Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'fun'

Daniel Holbach

For a few weeks we have been running the Snappy Playpen as a pet/research project already. Many great things have happened since then:

  • With the Playpen we now have a repository of great best-practice examples.
  • We brought together a lot of people who are excited about snaps, who worked together, collaborated, wrote plugins together and improved snapcraft and friends.
  • A number of cloud parts were put together by the team as well.
  • We landed quite a few high-quality snaps in the store.
  • We had lots of fun.

Opening the Sandpit

With our next Snappy Playpen event tomorrow, 20th September 2016, we want to extend the scheme. We are opening the Sandpit part of the Playpen!

One thing we realised in the last weeks is that we treated the Playpen more and more like a place where well-working, tested and well-understood snaps go to inspire people who are new to snapping software. What we saw as well was that lots of fellow snappers kept their half-done snaps on their hard-disk instead of sharing them and giving others the chance to finish them or get involved in fixing. Time to change that, time for the Sandpit!

In the Sandpit things can get messy, but you get to explore and play around. It’s fun. Naturally things need to be light-weight, which is why we organise the Sandpit on just a simple wiki page. The way it works is that if you have a half-finished snap, you simply push it to a repo, add your name and the link to the wiki, so others get a chance to take a look and work together with you on it.

Tomorrow, 20th September 2016, we are going to get together again and help each other snapping, clean up old bits, fix things, explain, hang out and have a good time. If you want to join, you’re welcome. We’re on Gitter and on IRC.

  • WHEN: 2016-09-20
  • WHAT: Snappy Playpen event – opening the Sandpit
  • WHERE: Gitter and on IRC

Added bonus

As an added bonus, we are going to invite Michael Vogt, one of the core developers of snapd to the Ubuntu Community Q&A tomorrow. Join us at 15:00 UTC tomorrow on and ask all the questions you always had!

See you tomorrow!

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Daniel Holbach

What do Kinshasa, Omsk, Paris, Mexico City, Eugene, Denver, Tempe, Catonsville, Fairfax, Dania Beach, San Francisco and various places on the internet have in common?

Right, they’re all participating in the Ubuntu Global Jam on the weekend of 6-8 February! See the full list of teams that are part of the event here. (Please add yours if you haven’t already.)

What’s great about the event is that there are just two basic aims:

  1. do something with Ubuntu
  2. get together and have fun!

What I also like a lot is that there’s always something new to do. Here are just 3 quick examples of that:

App Development Schools

We have put quite a bit of work into putting training materials together, now, you can take them out to your team and start writing Ubuntu apps easily.


As one tech news article said “Robots embrace Ubuntu as it invades the internet of things“. Ubuntu’s newest foray, making it possible to bring a stable and secure OS to small devices where you can focus on apps and functionality, is attracting a number of folks on the mailing lists (snappy-devel, snappy-app-devel)  and elsewhere. Check out the mailing lists and the snappy site to find out more and have a play with it.

Unity8 on Desktop

Convergence is happening and what’s working great on the phone is making its way onto the desktop. You can help making this happen, by installing and testing it. Your feedback will be much appreciated.




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Planes, Trains & Automobiles

Ok, the title shows my age. But a facebook post from a colleague (oh, yeah, who happens to be my boss), writing his thoughts on a train to Québec city made me think of my own experience of today, sitting in a plane for 8 hours on my way to Montréal.

Not because we were late leaving by one hour, wait that was only enlightened by the pilot’s humour in describing in almost real time the reasons for us being late (mixup in the baggage loading, then nobody to remove the boarding gate, then the guy who’s supposed to move the plane out of the  boarding area just left without notice). But because this plane was taking me from he country I elected to live from the country were I was born, the city where I spent some of my best time.

Flying for me is rarely a burden, once I’m in the plane.  Actually, once I’ve cleared security and am waiting to board.  Then the calm reaches me; all I need to do is sit and be taken care of. Even when, while watching the beginning of “The Fight Club” on the onboard video system, I watch an “in flight collision”, three days after dreaming of experiencing an airline crash on take off.  I am not a frequent flyer by any measure, but air travelling is not a problem for me.

But every now and then, I get to fly back home from home.  I get to return to Montréal, Québec, from Le Chesnay France.  This does often put me in curious positions. Like an hour ago when, in the hotel’s elevator, I meet two people from France. I recognise the accent, then automatically switch to my “France” accent and behave just like any other person from France visiting.  But earlier, coming back from the airport, I talked to the taxi driver as any other quebéquois would have done.  I do like this situation. Makes me think that I have taken out the best of both worlds. I also remember this big map of France that I put up on my appartment wall, back when going to France was not even a possibility yet.  Back then it was a wish.

It also take me away from my family, my two beloved daughter and Nathalie, the woman I love. And bring me back to my family, my two other brothers and my parents who still live here.  Even though I am briefly far away from the family I have participated to build, I am also briefly closer to the family who saw me grow up.  Airplanes get me to go from one to another in only a few hours.

Automobiles will not see me much here. This may be a proof that I am only a visitor here nowadays.  I used to drive the streets of Montréal daily, without hesitation, knowing where to go.  I have this feeling driving in the Paris area nowadays.  I’m much more familiar with Versailles and Paris than I would be in Laval or the east end of Montréal.  But if I was to come back here, it would all come back very quickly.

Planes, trains & Automobiles take us to our lives at the speed at which they evolve, or at the distances where they happen.

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Daniel Holbach

On 4th October everyone on our team at Canonical will work for a solid 24 hours period and stream it live to the internet. It will be hard, but it will also be lots of fun and we do it to raise money for charities. We all picked different ones and you can get more info about each of us on the Marathon page.

So a few friends already asked me: “Why Oxfam?” and there are obviously many many fantastic charities to choose from, but I thought I’d go into a bit more detail about why I love the work they’re doing.

Oxfam’s mission statement is “We believe we can end poverty and injustice, as part of a global movement for change.”, which is something I very much identify with.

I have very early memories of my life in which I had seen reports of injustice, poverty or hunger in the news and asked my mom why we let something like that happen. I was appalled, why isn’t everyone having a good life as I did? Even nowadays I find it hard to explain this to kids, which in my mind is the best way to test how much sense you are making.

Learning about organisations which helped to solve some of these problems reinstated my hope in humanity and I’m glad it did, because you’d probably all know a much less cheerful Daniel if that hope wasn’t reinstated back in my early days.

Oxfam makes long-term commitments to areas, so even when the reporters are gone, they stay and help to make these region less prone to catastrophes. They form local partnerships because they know that locals often know best how to address issues – there is no self-righteous sense of mission involved here.

A common garden

A common garden

Watershed in Balandougou, Mali

Watershed in Balandougou, Mali

Take the Sahel region for example. Life is hard there, rainfall is minimal and with climate change life gets a lot harder. Infrastructure and the medical situation can be problems too. So when there’s a drought hunger relief is important, but it’s not everything. You need to invest into education, you need to make sure people can sustain themselves and can find other venues of supporting themselves and others.

Oxfam’s help and support comes in all the forms mentioned above and many more, which is what I love about them. Sometimes it is seemingly small things like “an oven which needs less wood”, which in turn leads to less deforestation (which is a huge problem anyway) and girls (who do most of the wood collecting) having more time for their studies.

While this is all great work already, Oxfam doesn’t stop there. They deeply understand that some of the world’s problems are not made locally, but globally. So they campaign for policy change in lots of relevant areas, be it related to climate change, speculation on food prices, saving energy, issues related to biofuel and many other issues. Demonstrating against a coal power plant in Germany is connected to problems in the Sahel region. Oxfam get this. We’re in this world together.

Oxfam is also creative and fun. Their Unwrapped Store is a great opportunity to give presents and also make the world a better place. What I love most is the pair of goats (picture below) – there were a few weddings where this was part of my gift.

Pair of goats

Pair of goats

Also have Oxfam been around since 1942 and they picked two very important points: poverty and injustice, which if granted to everyone would put them into a position where they can “exercise their human rights, assert their dignity as full citizens and take control of their lives.”

This got more lengthy than I expected, but as you can see I really like what they’re doing. I have been supporting them for a while, getting their quarterly reports and a few of my friends volunteered from them. I’m quite sure you don’t do anything wrong if you support them.

If you want to support Oxfam and think working for 24h for Oxfam is a good idea, please donate here. Thanks in advance, you’re a hero!

See you all on on 4th October.

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Live from my phone

The fun of being a geek is to find silly things to do, like to try to blog from an Android phone.

Well, using the power of the open source (wordpress & Android) looks like it will be easier then expected (aside from the virtual keyboard that makes typing a bit tedious).

Kind of nice…


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Colin Ian King

cowsay and cowthink fun

Time for me to lighten up a little. I stumbled upon the cowsay and cowthink commands today while reading the Wikipedia entry about Tux. Cowsay prints an ASCII art picture of a cow and a speach bubble around some provided text, and cowthink puts the text in a think bubble.

cowsay "Well this is all very amusing."

< Well this is all very amusing. >
\ ^__^
\ (oo)\_______
(__)\ )\/\
||----w |
|| ||

The -f flag allows one to specify different picture, for example -f tux draws Tux instead of a cow.

cowthink -f tux "Why is my kernel building so slowly today?"
( Why is my kernel building so slowly )
( today? )
|o_o |
|:_/ |
// \ \
(| | )
/'\_ _/`\

There are over 50 pictures to chose from, use cowsay -l to list them all.

To install, use: sudo apt-get install cowsay


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Colin Ian King

Makerbot - an open source 3D printer

This week I'm attending a Ubuntu Kernel Sprint and my colleague Steve Conklin brought along a fantastic gizmo - the Makerbot 3D printer. It is most fascinating watching it print 3D objects by extruding a thin ABS plastic trail of plastic in layers. It can print objects up to 4" x 4" x 6" - the imagination is the limiting factor to what it can print. Steve already demo'd it printing a variety of objects, the most impressive being a working whistle including a moving ball inside the whistle. It's not too slow either - it took about 25 minutes to print the whistle, which isn't bad considering the complexity and size of the object.

It's a cool piece of kit - doubly so because it's completely open sourced.

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Colin Ian King

Ubuntu Release Party reaches 1000 users!

W00t - the Ubuntu Release Party for Karmic Koala reaches 1000 users!

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