Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'git'

David Murphy (schwuk)

I was browsing Twitter last night when Thoughbot linked to their post about commit messages.

This was quite timely as my team has been thinking about improving the process of creating our release notes, and it has been proposed that we generate them automatically from our commit messages. This in turn requires that we have commit messages of sufficient quality, which – to be honest – we don’t always. So the second proposal is to enforce “good” commit messages as part of reviewing and approving merge proposals into our projects. See this post from Kevin on my team for an overview of our branching strategies to get an idea of how our projects are structured.

We still need to define what constitutes a “good” message, but we will certainly use both the article from Thoughtbot and the oft-referenced advice from Tim Pope as our basis. We are also only planning to apply this to commits to trunk because, well, you don’t need a novel – or even a short story – for every commit in your spike branch!

Now, back to the Thoughtbot article, and this piece of advice stood out for me:

Never use the -m <msg> / --message=<msg> flag to git commit.

Since I first discovered -m I have used it almost exclusively, thinking I’m being so clever and efficient, but in reality I’ve been restricting what I could say to what felt “right” on an 80 character terminal. If nothing else, I will be trying to avoid the use of -m from now on.

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pitti

I finally listened to Sebastien Bacher and applied for GNOME commit rights yesterday, after hassling Seb once more about committing an approved patch for me. Surprisingly, it only took some 4 hours until my application was approved and my account created, wow! Apparently 71 patches are enough. :-)

With my new powers, I fixed a crash in gdm, and applied two stragglers into gvfs’ build system today.

More to come!

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Ian Clatworthy


Are you a Bazaar fan and need some help explaining to others why Bazaar is cool? I published a document last week called Why switch to Bazaar? that may help. I’ve tried hard to present the big picture together with some concrete examples, explaining what we stand for and what that means to users, teams and communities in reality. Furthermore, if you tried Bazaar 1.x but found it too slow or inefficient, I’m sure you’ll find the Bazaar 2.0 benchmarks included in the document great news.

I hope you find the document interesting and food for thought. If there are any mistakes or you’ll like to translate the document to another language, please let me know.

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