Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'cloud'

David Duffey

Today we announced a collaborative support and engineering agreement with Dell.  As part of this agreement Canonical will add Dell 11G & 12G PowerEdge models to the Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS Certification List and Dell will add Ubuntu Server to its Linux OS Support Matrix.

In May 2012, Dell launched the OpenStack Cloud Reference Architecture using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS on select PowerEdge-C series servers. Today’s announcement expands upon that offering by combining the benefits of Ubuntu Server Certification, Ubuntu Advantage enterprise support, and Dell Hardware ProSupport across the PowerEdge line.

Dell customers can now deploy with confidence when purchasing Dell PowerEdge servers with Dell Hardware ProSupport and Ubuntu Advantage.  When these customers call into Dell, their service tag numbers will be entitled with ProSupport and Ubuntu Advantage, which will create a seamless support experience via the collaborative Dell and Canonical support and engineering relationship.

In preparation for this announcement, Canonical engineers worked with Dell to enable and validate Ubuntu Server running on Dell PowerEdge Servers.  This work resulted in improved Ubuntu Server on Dell PowerEdge support for PCIe SSD (solid state drives), 4K-block drives, EFI booting, Web Services Management, consistent network device naming, and PERC (PowerEdge RAID Controllers).

Dell hardware systems management can be done out-of-band via ipmi, iDRAC, and the Lifecycle Controller.  Dell OMSA Ubuntu packages are also available but it is recommended to use the supported out-of-band systems management tools.  Dell TechCenter is a good resource for additional technical information about running Ubuntu Server on Dell PowerEdge servers.

If you are interested in purchasing Ubuntu Advantage for your Dell PowerEdge servers, please contact the Dell Solutions team at Canonical.  If your business is already using or thinking about using a supported Ubuntu Server infrastructure in your data-center then be sure to fill out the annual Ubuntu Server and Cloud Survey to provide additional feedback.

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Prakash

A very open cloud

Businesses will double the amount of data they send across networks in the next few years. In the US, that means greater use of managed IP. Australia, though, like a lot of countries, is heading in the opposite direction.

Cisco’s Virtual Networking Index provides sophisticated forecasts of how we will use networks over the next few years. It estimates that the amount of data transferred by businesses will increase from 6 trillion gigabytes last year to 12 trillion by 2016. Or, if you prefer, 12,051 petabytes.

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niemeyer

A small and fun experiment is out:

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Steve George

Dell announced today an updated XPS 13, preloaded with Ubuntu, which has a full high-definition 1080p display. It will be available for sale in the USA  and Canada, but as part of this update Dell will also be making it available in parts of Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

 

As we reported in November, the Dell XPS 13 is a high-end ultramobile laptop, offering developers a complete client-to-cloud experience. It is the result of Dell’s bold Sputnik initiative which embraced the community and received terrific response from developers around the world.  With Ubuntu 12.04 LTS preloaded, the machine is perfect for developers and anyone who wants high speed, brilliant graphics and smart design.

If you’re keen to get your hands on a new Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition with Ubuntu pre-loaded, check-out our web page for more details and links:

  http://www.ubuntu.com/partners/dell/dellxps

We’ll post more links allowing you to buy in additional countries as soon as we can.

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anthony-c-beckley

We are exhibiting at this year’s CeBIT event on March 5-9th, 2013 in Hannover Germany, in conjunction with our partner in the region, Teuto.net and we’re giving away number of free tickets to selected customers and partners. If you are interested in one of these tickets, please contact me at anthony.beckley@canonical.com for more information.

The Canonical/Teuto.net stand will be in the Open Source Arena (Hall 6, Stand F16, (030) and we will be showcasing two enterprise technology areas:

  • The Ubuntu Cloud Stack – demonstrating end user access to applications via an OpenStack cloud, powered by Ubuntu,
  • Ubuntu Landscape Systems Management – demonstrating ease of management of desktop, server and cloud nodes.

We will be running hourly demonstrations on our stand and attendees have the chance to win a Google Nexus 7 tablet! Simply come to out stand and watch a short demo or your chance to win If you would like to pre-register for a demonstration, email me at anthony.beckley@canonical.com

We look forward to seeing you at the show!

CeBIT draws a live audience of more than 3,000 people from over 100 different countries. In just five days the show delivers a panoramic view of the digital world’s mainstay markets: ICT and Telecommunications, Digital Media also Consumer Electronics.
To learn more about CeBIT click here.

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Ben Howard



Traditionally, updates for the stable release and long term stable release Cloud Images have been on an ad-hoc basis; reasons for releasing new images were generally restricted to security, critical bugs, and stale images. This ad-hoc update cycle meant that updated images were only released every three months or so, and for older releases, as often as six months.

While quality has always been a concern and top priority, during this cycle, Canonical has worked to vastly improve the QA infrastructure to support our Cloud Images. For example, when a new kernel is released, the daily build for that image is now put through the complete QA process. This change in process has allowed us to identify and automatically evaluate whether or not an image is a good candidate for update release.


As such, we are pleased to announce in the next few weeks, we will be turning on automated updates for Ubuntu Server 10.04 LTS, 11.10, 12.04 LTS, and 12.10. This means that approximately every three to four weeks, a new, freshened image will be released. The release cadence will follow the kernel SRU process.

The first updated image to be released under this process was 10.04 LTS[1].

There are a variety of ways to find the released Cloud Images. The two easiest ways are to go the AMI Finder[2] or use http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/<SUITE>/release. For example, http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/lucid/release would bring you to the last AMI's for Ubuntu Server 10.04 LTS.

Due to this change, we will discontinuing the email notifications of updated images to the various email lists for updated images. At UDS-R in Copenhagen[3], we discussed email notifications and the decision was reached to discontinue them. Replacing email notification is the RSS feed[4] and release notes (example from 10.04 LTS)[5].

As Cloud Image suites are migrated to automated releases, we will follow up on this announcement.

Finally, for 12.04 LTS and later, this change will introduce lock-step update releases with Windows Azure. As Windows Azure moves towards GA, we have been working to have the same releases for the Ubuntu Server Cloud Images on both EC2 and Windows Azure.

As always, your feedback is most appreciated. Please feel free to follow on either this post or to email concerns direct to me.

[1] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/lucid/release-20130124/
[2] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/locator/ec2/
[3] http://blueprints.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+spec/servercloud-r-cloudtesting
[4] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/rss/
[5] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/lucid/release-20130124/unpacked/release_notes.txt

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Jane Silber

Today’s inauguration of Barack Obama to his second term provides a good opportunity to look back at last year’s campaign and appreciate it in a bit more detail. We’ll skip discussion of the adverts, polls, photo ops, sound bites, political theatre and even the much appreciated informed debate on the issues, and focus instead on the interesting stuff – the IT infrastructure that powers something as dynamic as a presidential campaign. You can imagine the demands placed on such an infrastructure – scalability, reliability, cost effectiveness, manageability, openness, cloud. Once you have those requirements in mind, the clear choice for meeting those demands is Ubuntu. And so it’s no surprise that the Obama campaign reached the same conclusion.  We recently spoke with Harper Reed, the CTO of the Obama campaign, about the challenges he faced and solutions he and his team put in place during the campaign. We’ve published that piece in honour of today’s inauguration; you can find it on our new Insights blog.

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Ben Howard


We are pleased to announce the availability of beta Vagrant Cloud Images. These images have been customized to work with the Vagrant development environment, and are based on the Ubuntu Cloud Images. As such, these are vanilla images. They do, however, have the Virtualboxguest additions found in the Universe archive (required for Vagrant integration). 

For those who use Vagrant, your feedback is essential. Please feel free to send feedback via the ubuntu-cloud@lists.ubuntu.com mailing list.

The images are approximately 256M in size, and are configured for 512MB of RAM. They use a custom cloud-init user-data to drive the first boot. And of course, they have the vagrant user with vagrant insecure SSH key pre-installed. During the beta period, we will not be promoting any of the Vagrant boxes with the regular releases of the Ubuntu Cloud Images and will only publish the daily image builds; after the beta period these images will be promoted with the releases.

To kick the tires on the Vagrant images, take a look at http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/vagrant. I will be working with the fine folks at Vagrant to get the official Ubuntu Vagrant images listed at  http://www.vagrantbox.es/

If you are interested in learning about the Vagrant development environment, head on over to Vagrant for more information.

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Prakash

Netflix is at it again, this time showing off its homemade architecture for running Hadoop workloads in the Amazon Web Services cloud. It’s all about the flexibility of being able to run, manage and access multiple clusters while eliminating as many barriers as possible.

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Ben Howard


For sometime people have been asking me "when will Cloud Images sport a Twitter account?" Well, wait no longer, because the Ubuntu Cloud Image Builder now has a Twitter Account.

The Cloud Image process will now Tweet when a new image is build and published -- dailies, new release updates and new versions being releases. For right we're only Tweeting EC2 information, but once Windows Azure goes GA, we'll start Tweeting that too.

So in the meantime, you can follow our faithful Cloud Builder as it tweets merrily its build progress at @UbuCloudImages. But I'll have to warn you, the Cloud Builder won't response to tweets, so we're not snubbing you if there is no response.


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Ben Howard

If Twitter isn't your cup of tea, or coffee, or <insert liquid refreshment here>, how about RSS. A while back in November, we introduced RSS feeds for the Ubuntu Cloud Images.

There is a feed for both released images and dailies. The feeds are really simple: they show all the builds that are available. This is a great way to track new releases of the Ubuntu Cloud Images if you don't want want to follow Twitter, hate checking your email or you don't care much for reading our announcement emails.

Anyway, enjoy the RSS.

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Ben Howard

We are pleased to announce the immediate availability of the latest 12.04.1 (Precise Pangolin) and 12.10 (Quantal Quetzal) Cloud Images on Windows Azure, Microsoft's public cloud. These images are named:
  • 12.04.1: Ubuntu-12_04_1-LTS-amd64-20121218-en-us-30GB
  • 12.10: Ubuntu-12_10-amd64-20121218-1-en-us-30GB
Please note, that due to the way that Windows Azure Gallery works, we will not be able to maintain older images on the gallery. As new images become available, we will be expiring old images. If you need a specific version/serial of a Ubuntu Cloud Image, we strongly suggest that you snapshot and use that version.
Action required: Updates for Existing Images

ACTION REQUIRED: Update existing 12.04.1 or 12.10 images

Over the last year, it has been our pleasure to work with Microsoft to build the Ubuntu Cloud Images for Windows Azure. Microsoft is making updates to Windows Azure to further increase performance and stability of Virtual Machines, currently in preview. These updates require an action - by January 15, 2013 - on custom Linux virtual machine images that fit the definition below:

  • Any gallery Linux images captured into storage accounts from a virtual machine originally created on or before December 21, 2012
  • Any of your personal Linux images uploaded to Windows Azure on or before December 21, 2012.
To learn more about the changes that Microsoft has implemented, please see Microsoft’s announcement.
All Ubuntu users who have instances running on Windows Azure need to make sure that they take action BEFORE January 15, 2013 (else, they might find the Mayan prophecy 30 days late, as far as their instances are concerned).
If, however, you want to update existing images, then we present to you, utlemming’s tl;dr update guide (or you can use Microsoft’s guide, which does the same stuff, just with more explicit commands).

utlemming’s tl;dr update guide

From a Ubuntu perspective the changes required for 12.04 and 12.10 are:
  • CHANGE the current archive mirrors to the on-site Azure mirrors. Canonical has worked to build fast and stable regional mirrors which are co-located in each Azure region. To reduce your bandwidth costs and improve the experience of installing software, all users should update to the new mirrors.
  • CHANGE bootloader configuration to include kernel parameters of “rootdelay=300 console=ttyS0″ and drop the kernel parameter "ata_piix.disable_driver" as it is no longer beneficial and will cause harm after January 15, 2013
  • ADD hv-kvp-daemon-init, which facilitates the start of the hv-kvp-daemon and supporting scripts. The hv-kvp-daemon handles hyper-visor-to-Ubuntu communication channels.
  • ADD linux-backports-hv-{precise,quantal}-virtual (lbm module). The lbm module backports the 3.7 HV stack to support new hypervisor features, as well as increase performance and stability.
  • UPDATE walinuxagent to version 1.2. Microsoft has introduced some bug fixes to the way that provisioning of Linux images work. This updated agent will reduce provisioning failures.

   
Update Ubuntu 12.04 and 12.04.1

For those running 12.04 and 12.04.1, the following steps are needed to fully update Ubuntu to Windows Azure compatibility. Complete all eight steps to update the mirror, the kernel, and the Azure agent.
  1. sudo sed -i “s,archive.ubuntu.com,azure.archive.ubuntu.com,g” /etc/apt/sources.list
    • This step updates the mirrors to point to an Azure hosted mirror.
  2. sudo apt-add-repository ‘http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu precise-backports main’
    • This step adds the repository needed to get the kernel and agent changes.
  3. sudo apt-get update
  4. sudo apt-get install linux-backports-modules-hv-precise-virtual
    • This step adds the update kernel and associated modules.
  5. sudo apt-get install hv-kvp-daemon-init walinuxagent
    • This step adds the updated agent.
  6. Perform the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT steps outlined below to adjust the boot commandline options prior to your next boot.
  7. (recommended) sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
  8. sudo reboot

Update Ubuntu 12.10

For those who have already upgraded their images and area already running 12.10,  the following steps are needed to fully update Ubuntu to Windows Azure compatibility. Complete all eight steps to update the mirror, the kernel, and the Azure agent.
  1. sudo sed -i “s,archive.ubuntu.com,azure.archive.ubuntu.com,g” /etc/apt/sources.list
    • This step updates the mirrors to point to an Azure hosted mirror.
  2. sudo apt-add-repository ‘http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu precise-backports main’
    • This step adds the repository needed to get the kernel and agent changes.
  3. sudo apt-get update
  4. sudo apt-get install linux-backports-modules-hv-precise-virtual
    • This step adds the update kernel and associated modules.
  5. sudo apt-get install hv-kvp-daemon-init walinuxagent
    • This step adds the updated agent.
  6. Perform the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT steps outlined below to adjust the boot commandline options prior to your next boot.
  7. (recommended) sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
  8. sudo reboot

Update the Boot Loader Configuration

Ubuntu instances running on Windows Azure need to be configured for a long root delay (how long Ubuntu will wait for the root device to appear) and to output kernel messages to the serial console.

Edit /etc/default/grub and make sure that the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT has “console=ttyS0 rootdelay=300” in it.  Remove any reference to "ata_piix.disable_driver". For example: 

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="console=ttyS0 rootdelay=300”Ubuntu instances running on Windows Azure should no longer be configured to disable the ata_piix driver as it is now used for simulating a CD-ROM.


An alternative to using an editor on /etc/default/grub is to just run these commands:
  1. sudo sed -i 's/GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="/GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="console=ttyS0 rootdelay=300 /g' /etc/default/grub
  2. sudo sed -i 's/atapiix.disable_driver//g' /etc/default/grub
Then run the following to process these grub linux command line changes:
  1. sudo update-grub
  2. (optional) sudo reboot

Bring-your-own-Ubuntu (BYOU)

Obviously, we would love for you to use the images that Canonical builds. After all, we have a team that has put in countless hours building, perfecting and QA’ing. But, if for some reason you can’t, then can we suggest that you start with our base images? You can find them here:
These VHD files are the exact base-bits that have been uploaded and registered in the Windows Azure environment. Even better, these are based on the 20121218 Amazon AWS EC2 official images with the same package version and set (except there are a few more packages to support Windows Azure).
TIP: If you use the VHD files for BYOU, cloud-init is installed. Cloud-init is the magic sauce in the Ubuntu Cloud Images that gives each instance of Ubuntu running in the cloud a personality; for Windows Azure, Cloud-Init and WALinuxAgent work side-by-side to offer the best Ubuntu experience. We have configured cloud-init for NoDataSource, which means that it will look for user-data in /var/lib/cloud/seed/nocloud-net/user-data. Simply drop your user-data script in there, and at boot time, it will be run. Also, you can edit /etc/cloud/cloud.cfg as well to use different mirrors, add SSH keys, etc. You can read more about cloud-init here: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/CloudInit
For the adventurous that like to spin their own bits, please make sure that you have the following packages installed.
  • hv-kvp-daemon-init: handles hypervisor communication with Ubuntu
  • walinuxagent: Windows Azure Linux provisioning agent and Azure fabric registration agent
  • A kernel based on 3.7 or backports of the HV stack Ubuntu 13.04 kernels support the HV stack normally.
  • Install the linux-tools-common package.
  • 12.04 and 12.10 Ubuntu kernels will need the linux-backports-hv-{precise,quantal}-virtual package installed. This package is a complete backport of the _entire_ HV stack from Ubuntu 13.04.
  • Set /etc/apt/sources.list to use the hosted-in-Azure Ubuntu mirrors (http://azure.archive.ubuntu.com), which will use the speedy mirrors local to your Azure virtual machine. WARNING: these mirrors are dreadfully slow outside Azure.
Follow the Windows Azure recommendations for publication.
NOTE: It is very hard to generate a VHD file that is compatible with Windows Azure using open-source tools without playing a very annoying and disk-space intensive dance. For this reason we strongly recommend using the VHD files above, or using the in-Azure images and taking a snapshot.

Special thanks

The Ubuntu Cloud Image team recognizes that the success on Windows Azure would not be possible if not for the amazing help and special talents of Adam Conrad (infinity), Andy Whitcroft (apw) and the QA and Certification staff, as well as our fine colleagues at Microsoft.

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Mark Baker

As clouds for IT infrastructure become commonplace, admins and devops need quick, easy ways of deploying and orchestrating cloud services.  As we mentioned in October, Ubuntu now has a GUI for Juju, the service orchestration tool for server and cloud. In this post we wanted to expand a bit more on how Juju makes it even easier to visualise and keep track of complex cloud environments.

Juju provides the ability to rapidly deploy cloud services on OpenStack, HP Cloud, AWS and other platforms using a library of 100 ‘charms’ which cover applications from node.js to Hadoop. Juju GUI makes the Juju command line interface even easier, giving the ability to deploy, manage and track progress visually as your cloud grows (or shrinks).

Juju GUI is easy and totally intuitive.  To start, you simply search for the service you want on the Juju GUI charm search bar (top right on the screen).  In this case I want to deploy WordPress to host my blog site.  I have the chance to alter the WordPress settings, and with a few clicks the service is ready.  Its displayed as an icon on the GUI.

I then want a mysql service to go alongside.  Again I search for the charm, set the parameter (or accept the defaults) and away we go.

Its even easier to build the relations between these services by point and click. Juju knows that the relationship needs a suitable database link.

I can expose WordPress to users by setting expose flag  - at the bottom of a settings screen – to on. To scale up WordPress I can add more units, creating identical copies of the WordPress deployment, including any relationships.  I have selected ten in total, and this shows in the center of the wordpress icon.

And thats it.

For a simple cloud, Juju or other tools might be sufficient.  But as your cloud grows, Juju GUI will be a wonderful way not only to provision and orchestrate services, but more importantly to validate and check that you have the correct links and relationships.  Its an ideal way to replicate and scale cloud services as you need.

For more details of Juju, go to juju.ubuntu.com.  To try Juju GUI for yourself, go to http://uistage.jujucharms.com:8080/

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Mark Murphy

Ubuntu has long been a favourite with developers – especially in the worlds of web and cloud development. We’re excited that, from today, serious (and not-so-serious) developers will be able to get their hands on the super-sleek Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition, preloaded with and fully optimised for Ubuntu.

The Dell XPS 13 is a top spec, high-end ultramobile laptop, offering developers a complete client-to-cloud experience. It is the result of the Dell’s bold Sputnik initiative, which embraced the community and received terrific response from developers around the world. The community has spoken – and they said, “give us power, give us storage, give us a really ‘meaty’ machine – that also looks GREAT. And Dell has delivered.

The XPS 13 with Ubuntu allows developers to create ??microclouds? on the local drive, simulating a proper, at-scale environment, before deploying seamlessly to the cloud using Juju, Ubuntu’s service orchestration tool. That’s something you simply can’t do with a standard installation of any other OS.

With Juju now supporting 103 charms and counting, it covers the world’s most popular open source cloud services, all from the Ubuntu desktop.

I’d like to call out the drive and energy of Barton George and Michael Cote at Dell for making the XPS 13 launch possible. And of course, the team within Canonical for the fine tuning of this great product (mine ‘cold’ boots to desktop in under 11 seconds!) I’d also like to call out the dev community for their incredible support, helping us getting this from drawing board to factory ship – get buying!

Combining Ubuntu with the power of Dell hardware gives developers the perfect environment for productive software development, whatever their sector. The Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition is available from http://www.dell.com/us/soho/p/xps-13-linux/pd in America and Canada today.

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Victor Palau

Last month I attended DroidCon 2012 and did a talked about using Juju and Ubuntu to deliver Android applications with a Web Service background. The guys at Skillmatters were kind enough to record and edit the video, and now it publicly available.

 


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Sonia Ouarti

You have critical decisions ahead as you take your first steps into cloud computing.

One of them will be whether to build a private cloud infrastructure in your own data centre, make use of one of the public cloud services offered by vendors like Amazon, Rackspace and HP, or combine the two in a ‘hybrid cloud’ approach.

You can get closer to the right decision by considering the right questions now:

  • Budget - How much do you have (or how much don’t you have) to support your cloud strategy?
  • Speed - When do you need this done? Tomorrow, next year, yesterday…
  • Demand - How many users will you need to support? And will they call come at once?
  • Resources - What kind of resources do you have in-house? And how many can you realistically get your hands on?
  • Privacy -How sensitive is your data? Where are you doing business?

This short, sharp checklist takes you through the process that points you in the right direction and ensures your investments pay off from the start. Download it today.

 

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Prakash

At Netflix we need to be able to quickly query and analyze our AWS resources with widely varying search criteria. For instance, if we see a host with an EC2 hostname that is causing problems on one of our API servers then we need to find out what that host is and what team is responsible, Edda allows us to do this.

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Sonia Ouarti

OpenStack, your foundation for Cloud computing

14 November 2012 at 4pm GMT

 

The open cloud, based on OpenStack, is fast becoming one of the most popular cloud platforms. OpenStack delivers open standards, modularity and scalability, and avoids vendor lock-in.

Join this webinar to find out why OpenStack is surging ahead, learn about the OpenStack technical architecture and the new features of the recent Folsom release. Find out why, to date, all public cloud providers, such as DreamHost and HP, whom are using OpenStack, are deploying it on ubuntu.

You will also learn about investments that Canonical has made into OpenStack such a as our Continuous Integration efforts, the Ubuntu Cloud Archive and Ceilometer.

Register now

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Mark Baker

Hardened sysadmins and operators often spurn graphical user interfaces (GUIs) as being slow, cumbersome, unscriptable and inflexible. GUIs are for wimps, right?

Well, I’m not going to argue – and certainly, command line interfaces (CLIs) have their benefits, for those comfortable using them. But we are seeing a pronounced change in the industry, as developers start to take a much greater interest in the deployment and operation of flexible, elastic services in scale out or cloud environments. Whilst many of these new ‘devops’ are happy with a CLI, others want to be able to visualise their environment. In the same way that IDEs are popular, being able to see a representation of the services that are running and how they are related can prove extremely valuable. The same goes for launching new services or removing existing ones.

This is why, last week, as part of the new Ubuntu 12.10 release, we announced a GUI for Juju, the Ubuntu service orchestration tool for server and cloud.
The new Juju GUI does all these things and more. For those of you unfamiliar with it, Juju uses a service definition file know as a ‘charm’. Much of the magic in Juju comes from the collective expertise that has gone into developing this the charm. It enables you to deploy complex services without intimate knowledge of the best practice associated that service. Instead, all that deployment expertise is encapsulated in the charm.
Now, with the Juju GUI, it gets even easier. You can select services from a library of nearly 100 charms, covering applications from node.js to Hadoop. And you can deploy them live on any of the providers that Juju supports – OpenStack, HP Cloud, Amazon Web Services and Ubuntu’s Metal-as-a-Service. You can add relations between services while they are running, explore the load on them, upgrade them or destroy them. At the OpenStack Summit in San Diego this year, Mark Shuttleworth even used it to upgrade a running* OpenStack Cloud from Essex to Folsom.
Since the Juju GUI was first shown, the interest and feedback has been tremendous. It certainly seems to make the magic of Juju – and what it can do for people – easier to see. If you haven’t seen it already, check out the screen shots below or visit http://uistage.jujucharms.com:8080/

Because as we’ve always known, a picture really is worth a 1000 words.

 

Juju Gui Image

The Juju GUI

 

 

*Running on Ubuntu Server, obviously.

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Sonia Ouarti

If you’re considering the adoption of new technology in your business, there’s a new resource launching today that could give you everything you need to make the right decisions in what can be confusing and sometimes costly field.

With sections on the desktop, server and the hot topic of the moment – cloud computing – it offers useful content for business people of all kinds, regardless of how technical their background might be. It features contributions from IT experts across the Canonical departments, with content available in several formats.
Here are just some of the highlights on the site right now:

  • Cloud and the Enterprise Data Center: Everything Changes – a free ebook that sets out to make the cloud as straightforward as possible.
  • Open Cloud Computing: Mergers and Acquisitions – a fascinating article on how open standards in cloud computing are vital when combining the operations of more than one business.
  • Windows 8 Migration – Let’s Open the Debate – the first article in a series looking at the pros and cons of upgrading business PCs to Microsoft’s controversial new operating system, Windows 8.

Ubuntu Insights is aimed at business people who may not have a technology background, but who are increasingly faced with decisions that involve enterprise computing. We hope it will be useful to you or to some of your colleagues so, if you know of someone who could use a good introduction to the field, please share the link. And we’re always on the look-out for contributors, so if you have any content you’d like to contribute to the site, please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

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Ubuntu Insights

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