Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'cloud'

Prakash

Boris Renski is co-founder of OpenStack integration consultancy Mirantis and he says every enterprise he’s worked with so far has been interested in OpenStack because they view it as an alternative to VMware. The board’s vote earlier this month has now muddled the differences, he says. “If OpenStack isn’t an alternative to VMware, then what the hell is it?” Renski says.

VMware’s entrance into OpenStack has been part of a whirlwind of news during the past few months for the virtualization company and Renksi’s comments may reflect some tension between the two camps.

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  1. VMware Joining OpenStack Delayed, For Now The OpenStack Board of Directors met this week and on...
  2. If AWS is the Walmart of cloud, is OpenStack the Soviet Union? The Cloud Faceoff! The stage was set for a lively...
  3. OpenStack could be the Linux of the cloud OpenStack has the potential to become as widely used in...

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Victor Palau

If you thought I had concluded my blog series on demonstrating how Ubuntu is the best environment to write up “connected” or “cloud backend” Android Apps, think again!

So far this is what we covered:

  • Proof that you can access a Juju local environment from the Android Emulator  done!
  • Using a few charms from the charm store plus a custom one, set up a MySQL database that can be exposed through a web service with simple commands/steps - done!
  • Develop a TODO list android app and connect it to the web service, so they talk to each other. – done!

The next step is “How to test that it all works on a production environment”.  If you have tested to death both your Android application and your web service locally, it is time to check if they will still work in real life. How do we do this? With few simple commands, we are going to deploy the same web service into the Amazon Cloud, and  the application in a mobile phone. All managed from the comfort of my Ubuntu Desktop.

Deploying to Amazon Web Services (AWS)

The only pre-requisite here is that you do have an AWS account. Once you are logged into the AWS website, you can find the credentials that you will need to set up your juju environment.  You can find a tutorial on how to set up your Elastic Compute Cloud (ec2) environment –> here.

The required information for Juju is stored in the environment.yaml file in the ~/.juju folder. In the following sample file you can see that two environments have been defined:

  • “local” is the environment that I have been using in my PC to test my web service using LXC containers.
  • “aws” gives Juju the information required to deploy services using my Amazon account.
  • “local” is set as default. This means that if I just run “juju bootstrap” this command applies to the local environment. To bootstrap the AWS environment, I would do “juju bootstrap -e aws”.
default: local
environments:
 aws:
  type: ec2
  access-key: YOUR-ACCESS-KEY-GOES-HERE
  secret-key: YOUR-SECRET-KEY-GOES-HERE
  control-bucket: juju-faefb490d69a41f0a3616a4808e0766b
  admin-secret: 81a1e7429e6847c4941fda7591246594
  default-series: precise
  juju-origin: ppa
  ssl-hostname-verification: true
 local:
  type: local
  control-bucket: juju-a14dfae3830142d9ac23c499395c2785999
  admin-secret: 6608267bbd6b447b8c90934167b2a294999
  default-series: precise
  juju-origin: distro
  data-dir: /home/victorp/myjuju_data

With my environments now configured, it’s time to deploy my services. This first step is to bootstrap my environment:

juju bootstrap -e aws

With the command completed successfully, I can check the status and I will see that the juju control instance is now up and running in Amazon:

juju status -e aws
2012-09-19 11:43:34,248 INFO Connected to environment.
machines:
  0:
    agent-state: running
    dns-name: ec2-75-101-189-208.compute-1.amazonaws.com
    instance-id: i-0e4f7174
    instance-state: running
services: {}
2012-09-19 11:43:35,322 INFO 'status' command finished successfully

Lets continue deploying the services. As I am only doing testing, I want to pay the minimum for it, it will ask juju to set a constrain to only use micro instances. Then I will deploy a mysql and a lamp service:

juju set-constraints instance-type=t1.micro -e aws
juju deploy mysql -e aws
juju deploy --repository ~/mycharm local:lamp -e aws
juju set lamp website-database="android_todo" -e aws
juju set lamp website-bzr="lp:~vtuson/+junk/mytodo_web" -e aws
juju expose lamp -e aws
juju add-relation lamp mysql -e aws

With all my services now running I can go to the Amazon EC2 instance console and see how they have been deployed as micro instances. I can now also enter the public address for my lamp service and see the ToDo list table as expected.

Testing the Android App on a real phone

Running Juju status, I can retrieve the public url for the lamp service and I replace the uri vairable in the TodoSourceData class with “ec2-107-22-151-171.compute-1.amazonaws.com/database.php”.  The next step is to plug a HTC Desire set up on debug mode into my laptop’s usb port. The rest is taken care by the Android Eclipse plug-ins. When I click  the run project button, I am presented with a choice of targets:

I just need to press “OK” and my ToDo app is launched in the handset. Opening the menu options and pressing “Sync” fetches the ToDo data from the Amazon services, as expected:

That is all for today! Let me know if you have any suggestions on what else I should cover on this blog series.


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Kyle MacDonald

Today is the official launch of the OpenStack Foundation, which is leading the cloud industry in developing the most cutting-edge open enterprise-class cloud platform available. The OpenStack Foundation aims to promote the development, distribution and adoption of OpenStack. As a founding platinum member, Canonical is involved by contributing to the project’s governance, technical development and strategy. We’re helping service providers and enterprises, as well as their customers and users, benefit from the open technologies that are making the cloud more powerful, simple and ubiquitous.

Canonical was the first company to commercially distribute and support OpenStack – and Ubuntu has remained the reference operating system for the OpenStack project since the beginning – making it the easiest and most trusted route to an OpenStack cloud, whether for private use or as a commercial public cloud offering. We include it in every download of Ubuntu Server, one of the world’s most popular Linux server distributions, giving us a huge interest in its continuing development.

OpenStack developers are building and testing on Ubuntu every single day, which is why Ubuntu can fairly claim to be the most tightly integrated OS with OpenStack – and the most stringently tested. In short, if you want to run OpenStack then you really ought to run it on Ubuntu! Since 2009 we’ve been committed to the open cloud, and the creation of the OpenStack Foundation is a huge step in making it better.

Widely certified and supported for the long term, Ubuntu 12.04 LTS is the most reliable platform on which to move from a pilot or proof of concept to a large-scale production deployment. It offers the robustness and agility you need for rapid scaling of the underlying cloud, with first-class support for the key virtualization technologies that underpin successful OpenStack deployments.

Already thousands of global enterprises and service providers are deploying their cloud infrastructures on Ubuntu and OpenStack. Organisations like Mercadolibre, Internap and Nectar are running their mission critical applications on their Ubuntu OpenStack clouds. Ubuntu and OpenStack are also powering clouds at the likes of HP, AT&T, Rackspace and Dell. We are seeing strong global demand from leading enterprises worldwide and can’t wait to share their stories in the coming months. Service providers are rapidly adopting Ubuntu and OpenStack; we see this in our engagements with every one of the world’s largest service providers.

OpenStack and Ubuntu share the same six-monthly release schedule. But, while OpenStack is still young and developing fast, Ubuntu Server is a mature enterprise OS. In fact, most large companies choose to stay on our long-term support releases, which come out once every two years and are supported for five. So what about the majority of companies that need the stability and support of the latest LTS release of Ubuntu, alongside all the new OpenStack features and fixes that are released every six months?

That’s where our new Ubuntu Cloud Archive comes in. Unique to Ubuntu, it gives users the chance to run new versions of OpenStack as they are released, with full maintenance and support from Canonical, in the Ubuntu OS, even if they want to stay on the last LTS release.

Over recent months, other technology vendors have recognised the lead and impact that OpenStack is making in the market and have announced their commitment to the project. We should see even more of them joining the party and coming up with OpenStack offerings in the months to come. But in the meantime, the best way to build your OpenStack cloud is through the proven, rock-solid combination of OpenStack and Ubuntu.

You can read about the OpenStack Foundation news here.

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Mark Baker

Have you ever wanted to experiment with the latest cutting-edge cloud software, but run it on the same long-term support release of Ubuntu that you have all your other apps and services working on?

Well, now you can. Today, Canonical has released the Cloud Archive for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Server, an online software repository from which administrators can download the latest versions of OpenStack, for use with the latest long-term support (LTS) release of Ubuntu. This is hugely significant step for OpenStack users, because it means they can now access the latest OpenStack releases and betas on a stable and supported platform that is certified with many of the leading server vendors.

As many people know, the tradition of Ubuntu Server is to release every six months, with every fourth release (or two years) being a Long Term Support (LTS) version supported for five years. The interim releases are supported for 18 months. This generally works well: businesses that require a solid infrastructure for a long period of time normally use the most recent LTS, rather than upgrading every 6-18 months.

Users often find that this predictable release schedule allows all areas of a workload lifecycle (from requirement, design, develop to deploy) to work well.  However, sometimes a key piece of the stack is needed. This leaves users in a quandary: jump to a later (non-LTS) Ubuntu release, or find something that helps solve the problem, building on the LTS release.

One way to try and address this problem is via backports. Over the years, there has been attempts to use the Ubuntu Backports repository, and also ‘blessed’ PPA’s (Personal Package Archives) or private in-house archives to provide access to later technologies backported from upstream.

With OpenStack, which underpins Ubuntu Cloud Infrastructure, we needed to think about how we would deliver the new OpenStack releases on 12.04 LTS without backporting, as using the Backports Archive would restrict the number of versions we could support concurrently (unless we opted for multiple Backport archives). OpenStack made the early decision to implement their development processes around the Ubuntu development process and to follow our release cadence. This has helped OpenStack deliver features with pace and on a deadline but crucially, it has allowed us to put continuous integration testing in place to integrate and test OpenStack code as soon as it is committed.

So with OpenStack we are now building, integrating, testing and publishing all the OpenStack milestones and stable releases on 12.04 LTS. This is a departure from our previous policy but the process for updates getting into the Ubuntu Cloud Archive has been designed to closely align with the processes that the normal Ubuntu Archive would have for Stable Release Updates.

With a fast moving technology such as OpenStack, this is hugely significant, as we see many customers testing the milestones and building seed clouds with the latest code. All this helps us find bugs and improve the code for all – which can only be a good thing.

To get access to the Ubuntu Cloud archive, please add the following entries to your /etc/apt/sources.list:

 

/etc/apt/sources.list entries:

# Public -proposed archive mimicking the SRU process, packages should bake here for at least 7 days.

#  This is also where extended testing is performed

deb  http://ubuntu-cloud.archive.canonical.com/ubuntu precise-proposed/folsom main


# The primary updates archive that users should be using

deb http://ubuntu-cloud.archive.canonical.com/ubuntu precise-updates/folsom main


# Upstream milestone archive, this example is pinned to Folsom-1 upstream, then an example of Folsom-2.

#   This, being a snapshot, will not receive further updates.

deb http://ubuntu-cloud.archive.canonical.com/ubuntu precise-updates/folsom/snapshots/milestone-1 main

deb http://ubuntu-cloud.archive.canonical.com/ubuntu precise-updates/folsom/snapshots/milestone-2 main


* “To have your cake and eat it [too]” is an old English saying that is sometimes used to imply the desire for two incompatible things.

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Victor Palau

Time for the next chapter of my blog series about demonstrating how Ubuntu is the best environment to write up “connected” or “cloud backend” Android Apps.  As you might know, the Android SDK allows you to set up a sandboxed environment to develop Mobile apps in your desktop, using Juju  you can do the same for Cloud apps.

To walk you through how to put these great development tools together, I set out to accomplish:

  • Proof that you can access a Juju local environment from the Android Emulator  done!
  • Using a few charms from the charm store plus a custom one, set up a MySQL database that can be exposed through a web service with simple commands/steps  - done!
  • Develop a TODO list android app
  • Connect the android app and the webservice, so they talk to each other.

Today I am going to cover the bottom two bullet points in one go!  For this post, I am going to assume that you know a bit of Android development. If you want a great source of introductory material check Lars Vogel’s website.

I have created a simple ToDo Android application that can store tasks into a local SQLite db and allows you to “Star” important items. The code for my Simple Todo app is hosted in Launchpad. I have written my application for Android 2.3, but you can use a later version.

Reading remote data from the MySQL server is confined to a small class that retrieves a JSON object and translates it into a TodoItem object.  Equally , the server code that prints that content table into a JSON object is extremely simple. Beyond this, you can go crazy and implement a RESTfull API to sync the databases.

At the moment, I am just inserting Server side data into the Local database and making sure I don’t add duplicates.Here is a video that shows how easy is to work and test both environments:

Or Click Here for the video.

The same environment should then work if you are running the Android application on an external phone. But that is another blog post ;)


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Victor Palau

It is time to continue with my blog series on demonstrating how Ubuntu is the best environment to write up “connected” or “cloud backend” Android Apps.  As you might know, the Android SDK allows you to set up a sandboxed environment to develop Mobile apps in your desktop, using Juju  you can do the same for Cloud apps.

To walk you through how to put these great development tools together, I set out to accomplish:

  • Proof that you can access a Juju local environment from the Android Emulator  done!
  • Using a few charms from the charm store plus a custom one, set up a MySQL database that can be exposed through a web service with simple commands/steps
  • Develop a TODO list android app
  • Connect the android app and the webservice, so they talk to each other.

Today is time to set-up our own Cloud environment in a PC.  A good starting point for a web application is a LAMP stack. If you hope for you service to get popular, you might want to split out the database service and the web service into their own instances so they can be scaled easily.

When I set out to do this, I wanted to write an extremely simple PHP page that would expose a data table from a Mysql server.  I looked up the available charms on the store. I found that you had a lot of charms for existing apps, but none that had  the bare bones of a LAMP stack and just allowed you to install your own web pages. However, I did find a charm to deploy Mysql and a very handy tool to manage it (phpmyadmin). Taking this as a starting point I developed a generic LAMP charm.

The first thing the LAMP charm does is to install and configure a new instance with Apache and PHP5 in an LXC container. The new charm will then copy any files under /website  inside the charm folder structure, into /var/www. It also allows you to specify a Bazaar branch. It will clone the branch into the webserver and copy the contents to /var/www. I keep my TODO application for this exercise here.

Using juju, you can set up a relationship with a Mysql service. A Mysql database is created by default at this time. You can change the name of the database as a configuration options. If you provide a file called mysql_config either on the /website folder or in the root of you Bazaar branch, this will be used to configure further the Mysql database.

The charm will store the details of the relationship in /var/webconfig. In there you can also find opendb.php, a basic script that will open the connection to the MySQL database for you.

So lets get started! Clone the Lamp branch to a folder of your choice. I have it under “~/Mycharm/precise/lamp”. (If you need to get started with juju check my previous post here)

juju bootstrap

#step1 - deploy Mysql as a service.
juju deploy mysql

#step2 - deploy phpmyadmin tool
juju deploy phpmyadmin
juju set phpmyadmin password="password"

#this makes phpmyadmin public - exposes port 80/tcp
juju expose phpmyadmin

#step3 - link phpmyadmin and mysql so the can talk to each other
juju add-relation phpmyadmin mysql

#step4 deploy lamp from your local folder
juju deploy --repository ~/mycharm local:lamp

#step5 set up your bazaar branch and publish your website
juju set lamp website-bzr="lp:~vtuson/+junk/mytodo_web"
juju expose lamp

#step6 configure your database and link lamp and mysql services
juju set lamp website-database="android_todo"
juju add-relation lamp mysql

Once Juju has completed all the commands, run “juju status”. Now go to the ip address for the LAMP services and visit the databaseweb.php page (e.g. http://192.168.122.174/databaseweb.php) , you get this rather ugly table:

Id Todo Is it starred
1 hello this is a sample 1
2 yes it works! 0

This table is displaying the contents of a Mysql database. You will get the same data if you visit your Myphpadmin service:

So there you are a full and scalable LAMP stack in your PC!

If you want to update the web service by pulling the latest version of the Bazaar branch, just run the following commands:

juju set lamp bzr-update="yes"
juju set lamp bzr-update=

With my web developer “hat” on, I can now hand this charm over to my Android app developer. They will be able to set up exactly the same environment locally to test their app without using expensive server time.

So “Using a few charms from the charm store plus a custom one, set up a MySQL database that can be exposed through a web service with simple commands/steps” – DONE!


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Prakash

The OpenStack Board of Directors met this week and on the agenda was a somewhat surprising action item: Vote on whether or not to accept VMware – once thought to be a competitor to the project – into the increasingly popular who’s-who club of cloud computing.

VMware’s going to have to wait to see if they’ll join the party though.

The OpenStack Board met Tuesday evening but didn’t get around to considering VMware’s application. VMware may now have to wait for OpenStack’s next regularly scheduled board meeting, which is not until Oct. 19. There is a chance the board would reconvene in a special meeting before then, but there are no official plans to do so.

Some expect VMware to be a significant contributor to two areas of OpenStack, including virtual networking – which is being led by engineers from Nicira, which VMware bought – and integration of OpenStack with VMware’s Cloud Foundry platform as a service (PaaS) tool. The elephant in the room is whether VMware will work to further integrate its ESX hypervisor into the OpenStack project. Doing so could make it easier for VMware users to access non-VMware public clouds, undercutting the vCloud ecosystem that VMware has been developing.

Read More.

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Prakash

Rackspace one of the key founders of OpenStack, has finally switched to OpenStack.

These products will be provided to customers in limited amounts over a period of time to ensure a smooth ramp-up.

- Cloud Servers, powered by OpenStack – based on the latest OpenStack compute release, this solution is fast, reliable, scalable and is accessible via the new OpenStack API as well as via an easy-to-use, intuitive control panel. Limited availability sign-ups are open now and Rackspace will begin providing access on May 1.

- Cloud Control Panel – the new Control Panel was built from the ground up and with the customer in mind.  It is simple, fast, intuitive and flexible. The new control panel also features multiple enhancements, including server tagging and multi-region capabilities.

The following products are in “early access”, as they are production workload ready but have limited support available, no service commitments and no billing.

- Cloud Databases, powered by OpenStack –gives customers API access to massively scalable, high availability MySQL database that is based on SAN storage for high performance and provides automated management of common database tasks.

- Cloud Monitoring –helps customers easily monitor their infrastructure and applications proactively, including OpenStack Clouds.

The following products are in “preview”, as we are currently inviting customers to test the early version of these products.

- Cloud Block Storage, powered by OpenStack – this new solution is designed to give customers highly elastic raw storage and a choice between a high performance (leveraging solid state disks) or a standard lower-cost block storage solution.

- Cloud Networks, powered by OpenStack – this solution is designed to allow customers to manage logically abstracted network services programmatically. Software-defined virtual networks provide flexibility and agility in addition to enhanced security via network isolation and port filtering.

Read More.

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Prakash

Is cloud storage really more power efficient?

There is, however, an often-touted benefit of using the cloud for data storage and that is power savings. Broadcasters are only now becoming aware of the importance of controlling power costs. Moving forward, technical managers can expect federal, state and local government bureaucrats to increasingly drive companies to use less electricity. One proposed way to reduce electrical costs is to move large-scale data storage off site to a server farm.

A huge server farm may be more efficient, have newer servers consuming less power and operate with lower costs than can a local production or broadcast house—right? Cloud storage providers may tell you so, but the real answer requires a bit of investigation.

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Rick Spencer

12.04.1

Since its April release, 12.04 LTS has had an enthusiastic reception in organisations that look to the LTS for large scale deployments that will remain in place for many years. For those of you waiting for the first point release, we are delighted to announce Ubuntu 12.04.1 LTS. This update to the current long-term support release, available from 23rd August, is the result of four months’ worth of real-life enterprise usage. The resulting fixes and enhancements translate into a rock-solid, thoroughly tested upgrade path for any enterprise running Ubuntu 10.04, the last LTS release.

Users on 10.04 LTS will then receive their first system notifications encouraging them to upgrade to the new LTS release. Consequently, we expect an even bigger shift among enterprise users than we experienced when it was first made available, back in April. Enterprise users can now be completely confident that the upgrade will be fast and free from disruption.

In April, we announced an ARM version of Ubuntu Server. In the 12.04.1 release, we’ve added support for Calxeda SOCs, so businesses can prepare for a datacentre dominated by low-energy, hyperscale servers by testing their workloads on the new hardware now.

The Ubuntu Cloud Archive also makes its debut – essentially an online software repository from which administrators can download the latest versions of OpenStack for use with the latest long-term support (LTS) release of Ubuntu. It means Ubuntu Cloud users keep pace with OpenStack development, without having to migrate away from their chosen LTS release. Users will be able to download Folsom, the forthcoming release of OpenStack, and run it within their existing installation of Ubuntu.  For information on how to enable and use the Ubuntu Cloud Archive, please visit www.ubuntu.com/cloud/technical-resources.

On the desktop, a raft of bug fixes and security updates combine with five years of guaranteed updates and the option of commercial support to make this release an extremely attractive alternative to Windows. With native office apps and support for leading desktop virtualisation solutions, plus Unity, its modern, user-friendly GUI, Ubuntu enables desktop users to work more productively on the latest PCs, laptops and thin clients.

Ubuntu 12.04.1 is certified on 40 desktops, 98 laptops , 8 netbooks and 41 servers, including 12 of the latest HP Proliant Gen8 servers.

Canonical provides commercial support for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS in the form of Ubuntu Advantage, a subscription programme that gives enterprise customers the choice of two levels of support and access to the time-saving systems management tool, Landscape, which includes audit, compliance and ongoing management features for large Ubuntu deployments.

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Victor Palau

Have you ever wondered what is all the fuss about ARM Servers? Yes? good , good.

Have you ever wish you had some crazy Zooming UI presentation that told you all about it? what.. no!? Well though.. because now you have one :)

If you haven’t heard of Prezi, it is a new way to generate more dynamic presentations. I will give you a few tips:

  • When viewing a Prezi, make sure you click on the “Full Screen” for maximum effect (under More..)
  • You can also click on autorun if you fancy the animation to happen on its own
  • You can also use the right and left arrows to move around the animation at your leisure
  • If you want to zoom into something, just double click on it!

Without further ado, I give you ARM Server on  a Prezi:

url: http://prezi.com/_zwqpnowk8cv/arm-server/


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Susan Wu

Open-source software is increasingly at the heart of the biggest changes happening in enterprise computing all over the world. For me, open cloud is a perfect way to illustrate the benefits open source is bringing businesses and this is the major theme being discussed by some of the biggest names in the industry at the 2012 OpenStack APAC Conference in Beijing right now.

The business case for switching to or adopting cloud computing – and in particular, the open cloud – has never been stronger. Enterprises are realising reduced costs and increased flexibility without the risk of vendor lock-in. Open clouds let organisations move critical workloads to the cloud with the confidence that they can move from one vendor to another or onto a private cloud as they demand. This is because open source technology complies with established open standards.

As well as these business benefits, software like Ubuntu 12.04 LTS is helping devops massively reduce the complexity of cloud projects with deployment and service orchestration tools like Juju and MAAS. These sorts of technologies are streamlining the deployment process, making it quicker and simpler than ever to get applications running in the cloud.

The combination of Ubuntu and OpenStack has rapidly become the platform of choice for businesses building private cloud infrastructure.

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Cezzaine Haigh

The cloud is disrupting the enterprise computing world, driven by the growth of open-source software. As a result, new opportunities are emerging; it’s time to exploit them. 

On the 30th October, Canonical will host an Ubuntu Enterprise Summit in Copenhagen. Industry analysts and enterprise users of Ubuntu and open source technologies, will join key figures from Canonical to discuss the opportunities these converging trends present.

The event is designed around three key topics

- How flexibility creates business value
- Choosing which bandwagon to board
- The way ahead, from client to cloud

With a keynotes from Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth and two streams of content – one aimed at business decision-makers and the other at enterprise technologists – it offers an essential briefing on delivering effective IT in a cloud-obsessed world.

Learn more and register your place.

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Prakash

OpenStack has the potential to become as widely used in cloud computing as Linux in servers, according to Rackspace’s chief executive Lanham Napier.

Napier noted that OpenStack has more code contributors than Linux did when it started: it had 206 code contributors by its 84th week, whereas Linux took 615 weeks to get to that level. Similarly, OpenStack had 166 companies adding to it by its 84th week, whereas Linux reached 180 companies by its 828th week.

OpenStack is already well on the way to building that community, given the broad adoption the technology has seen since its launch two years ago. At the moment, more than 100 companies have put OpenStack into production, including AT&T, Korea Telecom, the San Diego Supercomputer Centre, HP and the US Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory.

Read More.

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Prakash

Google will be launching 1 Gbps (1000 Mbps) Internet connection in Kansas City, US.

  • This will be run over fiber
  • Will offer 2 TB of space
  • Will offer HD video from Netflix and YouTube
  • No more buffering and waiting
  • This will drive a lot of cloud applications as network speed is the key bottleneck for cloud adoption today

This will be a huge jump from the current average speed of 5.8 Mbps in the US.  Just hope this spreads to other places soon.

In India the average speed is 0.9 Mbps. Now when will this come to India ?

 

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Prakash

Cloud computing is more than just a new set of technologies businesses can utilize — it is a new way of thinking about technology. As a result, businesses are being challenged to transform every single practice and policy they are using to govern how IT systems are managed and deployed. This IT/business evolution spotlights the need for a more business-minded executive to oversee the dynamic issues introduced by the cloud. The time of the chief cloud officer (CCO) is upon us. Someone who will advise and manage a company’s approach to the cloud (community, hybrid, private, public) and who will maximize the opportunities it offers in a variety of lines of business, while mitigating the complexities or concerns introduced.

If cloud computing plays a significant role in your business or you expect it to in the near future, consider these 10 critical job functions, which a CCO could handle for your organization.

Read more.

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Laura czajkowski

Location: Flexible. If home based, reliable broadband connectivity required.

Role Summary

Do you want to be one of the engineers building the infrastructure at the heart of the cloud revolution?

At Canonical we’re developing technologies that are key to the transition to the cloud, with Ubuntu as the number one cloud operating system. We are looking for a fun, talented software engineer whose ingenuity, self-motivation and engineering skill have contributed to a shining track record of successful projects.

Alongside four or five other engineers, you’ll be part of an agile engineering squad, in Canonical’s Launchpad team, working in either a new development or maintenance role on a different cloud-related project every six to nine months. Your work will touch projects such as OpenStack, MAAS, AWSome and the Launchpad SaaS developer tools platform.

To succeed you’ll need to share our love of hard work and our passion for free software, Ubuntu and the cloud.

Your energy and enthusiasm will be key to delivering the project, and to making the squad fun to be a part of.

Key Skills and Accountabilities

  • Develop new features in existing web or cloud applications or even start new ones from scratch.
  • Participate in the maintenance of the portfolio of applications maintained by the Launchpad team (a group of six development squads).
  • Collaborate within a small team of four to five engineers to design and deliver agreed features on an established schedule.
  • Ensure high quality results from across the team by participating in established team practices such as code review and testing.
  • Maintain readable developer-oriented documentation.
  • Coordinate regularly with the rest of the Launchpad team.

Required Skills and Experience

  • You have extensive experience in development of web applications using a major object or oriented application framework
  • You are proficient with the technologies powering the web such as Python, HTTP, HTML, CSS and JavaScript
  • You live and breathe open source technology.  You know the industry, understand the community and share the ideals.  You know your OpenStack from your intel, your ARM from your aaS and your Bugzilla from your Git
  • You are well experienced with at least one web application framework, such as Rails, Django, Zope/Plone, Pyramid, Turbogears, Web Objects, etc
  • You are well experienced with at least one JavaScript library/framework such as YUI 3/2, jQuery, Dojo, MooTools, or Prototype
  • You love easy to use software and pay particular attention to making your applications a joy to use
  • You have created stellar user interfaces using JavaScript, HTML and CSS
  • You’re skilled in object-oriented programming in the Python language
  • How people solve complex problems in software fascinates you.  You also know that reliable and maintainable code are essential to long-term success.  You’re familiar with writing about what needs to be done, as well as test-driven development and other “agile methods
  • You have strong spoken English communication skills, and can communicate clearly in writing, including email and IRC environments.
  • You have a good sense of humour and enjoy building a fun working environment with your colleagues.
  • You are willing to travel internationally, for periods of one or two weeks and occasionally longer, for conferences, developer-oriented meetings and sprints

Desired Skills and Experience

  • You are familiar with interaction design and have contributed to the user interface of a leading web application.
  • You have built and managed a community around an open source project
  • You have contributed code to an open source project
  • You understand the basics of one or more of the following:
    • laaS platforms such as OpenStack, AWS, Eucalyptus
    • Ubuntu Server, particularly in cloud contexts
    • ARM server
    • Services Oriented Architecture
    • Message-passing systems
    • Distributed version control systems
    • A form of Linux packaging, such as .deb or .rpm
  • You are familiar with Agile/Lean development practices
  • You enjoy exploring new languages like Go, Haskell or Clojure
  • You have system programming experience in C
  • You worked as part of a distributed software engineering team and can demonstrate the self-motivation and discipline required in such an environment

Apply online, or talk to us in #launchpad-dev if you want to see what we do!

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Prakash

Virtualization and its many flavors has been one of the most dominating and influential technologies that has evolved over the past five years. While the technology has gained wide acceptance, it is also seen as a key element behind the cloud computing wave that is sweeping the IT landscape today.

Indian IT partners have started adopting the technology and are building successful business practices around it. In this article, we take a look at key trends in the virtualization market.

“Canonical is keen to explore opportunities, and offers very flexible packages for partners looking at virtualization services. Open source is emerging as not just a cost-effective alternative but also as an equally secure and stable alternative,” says Prakash Advani, Regional Manager, Asia Pacific, Canonical.

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Prakash

The Cloud Faceoff!

The stage was set for a lively debate between public cloud rivals at GigaOM Structure in San Francisco Thursday – representatives from Citrix, Eucalyptus and the OpenStack project certainly delivered. Nebula CEO and OpenStack co-founder Chris Kemp didn’t even get past the introductions before he challenged his fellow panelists on their “closed” cloud implementations and embrace of Amazon Web Services’ API, which he compared to the Walmart of infrastructure.

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Prakash

Does the rest of the cloud computing world really need to clone Amazon Web Services in order to succeed?

Probably not, says Lew Moorman, the president of Rackspace, the San Antonio, Texas, company that plays second fiddle to Amazon in the cloud game. According to him, some customers want companies like his to clone all of Amazon’s Application Programming Interfaces, the coding standards that let a program interact with Amazon’s cloud. But he thinks it’s a bad idea that isn’t going to work out.

Rackspace is also moving to OpenStack on August 1st! wow!

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