Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'english'

Victor Palau

Hi everyone, I’ve been talking to a lot of you in the comments on the Indiegogo page, so I thought I’d come on here with a little video of my own computing setup.

I’m going to show you convergence. Although the hardware is getting a lot of the attention, it’s the Ubuntu Edge’s ability to be your phone and your PC that will have the biggest impact. How do I know this for sure? Because I’m already experiencing it.

For over two months I’ve been running Ubuntu for Android on a Nexus 4 phone, and even with its much slower processor and smaller storage than the Edge will have, it’s still made my working life so much simpler. With just a phone I can do pretty much anything that I could do before on my laptop.

I’ve made a quick video to show you a few examples. Remember this code is still in beta – with the final production code and the much more powerful hardware of the Ubuntu Edge, the desktop will really fly.

If you can’t see the video - click here

We’re doing great so far but there’s a long way to go, so please keep on sharing our campaign with everyone you know. You’re our best chance of making this happen!


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David Planella

qreator-square

We’re preparing a new release of Qreator, the QR code creator for Ubuntu, to be published in the next few days.

This release adds a few new strings and quite a bunch of new features, including a new design, new QR codes, and the ability to edit the QR codes you create.

Kudos to everyone who has contributed translations in the past: thanks to you the development release Qreator is already fully translated in 10 languages. There are other 26 languages that are nearly completed and are only missing the newly-added strings. A very special mention goes also to the unstoppable Stefan Schwarzburg, whose contributions have been invaluable in putting the upcoming release together.

If you find it useful, please help translating and making it available in your language here:

Translate Qreator!

To get more context for the translation, you can also install the preview package. It’s for Ubuntu 13.04 only, but if someone needs an older version, let me know and I can create it too.

Thanks!

The post Upcoming Qreator release – call for translations appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

I’m thrilled to announce the availability of the Ubuntu 12.04 Online Tour for local community teams to localize and use on their websites. The tour has been the result of the stunning work done by Ant Dillon from the Canonical Web Design Team and should provide a web-based first impression of Ubuntu to new users, now in their language.

It’s a great opportunity to showcase Ubuntu to your local community to celebrate release day tomorrow.

Where is it?

How can I use it for my LoCo website?

First of all, you’ll need to get set up with the right tools before you start.

Getting set up:

  • Bazaar revision control system Install bzr
  • Polib library Install polib
  • Terminal. You’ll need to run the commands below on a terminal. Simply press Ctrl+Alt+T to fire up a new terminal console.

If you’ve already translated the tour in Launchpad, you can build a localized version in 3 easy steps:

1. Get the code:

bzr branch lp:ubuntu-online-tour/12.04

2. Build the localized tour:

cd 12.04
cd translate-html/bin
./translate-html -t

3. Deploy the tour:

  • This will vary depending on your setup, so simply make sure you copy the chromeless, css, img, js, pie and videos folders along with the videoplayer.swf file to your site. In addition, you will need the en folder and the folder for your language created in the previous step.

If you haven’t finished the translation for your language in Launchpad, you will need to complete the corresponding PO file before you run step 2. Just ask on the Ubuntu translators mailing list or on Launchpad in case you need help or are not familiar with PO files.

For any issues, suggestions or enhancement, use the Online Tour’s Launchpad project to report bugs or submit improvements.

Enjoy!

The post Get the Ubuntu Online Tour on your LoCo site appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella


If you follow the Ubuntu channels, and unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ll have noticed that this coming weekend we’re organizing the Ubuntu Global Jam, a worldwide event where Ubuntu local community teams (LoCos) join in a get-together fest to have some fun while improving Ubuntu.

As we’re ramping up to a Long Term Support release, this is a particularly important UGJ and we need all hands on deck to ensure that it does not only meet, but exceeds the high quality standard of previous Ubuntu LTS releases. This is another article in the series of blog posts showcasing the events our community is organizing, brought to you by Rafael Carreras, from the Ubuntu Catalan LoCo team.

Tell us a bit about your LoCo team

Our LoCo is language-oriented, and by language I mean Catalan (a Romanic one), not Perl or Python. In fact, the Catalan LoCo Team was the first language-oriented LoCo to be approved back in 2007. We manage our day-to-day in three mailing lists: technical doubts, team work and translations and do IRC meetings twice a month. We organise Ubuntu Global Jam events every 6 months (with some minor absences) and of course great release parties every 6 months along with some other little ones in between.

What kind of event are you organizing for this Ubuntu Global Jam?

As always, we will translate some new packages, discuss translation items, a bug triage session, some install release work and even evangelization to some passing people, as we organise UGJ this time in a civic centre.

Is this the first UGJ event you’re organizing?

No, it’s not, we are running UGJs since the first one and I think we only missed last one.

How do you think UGJ events help the Ubuntu community and Ubuntu?

It’s a great opportunity for meeting people you only know by email or chat. Also, as we sit down together, there is little room for procrastination. Well, more or less, anyway.

Why do you think Jono Bacon always features pictures of the Catalan team when announcing the UGJ? Are we the most good-looking LoCo?

Yeah, definitely. It must be that.

Join the party by registering your event at the Ubuntu LoCo Portal!

p1010458 by Alex Muntada

The post Ubuntu Global Jam events: jamming Catalan style appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

Docs jam

It’s Community Docs Jam today!

We want to fix the www.ubuntu.com/community page to better represent our community, and who better than our community to help providing that content?

So join us today, pick an area where you’re interested and give us a hand adding content. Join the Ubuntu Community Docs Jam ›

Image: Binded Document CC-BY 2.0 by Sean MacEntee

The post Join the Ubuntu Community Docs Jam today appeared first on David Planella.

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David

Documents

It’s Community Docs Jam today!

We want to fix the www.ubuntu.com/community page to better represent our community, and who better than our community to help providing that content?

So join us today, pick an area where you’re interested and give us a hand adding content. Join the Ubuntu Community Docs Jam ›

Image: Binded Document CC-BY 2.0 by Sean MacEntee


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David Planella

Just a quick reminder that I’ll be running a Workshop for the Ubuntu App Showdown in very few minutes. Update: the video is now live!

I’ll be talking about Qreator, an application I developed for quick creation of QR codes from the desktop. The idea is to explain how I put it together in order to help new app developers with an example where they can learn from and ask questions about.

So feel free to join me on the live feed, learn more and ask your questions.

If you cannot follow it live, you can also see the recording at your own time later on.

See you there in a bit!

The post Upcoming Ubuntu App Showdown Workshop: How I Made Qreator appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

I am pleased to announce that our current development release, Ubuntu Precise, is now open for translation:

Translate Ubuntu!

Translate Ubuntu Oneiric!

Some additional information that will be useful for translators:

  • Translation schedule. Remember that according to the release schedule translatable messages might be subject to change until the User Interface Freeze on the week of the 23rd of February.
  • Language packs. During the development cycle, language packs containing translations will be released twice per week except for the freeze periods. This will allow users and translators to quickly see and test the results of translations.
  • Test and report bugs. If you notice any issues (e.g. untranslated strings or applications), do check with the translation team for your language first. If you think it is a genuine bug, please report it.
  • Learn more. Learn how to start translating Ubuntu and enable millions to use it in their language.

Ubuntu 12.04 will be a Long Term Support release, so let’s rally around translations to provide the best translated OS around and go over the mark of nearly 40 languages in which Ubuntu is fully translated!

open image by loop_oh – License: CC by-nd 2.0

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David Planella

Ubuntu Global Jam Q+A Videocasts today!

Ubuntu Global Jam Q+A VideocastIn preparation for the Ubuntu Global Jam event next weekend, Jono and I will be running Q+A videocasts today

Jono’s videocast will be more convenient for the Americas and in the evening in Europe:

My videocast coming up in about 2 hours time and is more convenient for Europe and surrounding areas:

So if you are either thinking of organizing an event, you’re already organizing one, you’d like to participate in one, or simply want to learn more, do come along, ask your questions and have some fun!

Oh, and you should also check out the video about rolling your own event:

Can’t see it? Watch it here!

This Global Jam is going to be awesome, and it’s going to give that extra push to make Ubuntu 12.04 even a more rock-solid release. Have you already signed up for an event?

To ask your questions on the chat, you’ll need to sign up for a ustream account (it’s free, doesn’t take more than a couple of minutes and you can use your Launchpad OpenId), but I’ll also be answering your questions on the #ubuntu-locoteams IRC channel on Freenode.

The post Ubuntu Global Jam Q+A Videocasts today! appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ll have noticed that this coming weekend we’re organizing the Ubuntu Global Jam, a worldwide event where Ubuntu local community teams (LoCos) join in a get-together fest to have some fun while improving Ubuntu. As we’re ramping up to a Long Term Support release, this is a particularly important UGJ and we need every hand on deck to ensure it not only meets but exceeds the standard of previous Ubuntu LTS releases. This is another article in the series of blog posts showcasing the events our community is organizing, brought to you by Andrej Znidarsic, from the Ubuntu Slovenian LoCo team.

Tell us a bit about your LoCo team

The Slovenian Ubuntu LoCo team was founded in 2005 and we try to spread Ubuntu mainly by translation work and help and support to Slovenian Ubuntu users who don’t have the means (either language or technical knowledger barrier) to solve problems themselves. Slovenian has been among the top translated languages for a while, which is quite impressive considering there are only 2 million native speakers and we don’t have a big pool to get translators from. We operate an IRC channel, website, forum, Facebook, Twitter and Google+ page. Offline we meet at monthly Ubuntu hours and we do Global Jams :)

What kind of event are you organizing for the upcoming Ubuntu Global Jam (UGJ)?

We are mostly going to focus on translations. This has traditionally been our strong point, as we exceeded 90% translation of Ubuntu about 2 years ago. Now we are focusing on translation quality and consistency. This time we want to put extra polish into translation for the LTS. In addition to that, a couple of people will focus on creating videos explaining how to perform basic tasks in Ubuntu (installing Ubuntu, Installing/removing software, Unity “tricks”…) and how to contribute to Ubuntu (how to start translating in Launchpad, how to report a bug, common translation mistakes in Slovenian). We will also be testdriving Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and report bugs we find on the way. More info can be found in our Ubuntu Global Jam announcement (in Slovenian only).

Is this the first UGJ event you’re organizing?

Nope. We have already organized 3 Ubuntu Global Jams. The first one was online only and the last two have been organized offline. We are quite lucky to have Kiberpipa, which has kindly been providing us a great venue with a lot of space and internet access. So we mostly need to do marketing of the event, coordinate transport and grab some pizzas :).

How do you think UGJ events help the Ubuntu community and Ubuntu?

The results of previous UGJs have typically meant about 4000-5000 translated messages for us which is amazing for one day. Good translation coverage helps to grow Ubuntu usage in Slovenia. We have also managed to report a couple of bugs which improved overall quality. More importantly, in average about 15 people attend our global jam, so we meet and hang out with people we usually only see online. This vastly improves team cohesiveness. In addition there are always some newcomers, which is fantastic for community growth. Also, it’s fun :).

The post Upcoming Ubuntu Global Jam events: here’s how the Slovenian team rolls appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

You’ve probably read it in the news: as part of the ongoing initiative to make Ubuntu a target for app developers, we proudly announced the Ubuntu App Showdown contest last week.

The way it works is simple and the rules are well documented, so I won’t go into the details: in short, you’ve got 3 weeks to create a new app, submit it to MyApps and you can win awesome prizes, including 2 laptops from system76 and a many many Nokia N9 smartphones from the Qt project. So if you’ve always wanted to start application development in Ubuntu, that’s a unique opportunity!

So here’s a reminder that the Ubuntu App Showdown is officially starting today, and you’ve got until the 9th July 2012 to create and submit a cool app according to the rules.

Starting also today, we’ve got a series of app developer workshops to help you get started with writing your app. Coming up:

Monday 18th June

Session Time
Intro to Python (part 1) 15:00 UTC
Intro to Python (part 2) 16:00 UTC
Getting started with Quickly 17:00 UTC
Intro to Gtk 3/GObject 18:00 UTC
Getting started with Glade 19:00 UTC

Some other important points:

I’m personally very excited about the contest. It’s been great to see lots of questions and positive reactions over the weekend and I’m really looking forward to see lots of awesome apps coming into the Ubuntu Software Centre!

The post The Ubuntu App Showdown is starting today! appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

Just a heads up that in about 15 minutes, and as part of the Ubuntu Open Week, I’ll be talking about how to submit apps to the Software Centre.

So if you’re either interested in learning how to do it, or if you want to ask any questions, join me on IRC in the #ubuntu-classroom channel on Freenode.

See you there!

The post Upcoming Ubuntu Open Week session – submitting your apps to the Software Centre appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

Just a heads up that in about 50 minutes, and as part of the Ubuntu Open Week, I’ll be talking again, this time about how to contribute translating Ubuntu.

So if you’re either interested in learning how to do it, or if you want to ask any questions, join me on IRC in the #ubuntu-classroom channel on Freenode.

See you there!

The post Upcoming Ubuntu Open Week session – how to contribute translating Ubuntu appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

After reading the Ubuntu App Showdown subreddit, getting a few pings on G+ and IRC, it seems there are some showdown participants concerned about whether their app made it on time for the contest.

So here’s a quick heads up: don’t worry, if your app was submitted to MyApps on time, and complied with the contest requirements, it made it to the contest. If some of the requirements were not met, we’ve probably contacted you and given you a chance to meet them, as we appreciate the hard work you’ve put these last 3 weeks, and we want you to get in.

Some of you have noticed there is a Trello board the Ubuntu App Review Board and their contributors have been using to track progress on app reviews. Some of the apps are still not in there simply because of the overwhelmingly positive response and the work it takes to process the about 150 contest submissions we got. About 90% of them are valid, and while it might take us a bit more than expected to process them, it is a very pleasant problem to have, to be honest :).

We’re currently finishing off the list of qualified apps and setting up the voting infrastructure, so we’ll publish the list of apps on the Ubuntu App Developer blog very soon.

In any case, good work to all of you who’ve participated. You’ve made it. In only 3 weeks you’ve gone from idea to a finished app using the Free Software tools Ubuntu puts on your hands. It is amazing, and even more for those of you who were new to app development in Ubuntu. I hope you’ve had fun and learnt a lot. Good luck with your apps during the jury vote!

Looking forward to start voting on all your awesome apps!

Image Don’t Panic Badge Attribution Some rights reserved by Jim Linwood

The post Heads up to all Ubuntu App Showdown participants appeared first on David Planella.

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David

One of the main objectives for the Ubuntu 12.04 cycle is to build upon the foundations set by the Ubuntu App Developer site, My Apps and the Ubuntu Software Centre and start building an Ubuntu App Developer community to realize the vision of a rich ecosystem of apps around Ubuntu. This is the first of a series of posts that will discuss several aspects of this goal, how to get involved, and the benefits of Ubuntu as a target platform for both developers and users.

An important aspect of each community is to ensure that there are easily accessible resources that can act as a venue for communication for anyone wanting to get involved. For the Ubuntu App Developer community, but also in general, the degree of involvement will then vary according to what the individuals connecting to our app developer story are looking for. Some will be seeking help, some will be able to provide help, some will want to contribute to build the developer story, some will want to stay up to date with the news, some will write applications… The first step is to ensure that we cover the main venues, or connecting points to our story for them.

We already started out creating some of these resources ready for the launch of the Ubuntu App Developer last cycle, but we’ve been adding some more recently and I thought at this point it would be a good opportunity to provide an overview of the variety of ways to get involved and stay up to date with App Development in Ubuntu. So without further ado…

Stay up to date

This is a set of channels to follow and share the news and announcements related to Ubuntu App Development.

The Ubuntu App Developer Blog – the official source for news, updates, new tutorials and other application development content in Ubuntu. You can read it and subscribe to it

Ubuntu App Developers on G+ – the Google+ page to for anyone interested in app development in Ubuntu to read and share updates. You can add it to your circles or +1 it

Ubuntu App Developers on Facebook – the Facebook page, also for enthusiasts of app development in Ubuntu to follow and comment on the latest news. You can like it.

Ubuntu App Developers on LinkedIn – the LinkedIn group for professionals wanting to know more about publishing their apps in the Software Centre. You can join it.

Ubuntu App Developers on Twitter – you prefer 140 character updates? @ubuntuappdev is also tweeting away in the microblogs world, spreading the news on Ubuntu App Development. You can follow it.

Ubuntu App Developers on Identi.ca – if your microblogging choice is the open source alternative to Twitter, Ubuntu app developers are also on identi.ca. You can follow it.

Get (or give) support

This is a set of channels to either get help, give help, or actively contribute to discussions related to Ubuntu App Development.

Ubuntu App Development on Askubuntu – the central place to get and provide support for all your app development questions. You can ask questions, answer questions, read the FAQ and subscribe to the questions feed.

Ubuntu App Development Mailing list – the list is also the place for support, but also for discussion of new topics, coordination of work and announcements related to building the Ubuntu App Developer story. You can subscribe to it or send e-mail.

Ubuntu App Development on IRC – for those seeking real-time support on text or simply a friendly chat amongst app developers. You can enter the IRC channel.

Contribute

This is an overview of some of the ways in which to contribute to the Ubuntu App Developer story.

Create an app – the most obvious way to make an impact is to actually create an app to be distributed to millions in the Software Centre. You can learn how to get started, how to publish, and actually publish your application. Also check out the video tutorial in how to get started in app development on Ubuntu in a matter of minutes.

Submit a tutorial – knowledge sharing is a key contribution to app development in Ubuntu. If you know about  an app development topic you’d like to see featured and shared in the Ubuntu App developer site, you can submit a tutorial.

Join the ARB – our vision is that both open source and commercial applications are the key to a successful app ecosystem in Ubuntu. The Application Review Board are a group of individuals committed to reviewing and helping open source apps thrive in this environment. If you have technical skills and want to contribute to this goal, they need your help.

All in all, this now gives no excuse not to know what’s going on in the app development world and to get involved. Now let’s get to work to have a stunning App Developer story!

 Social Media Icons by Paul Robert Lloyd


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David

So now it’s the turn for the translations post!

For all of you interested in helping and being part of the effort of making Ubuntu available in any language, here’s a quick list with an overview of the Ubuntu Developer Summit sessions we’ve got in store this week.

Remember you can register your interest in sessions you want to attend or keep up to date with by using the Subscribe link on each session’s blueprint. The links in the list below will take you to the blueprints used to define the specifications for each feature or goal. You can also check out the full UDS schedule.

So, without further ado, here’s the list of translations sessions:

See you all there!


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David

UDS is here again. Tomorrow another week packed with content that will define the plans for a new Ubuntu LTS release will start, and this time around application development will be a prominent topic.

So for all of you interested in helping and being part of the effort of making Ubuntu a platform of choice for application developers, here’s a quick list with an overview of the sessions we’ve got in store this week.

Remember you can register your interest in sessions you want to attend or keep up to date with by using the Subscribe link on each session’s blueprint. The links in the list below will take you to the blueprints used to define the specifications for each feature or goal. You can also check out the full UDS schedule.

So, without further ado, here’s the list of app development sessions:

Oh, and don’t miss the Application development and the Qt keynotes on Tuesday

See you all there!


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David

Just a heads up that this week is Ubuntu Open Week!

Ubuntu Open Week is a series of online workshops where you can:

  • Learn about the Ubuntu landscape
  • Talk to some of the key developers from the Ubuntu project
  • Find out about the Community and its relationship with Canonical
  • Participate in an open Q&A with Mark Shuttleworth, the founder of Ubuntu. (*)

I’ll be running two sessions for everyone wanting to learn more about either translating Ubuntu or writing apps for Ubuntu (or both!):

  • WHERE: #ubuntu-classroom IRC channel on the Freenode network
  • WHAT, WHEN:
    • 14:00 UTC How to contribute translating Ubuntu – learn how to translate Ubuntu in your language
    • 16:00 UTC Writing your first Ubuntu app – a very gentle introduction to writing a simple “Ubuntu rocks!” app, and explaining its lifecycle from creation to publication, with tips along the way.

(*) Mark is on vacation this week, but we’ll schedule a separate IRC session with him, stay tuned!


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Iain Farrell

Some of you may have already seen our new 11.10 video. For those who haven’t, we’ll catch you once you’ve enjoyed it :)

Made in Ubuntu using only open source tools – indeed only an open source font! – I’ve made the source assets available so readers of the blog and beyond can make their own versions to promote Ubuntu. Here’s what you’ll need to do to get started.

1. Download the assets files from my Ubuntu One share by clicking this link.

2. While that’s downloading you can also install Pitivi, the video editor I used, which is easily found in the software centre.

3. Uncompress the zip file and take a look at the contents.

The Assets folder contains, as the name suggests, all the video and PNG files I used to create my video. The what’s new .xptv file is the file that Pitivi uses to pull all the assets together and make the video and the template.xcf file is the GIMP file I used as a template for the text slides that appear in between the video clips.

4. Open the What’s new 11.10v2.xptv file and you’ll have to tell Pitivi where all the assets have gone. Just point it to the Assets folder and it’ll do the rest reconstructing the video.

At this point you have two choices. You can either reuse my video assets and just translate the text panels that come up in between the videos or, if you’re feeling really daring, you can use mine like a storyboard and re-record the videos.

Translating the text panels is the simplest route, simply open the template in Gimp and then save copies as PNG files with the same names as I’ve given them. Once you hit render Pitivi will pull in the new PNGs and, boom, you’ve got a video with translated text panels. Simple!

Recording your own videos is a little more time consuming. The way I did it was using a command line tool called recordmydesktop, available again in the software centre, which I found was pretty straightforward to use. It allowed me to specify what area of the screen to record from and could be launched either in the terminal or, when I didn’t want the terminal in the launcher, using ALT-F2 and then killing the process once I’d recorded the features I wanted to share.

The only other things I did while recording was make sure that any time you’re showing the clock it’s set to 11.10 and that the wifi and volume are always at maximum and bluetooth is always on.

We’d really like to translate this into as many languages as possible and Paolo, long time Ubuntu supporter in Italy has kicked us off with Italian translation of the video and we’d love for you guys to try translating it into your own languages, maybe even go and record your own videos. Paolo’s video is below, thanks again chap, we’re hoping you’ll inspire others!

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David

Quoting the Ubuntu philosophy, one of our  core values is to provide the ability for every computer user to use Ubuntu in their language of choice. This in turn is made possible by an army of volunteer translators, who throughout the development cycle and beyond, tirelessly put their translation skills to work in an outstanding feat to make a full operating system accessible to millions.

As we’re ramping up to the Ubuntu 11.10 release in a few day’s time, there’s another important milestone for ensuring Ubuntu is available in as many languages as possible: the translations deadline on the 6th of October.

Up until now, and considering the 80% coverage cut-off, Ubuntu 11.10, the Oneiric Ocelot, is translated in 38 languages, lead by the Slovenian team’s heroic effort of becoming the #1 team in the ranking.

Making Oneiric the best translated Ubuntu release ever

Last cycle Ubuntu was fully translated in 43 languages. I think this cycle we should be able to aim for more, and I’m confident that with everyone’s help we could reach the 50 fully translated languages mark.

There are a few languages that are very close to reaching the 80% translation level:

Basque, Latvian, Hebrew, Uyghur, Albanian, Estonian, Bengali, Punjabi

And others which might need an extra push to climb up the 60% to 70% mark to reach 80%:

Serbian Latin, Hindi, Indonesian, Tamil, Thai, Telugu, Slovak, Arabic, Belarusian, Gujarati

So if you speak any of these or other languages, here’s what you can do to help yours reach the 80% level and make it to the list of supported languages:

  1. Go to the Ubuntu 11.10 translation statistics page
  2. Click on your language to find out which packages need attention
  3. Find those packages in the list of Ubuntu translations
  4. Translate them!
    • You’ll want to contact the translation team for your language or check out their documentation to ensure you’re using a consistent terminology
    • They’ll also help you get started with translations and answer your questions

Note: the translations statistics are updated daily at 12:00 UTC.

More on translations

And now for something different

If there is any web guru out there who’d like to lend a hand, help with the CSS and the JS code for the stats page would be greatly appreciated.

One cool thing I’d like to do for instance is for translators to, once they’ve clicked on their language, be able to click on a package that needs attention and be taken to the corresponding Launchpad Translations page. This only needs the corresponding rows in the table to be linkified, which is something I’ve been struggling with and I’m sure would be a five-minute job for an experienced web developer.

So if you want to help translators with your web skills, drop a comment here or feel free to submit a bzr branch. Thanks!

Looking forward to the best translated Ubuntu release ever! :-)


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