Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'deprecation'

pitti

PostgreSQL 9.1 has had its first release candidate out for some two weeks without major problem reports, so it’s time to promote this more heavily. If you use PostgreSQL, now is the time to try it out and report problems.

We always strive to minimize the number of major versions which we have to support. They not only mean more maintenance for developers, but also more upgrade cycles for the users.

9.0 has not been in any stable Debian or Ubuntu release, and 9.1 final will be released soon. So we recently updated the current Ubuntu development release for 11.10 (“oneiric”) to 9.1. In Debian, the migration from 8.4/9.0 to 9.1 is making good progress, and there is not much which is left until postgresql-9.0 can be removed.

Consequently, I also removed 9.0 from my PostgreSQL backports PPA, as there is nothing any more to backport it from. However, that mostly means that people will now set up installations with 9.1 instead of 9.0, and won’t magically make your already installed 9.0 packages go away. They will just be marked as obsolete in the postgresql-common debconf note.

If you want to build future 9.0 packages yourself, you can do this based on the current branch: bzr branch lp:~pitti/postgresql/debian-9.0, get a the new upstream tarball, name it accordingly, add a new changelog with a new upstream version number, and run bzr bd to build the package (you need to install the bzr-builddeb package for this).

Update 2011-09-09: As I got a ton of pleas to continue the 9.0 backports for a couple of months, and to keep it in Debian unstable for a while longer, I put them back now. I also updated the removal request in Debian to point out that I’m mainly interested in getting 9.0 out of testing. I don’t mind much maintaining it for a couple of more months in unstable. My dear, I had no idea that my backports PPA was that popular!

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pitti

The day has come!

Yesterday I dropped the superfluous hal dependency from gparted, today I uploaded gdm to stop using hal for getting the keyboard layout and use libxklavier instead.

I also applied Julian Cristau’s udevified X.org branch to our xorg-edgers packages into my halsectomy PPA, created some udev rules for udev-based X.org input detection ([1], [2]), and off we go: that was the last hal reverse dependency. My system now fully boots and works without hal.

Hooray!

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pitti

In the merciless vendetta for purging hal we now reached another major milestone: gvfs, GNOME’s file system layer which handles USB storage as well as virtual file systems for libgphoto2 cameras, Bluetooth devices, audio CDs, or ftp/sftp/cifs mounts, is now fully ported to libgudev and doesn’t need hal at all any more. These long nights of porting weren’t in vain, after all \o/.

Now I just need to hassle David Zeuthen to apply the patches soon. Of course I couldn’t wait and already uploaded them to Karmic, so please test the hell out of it and let me know about problems.

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Halsectomy is a little greener once again. :-)

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pitti

The migration away from hal continues. Yesterday I uploaded new udev-extras and hal packages which move the handling of local device access from hal to /lib/udev/rules.d/70-acl.rules. Note that this temporarily breaks device access to old cameras which don’t speak the standard PTP protocol yet (and aren’t mass-storage). Most devices should work fine, though, please let me know if something fails (ubuntu-bug udev-extras).

I started a discussion with upstream about how to migrate the libgphoto bits away from hal to udev rules. It shoulnd’t actually be hard to do, and I’m keen on working on it, but it needs agreement between the libgphoto, udev-extras, and gvfs/KDE upstreams, so some coordination work is in order.

I also created a wiki page of the current migration status. Please edit if I forgot something. If you feel inclined to work on a particular bit, the Linux world will heavily appreciate this! It’s still a major Karmic goal to push the transition as far as possible, to avoid intrusive system changes for Ubuntu 10.04 (which is likely to become an LTS).

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