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Posts tagged with 'devices'

Kyle Nitzsche

Running X Apps on Ubuntu Devices You can install, launch, and use traditional debian-packaged X apps on Ubuntu devices. This may be unexpected given that Ubuntu devices do not seem to support user-installed debian packages, nor do they run the X Display Server. But it does work, courtesy of Mir/XMir and Libertine.

So here’s a bit of background to get started.

But first, please note that at this time, display and use of X apps on an external monitor is only available on the Pro5/M10 and on future devices. (BQ 4.5/E5 and Meizu MX4 do not support this feature.)

Hello Mir (Goodbye X)

Traditionally, and still on the Ubuntu Classic desktop with Unity 7, Ubuntu runs an X Display Server. Apps are debian packaged. And, they are written for X:

Due in part to X’s inherent security shortcomings, the Mir display server is now used on Ubuntu Devices under Unity 8 (although not yet by default on the desktop). XMir bridges traditional X apps to Mir. That is, apps written for X can run fine in a Mir/XMir environment:

Packages and the root file system

Ubuntu Classic has a root file system (rootfs) that is populated through installation of a carefully curated set of debian packages. At run time, users can install debian packages to add apps or modify their system.

This approach raises security concerns because debian packages execute installation scripts with root level privileges and because debian packages can alter what the rootfs provides by modifying or replacing core system components.

Ubuntu devices are designed for security and reliability. Ubuntu devices have a read-only rootfs that is small and tight, providing just what is needed and simplifying system updates. The rootfs is not modifiable by the user. Indeed it is mounted as a read-only partition. Users install apps through click packages that do not modify the rootfs.

Given all of this: how do users install debian packaged apps that use X on Ubuntu Devices? The answer is LIbertine with XMir.

Hello Libertine

Libertine is a system to manage app containers. It is specifically designed to support the many traditional X apps that are debian packaged. Each container is a separate Ubuntu rootfs populated through debian package installations. (Currently these containers are chroots: later, LXD contains will be supported. Also, currently the containers must be of the same Ubuntu series as the device: Vivid.)

So, you can install or create a libertine container, install debian packaged X apps into it, and launch them using the XApps scope. The apps access to the user’s key directories: Documents, Downloads, Music, Pictures, and Videos. So data files created and saved by an app in one container are available to apps in any other container, and indeed outside of the containers.

Let’s take a quick look at the XApps scope.

XApps Scope

This scope simply lists the containers and, for each container, it displays its apps. Here’s a look at a device with two containers. This system has two containers (Puritine and My Container). And each has a few apps:

  • Tap an app to launch it.
  • long press an app to hide it.
  • If you have any hidden apps, see them from the search icon (magnifying glass) and tap Hidden X Apps. Long press a hidden app to unhide it.
  • Note that a container with no apps does not display in the scope.
So how does one create and delete containers, and add or remove apps from them?

Libertine Container Manager

libertine-container-manager is a command line tool you use on the device to create and manage containers. This includes installing debian packaged apps into them. (These containers are created in the phablet user’s home directory and are not a part of the read-only rootfs.)

Note: libertine-container-manager currently cannot be run in the Terminal App. Instead please connect to your device from an Ubuntu system using phablet-shell.
Listing Containers
phablet@ubuntu-phablet:~$ libertine-container-manager list
puritine
my-container

The “puritine” container is pre-installed on many devices through the com.ubuntu.puritine click package (“Desktop Applications”):

phablet@ubuntu-phablet:~$ click list | grep puritine
com.ubuntu.puritine 0.11

The second container (“my-container”) was created on the device with libertine-container-manager.

Note: It is possible to pre-install customized containers through bespoke channels.
Creating a Libertine Container
You can create a new container on a device. The container needs a unique ID and (optionally) a name.

Note: The container must be the same Ubuntu series as the device, currently: vivid.

phablet@ubuntu-phablet:~$ libertine-container-manager create --id my-container --name "My Container" --distro vivid --type chroot

I: Retrieving Release
I: Retrieving Release.gpg
I: Checking Release signature
I: Valid Release signature (key id 790BC7277767219C42C86F933B4FE6ACC0B21F32)
I: Retrieving Packages
I: Validating Packages
I: Resolving dependencies of required packages...
[...]
Listing Apps in a Container
It’s easy to list the apps in a container. You just use the container’s id, as follows:

Note: We add the optional --json argument here and show only lines with “name” for display convenience.

phablet@ubuntu-phablet:~$ libertine-container-manager list-apps --id my-container --json | grep "\"name\""
"name": "Panel Manager",
"name": "Python (v3.4)",
"name": "Python (v2.7)",
"name": "gedit",
"name": "Help",
"name": "Notification Daemon",
"name": "Terminal",
Also note that all apps that install a .desktop file are listed by this command, although many of them are not displayed in the XApps scope since they are not appropriate.
Installing an app in a container
To install a debian package in a container, you just use install-package with the container id and the debian binary package name, as follows:

phablet@ubuntu-phablet:~$ libertine-container-manager install-package --id my-container --package terminator

The package and all of its dependencies are installed in the container. After this, assuming the package installs a .desktop file, it displays in the XApps scope and is launchable with a tap as expected.
Installing an app from a specific Launchpad PPA
By default, available debian packages are installed from the standard Ubuntu archive the chroot’s apt configuration points to. You can add a launchpad PPA, as follows:

phablet@ubuntu-phablet:~$ libertine-container-manager configure --id my-container --archive ppa:USER/PPA-NAME

(Currently, private PPAs are scheduled for an upcoming release.)

After this, you can install packages into the container as usual, including from the PPA.
Removing apps from a container
Remove a debian package from a container with:

phablet@ubuntu-phablet:~$ libertine-container-manager remove-package --id my-container --package PACKAGE_NAME
Libertine-container-manager help
Use the --help for top level help.

You can see details on each subcommand, for example remove-package, as follows:

phablet@ubuntu-phablet:~$ libertine-container-manager remove-package --help
usage: libertine-container-manager remove-package [-h] -p PACKAGE [-i ID] [-r]


optional arguments:
-h, --help show this help message and exit
-p PACKAGE, --package PACKAGE
Name of package to remove. Required. -i ID, --id ID Container identifier. Default container is used if
omitted.
-r, --readline Readline mode. Use text-based frontend during debconf
Interactions.
Updating a container
Want the debian packages in a container updated? Easy:

phablet@ubuntu-phablet:~/.cache/libertine-container/my-container$ libertine-container-manager update --id my-container
Executing a Command in a Container
phablet@ubuntu-phablet:~/.cache/libertine-container/my-container$ libertine-container-manager exec --command "apt-get update" --id my-container
Atteint http://ppa.launchpad.net vivid InRelease
Atteint http://ports.ubuntu.com vivid InRelease
Atteint http://ports.ubuntu.com vivid-updates InRelease
Atteint http://ppa.launchpad.net vivid/main armhf Packages
Atteint http://ppa.launchpad.net vivid/main Translation-en
Atteint http://ports.ubuntu.com vivid/main armhf Packages [...]

Note: Running the apt-get update command in a container may be useful to update the container’s knowledge of newly available packages without installing/updating them all. You can then see whether a package is available, with:

phablet@ubuntu-phablet:~/.cache/libertine-container/my-container$ libertine-container-manager exec --command "apt-cache policy firefox" --id my-container
firefox:
Installé : (aucun)
Candidat : 44.0+build3-0ubuntu0.15.04.1
Table de version :
44.0+build3-0ubuntu0.15.04.1 0
500 http://ports.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-ports/ vivid-updates/main armhf Packages
37.0+build2-0ubuntu1 0
500 http://ports.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-ports/ vivid/main armhf Packages

More about the Libertine Containers

As noted, the container is a directory containing an Ubuntu rootfs. Container directories are here:

phablet@ubuntu-phablet:~/.cache/libertine-container$ pwd
/home/phablet/.cache/libertine-container
phablet@ubuntu-phablet:~/.cache/libertine-container$ ls
my-container puritine
phablet@ubuntu-phablet:~/.cache/libertine-container$ cd my-container/
phablet@ubuntu-phablet:~/.cache/libertine-container/my-container$ ls
rootfs

You can get a bash shell into the container as follows:

phablet@ubuntu-phablet:~/.cache/libertine-container/my-container$ libertine-container-manager exec --command "/bin/bash" --id my-container
groups: cannot find name for group ID 1001
[...]
root@ubuntu-phablet:/#

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Paty Davila

Last week I was invited to Beijing to take part in the China Launch Sprint. The focus of the sprint was to identify action items in our product roadmap for the next devices that will ship Ubuntu Touch in the Chinese market later this year.

photo_2016-06-17_15-25-12

I am a lead UX designer in the product strategy team currently doing many exciting things, such as designing the convergence experience across the Ubuntu platform. I was invited to offer design support and participate in the planning of the work we will be doing with our industry partner, China Mobile, after reviewing the CTA test results.

What is CTA?

CTA stands for China type approval which is a certificate granted to a product that meets a set of regulatory, technical and safety requirements. Generally, type approval is required before a product is allowed to be sold in a particular country.

Topics covered:

  • CTA Level 1-4 test cases and developed a new testing tool for pre-install applications.
    We reviewed the content and proposed design for all five of Migu scopes with design team’s input.
  • Also, we discussed the new RCS (Rich Communication Suite) integration with our Messaging app and prepared demos [link] for MWC Shanghai, Asia’s biggest mobile event happening at the end of this month.
  • And explored ideas around the design of mCloud service integration with our storage framework.

Achievements

The sprint was very productive and a great experience to sync up with old and new faces. We were all excited to explore ideas and work together on the next steps for China Mobile and Ubuntu.

Downtown in Beijing

I had some downtime to explore the city and have a taste of Beijing’s most interesting local dishes and potions with people I met from the sprint…

photo_2016-06-17_15-23-56

Michi has creatively named this one as snake juice.

Team dinner :)

A large team dinner.

photo_2016-06-28_15-40-59

The famous Great Wall of China.

The city lights of Beijing :)

The city lights of Beijing :)

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Timo Jyrinki

I recently obtained the newest Dell's Ubuntu developer offering, XPS 13 (2015, model 9343). I opted in for FullHD non-touch display, mostly because of better battery life, the actual no need for higher resolution, and matte screen which is great outside. Touch would have been "nice-to-have", but in my work I don't really need it.

The other specifications include i7-5600U CPU, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD [edit: lshw], and of course Ubuntu 14.04 LTS pre-installed as OEM specific installation. It was not possible to directly order it from Dell site, as Finland is reportedly not online market for Dell... The wholesale company however managed to get two models on their lists and so it's now possible to order via retailers. [edit: here are some country specific direct web order links however US, DE, FR, SE, NL]

In this blog post I give a quick look on how I started up using it, and do a few observations on the pre-installed Ubuntu included. I personally was interested in using the pre-installed Ubuntu like a non-Debian/Ubuntu developer would use it, but Dell has also provided instructions for Ubuntu 15.04, Debian 7.0 and Debian 8.0 advanced users among else. Even if not using the pre-installed Ubuntu, the benefit from buying an Ubuntu laptop is obviously smaller cost and on the other hand contributing to free software (by paying for the hardware enablement engineering done by or purchased by Dell).

Unboxing

The Black Box. (and white cat)

Opened box.






First time lid opened, no dust here yet!
First time boot up, transitioning from the boot logo to a first time Ubuntu video.
A small clip from the end of the welcoming video.
First time setup. Language, Dell EULA, connecting to WiFi, location, keyboard, user+password.
Creating recovery media. I opted not to do this as I had happened to read that it's highly recommended to install upgrades first, including to this tool.
Finalizing setup.
Ready to log in!
It's alive!
Not so recent 14.04 LTS image... lots of updates.

Problems in the First Batch

Unfortunately the first batch of XPS 13:s with Ubuntu are going to ship with some problems. They're easy to fix if you know how to, but it's sad that they're there to begin with in the factory image. There is no knowledge when a fixed batch will start shipping - July maybe?

First of all, installing software upgrades stops. You need to run the following command via Dash → Terminal once: sudo apt-get install -f (it suggests upgrading libc-dev-bin, libc6-dbg, libc6-dev and udev). After that you can continue running Software Updater as usual, maybe rebooting in between.

Secondly, the fixed touchpad driver is included but not enabled by default. You need to enable the only non-enabled ”Additional Driver” as seen in the picture below or instructed in Youtube.

Dialog enabling the touchpad driver.

Clarification: you can safely ignore the two paragraphs below, they're just for advanced users like me who want to play with upgraded driver stacks.

Optionally, since I'm interested in the latest graphics drivers especially in case of a brand new hardware like Intel Broadwell, I upgraded my Ubuntu to use the 14.04.2 Hardware Enablement stack (matches 14.10 hardware support): sudo apt install --install-recommends libgles2-mesa-lts-utopic libglapi-mesa-lts-utopic linux-generic-lts-utopic xserver-xorg-lts-utopic libgl1-mesa-dri-lts-utopic libegl1-mesa-drivers-lts-utopic libgl1-mesa-glx-lts-utopic:i386
 
Even though it's much better than a normal Ubuntu 14.10 would be since many of the Dell fixes continue to be in use, some functionality might become worse compared to the pre-installed stack. The only thing I have noticed though is the internal microphone not working anymore out-of-the-box, requiring a kernel patch as mentioned in Dell's notes. This is not a surprise since the real eventual upstream support involves switching from HDA to I2S and during 14.10 kernel work that was not nearly done. If you're excited about new drivers, I'd recommend waiting until August when the 15.04 based 14.04.3 stack is available (same package names, but 'vivid' instead of 'utopic'). [edit: I couldn't resist myself when I saw linux-generic-lts-vivid (3.19 kernel) is already in the archives. 14.04.2 + that gives me working microphone again!] [edit 08/2015: full 14.04.3 HWE stack now available, improves graphics performance and features among else, everything seems good: sudo apt install --install-recommends linux-generic-lts-vivid libgles2-mesa-lts-vivid libglapi-mesa-lts-vivid xserver-xorg-lts-vivid libgl1-mesa-dri-lts-vivid libegl1-mesa-lts-vivid libgl1-mesa-glx-lts-vivid:i386 libegl1-mesa-lts-vivid libwayland-egl1-mesa-lts-vivid mesa-vdpau-drivers-lts-vivid libgl1-mesa-dri-lts-vivid:i386 ]

Conclusion

Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is an extremely capable laptop + OS combination nearing perfection, but not quite there because of the software problems in the launch pre-install image. The laptop looks great, feels like a quality product should and is very compact for the screen size.

I've moved over all my work onto it and everything so far is working smoothly in my day-to-day tasks. I'm staying at Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and using my previous LXC configuration to run the latest Ubuntu and Debian development versions. I've also done some interesting changes already like LUKS In-Place Conversion, converting the pre-installed Ubuntu into whole disk encrypted one (not recommended for the faint hearted, GRUB reconfiguration is a bit of a pain).

I look happily forward to working a few productive years with this one!

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Daniel Holbach

Daniel McGuire is unstoppable. The work I mentioned yesterday was great, here’s some more, showing what would happen when the user selects “Playing Music”.

help app - playing music

 

More feedback we received so far:

  • Kevin Feyder suggested using a different icon for the app.
  • Michał Prędotka asked if we were planning to add more icons/pictures and the answer is “yes, we’d love to if it doesn’t clutter up the interface too much”. We are going to start a call for help with the content soon.
  • Robin of ubuntufun.de asked the same thing as Michał and wondered where the translations were. We are going to look into that. He generally like the Ubuntu-like style.

Do you have any more feedback? Anything you’d like to look or work differently? Anything you’d like to help with?

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Daniel Holbach

Some of you might have noticed the Help app in the store, which has been around for a couple of weeks now. We are trying to make it friendlier and easier to use. Maybe you can comment and share your ideas/thoughts.

Apart from actual bugs and adding more and more useful content, we also wanted the app to look friendlier and be more intuitive and useful.

The latest trunk lp:help-app can be seen as version 0.3 in the store or if you run

bzr branch lp:help-app
less help-app/HACKING

you can run and check it out locally.

Here’s the design Daniel McGuire suggested going forward.

help-mockup

What are your thoughts? If you look at the content we currently have, how else would you expect the app to look like or work?

Thanks a lot Daniel for your work on this! :-)

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Daniel Holbach

15.04 is out!

ubuntu.com

 

And another Ubuntu release went out the the door. I can’t believe that it’s the 22nd Ubuntu release already.

There’s a lot to be excited about in 15.04. The first phone powered by Ubuntu went out to customers and new devices are in the pipeline. The underpinnings of the various variants of Ubuntu are slowly converging, new Ubuntu flavours saw the light of day (MATE and Desktop next), new features landed, new apps added, more automated tests were added, etc. The future of Ubuntu is looking very bright.

What’s Ubuntu Core?

One thing I’m super happy about is a very very new addition: Ubuntu Core and snappy. What does it offer? It gives you a minimal Ubuntu system, automatic and bulletproof updates with rollback, an app store and very straight-forward enablement and packaging practices.

It has been brilliant to watch the snappy-devel@ and snappy-app-devel@ mailing lists in recent weeks and notice how much interest from enthusiasts, hobbyists, hardware manufacturers, porters and others get interested and get started. If you have a look at Dustin’s blog post, you get a good idea of what’s happening. It also features a video of Mark, who explains how Ubuntu has adapted to the demands of a changing IT world.

One fantastic example of how Ubuntu Snappy is already powering devices you had never thought of is the Erle-Copter. (If you can’t see the video, check out this link.)

It’s simply beautiful how product builders and hobbyists can now focus on what they’re interested in: building a tool, appliance, a robot, something crazy, something people will love or something which might change a small art of the world somewhere. What’s taken out of the equation by Ubuntu is: having to maintain a linux distro.

Maintaining a linux distro

Whenever I got a new device in my home I could SSH into, I was happy and proud. I always felt: “wow, they get it – they’re using open source software, they’re using linux”. This  feeling was replaced at some stage, when I realised how rarely my NAS or my router received system updates. When I checked for changelog entries of the updates I found out how only some of the important CVEs of the last year were mentioned, sometimes only “feature updates” were mentioned.

To me it’s clear that not all product builders or hardware companies collaborate with the NSA and create backdoors on purpose, but it’s hard work to maintain a linux stack and to do it responsibly.

That’s why I feel Ubuntu Core is an offering that “has legs” (as Mark Shuttleworth would say): as somebody who wants to focus on building a great product or solving a specific use case, you can do just that. You can ship your business logic in a snap on top of Ubuntu Core and be done with it. Brilliant!

What’s next?

Next week is Ubuntu Online Summit (5-7 May). There we are going to discuss the plans for the next time and that’s where you can get involved, ask questions, bring up your ideas and get to know the folks who are working on it now.

I’ll write a separate blog post in the coming days explaining what’s happening next week, until then feel free to have a look at:

 

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Daniel Holbach

I already blogged about the help app I was working on a bit in the last time. I wanted to go into a bit more detail now that we reached a new milestone.

What’s the idea behind it?

In a conversation in the Community team we noticed that there’s a lot of knowledge we gathered in the course of having used Ubuntu on a phone for a long time and that it might make sense to share tips and tricks, FAQ, suggestions and lots more with new device users in a simple way.

The idea was to share things like “here’s how to use edge swipes to do X” (maybe an animated GIF?) and “if you want to do Y, install the Z app from the store” in an organised and clever fashion. Obviously we would want this to be easily editable (Markdown) and have easy translations (Launchpad), work well on the phone (Ubuntu HTML5 UI toolkit) and work well on the web (Ubuntu Design Web guidelines) too.

What’s the state of things now?

There’s not much content yet and it doesn’t look perfect, but we have all the infrastructure set up. You can now start contributing! :-)

screenshot of web editionscreenshot of web edition screenshot of phone app editionscreenshot of phone app edition

 

What’s still left to be done?

  • We need HTML/CSS gurus who can help beautifying the themes.
  • We need people to share their tips and tricks and favourite bits of their Ubuntu devices experience.
  • We need hackers who can help in a few places.
  • We need translators.

What you need to do? For translations: you can do it in Launchpad easily. For everything else:

$ bzr branch lp:ubuntu-devices-help
$ cd ubuntu-devices-help
$ less HACKING

We’ve come a long way in the last week and with the easy of Markdown text and easy Launchpad translations, we should quickly be in a state where we can offer this in the Ubuntu software store and publish the content on the web as well.

If you want to write some content, translate, beautify or fix a few bugs, your help is going to be appreciated. Just ping myself, Nick Skaggs or David Planella on #ubuntu-app-devel.

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Dustin Kirkland


Forget about The Year of the Linux Desktop...This is The Year of the Linux Countertop!

I'm talking about Linux on every form of Internet-connected embedded devices.  The Internet-of-Things is already upon us.  Sensors, smart watches, TVs, thermostats, security cameras, drones, printers, routers, switches, robots -- you name it.  

And with that backdrop, we are thrilled to introduce Snappy Ubuntu for Devices.  Ubuntu is now a possibility, on almost any device, anywhere.  Now that's exciting!

This is the same Snappy Ubuntu, with its atomic, transactional updates that we launched on each major public cloud last month -- extended and updated for 64-bit Intel, AMD and ARM devices.


Now, if you want a detailed, developer's look at building a Snappy Ubuntu image and running it on a BeagleBone, you're in luck!  I shot this little instructional video (using Cheese, GTK-RecordMyDesktop, and OpenShot).  Enjoy!


A transcript of the video follows...


  1. What is Snappy Ubuntu?
    • A few weeks ago, we introduced a new flavor of Ubuntu that we call “Snappy” -- an atomically, transactionally updated Operating System -- and showed how to launch, update, rollback, and install apps in cloud instances of Snappy Ubuntu in Amazon EC2, Microsoft Azure, and Google Compute Engine public clouds.
    • And now we’re showing how that same Snappy Ubuntu experience is the perfect operating system for today’s Cambrian Explosion of smart devices that some people are calling “the Internet of Things”!
    • Snappy Ubuntu Core bundles only the essentials of a modern, appstore powered Linux OS stack and hence leaves room both in size as well as flexibility to build, maintain and monetize very own device solution without having to care about the overhead of inventing and maintaining your own OS and tools from scratch. Snappy Ubuntu Core comes right in time for you to put your very own stake into stake into still unconquered worlds of things
    • We think you’ll love Snappy on your smart devices for many of the same reasons that there are already millions of Ubuntu machine instances in hundreds of public and private clouds, as well as the millions of your own Ubuntu desktops, tablets, and phones!
  2. Unboxing the BeagleBone
    • Our target hardware for this Snappy Ubuntu demo is the BeagleBone Black -- an inexpensive, open platform for hardware and software developers.
    • I paid $55 for the board, and $8 for a USB to TTL Serial Cable
    • The board is about the size of a credit card, has a 1GHz ARM Cortex A8 processor, 512MB RAM, and on board ethernet.
    • While Snappy Ubuntu will run on most any armhf or amd64 hardware (including the Intel NUC), the BeagleBone is perhaps the most developer friendly solution.
  3. The easiest way to get your Snappy Ubuntu running on your Beaglebone
    • The world of Devices has so many opportunities that it won’t be possible to give everyone the perfect vertical stack centrally. Hence Canonical is trying to enable all of you and provide you with the elements that get you started doing your innovation as quickly as possible. Since there will be many devices that won’t need a screen and input devices, we have developed “webdm”. webdm gives you the ability to manage your snappy device and consume apps without any development effort.
    • To installl you simply download our prebuilt WEB .img and dd it to your sd card.
    • After that all you ahve to do is to connect your beaglebone to a DHCP enabled local network and power it on.
    • After 1-2 minutes you go to http://webdm.local:8080 and can get onto installing apps from the snappy appstore without any further effort
    • Of course, we are still in beta and will continue give you more features and a greater experience over time; we will not only make the UI better, but also work on various customization options that allow you to deliver your own app store powered product without investing your development resources in something that already got solved.
  4. Downloading Snappy and writing to an sdcard
    • Now we’re going to build a Snappy Ubuntu image to run on our device.
    • Soon, we’ll publish a library of Snappy Ubuntu images for many popular devices, but for this demo, we’re going to roll our own using the tool, ubuntu-device-flash.
    • ls -halF mysnappy.img
    • sudo dd if=mysnappy.img of=/dev/mmblk0 bs=1M oflag=dsync
  5. Hooking up the BeagleBone
    • Insert the microsd card
    • Network cable
    • USB debug
    • Power/USB
  6. Booting Snappy and command line experience
    • Okay, so we’re ready for our first boot of Snappy!
    • Let’s attach to the USB/serial console using screen
    • Now, I’ll attach the power, and if you watch very carefully, you might get to see some a few boot messages.
    • snappy help
    • ifconfig
    • ssh ubuntu@10.0.0.105
  7. WebDM experience
    • snappy info
    • Shows we have the webdm framework installed
    • point browser to http://10.0.0.105:8080
    • Configuration
    • Store
  8. Conclusion
    • Hey how cool is that!  Snappy Ubuntu running on devices :-)
    • I’ve spent plenty of time and money geeking out over my Nest and Dropcam and Netatmo and WeMo lightswitches, playing with their APIs and hooking them up to If-This-Then-That.
    • But I’m really excited about a world where those types of devices are as accessible to me as my Ubuntu servers and desktops!
    • And from what I’ve shown you here, with THIS, I think we can safely say that that we’ve blown right past the year of the Linux desktop.
    • This is the year of the Linux countertop!

Cheers,
Dustin

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Timo Jyrinki

If you're running an Android device with GNU userland Linux in a chroot and need a full network access over USB cable (so that you can use your laptop/desktop machine's network connection from the device), here's a quick primer on how it can be set up.

When doing Openmoko hacking, one always first plugged in the USB cable and forwarded network, or like I did later forwarded network over Bluetooth. It was mostly because the WiFi was quite unstable with many of the kernels.

I recently found out myself using a chroot on a Nexus 4 without working WiFi, so instead of my usual WiFi usage I needed network over USB... trivial, of course, except that there's Android on the way and I'm a Android newbie. Thanks to ZDmitry on Freenode, I got the bits for the Android part so I got it working.

On device, have eg. data/usb.sh with the following contents.

#!/system/xbin/sh
CHROOT="/data/chroot"

ip addr add 192.168.137.2/30 dev usb0
ip link set usb0 up
ip route delete default
ip route add default via 192.168.137.1;
setprop net.dns1 8.8.8.8
echo 'nameserver 8.8.8.8' >> $CHROOT/run/resolvconf/resolv.conf
On the host, execute the following:
adb shell setprop sys.usb.config rndis,adb
adb shell data/usb.sh
sudo ifconfig usb0 192.168.137.1
sudo iptables -A POSTROUTING -t nat -j MASQUERADE -s 192.168.137.0/24
echo 1 | sudo tee /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward
sudo iptables -P FORWARD ACCEPT
This works at least with Ubuntu saucy chroot. The main difference in some other distro might be whether the resolv.conf has moved to /run or not. You should be now all set up to browse / apt-get stuff from the device again.

Update: Clarified that this is to forward the desktop/laptop's network connection to the device so that network is accessible from the device over USB.
Update2, 09/2013: It's also possible to get working on the newer flipped images. Remove the "$CHROOT" from nameserver echoing and it should be fine. With small testing it got somehow reset after a while at which point another run of data/usb.sh on the device restored connection.

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Daniel Holbach

Whether or not Ubuntu Edge will get the green light or not (read Joey’s great 5 Reasons Why You Should Stop What You’re Doing & Pledge to #UbuntuEdge), everybody’s hard at work making Ubuntu Touch, the beautiful mobile OS happen.

The 7

Two weeks ago we had our first Ubuntu Touch Porting Clinic and it went quite well. We found and fixed a number of issues in our tools, our porting guide and many porters turned up to ask their questions and update the images.

There’s also still Michael Hall’s offer to win an OPPO Find 5. If you are interested in winning it, or work on an existing port, create a new one and generally get Ubuntu Touch on devices out there, show up, talk to the Ubuntu Touch engineers, find out what’s happening and how to get involved.

It’s all happening

Or reach us on the ubuntu-phone mailing list.

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Daniel Holbach

In the last weeks I blogged a couple of times about how we want to get Ubuntu out to more and more users in a much much easier way. It would be great if we could have gotten all images built in the data centre, but unfortunately do redistributability issues (some firmwares, blobs and proprietary kernel modules) not allow us to redistribute them easily.
Another issue were some short-comings in our infrastructure, which have to some degree been fixed already.

Anyway… we wanted to make it easier and take sort of a short-cut, so the unstoppable Sergio Schvezov sat down and restructured phablet-tools to let us much more easily support community ports of Ubuntu Touch.

What does this mean?

The four

Up until now, phablet-flash just supported these four devices: Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 4, Nexus 7 and Nexus 10. That was it.

After some discussions with port maintainers around the globe, we are quite happy to announce that we are now adding the following community ports to the mix: HTC Desire Z, Samsung Galaxy S2, Huawei Ascend P1. Now the family of phablet-flash‘able devices would look like this:

The 7

 

Once Sergio’s branch has landed, you will be able to just run
phablet-flash community --device u9200

to flash your device. (The above would be what you’d need to type in for a Huawei Ascend P1.) Until then you can just bzr branch lp:~sergiusens/phablet-tools/flash_change and run it from there.

More and more devices are on the way, and the process for telling phablet-flash about your port is actually quite easy.

You can help!

If you have any of the devices listed on our Touch Devices list, and you made a backup of things and you generally know your way around in terms of flashing, etc. Do the following:

  1. Check if your port is registered already. If yes, great.
    If not, please talk to the port maintainers listed on the page linked from our devices list and follow the instructions for registering the port.
  2. bzr branch lp:~sergiusens/phablet-tools/flash_change
    cd flash_change
    ./phablet-flash community --device <vendor> (ie, i9100)
  3. Give feedback on the ubuntu-phone mailing list.

Update: now it’s just
bzr branch lp:phablet-tools; cd phablet-tools
./phablet-flash community --device <vendor>

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Daniel Holbach

These are very exciting times for Ubuntu Touch. Not only is the Ubuntu Edge, an Ubuntu super-phone, being funded right now, but we are also making lots of progress on getting Ubuntu running perfectly on phones and tablets near you.

Ubuntu Touch

I blogged about this a couple of times now, but Ubuntu Touch has been ported to LOTS of devices in the meantime. If we consult our Touch Devices list, there are 45 working ports, with 30 more in progress, and across 21 different brands. This is awesome. Now it’s time to bring all of them into the fold.

There are two things we have to do:

  1. Update some of the ports to the flipped container model. This switch has been happening over the last couple of weeks, but we’re there now. Android bits now run on top of an Ubuntu container. Some of the images still need to be updated to benefit from this.
  2. Enable the ports in phablet-flash. Yes, you read correctly. Since the announce of the Touch preview, we only supported four devices (Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 4, Nexus 7 and Nexus 10). We always wanted to make it easier to flash all other devices too, and now we’re almost there: If you as an image maintainer make some information available, phablet-flash will soon be able to pick it up.

Updating your image to the new world order is something we are discussing today, 1st August, in #ubuntu-touch on irc.freenode.net. We are having an Ubuntu Touch Porting Clinic today. So bring your device, your questions and we’ll help you get set up for the new image formats.

If you want your images to be supported by phablet-flash, that can be easily arranged too. Follow this process, to document how the flashing of your image works. Check out the latest branch of phablet-flash (not yet landed in trunk) to try out if your image works: lp:~sergiusens/phablet-tools/flash_change.

As always: if you have any questions, talk to us on #ubuntu-touch on irc.freenode.net or on the ubuntu-phone mailing list.

Update: now it’s just
bzr branch lp:phablet-tools; cd phablet-tools
./phablet-flash community --device <vendor>

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Daniel Holbach

The unstoppable Sergio Schvezov is working on bug 1201811 right now. Once it’s fixed this should put is into a position where users of devices for which we have Ubuntu Touch images (and not just the four devices we supported right from the start) can just use phablet-flash. This doesn’t mean that they are “officially supported” or that they’re built daily in the Canonical data centre, but that you can make use of the images much more easily.

Over time we still want to build more images in the data centre in a regular fashion. One of the big blockers there has been information about the redistributability of firwmare, blobs and closed kernel modules. If you have information about the licenses any of these, it’d be great if you could help with updating the Touch device pages.

On Thursday, 1st August we are going to hold a Ubuntu Touch Porting Clinic in #ubuntu-touch on irc.freenode.net where you will be able to ask all the questions you have and our local experts can help you with updating your image(s) to the new world order. We hope to see you there!

Ubuntu Touch

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Daniel Holbach

Some weeks ago I wrote a blog post and shared a personal view on Ubuntu’s history as a project. In there I explained (among other things) my view that Ubuntu as a project has quite often taken hard decisions to bring something new and exciting to people. The goal always was the same: bring open source in a beautiful form to as many people as possible. If I look around me today, it’s just beautiful to see what we’ve achieved. In conversations it’s easy for me to explain what I work on, almost everybody has heard of Ubuntu or Linux or Open Source. Lots of people, even folks outside the tech scene, try out Ubuntu every day, and are quite happy with what we brought to the table.

In recent months we drastically increased the pace though. It’s amazing to see how many teams work on the phone, on porting, on our app story and on making one Ubuntu happen across all kinds of devices. My gut feeling was that with every new video showing off another new working part, the buzz and excitement grew. “We actually can pull this off” seems to be the message everyone is getting. It makes me proud being part of this and happy to see that this is coming to fruition.

Starting the Ubuntu Edge project was another bold move in this regard. Not only working with carriers and hardware manufacturers on bringing out a device running Ubuntu, which is already fantastic on its own terms, but getting out a high-end device which showcases our vision for a converged device, seems to have excited many people around the globe. Press coverage, comments on blog posts and the incredible amounts of backers in such short time all seem to say “CAN’T WAIT!”.

If you are excited about “one Ubuntu on all kinds of devices”, want to help make this a reality, consider pledging as well. If you are looking for a new phone anyway, one which you can use as your PC as well, consider pledging a bit more. This is totally going to be worth it. :-)

(Can’t see the video, click here.)

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Timo Jyrinki

I'd like to modify my discussion comment and earlier thoughts into a short blog post touching only some of the technical concerns voiced, and my opinion to those.

Claim (my version): Ubuntu/Canonical is going the "Google route" to become another Android, while Android has not benefited the Linux ecosystem in any way, forking everything

Firstly, Ubuntu is open to development and community for also mobile and tablet - Android has none of that, just code drops that get modded. (yes, some people have a problem with CLA like Canonical's or Qt's, I have no problem with those - let's keep that discussion elsewhere). Ubuntu contributes back to Debian and upstream projects like Qt - those upstream projects it's not upstream of itself. There are not too many free software mobile UIs for example. SHR has some E17 apps, Nemo Mobile a handful of Qt apps and so on.

Secondly, I disagree about Android - even in its current shape and after creating everything from scratch with mobile on mind, Android has done tremendous things for the free software community, kernel development, mobile device driver and making things like Replicant possible. If those aren't directly seen on the desktop side, that's because it's not the desktop and most free software desktop users don't use free software mobile products (usually at most a vendor provided Android).

I feel people get too attached to software projects or even the desktop in general. The money to pay desktop has traditionally largely come from the server. As a discussion-heating example Wayland has been a great promise for 5 years and continues to be, yet no products use it (software products like distributions or hardware+software products). That's not a problem per se for a great and ambitious project, but it means no interested party has taken it to create products. I was very excited about Gallium3D and Wayland in 2008, but somewhat optimistic in believing they would conquer the world in one or two years. In perspective, I've always seen the "version staring" a common habit in enthusiasts me included. I think it extents to "shiny development projects that should be taken into production use immediately".

The Nokia N9 triumphs all other 2011 mobile phones in general and even the current user interfaces like iOS, Android and Windows Phone in general usability ideas (if only it'd run Cortex-A15 instead of OMAP3..). It uses X.org and Qt 4.7. Jolla's plans for their first phone at the end of this year? Qt 4.8, no Wayland. Like N9 which otherwise had unfortunate fate, I hope Jolla will sell millions of free software wielding products to the masses. The biggest problem with X.org is, though, the drivers, generally zero support from vendors so hard to make products. Hooking into Android EGL drivers and building on top of that seems a good compromise at the moment. Note that from product creation point of view it's not the non-shininess of X.org that IMHO is the blocker. Wayland and Mir may help on the driver side.

I want products!

I'd love to see more push to have actual products on the market, since otherwise we don't get free software to the masses. If Mir helps Ubuntu to do that in one year, fine (I don't know how it's going to be). Yes Mir is a new shiny project, but it's a very product/target oriented project one. If Android would be open as a project, it wouldn't hurt - other than feelings attached to the other projects especially by the core developers and fans of those - if it was the superior alternative from product creation perspective making all of X.org, upstart, systemd, Wayland, Pulseaudio, D-Bus, glibc less interesting to product creators while even more interest would go to Android. It's not so now, Android is not an open project in any sense, even though still beneficial for free software. Ubuntu will keep using a lot more of the traditional stack anyway than Android (which also just got rid of BlueZ), but I have zero problem of changing any of the components if it's visioned to be required to get finished, ready to use products out. IMHO the key is to get products out, and I hope all the parties manage to do that.

Of the traditional GNU/Linux desktop distributions only Ubuntu seems to be adapting for the mobile in large steps at the moment. The other distributions in the mobile playing field are: (Android/)Replicant, Mer/Sailfish, Firefox OS, Tizen, added with OpenEmbedded based distributions like SHR. Have you used those on a daily basis on your devices? I believe you should. I think KDE will bring with its Plasma Active - currently focusing on building on top of Mer - mobile power to the traditional GNU/Linux distributions, but otherwise it's all up to the new players - and Ubuntu.

Like many know, I used Debian exclusively on my primary phone for ca. two years before switching mostly to N9. During all that time, I already pondered why people and distributions are so focused on x86 and desktop. And the reason is that that's what their history is, and I stared at the wrong place - desktop distributions. I dismissed Android and some of the small newcomers in the mobile distro playing field, but it seems that big changes are needed to not need completely new players. I think Ubuntu is on the completely right track to both benefit from the history and adapt for the future. I still hope more developers to Debian Mobile, though!! Debian should be the universal operating system after all.

Disclaimer: I'm an Ubuntu community person from 2004, Debian Developer since 2008 and a contractor for Canonical for ca. 1 year. My opinions haven't changed during the 1 year, but I've learned a lot more of how free software is loved at Canonical despite critics.

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Timo Jyrinki

UDS GTA04 Hacking

I'm sitting at the Bella Sky lobby bar while UDS people keep pouring in. I guess I have to start this UDS with some hacking (and a little beer)! I bootstrapped an Ubuntu armhf rootfs and coupled it with QtMoko's kernel already earlier after I received my GTA04 but it didn't boot right away so I had nothing to report. I wanted armhf so I chose QtMoko's 'experimental' Debian armhf rootfs + boot files as the reference to look at while working on the Ubuntu rootfs. I now went through again some of the configuration files, and voilà:


Now running apt-get install unity over SSH :) It will require OpenGL ES 2.0 hw acceleration to run, now that the support was integrated in Ubuntu 12.10. I will therefore need to tinker what kind of OMAP3 armhf binary blobs there are available, and what's again the situation with X.org DDX driver as well. I always feel that the fun starts at this point for me, when I've the device booting and I can SSH in. That's why I'm happy the work from Golden Delicious GmbH and QtMoko helped me to get here...

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Timo Jyrinki

OpenPhoenux GTA04

Postman was on a kind mood yesterday. My OpenPhoenux GTA04 arrived! I had my newer Neo FreeRunner upgraded via the service from Golden Delicious.

First, something rare to behold in phones nowadays - Made in Bavaria:






As a sidenote, also rare now - my Nokia N9 is one of the last phones that had this:

It's sad that's now a thing of the past for both hardware assembly and software! But that's just a hint for new companies to step in.

But back to GTA04 - a quick boot to the pre-installed Debian w/ LXDE:






And then as a shortcut unpacked and booted into QtMoko (well, it's also Debian) instead to test that phone functionality also works - and it does:



Next up: brewing something of my own!

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Timo Jyrinki

Do you ever have those afternoons you get a ”great” idea and you've all the evening time for that task. The task is a relaxing one and won't need much attention, and you can watch a movie or something.  But then, it happens that the evening turns into night as you realize a couple of little details adding complexity to the idea, and the task turns out to be much more invasive to your evening than you thought?

In this example, I got the great idea to upgrade my Debian running NAS device (thanks Martin for everything!) to use ext4 instead of ext3. The kind of idea that takes a long time for relatively little practical benefit, but it just feels like a nice thing do when you've the extra amounts of nerd time available. It's basically just opening the NAS device up, mounting its hard disk to a laptop via external case, running the tune2fs and fsck then putting the disk back. It just takes a long time for the initial fsck (to make sure everything's intact) and then the required fsck run to get ext4 mountable.

Only in this situation, it would have been beneficial to have the ext4 support in the flashed initramfs before the migration. So... before the photo below, I've already:

  1. done the ext4 migration and fsck:s
  2. screwed the disk back to the NAS case, attached cables and found that it doesn't boot
  3. (on the laptop with the hard disk attached again tried manually unpacking initramfs and adding ext4 module... also had time to bind mount everything and chroot into the ARM system to run update-initramfs manually... also tried booting with those... until remembered the simple fact that the /boot partition is only for show and also the initramfs is loaded directly from flash)
  4. copied the main root filesystem content from the original disk to another external disk with ext3 partition
  5. attached the another disk (with same UUID:s) to the QNAP NAS device, booted, double-checked that I have now ext4 specified under /etc/initramfs-tools/modules, reconfigured the linux image that also regenerates initramfs and flashes it
And in the photo, what's happening is that:
  1. I've again the original disk reattached and system booted with the initramfs generated and flashed from the ext3 disk
  2. the NAS device is hanging in the air, cover open, from the closet where I've things stuffed in (normally secured with cable ties), and I need to support it with a knee or one hand since the 2TB disk is much heavier than the small SSD I used as the ext3 disk so the power cable and RJ-45 cable would have pretty heavy load
  3. Since I've only one hand in use and can't use a laptop, I'm logging in via my Nokia N9 and then reflashing the kernel + initramfs from this original disk, just to make sure everything is now alright and also after that flashing it still boots (it does!). Note that I feel like the setup is secure enough for non-interrupted flashing so that I can indeed support the NAS with a knee, use one hand to keep N9 and another hand to take a photo with a camera.

And so we have had a productive and educating afternoon/evening/night once again. Does this ever happen to you?

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Colin Ian King

I've been fortunate to get my hands on an Intel ® 520 2.5" 240GB Solid State Drive so I thought I'd put it through some relatively simple tests to see how well it performs.

Power Consumption


My first round of tests involved seeing how well it performs in terms of power consumption compared to a typical laptop spinny Hard Disk Drive.  I rigged up a Lenovo X220i (i3-2350M @ 2.30GHz) running Ubuntu Precise 12.04 LTS (x86-64) to a Fluke 8846A precision digital multimeter and then compared the SSD with a 320GB Seagate ST320LT020-9YG142 HDD against some simple I/O tests.  Each test scenario was run 5 times and I based my results of the average of these 5 runs.

The Intel ® 520 2.5" SSD fits into conventional drive bays but comes with a black plastic shim attached to one side that has to be first removed to reduce the height so that it can be inserted into the Lenovo X220i low profile drive bay. This is a trivial exercise and takes just a few moments with a suitable Phillips screwdriver.   (As a bonus, the SSD also comes with a 3.5" adapter bracket and SATA 6.0 signal and power cables allowing it to be easily added into a Desktop too).

In an idle state, the HDD pulled ~25mA more than the SSD, so in overall power consumption terms the SSD saves ~5%, (e.g. adds ~24 minutes life to an 8 hour battery).

I then exercised the ext4 file system with Bonnie++ and measured the average current drawn during the run and using the idle "baseline" calculated the power consumed for the duration of the test.    The SSD draws more current than the HDD, however it ran the Bonnie++ test ~4.5 times faster and so the total power consumed to get the same task completed was less, typically 1/3 of the power of the HDD.

Using dd, I next wrote 16GB to the devices and found the SSD was ~5.3 times faster than the HDD and consumed ~ 1/3 the power of the HDD.    For a 16GB read, the SSD was ~5.6 times faster than the HDD and used about 1/4 the power of the HDD.

Finally, using tiobench I calculated that the SSD was ~7.6 times faster than the HDD and again used about 1/4 the power of the HDD.

So, overall, very good power savings.  The caveat is that since the SSD consumes more power than the HDD per second (but gets way more I/O completed) one can use more power with the SSD if one is using continuous I/O all the time.    You do more, and it costs more; but you get it done faster, so like for like the SSD wins in terms of reducing power consumption.

 

Boot Speed


Although ureadhead tries hard to optimize the inode and data reads during boot, the HDD is always going to perform badly because of seek latency and slow data transfer rates compared to any reasonable SSD.   Using bootchart and five runs the average time to boot was ~7.9 seconds for the SSD and ~25.8 seconds for the HDD, so the SSD improved boot times by a factor of about 3.2 times.  Read rates were topping ~420 MB/sec which was good, but could have been higher for some (yet unknown) reason. 

 

Palimpsest Performance Test


Palimpsest (aka "Disk Utility") has a quick and easy to use drive benchmarking facility that I used to measure the SSD read/write rates and access times.  Since writing to the drive destroys the file system I rigged the SSD up in a SATA3 capable desktop as a 2nd drive and then ran the tests.  Results are very impressive:

Average Read Rate: 535.8 MB/sec
Average Write Rate: 539.5 MB/sec
Average Access Time: sub 0.1 milliseconds.

This is ~7 x faster in read/write speed and ~200-300 x faster in access time compared to the Seagate HDD.

File System Benchmarks


So which file system performs best on the SSD?  Well, it depends on the use case. There are may different file system benchmarking tools available and each one addresses different types of file system behaviour.   Which ever test I use it most probably won't match your use case(!)  Since SSDs have very small latency overhead it is worth exercising various file systems with multiple threaded I/O read/writes and see how well these perform.  I rigged up the threaded I/O benchmarking tool tiobench to exercise ext2, ext3, ext4, xfs and btrfs while varying the number of threads from 1 to 128 in powers of 2.  In theory the SSD can do multiple random seeks very efficiently, so this type of testing should show the point where the SSD has optimal performance with multiple I/O requests.

 

Sequential Read Rates

Throughput peaks at 32-64 threads and xfs performs best followed by ext4, both are fairly close to the maximum device read rate.   Interestingly btrfs performance is always almost level.

Sequential Write Rates


xfs is consistently best, where as btrfs performs badly with the low thread count.

 

Sequential Read Latencies



These scale linearly with the number of threads and all file systems follow the same trend.

 

 Sequential Write Latencies



Again, linear scaling of latencies with number of threads.

Random Read Rates


Again, best transfer rates seem to occur at with 32-64 threads, and btrfs does not seem to perform that well compared to ext2, ext3, ext4 and xfs

Random Write Rates



Interestingly ext2 and ext3 fair well with ext4 and xfs performing very similarly and btrfs performing worst again.

 

Random Read Latencies



Again the linear scaling with latency as thread count increases with very similar performance between all file systems.  In this case, btrfs performs best.

Random Write Latencies


With random writes the latency is consistently flat, apart from the final data point for ext4 at 128 threads which could be just due to an anomaly.

Which I/O scheduler should I use?

 

Anecdotal evidence suggests using the noop scheduler should be best for an SSD.  In this test I exercised ext4, xfs and btrfs with Bonnie++ using the CFQ, Noop and Deadline schedulers.   The tests were run 5 times and below are the averages of the 5 test runs.

ext4:




CFQNoopDeadline
Sequential Block Write (K/sec):506046513349509893
Sequential Block Re-Write (K/sec):213714231265217430
Sequentual Block Read (K/sec):523525551009508774


So for ext4 on this SSD, Noop is a clear winner for sequential I/O.

xfs:




CFQNoopDeadline
Sequential Block Write (K/sec):514219514367514815
Sequential Block Re-Write (K/sec):229455230845252210
Sequentual Block Read (K/sec):526971550393553543


It appears that Deadline for xfs seems to perform best for sequential I/O.

 

btrfs:




CFQNoopDeadline
Sequential Block Write (K/sec):511799431700430780
Sequential Block Re-Write (K/sec):252210253656242291
Sequentual Block Read (K/sec):629640655361659538


And for btrfs, Noop is marginally better for sequential writes and re-writes but Deadline is best for reads.

So it appears for sequential I/O operations, CFQ is the least optimal choice with Noop being a good choice for ext4, deadline for xfs and either for btrfs.   However, this is just based on Sequential I/O testing and we should explore Random I/O testing before drawing any firm conclusions.

Conclusion

 

As can be seen from the data, SSD provide excellent transfer rates, incredibly short latencies as well as a reducing power consumption.   At the time of writing the cost per GB for an SSD is typically slightly more than £1 per GB which is around 5-7 times more expensive than a HDD.    Since I travel quite frequently and have damaged a couple of HDDs in the last few years the shock resistance, performance and power savings of the SSD are worth paying for.

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Timo Jyrinki

A couple of photos from the Ubuntu release fest in Tampere yesterday.

People gathering up before presentations

Tieto's Markus Mannio

Again, continuing on how Ubuntu is used at Tieto

A cut to the end of presentations, Trine 2 game licenses from Frozenbyte being raffled. A great game available on Linux.

Tablets running KDE Plasma, and Ubuntu for Android being demoed.

Someone else probably has photos of my generic Ubuntu 12.04 LTS presentation (what's new, what's next), and likewise for the other presentations (Ubuntu for Android, uTouch) held. Those will be available as slides and videos later on, although do note the whole event was in the crypto-language called Finnish.

Thanks to the organizers, sponsors and everyone I met, it was a great event with nice little dinner and wine served at the end!

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