do this without being a developer.  In this article, I will show you how to add Keywords to an application that will be used by the Dash’s search function.

Just like in my previous tutorial on Quicklists, I will once again be using Geany as my example application since it is one of my most-used programs.  Geany will be found in a search for “IDE” or “Development”, thanks to those words being in the Comment and GenericName fields of it’s .desktop file.  However, I think it should also be found in a search for “Code” and “Programming”, which it currently does not.

Step 0: File bug reports

This wasn’t part of the Quicklist tutorial, because I had already  filed bugs for the apps we were targetting.  But this time there is no list, so it’s up to you to make sure there is a bug report.  For ubuntu, you can file it against:

https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/<source_name>/

It’s equally important to file a bug in the upstream’s Bug Tracker.  Refer to the stems up my post about upstreaming your quicklists for how to find your upstream.

Once you  have your bugs filed, post a link to them in the comments so that others know you are working on them.

Step 1: Getting the package code

Everything in Ubuntu exists in bzr, which makes getting the source for the package easy.  just “bzr branch ubuntu:<project>”.  For geany, this is what I ran:

bzr branch ubuntu:geany

If you followed the Quicklist tutorial, you’ll have already done this.  However, if your merge proposal hasn’t been accepted yet, it’ll be easier to do these changes on a clean branch.  You can give the name of a new directory for this checkout by running:

bzr branch ubuntu:geany ./geany-keywords

Step 2: Adding keywords

Again, just like with Quicklists, you first need to locate the .desktop file for your application.  For me, it was located in the root of the branch in a file called “geany.desktop.in”.  If you don’t see it in the root of your project’s branch, try running this command:

find ./ -name "*.desktop*"

This may not look exactly like the file in your /usr/share/applications/, since some processing is done to add translated strings for the application name and comments.  But as long as you are just adding the Keywords item to the bottom of the file you shouldn’t have to worry about that.

Next you  should look for deprecated keyword fields.  ”Keywords” is a new part of the XDG specification, but your application may have already been using the desktop-specific field “X-GNOME-Keywords”.  If it does, go ahead and rename it to “Keywords”.  Also check for the existence of fields starting with an underscore, like “_Name”.  If your .desktop file has those, that means it’s probably setup for translations already, and you should use “_Keywords” instead, so that they can be translated as well.

For geany, there was no existing Keywords field of any kind, but it was setup for translations, so I used the following:

mhall@mhall-laptop:~/projects/Ubuntu/unity/quicklists/geany$ bzr diff
=== modified file 'geany.desktop.in'
--- geany.desktop.in	2012-02-24 19:30:41 +0000
+++ geany.desktop.in	2012-02-27 18:31:39 +0000
@@ -10,3 +10,4 @@
 Categories=GTK;Development;IDE;
 MimeType=text/plain;text/x-chdr;text/x-csrc;text/x-c++hdr;text/x-c++src;text/x-java;text/x-dsrc;text/x-pascal;text/x-perl;text/x-python;application/x-php;application/x-httpd-php3;application/x-httpd-php4;application/x-httpd-php5;application/xml;text/html;text/css;text/x-sql;text/x-diff;
 StartupNotify=true
+_Keywords=Code;Editor;Programming;

Step 3: Submitting to Ubuntu

Now you need to send your changes to Ubuntu.  This is very similar to what we did for Quicklists, but I’ve added one extra piece to the commit command.

bzr commit -m "Add Keywords to .desktop file" --fixes lp:942154
bzr push lp:~mhall119/ubuntu/precise/geany/add_keywords

By passing the –fixes flag, along with your Launchpad bug #, to the bzr commit command, you will automatically link your new branch with the bug report you created in step 0.

The next step is to once again propose that your changes be merged into the Ubuntu package. To do that, run the following command to open the Launchpad page for your new branch:

bzr lp-open

On that page you’ll see a link labeled “Propose for merging”, click that and fill out the form on the next page to create your merge proposal.

Step 4: Submitting to Upstream

The final step is to send your changes upstream as well.  This is good practice whenever you are making changes, plus it makes it easier for Ubuntu’s package maintainers.  Since every upstream is different in how they want to get submissions, I recommend following my previous upstreaming tutorial for this step.

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Michael Hall

The Ubuntu Florida LoCo Team is my home team, and this cycle I will once again be meeting up with Chris Johnston to participate in the Ubuntu Global Jam.  Since Chris is the one organizing this event again, I asked him a few questions about it.

Tell me about yourself and how you are involved in Ubuntu

My name is Chris Johnston. I got involved in Ubuntu about 3 years ago. I started by attending a Florida LoCo Team event at Michael Hall’s house. I got involved with the Ubuntu Beginners Team, the Classroom Team, and the BugSquad. I was one of the original planners of Ubuntu User Days and I got involved in developing for what is now the LoCo Team Portal. After attending my first UDS I saw a need and started coding on the Summit Scheduler. Now days I spend most of my time developing on Summit or the LoCo Team Portal.

Have you organized a Global Jam event before, and if so what was your experience? How did you choose a venue and select activities?

I organized a Global Jam event last cycle. We ended up with only 3 people participating, but we had a productive day hacking on summit.ubuntu.com and even got a new developer involved.

What kinds of activities do you plan of doing as part of your upcoming jam?

During this Global Jam, we will again be working on some of the community supported websites, including Summit and the LoCo Team Portal.

How do you spread the word about your event to get more people to participate?

Through the LoCo Team Portal and talking to people about it.

 

Now it’s time for you all to share your stories about past and future Global Jam events!

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