Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'cloud'

Prakash

Raspberry Pi cloud

Computer scientists have made a working model of multi million pound cloud computing technology using just Lego bricks and a handful of 20 mini computers.

The University of Glasgow’s Raspberry Pi Cloud project links together 56 Raspberry Pi computer boards in racks made from Lego, which mimic the function and modular design of commercial cloud computing infrastructure.

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Mark Baker

“May you live in interesting times.” This Chinese proverb probably resonates well with teams running OpenStack in production over the last 18 months. But, at the OpenStack Summit in Portland, Ubuntu and Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth demonstrated that life is going to get much less ‘interesting’ for people running OpenStack and that is a good thing.

OpenStack has come a long way in a short time. The OpenStack Summit event in April attracted 3000 attendees with pretty much every significant technology company represented.

Only 12 months ago, being able to install OpenStack in under a few hours was deemed to be an extraordinary feat. Since then deployment tools such as Juju have simplified the process and today very large companies such as AT&T, HP and Deutsche Telekom have been able to rapidly push OpenStack Clouds into production. This means the community has had to look into solving the next wave of problems – managing the cloud in production, upgrading OpenStack, upgrading the underlying infrastructure and applying security fixes – all without disrupting services running in the cloud.

With the majority of OpenStack clouds running on Ubuntu, Canonical has been uniquely positioned to work on this. We have spent 18 months building out Juju and Landscape, our service orchestration and systems management tools to solve these problems, and at the Summit, Mark Shuttleworth demonstrated just how far they have come. During a 30 min session, Mark performed kernel upgrades on a live running system without service interruption. He talked about the integrations and partnerships in place with VMWare, Microsoft and Inktank that mean these technologies can be incorporated into an OpenStack Cloud on Ubuntu with ease. This is is the kind of practicality that OpenStack users need and represents how OpenStack is growing up. It also makes OpenStack less “interesting” and far more adoptable by a typical user which is what OpenStack needs in order to continue its incredible growth. We at Canonical aim to be with it every step of the way.

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niemeyer

Today ubuntufinder.com was updated with the latest image data for Ubuntu 13.04 and all the previous releases as well. Rather than simply hardcoding the values again, though, the JavaScript code was changed so that it imports the new JSON-based feeds that Canonical has been publishing for the official Ubuntu images that are available in EC2, thanks to recent work by Scott Moser. This means the site is always up-to-date, with no manual actions.

Although the new feeds made that quite straightforward, there was a small detail to sort out: the Ubuntu Finder is visually dynamic, but it is actually a fully static web site served from S3, and the JSON feeds are served from the Canonical servers. This means the same-origin policy won’t allow that kind of cross-domain import to be easily done without further action.

The typical workaround for this kind of situation is to put a tiny proxy within the site server to load the JSON and dispatch to the browser from the same origin. Unfortunately, this isn’t an option in this case because there’s no custom server backing the data. There’s a similar option that actually works, though: deploying that tiny proxy server in some other corner and forward the JSON payload as JSONP or with cross-origin resource sharing enabled, so that browsers can bypass the same-origin restriction, and that’s what was done.

Rather than once again doing a special tiny server for that one service, though, this time around a slightly more general tool has emerged, and as an experiment it has been put live so anyone can use it. The server logic is pretty simple, and the idea is even simpler. Using the services from jsontest.com as an example, the following URL will serve a JSON document that can only be loaded from a page that is in a location allowed by the same-origin policy:

If one wanted to load that page from a different location, it might be transformed into a JSONP document by loading it from:

Alternatively, modern browsers that support the cross-origin resource sharing can simply load pure JSON by omitting the jsonpeercb parameter. The jsonpeer server will emit the proper header to allow the browser to load it:

This service is backed by a tiny Go server that lives in App Engine so it’s fast, secure (hopefully), and maintenance-less.

Some further details about the service:

  • Results are JSON with cross-origin resource sharing by default
  • With a query parameter jsonpeercb=<callback name>, results are JSONP
  • The callback name must consist of characters in the set [_.a-zA-Z0-9]
  • Query parameters provided to jsonpeer are used when doing the upstream request
  • HTTP headers are discarded in both directions
  • Results are cached for 5 minutes on memcache before being re-fetched
  • Upstream results must be valid JSON
  • Upstream results must have Content-Type application/json or text/plain
  • Upstream results must be under 500kb
  • Both http and https work; just tweak the URL and the path accordingly

Have fun if you need it, and please get in touch before abusing it.

UPDATE: The service and blog post were tweaked so that it defaults to returning plain JSON with CORS enabled, thanks to a suggestion by James Henstridge.

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Mark Baker

If you are interested in either OpenStack or MySQL (or both) then you need to know about 2 meetups running the evening of May 23rd in London.

The London OpenStack meetup.

This is the 3rd meeting to take place and promises to be a good one with 3 talks planned so far:

* Software defined networking and OpenStack – VMWare Nicera’s Andrew Kennedy
* OpenStack Summit Overview – Rackspace’s Kevin Jackson
* An introduction to the Heat API – Red Hat’s Steven Hardy

For a 4th talk we are looking at a customer example – watch this space.

To come along please register at:

http://www.meetup.com/Openstack-London/

The MySQL Meetup.

This group hasn’t met for quite some time but MySQL remains as popular as ever and new developments with MariaDB mean the group has plenty to catch up on. There 2 talks planned so far:

* HP’s database as a service – HP’s Andrew Hutching

* ‘Whatever he wants to talk about’ – MySQL and MariaDB founder Monty Widenius.

 

With David Axmark also in attendance it could be one of the most significant MySQL meetings in London ever. Not one to miss if you are interested in MySQL, MariaDB or related technologies

MySQL meetups are managed in Facebook – please register to attend here:

http://www.meetup.com/The-London-MySQL-Meetup-Group/events/110243482/

 

Of course given the events are running in rooms next to each other you are welcome to register for both and switch between them based on the schedule. We hope to see you there!

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anthony-c-beckley

From our Cloud partner Inktank…

Today marks another milestone for Ceph with the release of Cuttlefish (v0.61), the third stable release of Ceph. Inktank’s development efforts for the Cuttlefish release have been focused around Red Hat support and making it easier to install and configure Ceph while improving the operational ease of integrating with 3rdparty tools, such as provisioning and billing systems. As ever, there have also been a ton of new features we have added to the object and block capabilities of Ceph, as well as with the underlying storage cluster (RADOS), alongside some great contributions from the community.

So what’s new for Ceph users in Cuttlefish?

Ease of installation:

  • Ceph-deploy: a new deployment tool which requires no other tools and allows a user to start running a multi-node Ceph cluster in minutes. Ideal for users who want to do quick proof of concepts with Ceph.
  • Chef recipes: a new set of reference Chef recipes for deploying a Ceph storage cluster, which Inktank will keep authoritative as new features emerge in Ceph. These are in addition to the Puppet scripts contributed by eNovance and Bloomberg, the Crowbar Barclamps developed with Dell, and the Juju charms produced in conjunction by Canonical, ensuring customers can install Ceph using most popular tools.
  • Fully tested RPM packages for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and derivatives, available on both the ceph.com repo and in EPEL (Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux).

Administrative functionality:

  • Admins can now create, delete or modify users and their access keys as well as manipulate and audit users’ bucket and object data using the RESTful API of the Ceph Object Gateway. This makes it easy to hook Ceph into provisioning or billing systems.
  • Administrators can now quickly and easily set a quota for a RADOS pool. This helps with capacity planning management as well as preventing specific Ceph clients from consuming all available data at the expense of other users.
  • In addition, to the pool quotas, administrators can now quickly see the total used and available capacity of a cluster using the ceph df command, very similar to how the generic UNIX df command works with other local file systems.

Ceph Block Device (RBD) Incremental Snapshots

It is now possible to just take a snapshot of the recent changes to a Ceph block image. Not only does this reduce the amount of space needed to store snapshots on a cluster, but forms the foundation for delivering disaster recovery options for volumes, as part of the popular cloud platforms such as OpenStack and CloudStack.

You can see the complete list of features in the release notes are available at  http://ceph.com/docs/master/release-notes/. You can also check out our roadmap page for more information on what’s coming up in future releases of Ceph. If you would like to contribute towards Ceph, you can visit Ceph.com for more information on how you can get started and we invite you to join our online Ceph Development Summit on Tuesday May 7th, more details available at http://wiki.ceph.com.

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Prakash

 Public cloud services market in India is forecast to grow 36 per cent in 2013 to total $443 million, research firm Gartner today said.

The public cloud services market stood at $326 million in 2012, Gartner said in a statement.

Infrastructure as a service (IaaS), including cloud compute, storage and print services, which was the fastest- growing segment, grew 22.7 per cent in 2012 to $43.1 million.

It’s expected to further grow 39.6 per cent in 2013 to $60.2 million, Gartner said.

Software as a service (SaaS), which is the largest segment of the cloud services market in India, comprised 36 per cent of the total market in 2012.

Gartner expects that from 2013 through 2017, $4.2 billion will be spent on cloud services in India, of which $1.6 billion will be spent on SaaS.

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Prakash

Netflix, the popular video-streaming service that takes up a third of all internet traffic during peak traffic hours isn’t just the single largest internet traffic service. Netflix, without doubt, is also the largest pure cloud service.

netflixcloud-620x457
Netflix, with more than a billion video delivery instances per month, is the largest cloud application in the world.

At the Linux Foundation’s Linux Collaboration Summit in San Francisco, California, Adrian Cockcroft, director of architecture for Netflix’s cloud systems team, after first thanking everyone “for building the internet so we can fill it with movies”, said that Netflix’s Linux, FreeBSD, and open-source based services are “cloud native”.

By this, Cockcroft meant that even with more than a billion video instances delivered every month over the internet, “there is no datacenter behind Netflix”. Instead, Netflix, which has been using Amazon Web Services since 2009 for some of its services, moved its entire technology infrastructure to AWS in November 2012.

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Paul Oh

The emergence of public cloud computing has changed the IT landscape for developers and enterprises, making it significantly easier and more cost effective to develop and deploy new applications, services and infrastructure. Enterprises can choose among cloud providers to meet their needs for performance, features, price and flexibility that will support their technology strategy today as well as in the future.

Today, Microsoft Corp. has announced the general availability of Windows Azure Infrastructure Services, its public cloud offering with the ability to create and manage both Windows and Linux virtual machines. As part of Canonical’s Certified Public Cloud Program, Ubuntu on Windows Azure is fully certified and has been tested and optimized by Canonical and Microsoft for excellent performance and reliability. Enterprises that require both Windows and Linux can choose the right operating system for running their workloads based on application performance and availability.

Canonical and Microsoft have been working together to make Ubuntu run seamlessly on Windows Azure. As Bob Kelly, Corporate Vice President, Server and Tools Business at Microsoft commented:

“Windows Azure is committed to openness and interoperability. Having Ubuntu available to Windows Azure users is a big step forward for interoperability in the public cloud. Our customers can deploy mission critical applications on both Windows Server and Linux and across both public and private clouds.”

Ubuntu Server is highly available, secure, built for scale and provides the tools that simplify and reduce the cost of cloud deployments. So, for enterprises looking to deploy demanding cloud oriented workloads such as Hadoop, Cassandra and other scale out type applications,  Ubuntu on Windows Azure will be a familiar and well suited offering that provides maximum deployment flexibility. This includes hybrid clouds where applications and data can remain behind the company firewall for security or compliance reasons, and that are able to access public cloud resources on demand.  As the leading guest OS in most major public clouds, Ubuntu can be deployed across multiple public clouds at scale for pricing and redundancy benefits as well as avoiding lock-in to a single cloud provider.

At Canonical, we invest in the Ubuntu experience to provide the most complete combination of performance, update handling, compliance and reliability in the market. We also extend our commercial offerings of support, systems management, audit compliance and IP assurance to commercial customers using Ubuntu on certified public clouds.

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Ben Howard

We are pleased to announce that Canonical has stood up official mirrors in HP Cloud's AZ-1, 2, and 3 regions.

If you are using Ubuntu Server 12.10 Cloud Images, there is no action to take; 12.10 images are by default configured to use the new mirror address.

For Ubuntu 12.04 instances, the default Ubuntu image does not automatically use the in-HP Cloud mirrors. We are currently working with HP to publish a new image that defaults to the local mirrors. If you would like to switch to the new in-HP mirrors, simply run:
          
    $ sudo sed -i -e \
            's,^archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu,nova.clouds.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu,g'  \
             /etc/apt/sources.list 

    $ sudo apt-get -y update

Note: *.clouds.archive.ubuntu.com is configured using split-horizon DNS. This means that the DNS answer to queries is based on the askering IP address; only queries originating within HP Cloud are answered with the HP Cloud mirror addresses. If your DNS resolver[s] is not based in HP Cloud, then you will be unable to benefit from these new mirrors. 
 

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Prakash

Google unveiled a “patent pledge” that it hopes will shield cloud software and big data developers from the type of litigation that has engulfed the mobile phone industry. The pledge, which is like a non-aggression pact, covers ten patents related to Google’s MapReduce technology.

The pledge, which Google announced on Thursday, says that developers are free to use or sell the technology described in the patents without fear of future lawsuits. The shield applies, however, only to projects based on open source software that is available to all

The ten patents included in Google’s pledge include a controversial one issued last year that covers a form of parallel processing known as MapReduce. The patent gave rise to fears that Google would be able to monopolize tools like Hadoop, which is an integral part of the so-called “big data” revolution that is fueling a wide range of new products and services. Google’s pledge appears intended to allay that fear.

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Prakash

Cloud computing represents a fundamental shift in the way technology services will be delivered to enterprises, forcing IT firms to re-look at how they operate now, according to Pat Gelsinger, chief executive officer of VMware, which provides software that enable creation of cloud computing infrastructure within corporate premises.

Gelsinger is convinced that not all major IT firms (including Indian ones) will survive this wave of technology transition. Change may mean sacrificing revenue in the short term said, Gelsinger, an Intel veteran rumoured to replace the retiring incumbent Intel CEO Paul Otellini, a rumour he denied.

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David Duffey

Today we announced a collaborative support and engineering agreement with Dell.  As part of this agreement Canonical will add Dell 11G & 12G PowerEdge models to the Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS Certification List and Dell will add Ubuntu Server to its Linux OS Support Matrix.

In May 2012, Dell launched the OpenStack Cloud Reference Architecture using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS on select PowerEdge-C series servers. Today’s announcement expands upon that offering by combining the benefits of Ubuntu Server Certification, Ubuntu Advantage enterprise support, and Dell Hardware ProSupport across the PowerEdge line.

Dell customers can now deploy with confidence when purchasing Dell PowerEdge servers with Dell Hardware ProSupport and Ubuntu Advantage.  When these customers call into Dell, their service tag numbers will be entitled with ProSupport and Ubuntu Advantage, which will create a seamless support experience via the collaborative Dell and Canonical support and engineering relationship.

In preparation for this announcement, Canonical engineers worked with Dell to enable and validate Ubuntu Server running on Dell PowerEdge Servers.  This work resulted in improved Ubuntu Server on Dell PowerEdge support for PCIe SSD (solid state drives), 4K-block drives, EFI booting, Web Services Management, consistent network device naming, and PERC (PowerEdge RAID Controllers).

Dell hardware systems management can be done out-of-band via ipmi, iDRAC, and the Lifecycle Controller.  Dell OMSA Ubuntu packages are also available but it is recommended to use the supported out-of-band systems management tools.  Dell TechCenter is a good resource for additional technical information about running Ubuntu Server on Dell PowerEdge servers.

If you are interested in purchasing Ubuntu Advantage for your Dell PowerEdge servers, please contact the Dell Solutions team at Canonical.  If your business is already using or thinking about using a supported Ubuntu Server infrastructure in your data-center then be sure to fill out the annual Ubuntu Server and Cloud Survey to provide additional feedback.

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Prakash

A very open cloud

Businesses will double the amount of data they send across networks in the next few years. In the US, that means greater use of managed IP. Australia, though, like a lot of countries, is heading in the opposite direction.

Cisco’s Virtual Networking Index provides sophisticated forecasts of how we will use networks over the next few years. It estimates that the amount of data transferred by businesses will increase from 6 trillion gigabytes last year to 12 trillion by 2016. Or, if you prefer, 12,051 petabytes.

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niemeyer

A small and fun experiment is out:

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Steve George

Dell announced today an updated XPS 13, preloaded with Ubuntu, which has a full high-definition 1080p display. It will be available for sale in the USA  and Canada, but as part of this update Dell will also be making it available in parts of Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

 

As we reported in November, the Dell XPS 13 is a high-end ultramobile laptop, offering developers a complete client-to-cloud experience. It is the result of Dell’s bold Sputnik initiative which embraced the community and received terrific response from developers around the world.  With Ubuntu 12.04 LTS preloaded, the machine is perfect for developers and anyone who wants high speed, brilliant graphics and smart design.

If you’re keen to get your hands on a new Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition with Ubuntu pre-loaded, check-out our web page for more details and links:

  http://www.ubuntu.com/partners/dell/dellxps

We’ll post more links allowing you to buy in additional countries as soon as we can.

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anthony-c-beckley

We are exhibiting at this year’s CeBIT event on March 5-9th, 2013 in Hannover Germany, in conjunction with our partner in the region, Teuto.net and we’re giving away number of free tickets to selected customers and partners. If you are interested in one of these tickets, please contact me at anthony.beckley@canonical.com for more information.

The Canonical/Teuto.net stand will be in the Open Source Arena (Hall 6, Stand F16, (030) and we will be showcasing two enterprise technology areas:

  • The Ubuntu Cloud Stack – demonstrating end user access to applications via an OpenStack cloud, powered by Ubuntu,
  • Ubuntu Landscape Systems Management – demonstrating ease of management of desktop, server and cloud nodes.

We will be running hourly demonstrations on our stand and attendees have the chance to win a Google Nexus 7 tablet! Simply come to out stand and watch a short demo or your chance to win If you would like to pre-register for a demonstration, email me at anthony.beckley@canonical.com

We look forward to seeing you at the show!

CeBIT draws a live audience of more than 3,000 people from over 100 different countries. In just five days the show delivers a panoramic view of the digital world’s mainstay markets: ICT and Telecommunications, Digital Media also Consumer Electronics.
To learn more about CeBIT click here.

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Ben Howard



Traditionally, updates for the stable release and long term stable release Cloud Images have been on an ad-hoc basis; reasons for releasing new images were generally restricted to security, critical bugs, and stale images. This ad-hoc update cycle meant that updated images were only released every three months or so, and for older releases, as often as six months.

While quality has always been a concern and top priority, during this cycle, Canonical has worked to vastly improve the QA infrastructure to support our Cloud Images. For example, when a new kernel is released, the daily build for that image is now put through the complete QA process. This change in process has allowed us to identify and automatically evaluate whether or not an image is a good candidate for update release.


As such, we are pleased to announce in the next few weeks, we will be turning on automated updates for Ubuntu Server 10.04 LTS, 11.10, 12.04 LTS, and 12.10. This means that approximately every three to four weeks, a new, freshened image will be released. The release cadence will follow the kernel SRU process.

The first updated image to be released under this process was 10.04 LTS[1].

There are a variety of ways to find the released Cloud Images. The two easiest ways are to go the AMI Finder[2] or use http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/<SUITE>/release. For example, http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/lucid/release would bring you to the last AMI's for Ubuntu Server 10.04 LTS.

Due to this change, we will discontinuing the email notifications of updated images to the various email lists for updated images. At UDS-R in Copenhagen[3], we discussed email notifications and the decision was reached to discontinue them. Replacing email notification is the RSS feed[4] and release notes (example from 10.04 LTS)[5].

As Cloud Image suites are migrated to automated releases, we will follow up on this announcement.

Finally, for 12.04 LTS and later, this change will introduce lock-step update releases with Windows Azure. As Windows Azure moves towards GA, we have been working to have the same releases for the Ubuntu Server Cloud Images on both EC2 and Windows Azure.

As always, your feedback is most appreciated. Please feel free to follow on either this post or to email concerns direct to me.

[1] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/lucid/release-20130124/
[2] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/locator/ec2/
[3] http://blueprints.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+spec/servercloud-r-cloudtesting
[4] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/rss/
[5] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/lucid/release-20130124/unpacked/release_notes.txt

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Jane Silber

Today’s inauguration of Barack Obama to his second term provides a good opportunity to look back at last year’s campaign and appreciate it in a bit more detail. We’ll skip discussion of the adverts, polls, photo ops, sound bites, political theatre and even the much appreciated informed debate on the issues, and focus instead on the interesting stuff – the IT infrastructure that powers something as dynamic as a presidential campaign. You can imagine the demands placed on such an infrastructure – scalability, reliability, cost effectiveness, manageability, openness, cloud. Once you have those requirements in mind, the clear choice for meeting those demands is Ubuntu. And so it’s no surprise that the Obama campaign reached the same conclusion.  We recently spoke with Harper Reed, the CTO of the Obama campaign, about the challenges he faced and solutions he and his team put in place during the campaign. We’ve published that piece in honour of today’s inauguration; you can find it on our new Insights blog.

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Ben Howard


We are pleased to announce the availability of beta Vagrant Cloud Images. These images have been customized to work with the Vagrant development environment, and are based on the Ubuntu Cloud Images. As such, these are vanilla images. They do, however, have the Virtualboxguest additions found in the Universe archive (required for Vagrant integration). 

For those who use Vagrant, your feedback is essential. Please feel free to send feedback via the ubuntu-cloud@lists.ubuntu.com mailing list.

The images are approximately 256M in size, and are configured for 512MB of RAM. They use a custom cloud-init user-data to drive the first boot. And of course, they have the vagrant user with vagrant insecure SSH key pre-installed. During the beta period, we will not be promoting any of the Vagrant boxes with the regular releases of the Ubuntu Cloud Images and will only publish the daily image builds; after the beta period these images will be promoted with the releases.

To kick the tires on the Vagrant images, take a look at http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/vagrant. I will be working with the fine folks at Vagrant to get the official Ubuntu Vagrant images listed at  http://www.vagrantbox.es/

If you are interested in learning about the Vagrant development environment, head on over to Vagrant for more information.

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Prakash

Netflix is at it again, this time showing off its homemade architecture for running Hadoop workloads in the Amazon Web Services cloud. It’s all about the flexibility of being able to run, manage and access multiple clusters while eliminating as many barriers as possible.

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