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Posts tagged with 'connect'

Chris Johnston

This week I will be attending Linaro Connect Q1.12 in Redwood City, California. Infact, I’m in an American Airlines plane at 34,000 feet heading there now. In-flight WiFi is awesome!

Over the past two months Michael Hall and myself have been doing a large amount of work on The Summit Scheduler to get it ready for Connect this week including modifying more than 2,400 lines of Summit code. You can find out more about that in my previous post.

I have a few things that I want to get out of Connect. The first is that I want to get feedback on the changes to Summit, as well as figure out what other things we may need to change. The second thing that I want to do is to learn more about the Beagleboard-xM that I have and how to use it for the many different things it can be used for. The third thing that I want to do is to learn about Linaro’s LAVA.

LAVA is an automated validation suite used to run all sorts of different tests on the products that Linaro produces. The things that I would like to get out of Connect in relation to LAVA are how to setup and run LAVA, how to set it up to run tests, and how to produce results and display those results the way that I want them.

If you are at Linaro Connect, and would be willing to talk with me about Summit and the way you use it and your thoughts on the changes, please contact me and we will set aside a time to meet.

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Michael Hudson-Doyle

A few weeks ago now, most of the Linaro engineers met at “Linaro Connect”, the new name for our get-together.  Linaro bootstrapped its processes by borrow heavily from Ubuntu, including the “two planning meetings, two hacking meetings” pattern. Over the last year though it’s become clear that this isn’t totally appropriate for Linaro and while we’re sticking to the same number of meetings, 4 a year, each meeting now has the same status and will be a mix of planning and hacking.  Based on a sample size of 1, this seems to be a good idea – last week’s meeting was excellent.  Very intense, which is why I never got around to blogging during the event, but also very productive.

The validation team had a dedicated hacking room, and on Monday we set up a “mini-Lab” that we could run tests on.  This took a surprisingly (and pleasingly) short amount of time, although we weren’t as neat about the cabling as we are in the real lab:

The main awkwardness in this kind of setup where you are connecting to the serial ports via USB rather than a console server is that the device names of the usb serial dongles is not predictable, and so naming boards becomes a challenge.  Dave worked out a set of hacks to mostly make this work, although I know nothing about the details.

Now that a few weeks have passed I can’t really remember what we did next </p>
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