Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'community'

Nicholas Skaggs

Google Code In 2015

As you may have heard, ubuntu has been selected as a mentoring organization for Google Code In (GCI). GCI is a opportunity for high school students to learn about and participate in open source communities. As a mentoring organization, we'll create tasks and review the students work. Google recruits the students and provides rewards for those who do the best work. The 2015 contest runs from December 7, 2015 to January 25, 2016.

Are you excited?
On December 7th, we'll be gaining a whole slew of potential contributors. Interested students will select from the tasks we as a community have put forth and start working them. That means we need your help to both create those tasks, and mentor incoming students.

I know, I know, it sounds like work. And it is a bit of work, but not as much as you think. Mentors need to provide a task description and be available for questions if needed. Once the task is complete, check the work and mark the task complete. You can be a mentor for as little as a single task. The full details and FAQ can be found on the wiki. Volunteering to be a mentor means you get to create tasks to be worked, and you agree to review them as well. You aren't expected to teach someone how to code, write documentation, translate, do QA, etc, in a few weeks. Breathe easy.

You can help!
I know there is plenty of potential tasks lying in wait for someone to come along and help out. This is a great opportunity for us as a community to both gain a potential contributor, and get work done. I trust you will consider being a part of the process.

I'm still not sure
Please, do have a look at the FAQ, as well as the mentor guide. If that's not enough to convince you of the merits of the program, I'd invite you to read one student's feedback about his experience participating last year. Being a mentor is a great way to give back to ubuntu, get invovled and potentially gain new members.

I'm in, what should I do?
Contact myself, popey, or José who can add you as a mentor for the organization. This will allow you to add tasks and participate in the process. Here's to a great GCI!

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Michael Hall

I’ve just published the most recent Community Donations Report highlighting where donations made to the Ubuntu community have been used by members of that community to promote and improve Ubuntu. In this report I’ve included links to write-ups detailing how those funds were put to use.

Over the past two years these donations have allowed Ubuntu Members to travel and speak at events, host local events, accelerate development and testing, and much more. Thank you all who have donated to this fund. You can help us do more, by donating to the fund and helping spread the word about it, both to potential donors and potential beneficiaries.

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Michael Hall

With the release of the Wily Werewolf (Ubuntu 15.10) we have entered into the Xenial Xerus (to be Ubuntu 16.04) development cycle. This will be another big milestone for Ubuntu, not just because it will be another LTS, but it will be the last LTS before we acheive convergence. What we do here will not only be supported for the next 5 years, it will set the stage for everything to come over that time as we bring the desktop, phone and internet-of-things together into a single comprehensive, cohesive platform.

To help get us there, we have a track dedicated to Convergence at this week’s Ubuntu Online Summit where we will be discussing plans for desktops, phones, IoT and how they are going to come together.


We’ll start the the convergence track at 1600 with the Ubuntu Desktop team talking about the QA (Quality Assurance) plans for the next LTS desktop, which will provide another 5 years of support for Ubuntu users. We’ll end the day with the Kubuntu team who are planning for their 16.04 (Xenial Xerus) release at 1900 UTC.


The second day kicks off at 1400 UTC with plans for what version of the Qt toolkit will ship in 16.04, something that now affects both the KDE and Unity 8 flavors of Ubuntu. That will be followed by development planning for the next Unity 7 desktop version of Ubuntu at 1500, and a talk on how legacy apps (.deb and X11 based) might be supported in the new Snappy versions of Ubuntu. We will end the day with a presentation by the Unity 8 developers at 1800 about how you can get started working on and contributing to the next generation desktop interface for Ubuntu.


The third and last day of the Online Summit will begin with a live Questions and Answers session at 1400 UTC about the Convergence plans in general with the project and engineering managers who are driving it forward. At 1500 we’ll take a look at how those plans are being realized in some of the apps already being developed for use on Ubuntu phones and desktop. Then at 1600 UTC members of the design team will be talking to independent app developers about how to design their app with convergence in mind. We will then end the convergence track with a summary from KDE developers on the state and direction of their converged UI, Plama Mobile.


Outside of the Convergence track, you’ll want to watch Mark Shuttleworth’s opening keynote at 1400 UTC on Tuesday, and Canonical CEO Jane Silber’s live Q&A session at 1700 UTC on Wednesday.

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David Planella

Ubuntu Online Summit
Starting on Tuesday 3rd to Thursday 5th of November, a new edition of the Ubuntu Online Summit is taking place next week.

Three days of free and live content all around Ubuntu and Open Source: discussions, tutorials, demos, presentations and Q+As for anyone to get in touch with the latest news and technologies, and get started contributing to Ubuntu.

The tracks

As in previous editions, the sessions runs along multiple tracks that group related topics as a theme:

  • App & scope development: the SDK and developer platform roadmaps, phone core apps planning, developer workshops
  • Cloud: Ubuntu Core on clouds, Juju, Cloud DevOps discussions, charm tutorials, the Charm, OpenStack
  • Community: governance discussions, community event planning, Q+As, how to get involved in Ubuntu
  • Convergence: the road to convergence, the Ubuntu desktop roadmap, requirements and use cases to bring the desktop and phone together
  • Core: snappy Ubuntu Core, snappy post-vivid plans, snappy demos and Q+As
  • Show & Tell: presentations, demos, lightning talks (read: things that break and explode) on a varied range of topics

The highlights

Here are some of my personal handpicks on sessions not to miss:

  • Opening keynote: Mark Shuttleworth, Canonical and Ubuntu founder will be opening the Online Summit with his keynote, on Tuesday 3rd Nov, 14:00 UTC
  • Ask the CEO: Jane Silber, Canonical’s CEO will be talking with the audience and answering questions from the community on her Q+A session, on Wednesday 4th Nov, 17:00 UTC
  • Snappy Clinic: join the snappy team on an interactive session about bringing robotics to Ubuntu – porting ROS apps to snappy Ubuntu Core, on Tuesday 3rd Nov, 18:00 UTC
  • JavaScript scopes hands-on: creating Ubuntu phone scopes is now easier than ever with JavaScript; learn all about it with resident scopes expert Marcus Tomlinson on Thursday 5th Nov, 15:00 UTC
  • An introduction to LXD: Stéphane Graber will be demoing LXD, the container hypervisor, and discussing features and upcoming plans on Thursday 5th Nov, 16:00 UTC
  • UbuCon Europe planning: a community team around the Ubuntu German LoCo will be getting together to plan the next in-person UbuCon Summit in Europe next year on Wednesday 4th Nov, 18:00 UTC

Check out the full schedule for more! >


Joining the summit is easy. Simply remember to:

Once you’ve done that, there are different ways of taking part online event via video hangouts and IRC:

  • Participate or watch sessions – everyone is welcome to participate and join a discussion to provide input or offer contribution. If you prefer to take a rear seat, that’s fine too. You can either subscribe to sessions, watch them on your browser or directly join a live hangout.
  • Propose a session – do you want to take a more active role in contributing to Ubuntu? Do you have a topic you’d like to discuss, or an idea you’d like to implement? Then you’ll probably want to propose a session to make it happen. There is still a week for accepting proposals, so why don’t you go ahead and propose a session?

Looking forward to seeing you all at the Summit!

The post The Ubuntu Online Summit starts next week appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

I am thrilled to announce the next big event in the Ubuntu calendar: the UbuCon Summit, taking place in Pasadena, CA, in the US, from the 21st to 22nd of January 2016, hosted at SCALE and with Mark Shuttleworth on the opening keynote.

Taking UbuCons to the next level

UbuCons are a remarkable achievement from the Ubuntu community: a network of conferences across the globe, organized by volunteers passionate about Open Source and about collaborating, contributing, and socializing around Ubuntu. The UbuCon at SCALE has been one of the most successful ones, and this year we are kicking it up a notch.

Enter the UbuCon Summit. In discussions with the Community Council, and after the participation of some Ubuntu team members at the Community Leadership Summit a few months ago, one of the challenges that we identified our community is facing was the lack of a global event to meet face to face after the UDS era. While UbuCons continue to thrive as regional conferences, one of the conclusions we reached was that we needed a way to bring everyone together on a bigger setting to complement the UbuCon fabric: the Summit.

The Summit is the expansion of the traditional UbuCon: more content and at a bigger scale. But at the same maintaining the grass-roots spirit and the community-driven organization that has made these events successful.

Two days and two tracks of content

During these two days, the event will be structured as a traditional conference with presentations, demos and plenaries on the first day and as an unconference for the second one. The idea behind the unconference is simple: participants will propose a set of topics in situ, each one of which will be scheduled as a session. For each session the goal is to have a discussion and reach a set of conclusions and actions to address the topics. Some of you will be familiar with the setting :)

We will also have two tracks to group sessions by theme: Users, for those interested in learning about the non-tech, day-to-day part of using Ubuntu, but also including the component on how to contribute to Ubuntu as an advocate. The Developers track will cover the sessions for the technically minded, including app development, IoT, convergence, cloud and more. One of the exciting things about our community is that there is so much overlap between these themes to make both tracks interesting to everyone.

All in all, the idea is to provide a space to showcase, learn about and discuss the latest Ubuntu technologies, but also to focus on new and vibrant parts of the community and talk about the challenges (and opportunities!) we are facing as a project.

A first-class team

In addition to the support and guidance from the Community Council, the true heroes of the story are Richard Gaskin, Nathan Haines and the Ubuntu California LoCo. Through the years, they have been the engines behind the UbuCon at SCALE in LA, and this time around they were quick again to jump and drive the Summit wagon too.

This wouldn’t have been possible without the SCALE team either: an excellent host to UbuCon in the past and again on this occasion. In particular Gareth Greenaway and Ilan Rabinovitch, who are helping us with the logistics and organization all along the way. If you are joining the Summit, I very much recommend to stay for SCALE as well!

More Summit news coming soon

On the next few weeks we’ll be sharing more details about the Summit, revamping the global UbuCon site and updating the SCALE schedule with all relevant information.

Stay tuned for more, including the session about the UbuCon Summit at the next Ubuntu Online Summit in two weeks.

Looking forward to seeing some known and new faces at the UbuCon Summit in January!

Picture from an original by cm-t arudy

The post Announcing the UbuCon Summit appeared first on David Planella.

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Daniel Holbach


This morning I chatted with Laura Czajkowski and we quickly figured out that wily is our 23rd Ubuntu release. Crazy in a way – 23 releases, who would’ve thought? But on the other hand, Ubuntu is a constant evolution of great stuff becoming even better. Even after 11 years of Ubuntu I can still easily get excited about what’s new in Ubuntu and what is getting better. If you have read any of my recent blog entries you will know that snappy and snapcraft are a combination too good to be true. Shipping software on Ubuntu has never been that easy and I can’t wait for snappy and snapcraft to reach into further parts of Ubuntu. The 16.04 (‘xenial‘) cycle is going to deliver much more of this. Awesome!

But for now: enjoy the great work wrapped up in our wily 15.10 package. Take it, install it, give it to friends and family and spread great open source software in the world. :-)

When you download it, please consider making a donation. And if you do, please consider donating to “Community projects“. This is what allows us to help LoCos with events, fly people to conferences and do all kinds of other great things. We have docs online which explain who can apply for funding for which purposes and what exactly each penny was spent on previously.

Community donations

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James Mulholland

We sat down with Dekko star Dan Chapman to get an insight into how he got involved with Ubuntu and his excitement for the release of the Pocket Desktop.


Dan has been an active member of the Community since 2013, where he has worked closely with our Design Team to create one of our first convergent showcase apps: Dekko. He also helps out with the Ubuntu QA community with package testing and automated tests for the ubuntu-autopilot-tests project.

The Dekko app is an email client that we are currently developing to work across all devices: mobile, tablet and desktop. If you are interested in contributing to Dekko, whether that be writing code, testing, documentation, translations or have some super cool ideas you would just like to discuss. Then please do get in touch, all contributions are welcomed!

Dan can be reached by email or pop by #dekko on or see his wiki page

Early Dekko exploration

Dekko Phone Retro 1

What inspired you to contribute?

I first got involved with the Community in 2013, where Nicholas Skaggs introduced me to the Quality Team to write test cases for automated testing for the Platform. I can’t remember why I started exactly, but I saw it as an opportunity to improve it. Ever since then it’s been a well worth it experience.

What is it about open source that you like?

I like the fact that in the Community everyone has a common goal to build something great.

How does it fit into your lifestyle?

I study from home at the moment so I have to divide my time between my family, Ubuntu and my studies.

What I do for Ubuntu and my course are quite closely tied. The stuff I do for Ubuntu is giving me real life practical skills that I can relate to my course, which is mainly theory based.

Have you made your work with the Ubuntu Community an integral part of your studies as well?

I’m actually doing a project at the moment that is to do with my work on Dekko, but it’s for interacting with an exchange server and implementing a client side library. Hopefully when that’s done I can bring it into Dekko on a later date. I try to keep my interests parallel.

How much time does it take you to develop an app?

Quite a large proportion of my time goes towards Ubuntu.

How is it working remotely?

I find it more than effective. I mean it would be great to meet people face-to-face too.

Dekko development

Dekko Phone Retro 2

What are you most excited about?

Being able to have a full-blown computer in my pocket. As soon as it’s available i’m having the pocket desktop.

Do you use your Ubuntu phone as your main device?

I do yes. The rest of the family do too. I even got my eldest boy, who’s 9 to use it, as well as my partner and mother-in-law.

How is it working with the Ubuntu Design Team?

It’s been great actually because i’m useless at design. There’s always something to improve on, so even if the designs aren’t ready there’s still enough to work on. There hasn’t been big waits in-between or waiting for you guys as you’re busy. The support is there if you need it.

Have you faced any challenges when working on an app for many form factors (phone, tablet, desktop etc)?

The only challenge is getting the design before the toolkit components are ready. It was a case of creating custom stuff and trying to not cause myself too much pain when I have to switch. The rest has been plain sailing as they toolkit is a breeze to use, and the Design team keep me informed of any changes.

What’s the vibe like in the Community at the moment?

I speak to a fair few of them now through Telegram, that seems to be the place to talk now there’s an app for it. It’s nice you can ping your question to anyone and you’ll get an immediate response relatively quickly. Alan Pope, always gives you answers.

What are you thoughts on the Pocket Desktop?

It is exciting as it’s something different. I don’t think there’s competition, as we all have different target audiences we are reaching to. I’m really excited about where the Platform is heading.

The future of convergent Dekko

Dekko Future

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Michael Hall

Photo from Aaron Honeycutt

Nicholas Skaggs presenting at UbuCon@FOSSETCON 2014

Thanks to the generous organizers of FOSSETCON who have given us a room at their venue, we will be having another UbuCon in Orlando this fall!

FOSSETCON 2015 will be held at the Hilton Orlando Lake Buena Vista‎, from November 19th through the 21st. This year they’ve been able to get Richard Stallman to attend and give a keynote, so it’s certainly an event worth attending for anybody who’s interested in free and open source software.

UbuCon itself will be held all day on the 19th in it’s own dedicate room at the venue. We are currently recruiting presenters to talk to attendees about some aspect of Ubuntu, from the cloud to mobile, community involved and of course the desktop. If you have a fun or interesting topic that you want to share with, please send your proposal to me at

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Nicholas Skaggs

I wanted to share a unique opportunity to get invovled with ubuntu and testing. Last cycle, as part of a datacenter shuffle, the automated installer testing that was occurring for ubuntu flavors stopped running. The images were being test automatically via a series of autopilot tests, written originally by the community (Thanks Dan et la!). These tests are vital in helping reduce the burden of manual testing required for images by running through the base manual test cases for each image automatically each day.

When it was noticed the tests didn't run this cycle, wxl from Lubuntu accordingly filed an RT to discover what happened. Unfortunately, it seems the CI team within Canonical can no longer run these tests. The good news however is that we as a community can run them ourselves instead.

To start exploring the idea of self-hosting and running the tests, I initially asked Daniel Chapman to take a look. Given the impending landing of dekko in the default ubuntu image, Daniel certainly has his hands full. As such Daniel Kessel has offered to help out and begun some initial investigations into the tests and server needs. A big thanks to Daniel and Daniel!

But they need your help! The autopilot tests for ubiquity have a few bugs that need solving. And a server and jenkins need to be setup, installed, and maintained. Finally, we need to think about reporting these results to places like the isotracker. For more information, you can read more about how to run the tests locally to give you a better idea of how they work.

The needed skillsets are diverse. Are you interested in helping make flavors better? Do you have some technical skills in writing tests, the web, python, or running a jenkins server? Or perhaps you are willing to learn? If so, please get in touch!

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Michael Hall

Picture by Aaron HoneycuttThe next Ubuntu Global Jam is coming up next month, the weekend of August 7th through the 9th. Last cycle we introduced the Ubuntu Global Jam Packs, and they were such a big hit that we’re bringing them back this cycle.

Jam Packs are a miniaturized version of the conference packs that Canonical has long offered to LoCo Teams who show off Ubuntu at events. These smaller packs are designed specifically for LoCo Teams to use during their own Global Jam events, to help promote Ubuntu in their area and encourage participation with the team.

What’s in the Global Jam Pack?

The Global Jam Pack contains a number of give-away items to use during your team’s Global Jam event. This cycle the packs will contain:

  • 20 DVDs
  • 20 sticker sheets
  • 20 pens
  • 20 notebooks

There will also be one XL t-shirt for the person who is organizing the event.

Who can request a Global Jam Pack?

The Global Jam Pack is available to any LoCo team that is running a Global Jam event. It doesn’t matter if your team has verified status or not, if you are hosting a Global Jam event, you can request a Jam Pack for it.

How do I request a Global Jam Pack?

The first thing you need to do is plan a Global Jam event for your LoCo team. Global Jams happen one weekend each cycle, and are a chance for you to meet up with Ubuntu contributors in your area to work together on improving some aspect of Ubuntu. They don’t require a lot of setup, just pick a day, time and location for everybody to show up.

Once you know when and where you will be holding your event, you need to register it in the LoCo Team Portal, making sure it’s listed as being part of the Ubuntu Global Jam parent event. You can use your event page on the portal to advertise your event, and allow people to register their intention to attend.

Next you will need to fill out a community donations request for your Jam Pack. In there you will be asked for your name and shipping address. In the field for describing your request, be sure to include the link to your team’s Global Jam event.

Need help?

If you need help or advice in organizing a Global Jam event, join #ubuntu-locoteams on Freenode IRC to talk to folks from the community who have experience running them. We’ve also documented some great advice to help you with organization on our wiki, including a list of suggested topics for you to work on during your event.

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Nicholas Skaggs

On Community Governance

Recently the Community Council formally requested Jonathan Riddell to step away from his leadership role in the Kubuntu community. For many people this came as a shock. Who are the community council? Why would they have authority over Kubuntu and Jonathan? And what did he do to deserve this?

These are all valid questions! To be clear, despite being a part of the community team at Canonical, I was not a part of this decision. Nor were my fellow team members apart from Daniel and Michael who serve on the CC. It's important to remember this decision came from the Community Council.

For my part, I'd like to talk a little about the governance structure of ubuntu as I think it's important. Regardless of what you think about the decision, Johnathan, Kubuntu, or Canonical, I think it's a good idea we answer the questions of just who is the Community Council and what authority they have within the project. I've tried to present the facts about governance as clearly as possible here to the best of my ability, but I am happily corrected.

Who are the community council?
The are a group of volunteers who were elected by all of us who are community members. Mark sits as a permanent member and acts as SABDFL. He does vet out candidates, but anyone can be nominated. The elections are open and the most recent had several candidates to choose from. At the moment, two of the seven elected members (with Mark being the permanent 8th member) are Canonical employees.

What does the community council do?
One of the biggest responsibilities of the council are to act as a mediator and arbitrator for conflict between folks within the community. In addition, they help oversee the other councils, delegate responsibilities and ensure the community upholds the Code of Conduct.

Why do we need a community council?
The community council exists to help ensure the community has a way of dealing with conflicts, resolving disputes and making hard decisions when there is otherwise no clear majority or easy answer. They also are one of the primary ways the Code of Conduct is enforced.

Should the community council have authority in this matter?
In a nutshell, yes. As the ultimate upholders in Code of Conduct violations, the community council should have authority for any such violation.

Should I blindly trust the community council?
Of course not! They are a like any other elected official and abuse of power is something we have to deal with as humans. Respect the position and authority of leaders, but never grant them a free pass. And make sure you vote!

So what about this decision?
The decision made by the CC in this case is not an easy one. That said, while I don't agree with how this decision was communicated, I do respect the authority and position of the council to weigh in on these matters. This is important! These folks deserve our respect as volunteers who freely give their time to help ubuntu!

I empathize greatly with the Kubuntu Council and community as such a decision seemingly has a large perceived effect. Perhaps the actual ramifications aren't as great as they appear? Perhaps not. I hope and trust Johnathan will continue working on KDE and kubuntu. My hope for Kubuntu is they emerge as a stronger community and continue to produce an awesome distro.

And as for my opinion on if the CC should have made this decision? Remember being a sideline observer in matters like this that you intrinsically don't have all the facts. It's easy to point fingers and assume things. Hindsight also makes it easy to say you would have made a different decision or went about it a different way. I don't envy the position of anyone in the community council. As I've not personally had the pleasure of working with Johnathan anywhere near the extent these folks have I can honestly say I don't know. But the reality is my opinion doesn't matter here. Keep in mind ubuntu is a meritocracy, and while all opinions are welcomed, not all cast equal weight.

So please respect the authority of our community governance structure. Respect those who serve on both councils. Not satisfied? We vote again on Community Council members this year! Think we should tweak/enhance/change our governance structure? I welcome the discussion! I enjoyed learning more about ubuntu governance and I challenge you to do the same before you let your emotions run with your decisions.

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Michael Hall

Ubuntu is sponsoring the South East Linux Fest this year in Charlotte North Carolina, and as part of that event we will have a room to use all day Friday, June 12, for an UbuCon. UbuCon is a mini-conference with presentations centered around Ubuntu the project and it’s community.

I’m recruiting speakers to fill the last three hour-long slots, if anybody is willing and able to attend the conference and wants to give a presentation to a room full of enthusiastic Ubuntu users, please email me at Topic can be anything Ubuntu related, design, development, client, cloud, using it, community, etc.

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Michael Hall

Ubuntu has been talking a lot about convergence lately, it’s something that we believe is going to be revolutionary and we want to be at the forefront of it. We love the idea of it, but so far we haven’t really had much experience with the reality of it.

image20150423_164034801I got my first taste of that reality two weeks ago, while at a work sprint in London. While Canonical has an office in London, it had other teams sprinting there, so the Desktop sprint I was at was instead held at a hotel. We planned to visit the office one day that week, it would be my first visit to any Canonical office, as well as my first time working at an actual office in several years. However, we also planned to meet up with the UK loco for release drinks that evening. This meant that we had to decide between leaving our laptops at the hotel, thus not having them to work on at the office, or taking them with us, but having to carry them around the pub all evening.

I chose to leave my laptop behind, but I did take my phone (Nexus 4 running Ubuntu) with me. After getting a quick tour of the office, I found a vacant seat at a desk, and pulled out my phone. Most of my day job can be done with the apps on my phone: I have email, I have a browser, I have a terminal with ssh, I can respond to our community everywhere they are active.

I spent the next couple of hours doing work, actual work, on my phone. The only problem I had was that I was doing it on a small screen, and I was burning through my battery. At one point I looked up and realized that the vacant desk I was sitting at was equipped with a laptop docking station. It had also a USB hub and an HDMI monitor cable available. If I had a slimport cable for my phone, I might have been able to plug it into this docking station and both power my phone and get a bigger screen to work with.

If I could have done that, I would have achieved the full reality of convergence, and it would have been just like if I had brought my laptop with me. Only with this I was able to simply slide it into my pocket when it was time to leave for drinks. It was tantalizingly close, I got a little taste of what it’s going to be like, and now I’m craving more of it.

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Michael Hall

A couple of years ago the Ubuntu download page introduced a way for users to make a financial contribution to the ongoing development of Ubuntu and it’s surrounding projects and community. Later a program was established within Canonical to make the money donated specifically for supporting the community available directly to members of the community who would use it to benefit the wider project.

During the last month, at the request of members of the Ubuntu community and the Community Council, we have undertaken a review of the this program. While conducting a more thorough analysis of the what was donated to us and when, it was discovered that we made an error in our initial reporting, which has unfortunately affected the accuracy of all subsequent reports as well.

What Happened?

Our first report, published in May of 2014, combined the amounts donated to the community slider and the amounts dispersed to the community during the previous four financial quarters. In that report we listed the amount donated from April 2013 to June 2013 as being a total of $34,353.63. However, when looking over all of the quarterly donations going back to the start of the program, we realized that this amount actually covered donations made from April 2013 all the way to October 2013.

This means that the figure contains both the amount donated during that Apr-Jun quarter, as well as duplicating the amounts listed as being donated for the Jul-Sep quarter, and a part of the Oct-Dec quarter. The actual amount donated during just the Apr-Jun 2013 quarter was $15,726.72. As a result of this, and the fact that it affected the carry over balanced for all subsequent reports, I have gone back and corrected all of these to reflect the correct figures.

Now for the questions:

Where are the updated reports?

The reports have not moved, you can still access them from the previously published URLs, and they are also listed on a new Reports page on the community website. The original report data has been preserved in a copy which is linked to at the top of each revised report.

Where did the money go?

No money has been lost or taken away from the program, this change is only a correction to the actual state of things. We had originally over-stated the amount that was donated, due to an error when reading the raw donation data at the time the first report was written.

How could a mistake like this happen?

The information we get is a summary of a summary of the raw data. At some point in the process the wrong number was put in the wrong place. All of these reports are manually written and verified, which often catches errors such as this, but in the very first report this error was missed.

Are these numbers trustworthy?

I understand that a reduction in the balance number, in conjunction with questions being raised about the operation of the program, will lead some people to question the honesty of this change. But the fact remains that we were asked to investigate this, we did find a discrepant, and correcting it publicly is the right thing for us to do, regardless of how it may look.

Is the community funding program in trouble?

Absolutely not. Even with this correction there has been more money donated to the community slider than we have been able to use. There’s still a lot more good that can be done, if you think you have a good use for some of it please fill out a request.

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Daniel Holbach

Next week we are going to have another Ubuntu Online Summit (5-7 May 2015). This is (among many other things) a great time for you to get involved with, learn about and help shape Ubuntu Snappy.

As I said in my last blog post I’m very impressed to see the general level of interest in Ubuntu Snappy given how new it is. It’ll be great to see who is joining the sessions and who is going to get involved.

For those of you who are new to it: Ubuntu Online Summit is an open event, where we’ll plan in hangouts and IRC the next Ubuntu release. You can

  • tune in
  • ask questions
  • bring up ideas
  • get to know the team
  • help out :-)

This is the preliminary schedule. Sessions might still move around a bit, but be sure to register for the event and subscribe to the blueprint/session – that way you are going to be notified of ongoing work and discussion.

Tuesday, 5th May 2015

Wednesday, 6th May 2015

Thursday, 7th May 2015

Please note that we are likely going to add more sessions, so you should definitely keep your eyes open and check the schedule every now and then.

I’m looking forward to seeing you all and seeing us shape what Snappy is going to be! See you next week!

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Ben Howard

I am pleased to announce initial Vagrant images [1, 2]. These images are bit-for-bit the same as the KVM images, but have a Cloud-init configuration that allows Snappy to work within the Vagrant workflow.

Vagrant enables a cross platform developer experience on MacOS, Windows or Linux [3].

Note: due to the way that Snappy works, shared file systems within Vagrant is not possible at this time. We are working on getting the shared file system support enabled, but it will take us a little bit to get going.

If you want to use Vagrant packaged in the Ubuntu archives, in a terminal run::

  • sudo apt-get -y install vagrant
  • cd <WORKSPACE>
  • vagrant init 
  • vagrant up
  • vagrant ssh
If you use Vagrant from [4] (i.e Windows, Mac or install the latest Vagrant) then you can run:
  • vagrant init ubuntu/ubuntu-15.04-snappy-core-edge-amd64
  • vagrant up
  • vagrant ssh

These images are a work in progress. If you encounter any issues, please report them to "" or ping me (utlemming) on



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Jouni Helminen

Ubuntu community devs Andrew Hayzen and Victor Thompson chat with lead designer Jouni Helminen. Andrew and Victor have been working in open source projects for a couple of years and have done a great job on the Music application that is now rolling out on phone, tablet and desktop. In this chat they are sharing their thoughts on open source, QML, app development, and tips on how to get started contributing and developing apps.

If you want to start writing apps for Ubuntu, it’s easy. Check out, get involved on Google+ Ubuntu App Dev –… – or contact – you are in good hands!

Check out the video interview here :)

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Michael Hall

A couple of weeks ago I had the opportunity to attend the thirteenth Southern California Linux Expo, more commonly known at SCaLE 13x. It was my first time back in five years, since I attended 9x, and my first time as a speaker. I had a blast at SCaLE, and a wonderful time with UbuCon. If you couldn’t make it this year, it should definitely be on your list of shows to attend in 2016.


Thanks to the efforts of Richard Gaskin, we had a room all day Friday to hold an UbuCon. For those of you who haven’t attended an UbuCon before, it’s basically a series of presentations by members of the Ubuntu community on how to use it, contribute to it, or become involved in the community around it. SCaLE was one of the pioneering host conferences for these, and this year they provided a double-sized room for us to use, which we still filled to capacity.

image20150220_100226891I was given the chance to give not one but two talks during UbuCon, one on community and one on the Ubuntu phone. We also had presentations from my former manager and good friend Jono Bacon, current coworkers Jorge Castro and Marco Ceppi, and inspirational community members Philip Ballew and Richard Gaskin.

I’d like thank Richard for putting this all together, and for taking such good care of those of us speaking (he made sure we always had mints and water). UbuCon was a huge success because of the amount of time and work he put into it. Thanks also to Canonical for providing us, on rather short notice, a box full of Ubuntu t-shirts to give away. And of course thanks to the SCaLE staff and organizers for providing us the room and all of the A/V equipment in it to use.

The room was recorded all day, so each of these sessions can be watched now on youtube. My own talks are at 4:00:00 and 5:00:00.

Ubuntu Booth

In addition to UbuCon, we also had an Ubuntu booth in the SCaLE expo hall, which was registered and operated by members of the Ubuntu California LoCo team. These guys were amazing, they ran the booth all day over all three days, managed the whole setup and tear down, and did an excellent job talking to everybody who came by and explaining everything from Ubuntu’s cloud offerings, to desktops and even showing off Ubuntu phones.

image20150221_162940413Our booth wouldn’t have happened without the efforts of Luis Caballero, Matt Mootz, Jose Antonio Rey, Nathan Haines, Ian Santopietro, George Mulak, and Daniel Gimpelevich, so thank you all so much! We also had great support from Carl Richell at System76 who let us borrow 3 of their incredible laptops running Ubuntu to show off our desktop, Canonical who loaned us 2 Nexus 4 phones running Ubuntu as well as one of the Orange Box cloud demonstration boxes, Michael Newsham from TierraTek who sent us a fanless PC and NAS, which we used to display a constantly-repeating video (from Canonical’s marketing team) showing the Ubuntu phone’s Scopes on a television monitor provided to us by Eäär Oden at Video Resources. Oh, and of course Stuart Langridge, who gave up his personal, first-edition Bq Ubuntu phone for the entire weekend so we could show it off at the booth.

image20150222_132142752Like Ubuntu itself, this booth was not the product of just one organization’s work, but the combination of efforts and resources from many different, but connected, individuals and groups. We are what we are, because of who we all are. So thank you all for being a part of making this booth amazing.

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Daniel Holbach

What do Kinshasa, Omsk, Paris, Mexico City, Eugene, Denver, Tempe, Catonsville, Fairfax, Dania Beach, San Francisco and various places on the internet have in common?

Right, they’re all participating in the Ubuntu Global Jam on the weekend of 6-8 February! See the full list of teams that are part of the event here. (Please add yours if you haven’t already.)

What’s great about the event is that there are just two basic aims:

  1. do something with Ubuntu
  2. get together and have fun!

What I also like a lot is that there’s always something new to do. Here are just 3 quick examples of that:

App Development Schools

We have put quite a bit of work into putting training materials together, now, you can take them out to your team and start writing Ubuntu apps easily.


As one tech news article said “Robots embrace Ubuntu as it invades the internet of things“. Ubuntu’s newest foray, making it possible to bring a stable and secure OS to small devices where you can focus on apps and functionality, is attracting a number of folks on the mailing lists (snappy-devel, snappy-app-devel)  and elsewhere. Check out the mailing lists and the snappy site to find out more and have a play with it.

Unity8 on Desktop

Convergence is happening and what’s working great on the phone is making its way onto the desktop. You can help making this happen, by installing and testing it. Your feedback will be much appreciated.




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Michael Hall

For a long time now Canonical has provided Ubuntu LoCo Teams with material to use in the promotion of Ubuntu. This has come in the form of CDs and DVDs for Ubuntu releases, as well as conference packs for booths and shows.

We’ve also been sent several packages, when requested by an Ubuntu Member, to LoCo Teams for their own events, such as release parties or global jams.

Ubuntu Mauritius Team 14.10 Global Jam

This cycle we are extending this offer to any LoCo team that is hosting an in-person Global Jam event. It doesn’t matter how many people are going, or what you’re planning on doing for your jam. The Jam Packs will include DVDs, stickers, pens and other giveaways for your attendees, as well as an Ubuntu t-shirt for the organizers (or as a giveaway, if you choose).

Since there is only a few weeks before Global Jam weekend, and these will be shipped from London, please take your country’s customs process into consideration before ordering. Countries in North America and Europe shouldn’t have a problem, but if you’ve experienced long customs delays in the past please consider waiting and making your request for the next Global Jam.

To get an Ubuntu Global Jam Pack for your event, all you need to do is the following:

  • Register you Global Jam event on the LoCo Team Portal
    • Your event must be in-person, and have a venue associated with it
  • Fill out the community donation request form
    • Include a link to your LoCo Team Portal event in your request
  • Promote your event, before and after
    • Blog about it, post pictures, and share your excitement on social media
      • Use the #ubuntu hashtag when available

You can find all kinds of resources, activities and advice for running your Global Jam event on the Ubuntu Wiki, where we’ve collected the cumulative knowledge from all across the community over many years. And you can get live help and advice any time on the #ubuntu-locoteams IRC channel on Freenode.

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