Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'cloud'

Rick Spencer

12.04.1

Since its April release, 12.04 LTS has had an enthusiastic reception in organisations that look to the LTS for large scale deployments that will remain in place for many years. For those of you waiting for the first point release, we are delighted to announce Ubuntu 12.04.1 LTS. This update to the current long-term support release, available from 23rd August, is the result of four months’ worth of real-life enterprise usage. The resulting fixes and enhancements translate into a rock-solid, thoroughly tested upgrade path for any enterprise running Ubuntu 10.04, the last LTS release.

Users on 10.04 LTS will then receive their first system notifications encouraging them to upgrade to the new LTS release. Consequently, we expect an even bigger shift among enterprise users than we experienced when it was first made available, back in April. Enterprise users can now be completely confident that the upgrade will be fast and free from disruption.

In April, we announced an ARM version of Ubuntu Server. In the 12.04.1 release, we’ve added support for Calxeda SOCs, so businesses can prepare for a datacentre dominated by low-energy, hyperscale servers by testing their workloads on the new hardware now.

The Ubuntu Cloud Archive also makes its debut – essentially an online software repository from which administrators can download the latest versions of OpenStack for use with the latest long-term support (LTS) release of Ubuntu. It means Ubuntu Cloud users keep pace with OpenStack development, without having to migrate away from their chosen LTS release. Users will be able to download Folsom, the forthcoming release of OpenStack, and run it within their existing installation of Ubuntu.  For information on how to enable and use the Ubuntu Cloud Archive, please visit www.ubuntu.com/cloud/technical-resources.

On the desktop, a raft of bug fixes and security updates combine with five years of guaranteed updates and the option of commercial support to make this release an extremely attractive alternative to Windows. With native office apps and support for leading desktop virtualisation solutions, plus Unity, its modern, user-friendly GUI, Ubuntu enables desktop users to work more productively on the latest PCs, laptops and thin clients.

Ubuntu 12.04.1 is certified on 40 desktops, 98 laptops , 8 netbooks and 41 servers, including 12 of the latest HP Proliant Gen8 servers.

Canonical provides commercial support for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS in the form of Ubuntu Advantage, a subscription programme that gives enterprise customers the choice of two levels of support and access to the time-saving systems management tool, Landscape, which includes audit, compliance and ongoing management features for large Ubuntu deployments.

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Victor Palau

Have you ever wondered what is all the fuss about ARM Servers? Yes? good , good.

Have you ever wish you had some crazy Zooming UI presentation that told you all about it? what.. no!? Well though.. because now you have one :)

If you haven’t heard of Prezi, it is a new way to generate more dynamic presentations. I will give you a few tips:

  • When viewing a Prezi, make sure you click on the “Full Screen” for maximum effect (under More..)
  • You can also click on autorun if you fancy the animation to happen on its own
  • You can also use the right and left arrows to move around the animation at your leisure
  • If you want to zoom into something, just double click on it!

Without further ado, I give you ARM Server on  a Prezi:

url: http://prezi.com/_zwqpnowk8cv/arm-server/


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Susan Wu

Open-source software is increasingly at the heart of the biggest changes happening in enterprise computing all over the world. For me, open cloud is a perfect way to illustrate the benefits open source is bringing businesses and this is the major theme being discussed by some of the biggest names in the industry at the 2012 OpenStack APAC Conference in Beijing right now.

The business case for switching to or adopting cloud computing – and in particular, the open cloud – has never been stronger. Enterprises are realising reduced costs and increased flexibility without the risk of vendor lock-in. Open clouds let organisations move critical workloads to the cloud with the confidence that they can move from one vendor to another or onto a private cloud as they demand. This is because open source technology complies with established open standards.

As well as these business benefits, software like Ubuntu 12.04 LTS is helping devops massively reduce the complexity of cloud projects with deployment and service orchestration tools like Juju and MAAS. These sorts of technologies are streamlining the deployment process, making it quicker and simpler than ever to get applications running in the cloud.

The combination of Ubuntu and OpenStack has rapidly become the platform of choice for businesses building private cloud infrastructure.

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Cezzaine Haigh

The cloud is disrupting the enterprise computing world, driven by the growth of open-source software. As a result, new opportunities are emerging; it’s time to exploit them. 

On the 30th October, Canonical will host an Ubuntu Enterprise Summit in Copenhagen. Industry analysts and enterprise users of Ubuntu and open source technologies, will join key figures from Canonical to discuss the opportunities these converging trends present.

The event is designed around three key topics

- How flexibility creates business value
- Choosing which bandwagon to board
- The way ahead, from client to cloud

With a keynotes from Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth and two streams of content – one aimed at business decision-makers and the other at enterprise technologists – it offers an essential briefing on delivering effective IT in a cloud-obsessed world.

Learn more and register your place.

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Prakash

OpenStack has the potential to become as widely used in cloud computing as Linux in servers, according to Rackspace’s chief executive Lanham Napier.

Napier noted that OpenStack has more code contributors than Linux did when it started: it had 206 code contributors by its 84th week, whereas Linux took 615 weeks to get to that level. Similarly, OpenStack had 166 companies adding to it by its 84th week, whereas Linux reached 180 companies by its 828th week.

OpenStack is already well on the way to building that community, given the broad adoption the technology has seen since its launch two years ago. At the moment, more than 100 companies have put OpenStack into production, including AT&T, Korea Telecom, the San Diego Supercomputer Centre, HP and the US Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory.

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Prakash

Google will be launching 1 Gbps (1000 Mbps) Internet connection in Kansas City, US.

  • This will be run over fiber
  • Will offer 2 TB of space
  • Will offer HD video from Netflix and YouTube
  • No more buffering and waiting
  • This will drive a lot of cloud applications as network speed is the key bottleneck for cloud adoption today

This will be a huge jump from the current average speed of 5.8 Mbps in the US.  Just hope this spreads to other places soon.

In India the average speed is 0.9 Mbps. Now when will this come to India ?

 

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Prakash

Cloud computing is more than just a new set of technologies businesses can utilize — it is a new way of thinking about technology. As a result, businesses are being challenged to transform every single practice and policy they are using to govern how IT systems are managed and deployed. This IT/business evolution spotlights the need for a more business-minded executive to oversee the dynamic issues introduced by the cloud. The time of the chief cloud officer (CCO) is upon us. Someone who will advise and manage a company’s approach to the cloud (community, hybrid, private, public) and who will maximize the opportunities it offers in a variety of lines of business, while mitigating the complexities or concerns introduced.

If cloud computing plays a significant role in your business or you expect it to in the near future, consider these 10 critical job functions, which a CCO could handle for your organization.

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Laura czajkowski

Location: Flexible. If home based, reliable broadband connectivity required.

Role Summary

Do you want to be one of the engineers building the infrastructure at the heart of the cloud revolution?

At Canonical we’re developing technologies that are key to the transition to the cloud, with Ubuntu as the number one cloud operating system. We are looking for a fun, talented software engineer whose ingenuity, self-motivation and engineering skill have contributed to a shining track record of successful projects.

Alongside four or five other engineers, you’ll be part of an agile engineering squad, in Canonical’s Launchpad team, working in either a new development or maintenance role on a different cloud-related project every six to nine months. Your work will touch projects such as OpenStack, MAAS, AWSome and the Launchpad SaaS developer tools platform.

To succeed you’ll need to share our love of hard work and our passion for free software, Ubuntu and the cloud.

Your energy and enthusiasm will be key to delivering the project, and to making the squad fun to be a part of.

Key Skills and Accountabilities

  • Develop new features in existing web or cloud applications or even start new ones from scratch.
  • Participate in the maintenance of the portfolio of applications maintained by the Launchpad team (a group of six development squads).
  • Collaborate within a small team of four to five engineers to design and deliver agreed features on an established schedule.
  • Ensure high quality results from across the team by participating in established team practices such as code review and testing.
  • Maintain readable developer-oriented documentation.
  • Coordinate regularly with the rest of the Launchpad team.

Required Skills and Experience

  • You have extensive experience in development of web applications using a major object or oriented application framework
  • You are proficient with the technologies powering the web such as Python, HTTP, HTML, CSS and JavaScript
  • You live and breathe open source technology.  You know the industry, understand the community and share the ideals.  You know your OpenStack from your intel, your ARM from your aaS and your Bugzilla from your Git
  • You are well experienced with at least one web application framework, such as Rails, Django, Zope/Plone, Pyramid, Turbogears, Web Objects, etc
  • You are well experienced with at least one JavaScript library/framework such as YUI 3/2, jQuery, Dojo, MooTools, or Prototype
  • You love easy to use software and pay particular attention to making your applications a joy to use
  • You have created stellar user interfaces using JavaScript, HTML and CSS
  • You’re skilled in object-oriented programming in the Python language
  • How people solve complex problems in software fascinates you.  You also know that reliable and maintainable code are essential to long-term success.  You’re familiar with writing about what needs to be done, as well as test-driven development and other “agile methods
  • You have strong spoken English communication skills, and can communicate clearly in writing, including email and IRC environments.
  • You have a good sense of humour and enjoy building a fun working environment with your colleagues.
  • You are willing to travel internationally, for periods of one or two weeks and occasionally longer, for conferences, developer-oriented meetings and sprints

Desired Skills and Experience

  • You are familiar with interaction design and have contributed to the user interface of a leading web application.
  • You have built and managed a community around an open source project
  • You have contributed code to an open source project
  • You understand the basics of one or more of the following:
    • laaS platforms such as OpenStack, AWS, Eucalyptus
    • Ubuntu Server, particularly in cloud contexts
    • ARM server
    • Services Oriented Architecture
    • Message-passing systems
    • Distributed version control systems
    • A form of Linux packaging, such as .deb or .rpm
  • You are familiar with Agile/Lean development practices
  • You enjoy exploring new languages like Go, Haskell or Clojure
  • You have system programming experience in C
  • You worked as part of a distributed software engineering team and can demonstrate the self-motivation and discipline required in such an environment

Apply online, or talk to us in #launchpad-dev if you want to see what we do!

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Prakash

Virtualization and its many flavors has been one of the most dominating and influential technologies that has evolved over the past five years. While the technology has gained wide acceptance, it is also seen as a key element behind the cloud computing wave that is sweeping the IT landscape today.

Indian IT partners have started adopting the technology and are building successful business practices around it. In this article, we take a look at key trends in the virtualization market.

“Canonical is keen to explore opportunities, and offers very flexible packages for partners looking at virtualization services. Open source is emerging as not just a cost-effective alternative but also as an equally secure and stable alternative,” says Prakash Advani, Regional Manager, Asia Pacific, Canonical.

Read More on CRN.

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Prakash

The Cloud Faceoff!

The stage was set for a lively debate between public cloud rivals at GigaOM Structure in San Francisco Thursday – representatives from Citrix, Eucalyptus and the OpenStack project certainly delivered. Nebula CEO and OpenStack co-founder Chris Kemp didn’t even get past the introductions before he challenged his fellow panelists on their “closed” cloud implementations and embrace of Amazon Web Services’ API, which he compared to the Walmart of infrastructure.

Read More.

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Prakash

Does the rest of the cloud computing world really need to clone Amazon Web Services in order to succeed?

Probably not, says Lew Moorman, the president of Rackspace, the San Antonio, Texas, company that plays second fiddle to Amazon in the cloud game. According to him, some customers want companies like his to clone all of Amazon’s Application Programming Interfaces, the coding standards that let a program interact with Amazon’s cloud. But he thinks it’s a bad idea that isn’t going to work out.

Rackspace is also moving to OpenStack on August 1st! wow!

Read more.

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Paul Oh

We’re announcing today that you can obtain and launch Official Ubuntu Images from Canonical on Windows Azure. Windows Azure is a Platform as a Service (PaaS) from Microsoft that now includes the ability to manage individual virtual machines so that you can fully customize and control the infrastructure behind your cloud instances. Many developers and IT shops use both Ubuntu and Windows and as workloads migrate to the cloud, the case for making Ubuntu available on Windows Azure became even more compelling.  Canonical and Microsoft worked together to ensure that Ubuntu, the leading operating system for the Cloud is tested, certified and enterprise ready from the start.

During the current Spring Release of Windows Azure, you can launch Ubuntu images directly from the Windows Azure Gallery. The Windows Azure gallery currently contains Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS and support is available directly from Canonical. In the Fall Release of Windows Azure you will be able to buy support directly from the Windows Azure Gallery. If you want to deploy Ubuntu on multiple clouds as well as in your data center, our commercial support offering, Ubuntu Advantage provides mission critical support along with capabilities for automating and managing your Ubuntu environment. If you want to create new applications and scale them as you go the hourly support option could be just what you’re looking for. No matter which option you choose you can have the assurance that Canonical stands behind your Ubuntu solution in the cloud.

We’ve made sure that using Ubuntu on Windows Azure is a great experience right now but we’re eager to hear from you what other capabilities would make it even more exciting and useful. You can take Ubuntu for Windows Azure for a spin at http://www.windowsazure.com

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John Bernard

We’ve been extremely busy at Computex, with over 1,000 people visiting the Ubuntu booth, and over 25 media interviews about Ubuntu for Android, Ubuntu Cloud and Ubuntu TV.

One of the highlights so far was ARM’s Ian Ferguson, director of server systems and our very own Mark Shuttleworth presenting a keynote session at the Computex industry forum about cloud computing. As part of this, they unveiled MiTAC’s new ARM server, based on Ubuntu. This is only the third ARM server made in the world and it’s a significant step forward in a new era of hyperscale computing. Based on ARM processors, these servers have higher densities and lower power to enable more efficient cloud deployments and lower cost.

The MiTAC server can be seen on the Ubuntu stand at M0106, Nangang Exhibition Hall, alongside the latest developments in Desktop and Cloud until the end of the show on June 9th.

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John Bernard

Canonical will be exhibiting at Computex in Taipei, June 5th – 9th, Asia’s largest ICT trade show. We will be at the show alongside some our partners and biggest names in the industry. At the booth (at M0106 in the Nangang exhibition hall) we will be showcasing new products and services, including Ubuntu for Android, Ubuntu TV and Ubuntu Cloud.

Today, Ubuntu for Android will be demoed at a pre-show ARM media gathering and in addition, Mark Shuttleworth will be part of a keynote presentation on Tuesday at the TICC.

We look forward to seeing you at the booth. If you can’t be at Computex, we’ll be updating the blog with pictures and more as it unfolds.

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Michael Hall

Sweet Chorus

Juju is revolutionizing the way web services are deployed in the cloud, taking what was either a labor-intensive manual task, or a very labor-intensive re-invention of the wheel  (or deployment automation in this case), and distilling it into a collection of reusable components called “Charms” that let anybody deploy multiple inter-connected services in the cloud with ease.

There are currently 84 Juju charms written for everything from game backends to WordPress sites, with databases and cache servers that work with them.  Charms are great when you can deploy the same service the same way, regardless of it’s intended use.  Wordpress is a good use case, since the process of deploying WordPress is going to be the same from one blog to the next.

Django’s Blues

But when you go a little lower in the stack, to web frameworks, it’s not quite so simple.  Take Django, for instance.  While much of the process of deploying a Django service will be the same, there is going to be a lot that is specific to the project.  A Django site can have any number of dependencies, both common additions like South and Celery, as well as many custom modules.  It might use MySQL, or PostgreSQL, or Oracle (even SQLite for development and testing).  Still more things will depend on the development process, while WordPress is available in a DEB package, or a tarball from the upstream site, a Django project may be anywhere, and most frequently in a source control branch specific to that project.  All of this makes writing a single Django charm nearly impossible.

There have been some attempts at making a generic, reusable Django charm.  Michael Nelson made one that uses Puppet and a custom config.yaml for each project.  While this works, it has two drawbacks: 1) It requires Puppet, which isn’t natural for a Python project, and 2) It required so many options in the config.yaml that you still had to do a lot by hand to make it work.  The first of these was done because ISD (where Michael was at the time) was using Puppet to deploy and configure their Django services, and could easily have been done another way.  The second, however, is the necessary consequence of trying to make a reusable Django charm.

Just for Fun

Given the problems detailed above, and not liking the idea of making config options for every possible variation of a Django project, I recently took a different approach.  Instead of making one Django Charm to rule them all, I wrote a small Django App that would generate a customized Charm for any given project.  My goal is to gather enough information from the project and it’s environment to produce a charm that is very nearly complete for that project.  I named this charming code “Naguine” after Django Reinhardt’s second wife, Sophie “Naguine” Ziegler.  It seemed fitting, since this project would be charming Django webapps.

Naguine is very much a JFDI project, so it’s not highly architected or even internally consistent at this point, but with a little bit of hacking I was able to get a significant return. For starters, using Naguine is about as simple as can be, you simply install it on your PYTHONPATH and run:

python manage.py charm --settings naguine

The –settings naguine will inject the naguine django app into your INSTALLED_APPS, which makes the charm command available.

This Kind of Friend

The charm command makes use of your Django settings to learn about your other INSTALLED_APPS as well as your database settings.  It will also look for a requirements.txt and setup.py, inspecting each to learn more about your project’s dependencies.  From there it will try to locate system packages that will provide those dependencies and add them to the install hook in the Juju  charm.

The charm command also looks to see if your project is currently in a bzr branch, and if it is it will use the remote branch to pull down your  project’s code during the install.  In  the future I hope to also support git and hg deployments.

Finally the command will write hooks for linking to a database instance on another server, including running syncdb to create the tables for your models, adding a superuser account with a randomly generated password and, if you are using South, running any migration scripts as well. It also writes some metadata about your charm and a short README explaining how to use it.

All that is left for you to do is review the generated charm, manually add any dependencies Naguine couldn’t find a matching package for, and manually add any install or database initialization that is specific to your project.  The amount of custom work needed to get a charm working is extremely minor, even for moderately complex projects.

Are you in the Mood

To try Naguine with your Django project, use the following steps:

  1. cd to your django project root (where your manage.py is)
  2. bzr branch lp:naguine
  3. python manage.py charm –settings naguine

That’s all you need.  If your django project lives in a bzr branch, and if it normally uses settings.py, you should have a directory called ./charms/precise/ that contains an almost working Juju charm for your project.

I’ve only tested this on a few Django project, all of which followed the same general conventions when it came to development, so don’t be surprised if you run into problems.  This is still a very early-stage project after all.  But you already have the code (if you followed step #2 above), so you can poke around and try to get it working or working better for your project.  Then submit your changes back to me on Launchpad, and I’ll merge them in.  You can also find me on IRC (mhall119 on freenode) if you get stuck and I will help you get it working.

(For those who are interested, each of the headers in this post is the name of a Django Reinhardt song)

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Victor Tuson Palau

Have you been wondering if your Web application will work with the new generation of Hyperdense ARM Servers? Now you can easily find out by using Ubuntu and Amazon Web Services.

For over 4 years, Canonical has been supporting Linux on ARM. Ubuntu Server 12.04 is our first Long Term Support on ARM.

As a confirmation of Ubuntu’s leadership position on hyperdense servers, Calxeda unveiled earlier this month their ARM Server platform at UDS-Q Oakland.

Now, Canonical makes available in Amazon Web Services an AMI image for developers wishing to experiment with Ubuntu ARM Server. Dann Frazier is the engineer behind this initiative. I took some of his time today to asking a few questions:

How did this came about?
We were wanting to do some internal functional testing of the 12.04 release across our global team without shipping hardware around. We had a QEMU model with us and using cloud systems to host it seemed like an excellent way to grow our (emulated) machine count.

Can you give me some examples of what could I do with it?
Basically, anything you can do with Ubuntu Server. You can install packages, deploy Juju charms, test your web applications, etc. However, I would strongly suggest not using it for any production work or performance testing – being an emulated environment, you will notice some overhead.

Who do you expect will use this new AMI?
Developers looking to test their applications on ARM, people wanting to test Juju charm deployments in a multi-architecture environment, and anyone just looking to kick the tires.

This is all great, How do I get my hands on it?
Canonical has published an AMI on Amazon EC2. You will need an Amazon Web Services account, then just go into your Management Console for EC2 and launch a new instance.  Select “Community AMIs” and look for AMI ID ‘ami-aef328c7′. (We’ll keep the latest AMI ID posted at http://wiki.ubuntu.com/ARM/Server). Or click here.

Are there any limations compared to a real hardware box?
The AMI provides an Ubuntu 12.04 (‘armhf’) system running on an emulated hardware system. Performance is limited due to the emulation overhead. This AMI requires the use of an m1.large instance type due to memory requirements.

Once again, thanks to Dann and the Canonical team for sharing this neat tool with the community. It sounds great and easy to set up. So, What are you waiting for?

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Jane Silber

The Ubuntu Developer Summit  last week was an incredible event. The energy, excitement and passion around Ubuntu was palpable in the sessions, hallways and the neighbouring streets and restaurants. (The riot police were there for the Occupy protest, not UDS!) Over 650 attendees came from all over the world, the local environs, and we even had a few Ubuntu fans who were simply staying in the same hotel who were thrilled to see the community behind their favourite technology product in action.

I’d like to thank once again the sponsors of the event: HP, Google, Intel, Linaro, Qt, Oracle and Rackspace. Their support is critical to health of Ubuntu and the Ubuntu community, and also demonstrates the importance of Ubuntu to their businesses.

An incredible amount of work gets done at each UDS. To see the breadth and depth of the topics addressed at this one, take a look at the schedule or the list of 272 blueprints registered for UDS. If you just want an overview of some of the outcomes of UDS, here is a video of the track leads summarising the highlights each track. And as usual we will publicly track the development progress throughout the cycle, allowing you to see how key features are progressing or to find areas in which you can contribute to the goals. You can see that Ubuntu 12.10 is starting to take shape already!

Several times throughout the event I was asked what stood out about this UDS. The most striking thing for me in this UDS is the involvement of companies who are building their business and products around Ubuntu. Ubuntu and UDS have long had strong industry support, with OEMs and corporate customers hosting, sponsoring and speaking at previous UDS’s. But in addition to the sponsors mentioned above, at the UDS we saw:

- the worldwide debut of a Calxeda cluster using their EnergyCore ARM-based server chip. Later in the week Calxeda also demonstrated a scaling website deployment on this hardware using Juju and OpenStack
- the first  Ubuntu Cloud Day, with an impressive line up of speakers from HP, Cloudscaling, Rackspace, VMWare, Scality, 10gen, EngineYard, Iron IO, Scalr, enStratus, RedMonk and Canonical. Presentations and discussions focused on the importance of the open cloud and lessons from real cloud deployments, and it was clear how central Ubuntu is to majority of real world cloud use.
- an insightful talk from Thomas Bushnell from Google about their Ubuntu use

This has also inspired a number of other companies to blog about their use – e.g., iAcquire recently blogged about their use of Ubuntu and associated cost-savings. If you have a similar post, leave a link in the comments.

I am also often asked about the history of UDS, how many we’ve had, where they were, etc. So for the history buffs, here’s a list of the events that have now become the Ubuntu Developer Summit (it took a couple years to settle into the current name and rhythm). I feel privileged to have been at all of them, and to have seen how they have matured into a best practice which projects from OpenStack to Linaro now adopt and help improve. I also have treasured memories from each – what do you remember most about each of them?

  • Aug 2004 Oxford, England – aka Warthogs Conference. Working on 4.10 (Warty)
  • Dec 2004 Mataro, Spain – aka The Mataro Sessions. Working on 5.04 (Hoary)
  • Apr 2005 Sydney, Australia – aka Ubuntu Down Under. Planning for 5.10 (Breezy), co-located with an Ubuntu Love Day.
  • Oct 2005 Montreal, Canada – aka Ubuntu Below Zero. Planning for 6.06 LTS (Dapper), co-located with an Ubuntu Love Day.
  • June 2006 Paris, France – first event called Ubuntu Developer Summit. Planning for 6.10 (Edgy)
  • Nov 2006 Mountain View, California. Planning for 7.04 (Feisty)
  • May 2007 Sevilla, Spain. Planning for 7.10 (Gutsy)
  • Nov 2007 Cambridge, Massachusetts. Planning for 8.04 LTS (Hardy)
  • May 2008 Prague, Czech Republic. Planning for 8.10 (Intrepid)
  • Oct 2008 Mountain View, California. Planning for 9.04 (Jaunty), co-located with a FOSSCamp
  • May 2009 Barcelona, Spain. Planning for 9.10 (Karmic)
  • Nov 2009 Dallas, Texas. Planning for 10.04 LTS (Lucid)
  • May 2010 La Hulpe, Belgium. Planning for 10.10 (Maverick)
  • Oct 2010 Orlando, Florida. Planning for 11.04 (Natty). Co-located with LinaroConnect.
  • May 2011 Budapest, Hungary. Planning for 11.10 (Oneiric). Co-located with LinaroConnect.
  • Nov 2011 Orlando, Florida. Planning for 12.04 LTS (Precise). Co-located with LinaroConnect.
  • May 2012 Oakland, California. Planning for 12.10 (Quantal). Co-located with the Ubuntu Cloud Summit
  • And coming up on 29 Oct – 2 Nov 2012 …  mark your calendar now and stay tuned for details about location, sponsorship and participation!

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Prakash

It may be known to some as the Dropbox-for-the-enterprise, but Box.com could be forgiven for insisting on its own identity. With more than 120,000 customers, including 82 percent of the Fortune 500, the company has made a name for itself as one of the leaders in the enterprise cloud storage and data management space.

Read More.

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Mark Baker

On Monday, Calxeda, one of the leading innovators bringing revolutionary efficiency to the datacenter, unveiled their new EnergyCore reference server live onstage with Mark Shuttleworth at the Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) in Oakland California.

 

Calxeda CTO and Founder Larry Wikelius with Mark Shuttleworth at UDS

The choice of UDS at the venue to unveil the new hardware to the world was flattering and underlines how the innovators in next generation computing are building out a compelling platform together. Ubuntu and Calxeda have been working together for several years to bring Ubuntu on Calxeda to market in the form now being shown at UDS. The collaboration of Canonical and the Ubuntu community with Calxeda has been vital to be able to deliver a solution that can very easily deploy OpenStack based cloud using MAAS and Juju on hardware that is so innovative.

The EnergyCore reference server unveiled at UDS can house up to 48 Quadcore nodes at under 300 Watts with up to 24 SATA drives. In this configuration it is possible to house 1000 server instances in a single rack and other server form factors being developed by OEMs may enable several times this volume. It is precisely this type of power efficient technology that will accelerate the adoption of next generation hyperscale services such as cloud and we are proud to be at the very core of it.

So congratulations to Calxeda on the arrival of the EnergyCore and congratulations to Canonical and the Ubuntu Community for providing the platform that will power it.

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Jane Silber

Ubuntu 12.04 LTS will be released to the world this Thursday and it’s going to be fantastic. We’ve known for quite a while that Ubuntu is not only beautiful, but also usable and robust for individuals and a great platform for app developers. Those traditions continue in 12.04, with the added bonus of long term support (LTS) promise. This release will be our fourth LTS release, a significant milestone by itself, but it will also be the first in which we offer special consideration of hardware refresh cycles on the desktop and fast-moving technology developments in the cloud.

Ubuntu 12.04 LTS  is the ideal platform for organisations looking for more cost-effective alternatives to traditional desktop computing. As enterprise moves to cloud-based apps and lighter, more mobile clients, the argument for moving beyond a Windows-only environment has never been stronger. Ubuntu delivers an intuitive, responsive and above all, productive desktop experience at a fraction of the cost of its competitors.

Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS combines the world’s best open source server and cloud technologies with five years of hardware, security and maintenance updates, and of course the option of enterprise-grade commercial support. This combination of proven technologies, time-saving deployment tools and long-term support makes it a cost-effective platform for any workload from print and web serving to big data applications and the cloud.

With support guaranteed for five years, certification on a wide range of hardware and the option of enterprise-grade commercial services, Ubuntu is a proven, cost-effective enterprise platform that can be relied on for the long term for their desktop, server, and cloud needs.

On Thursday we expect to see the reliability, collaboration, freedom and yes, precision, that Ubuntu embodies delivered again, on time, and in style. I can’t wait.

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