Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'cloud'

Mark Baker

Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

Today is a big day for Ubuntu and a big day for cloud computing: Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is released. Everyone involved with Ubuntu can’t help but be impressed and stirred about the significance of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

We are impressed because Ubuntu is gaining extensive traction outside of the tech luminaries such as Netflix, Snapchat and wider DevOP community; it is being adopted by mainstream enterprises such as BestBuy. Ubuntu is dominant in public cloud with typically 60% market share of Linux workloads in the major cloud providers such as Amazon, Azure and Joyent. Ubuntu Server also is the fastest growing platform for scale out web computing having overtaken CentOS some six months ago. So Ubuntu server is growing up and we are proud of what it has become. We are stirred up by how the adoption of Ubuntu, coupled with the adoption of cloud and scale out computing is set grow enormously as it fast becomes an ‘enterprise’ technology.

Recently 70% of CIOs stated that they are going to change their technology and sourcing relationships within the next two or three years. This is in large part due to their planned transition to cloud, be it on premise using technologies such as Ubuntu OpenStack, in a public cloud or, most commonly, using combinations of both. Since the beginning of Ubuntu Server we have been preparing for this time, the time when a wholesale technology infrastructure change occurs and Ubuntu 14.04 arrives just as the change is starting to accelerate beyond the early adopters and technology companies. Enterprises now moving parts of their infrastructure to cloud can choose the technology best suited for the job: Ubuntu 14.04 LTS:

Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS at a glance

  • Based on version 3.13 of the Linux kernel

  • Includes the Icehouse release of OpenStack

  • Both Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS and OpenStack are supported until April 2019

  • Includes MAAS for automated hardware provisioning

  • Includes Juju for fast service deployment of 100+ common scale out applications such as MongoDB, Hadoop, node.js, Cloudfoundry, LAMP stack and Elastic Search

  • Ceph Firefly support

  • Openvswitch  2.0.x

  • Docker included & Docker’s own repository now populated with official     Ubuntu 14.04 images

  • Optimised Ubuntu 14.04 images certified for use on all leading public cloud     platforms – Amazon AWS, Microsoft Azure, Joyent Cloud, HP Cloud, Rackspace Cloud, CloudSigma and many others.

  • Runs on key hardware architectures: x86, x64,  Avoton, ARM64, POWER Systems

  • 50+ systems certified at launch from leading hardware vendors such as HP, Dell, IBM, Cisco and SeaMicro.

The advent of OpenStack, the switch to scale out computing and the move towards public cloud providers presents a perfect storm out of which Ubuntu is set to emerge the technology used ubiquitously for the next decade. That is why we are impressed and stirred by Ubuntu 14.04. We hope you are too. Download 14.04 LTS here

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John Zannos

Canonical and Cisco share a common vision around the direction of the cloud and the application-driven datacentre.  We believe both need to quickly respond to an application’s needs and be highly elastic.

Cisco’s announcement of an open approach with OpFlex is a great step towards to an application centric cloud and datacenter. Cisco Application Centric Infrastructure policy engine (APIC) makes the policy model APIs and documentation open to the marketplace. These policies will be freely usable by an emerging ecosystem that is adopting an open policy model. Canonical and Cisco are aligned in efforts to leverage open models to accelerate innovation in the cloud and datacenter.

Cisco’s ACI operational model will drive multi-vendor innovation, bringing greater agility, simplicity and scale.  Opening the ACI policy engine (APIC) to multi-vendor infrastructure is a positive step to open source cloud and datacenter operations.  This aligns with the Canonical open strategy for the cloud and datacenter.  Canonical is a firm believer in a strong and open ecosystem.  We take great pride that you can build an OpenStack cloud on Ubuntu from all the major participants in the OpenStack ecosystem (Cisco, Dell, HP, Mirantis and more).  The latest OpenStack Foundation survey of production OpenStack deployments found 55% of them on Ubuntu – that’s over twice the number of deployments than the next operating system. We believe a healthy and open ecosystem is the best way to ensure great choice for our collective customers.

Canonical is pleased to be a member of Cisco’s OpFlex ecosystem.  Canonical and Cisco intend to collaborate in the standards process. As the standard is finalised, Cisco and Canonical will integrate their company’s technology to improve the customer experience. This includes alignment of Canonical’s Juju and KVM with Cisco’s ACI model.

Cisco and Canonical believe there are opportunities to leverage Ubuntu, Ubuntu OpenStack and Juju, Canonical’s service orchestration, with Cisco’s ACI policy-based model.  We see many companies moving to Ubuntu and Ubuntu OpenStack that use Cisco network and compute technology. The collaboration of Canonical with Cisco towards an application centric cloud and datacenter is an opportunity for our mutual customers.

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Mark Baker

It is pretty well known that most of the OpenStack clouds running in production today are based on Ubuntu. Companies like Comcast, NTT, Deutsche Telekom, Bloomberg and HP all trust Ubuntu Server as the right platform to run OpenStack. A fair proportion of the Ubuntu OpenStack users out there also engage Canonical to provide them with technical support, not only for Ubuntu Server but OpenStack itself. Canonical provides full Enterprise class support for both Ubuntu and OpenStack and has been supporting some of the largest, most demanding customers and their OpenStack clouds since early 2011. This gives us a unique insight into what it takes to support a production OpenStack environment.

For example, in the period January 1st 2014 to end of March, Canonical processed hundreds of OpenStack support tickets averaging over 100 per month. During that time we closed 92 bugs whilst customers opened 99 new ones. These are bugs found by real customers running real clouds and we are pleased that they are brought to our attention, especially the hard ones as it helps makes OpenStack better for everyone.

The type of support tickets we see is interesting as core OpenStack itself only represents about 12% of the support traffic. The majority of problems arise between the interaction of OpenStack, the operating system and other infrastructure components – fibre channel drivers used by nova volume, or, QEMU/libvirt issues during upgrades for example. Fixing these problems requires deep expertise Ubuntu as well as OpenStack which is why customers choose Canonical to support them.

In my next post I’ll dig a little deeper into supporting OpenStack and how this contributes to the OpenStack ecosystem.

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Sally Radwan

A few years ago, the cloud team at Canonical decided that the future of cloud computing lies not only in what clouds are built on, but what runs on it, and how quickly, securely, and efficiently those services can be managed. This is when Juju was born; our service orchestration tool built for the cloud and inspired by the way IT architects visualise their infrastructure: boxes representing services, connected by lines representing interfaces or relationships. Juju’s GUI simplifies searching, dragging and dropping a ‘Charm’ into a canvas to deploy services instantly.

Today, we are announcing two new features for DevOps seeking ever faster and easier ways of deploying scalable infrastructure. The first are Juju Charm bundles that allow you to deploy an entire cloud environment with one click. Secondly we are announcing Quickstart which spins up an entire Juju environment and deploys the necessary services to run Juju, all with one command. Juju Bundles and Quickstart are powerful tools on their own but offer enormous value comes when they are used together: Quickstart can be combined with bundles to rapidly launch Juju, start-up the environment, and deploy an entire application infrastructure, all in one action.

Already there are several bundles available that cover key technology areas: security, big data, SaaS, back office workloads, web servers, content management and the integration of legacy systems. New Charm bundles available today include:

Bundles for complex services:

  • Instant Hadoop: The Hadoop cluster bundle is a 7-node starter cluster designed to deploy Hadoop in a way that’s easily scalable. The deployment has been tested with up to 2,000 nodes on AWS.

  • Instant Mongo: Mongodb, a 13-node (over three shards) starter MongoDB cluster and has the capability to horizontally scale all of the three shards.

  • Instant Wiki: Two Mediawiki deployments; a simple example mediawiki deployment with just mediawiki and MySQL; and a load balanced deployment with HAProxy and memcached, designed to be horizontally scalable.

  •  A new bundle from import.io allows their SaaS platform to be instantly integrated inside Juju. Navigate to any website using the import.io browser, template the data and then test your crawl. Finally, use the import.io charm to crawl your data directly into ElasticSearch.
  • Instant Security: Syncope + PostgreSQL, developed by Tirasa, is a bundle providing Apache Syncope with the internal storage up and running on PostreSQL. Apache Syncope is an open source system for managing digital identities in enterprise environments.

  • Instant Enterprise Solutions: Credativ, experts in Open Source consultancy, are showing with their OpenERP bundle how any enterprise can instantly deploy an enterprise resource planning solution.

  • Instant High Performance Computing: HPCC (High Performance Computing Cluster) is a massive parallel-processing computing platform that solves Big Data problems. The platform is Open Source and can now be instantly deployed via Juju.

Francesco Chicchiriccò, CEO Tirasa / VP Apache Syncope comments; “The immediate availability of an Apache Syncope Juju bundle dramatically shortens the product evaluation process and encourages adoption. With this additional facility to get started with Open Source Identity Management, we hope to increase the deployments of Apache Syncope in any environment.”

 

Bundles for developers:

These bundles provide ‘hello world’ blank applications; they are designed as templates for application developers. Simply, they provide templates with configuration options to an application:

  • Instant Django: A Django bundle with gunicorn and PostgreSQL modelled after the Django ‘Getting Started’ guide is provided for application developers.

  • Instant Rails: Two Rails bundles, one is a simple Rails/Postgres deployment, the ‘scalable’ bundle adds HAProxy, Memcached, Redis, Nagios (for monitoring), and a Logstash/Kibana (for logging), providing an application developer with an entire scalable Rails stack.

  • Instant Wildlfy (The Community JBoss): The new Wildfly bundle from Technology Blueprint, provides an out-of-the-box Wildfly application server in a standalone mode running on openjdk 7. Currently MySQL as a datasource is also supported via a MySQL relation.

Technology Blueprint, creators of the Wildfly bundle, also uses Juju to build its own cloud environments. The company’s system administrator, Saurabh Jha comments; “Juju bundles are really beneficial for programmers and system administrators. Juju saves time, efforts as well as cost. We’ve used it to create our environment on the fly. All we need is a quick command and the whole setup gets ready automatically. No more waiting for installing and starting those heavy applications/servers manually; a bundle takes care of that for us. We can code, deploy and host our application and when we don’t need it, we can just destroy the environment. It’s that easy.”

You can browse and discover all new bundles on jujucharms.com.

Our entire ecosystem is hard at work too, charming up their applications and creating bundles around them. Upcoming bundles to look forward to include a GNU Cobol bundle, which will enable instant legacy integration, a telecom bundle to instantly deploy and integrate Project Clearwater – an open source IMS, and many others. For sure you have some ideas about a bundle that gives an instant solution to some common problems. It has never been easier to see your ideas turn into reality.

==

If you would like to create your own charm or bundle, here is how to get started: http://developer.ubuntu.com/cloud/ or see a video about Charm Bundles:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYpnQI6GZTA.

And if you’ve never used Juju before, here is an excellent series of blog posts that will guide you through spinning up a simple environment on AWS: http://insights.ubuntu.com/resources/article/deploying-web-applications-using-juju-part-33/.

Need help or advice? The Juju community is here to assist https://juju.ubuntu.com/community.

Finally, for the more technically-minded, here is a slightly more geeky take on things by Canonical’s Rick Harding, including a video walkthrough of Quickstart.

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Prakash Advani

 Google is currently in the best position to challenge Amazon because they have the engineering culture and technical abilities to release some really innovative features. IBM has bought into some excellent infrastructure at Softlayer but still has to prove its cloud engineering capabilities.

Amazon has set the standard for how we expect cloud infrastructure to behave, but Google doesn’t conform to these standards in some surprising ways. So, if you’re looking at Google Cloud, here are some things you need to be aware of.

Read More: http://gigaom.com/2014/03/02/5-things-you-probably-dont-know-about-google-cloud/

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Prakash Advani

Demand for people with Linux skills is increasing, a trend that appears to follow a shift in server sales.

Cloud infrastructure, including Amazon Web Service, is largely Linux based, and cloud services’ overall growth is increasing Linux server deployments. As many as 30% of all servers shipped this year will be cloud services providers, according to research firm IDC.

This shift may be contributing to Linux hiring trends reported by the Linux Foundation and IT careers website Dice, in a report released Wednesday. The report states that 77% of hiring managers have put hiring Linux talent on their list of priorities, up from 70% a year ago.

Read More: http://www.computerworld.in/news/demand-for-linux-skills-rises

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Mark Baker

Two of the most frequently asked questions about Ubuntu and Canonical are:

* So, just how do you make money when Ubuntu is free?

and

* Ubuntu is great for developers, but is it really suitable for ‘enterprise use’?

We’re trying to do things differently, so we’re not surprised by these questions. What many people hear from other successful open source companies seems to narrow thinking about the value chain and open source economics.

So lets try and explain the answers to these questions, what we are doing and why Ubuntu has a model better suited for business in 2014 than that of legacy linux. Six years ago we made the decision to base our strategy for Ubuntu Server around cloud and scale out computing. We worked hard to make Ubuntu a great instance on Amazon EC2, which, at the time was just getting going. We created technologies such as Cloud-init to handle initialisations of a cloud image. We streamlined the base Ubuntu OS image to create a fast, lightweight base for users and developers to build upon. And very importantly, we doubled down on our model of releasing to a cadence (every six months) and giving developers access to the latest technologies quickly and easily.

The result? It worked. Ubiquity has spoken and Ubuntu is now the most popular operating system in cloud – it’s number one on AWS, the leading Linux on Azure, dominates DigitalOcean and is first choice on most other public clouds. Ubuntu is also w3tech’s web operating system of the year and the Linux platform showing the fastest growth for online infrastructure whilst most others are decline. In 2012 and 2013 we saw Ubuntu and Ubuntu OpenStack being chosen by large financial service organisations and global telcos for their infrastructure. Big name web scale innovators like Snapchat, Instagram, Uber, Quora, Hailo and Hipchat among others have all chosen Ubuntu as their standard infrastructure platform. We see Ubuntu leading the charge as the platform for software defined networking, scale out storage, platform as a service and OpenStack infrastructure. In fact, a recent OpenStack Foundation survey revealed that 55% respondents are running Ubuntu on OpenStack – over double that of its nearest competitor. If you measure success by adoption, then Ubuntu is certainly winning the market for next generation, scale out workloads.

However, many measure business success in monetary terms and as one industry pundit often reminds us, “a large percentage of a market that pays zero dollars is still zero dollars”. So, lets come back to the first question: How do you make money when your product is freely available? Ubiquity creates many opportunities for revenue. It can be from paid for, value added tools to help manage security and compliance for customers that care about those things. It can be from commercial agreements with cloud providers and it can be via the product being an optimised embedded component of a cloud solution being delivered by OEMs. Truth is, Canonical is pursuing all of the models above and we are doing well out of it.

As for Enterprise use, Enterprises are now really starting to understand that new, high tech companies are operating their IT infrastructure in radically different ways to them. Some high tech companies are able to scale to 1 Billion users 24x7x365 with less than 100 staff and frugal IT budgets and Enterprises crave some of that efficiency in their infrastructure. So whilst Ubuntu might not be suitable for use in an enterprise set on legacy Linux thinking, it is very much where forward thinking enterprises are headed to stay ahead of the game.

So, the basic values of of Ubuntu Server: freely available, provide developers access to the latest technology through a regular cadence of releases and optimise for cloud and scale out have been in place for years. Both adoption and revenue confirm it is the right strategy long term. Enterprises are evolving and starting to adopt Ubuntu and the model of restricting access to bits unless money is paid is now drawing to a close. Others are begrudgingly starting to accept this and trying to evolve their business models to compete with the momentum of Ubuntu.

We welcome it, after all, where is the fun in winning if you have no one to beat?

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Prakash

GoGrid CEO John Keagy says if an organization wants to use a true open source database, like MongoDB, Basho’s Riak, Hadoop or Cassandra, Amazon is not the place to go.

“We want to be an open source alternative,” he says. “If you’re not worried about lock-in then use (AWS). If you’re an enterprise that wants to be able to scale indefinitely and have a flexible architecture then you should identify those needs early and embrace an open source architecture.”

Read More: http://www.computerworld.in/news/gogrid-wants-to-be-your-open-source-alternative-to-amazon’s-cloud-databases

 

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Prakash

PayPal has spoken publicly and regularly about its private OpenStack implementation and recently said that 20 percent of its infrastructure runs on OpenStack.

But it’s only a matter of time before PayPal starts running some of its operations on public clouds, said James Barrese, CTO of PayPal.

“We have a few small apps that aren’t financial related where we’re doing experiments on the public cloud,” he said. “We’re not using it in a way that’s a seamless hybrid because we’re a financial system and have very stringent security requirements.”

Read More: http://www.itworld.com/cloud-computing/400964/private-cloud-poster-child-paypal-experimenting-public-cloud

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Mark Baker

It is with great pride that we saw Ubuntu winning W3tech’s Operating System of the year award.

w3techs_Jan2014

For those of us that work on Ubuntu, increased adoption is one of the most satisfying results of our work and is the best measure of the if we are doing the right thing or not. What is most significant about this though, as is highlighted above, this is the third year running that Ubuntu has won the award. The reasoning is fairly simple: the growth of Ubuntu as a platform for online infrastructure has far outstripped that of other operating systems.

w3techs_last3_yrs

In fact, over the last three years only two Linux operating systems showed any growth at all – Debian and Ubuntu, although Gentoo had some traction in 2013.

Ubuntu overtaking CentOS was the most significant change in 2013 and our popularity continues to grow whilst many other decline. Many of the notable web properties of 2013 are confirmed Ubuntu users: Snapchat, Uber, Instagram, Buzzfeed, Hailo, Netflix etc…Developers at fast thinking, innovative companies love Ubuntu for its flexibility and the ability to get the latest frameworks up and running quickly and easily on cloud on or bare metal.

As observers of the industry will know, tech used in Silicon Valley startups quickly filters through to more traditional Enterprises. With the launch of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS in April, Ubuntu is set for continued greatness this year as more and more businesses seek the agility and innovation shown by many of the hot tech properties. It will be fun trying to make it happen too.

Read about the w3tech awards at:

http://w3techs.com/blog/entry/web_technologies_of_the_year_2013

Images courtesy of w3techs.com

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Prakash

You gotta love it when one vendor helpfully announces what another vendor’s plans. That’s what apparently happened Monday when Rackspace Chairman and co-founder Graham Weston was quoted in the Wall Street Journal’s CIO blog  saying that Salesforce.com would start running OpenStack’s open-source cloud technology.

Read More: http://gigaom.com/2013/12/17/salesforce-com-will-adopt-openstack-says-rackspace/

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Prakash

According to a new Gartner report, around $3.9 billion will be spent on cloud services in India from 2013 through 2017, of which $1.7 billion will be spent on software-as-a-service (SaaS). The overall public cloud services market in India is also set to grow 33.6% this year to touch $404 million, an increase of $101 million from the 2012 revenue of $303 million, said the research firm.

Read More: http://www.cxotoday.com/story/india-to-spend-39-billion-on-cloud-services-by-2017/

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Prakash

OpenStack, a non-profit organization promoting open source cloud computing software, wants to increase its presence in India.

The organization has formed a three -pronged strategy—launching new products and features, tapping organizations deploying cloud computing, and training the vast channel base of its alliance partners who have a strong presence in the country.

Mark Collier, COO, OpenStack, affirmed, “After the US, India and China are the most important countries for us. We will target the large organizations that are either in the process of deploying, or have a cloud computing strategy in place. And cloud computing requires a lot of business transformation because of the cultural shift and dramatic changes in processes.”

 

Read More: http://www.crn.in/news/software/2013/11/15/openstack-keen-on-indian-market

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Mark Baker

To paraphrase from Mark Shuttleworth’s keynote at the OpenStack Developer Summit last week in Hong Kong, building clouds is no longer exciting. It’s easy. That’s somewhat of an exaggeration, of course, as clouds are still a big choice for many enterprises, but there is still a lot of truth in Mark’s sentiment. The really interesting part about the cloud now is what you actually do with it, how you integrate it with existing systems, and how powerful it can be.

OpenStack has progressed tremendously in its first few years, and Ubuntu’s goal has been to show that it is just as stable, production-ready, easy-to-deploy and manage as any other cloud infrastructure. For our part, we feel we’ve done a good job, and the numbers certainly seem to support that. More than 3,000 people from 50 countries and 480 cities attended the OpenStack Summit in Hong Kong, a new record for the conference, and a recent IDG Connect survey found that 84 percent of enterprises plan to make OpenStack part of their future clouds.

Clearly OpenStack has proven itself. And, now, the OpenStack community’s aim is making it work even better with more technologies, more players and more platforms to do more complex things more easily. These themes were evident from a number of influential contributors at the event and require an increased focus amongst the OpenStack community:

Global Collaboration

OpenStack’s collaborative roots were exemplified early on with the opening address by Daniel Lai, Hong Kong’s CIO, who talked about how global the initially U.S.-founded project has become. There are now developers in more than 400 cities around the world with the highest concentration of developers located in Beijing.

Focus on the Core

One of the first to directly hit on the theme of needing more collaboration, though, was Mark Shuttleworth with a quote from Albert Einstein: “Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius — and a lot of courage — to move in the opposite direction.” OpenStack has grown fantastically, but we do, as a community, need to ensure we can support that growth rate. OpenStack should focus on the core services and beyond that, provide a mechanism to let many additional technologies plug in, or “let a thousand flowers bloom,” as Mark eloquently put it.

HP’s Monty Taylor also called for more collaboration between all of OpenStack’s players to really continue enhancing the core structure and principle of OpenStack. As he put it, “If your amazing plug-in works but the OpenStack core doesn’t, your plug-in is sitting on a pile of mud.” A bit blunt, but it gets to the point of needing to make sure that the core benefits of OpenStack – that an open and interoperable cloud is the only cloud for the future – are upheld.

Greasing the Wheels of Interoperability

And, that theme of interoperability was at the core of one of Ubuntu’s own announcements at the Hong Kong summit: the Ubuntu OpenStack Interoperability Lab, or Ubuntu OIL. Ubuntu has always been about giving companies choice, especially in the cloud. Our contributions to OpenStack so far have included new hypervisors, SDN stacks and the ability to run different workloads on multiple clouds.

We’ve also introduced Juju, which is one step up from a traditional configuration management tool and is able to distil functions into groups – we call them Charms – for rapid deployment of complex infrastructures and services.

Will all the new capabilities being added to OpenStack, Ubuntu OIL will test all of these options, and other non-OpenStack-centric technologies, to ensure Ubuntu OpenStack offers the broadest set of validated and supported technology options compatible with user deployments.

Collaboration and interoperability testing like this will help ensure OpenStack only becomes easier to use for enterprises, and, thus, more enticing to adopt.

For more information on Ubuntu OIL, or to suggest components for testing in the lab, email us at oil@ubuntu.com or visit http://www.ubuntu.com/cloud/ecosystem/ubuntu-oil

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Prakash

  • US Number 1 Country, India Number 2!
  • Ubuntu No 1 OS.
  • KVM Number 1 Hypervisor.

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Prakash

Nearly 9 of every 10 (89 percent) respondents in India believe that Cloud Computing, or ‘as-a-service’ approach, is relevant to their organization. Nearly 8 of every 10 (79 percent) respondents in India say they currently have a cloud-related initiative in place within the organization, or are planning to implement cloud, or ‘as-a-service’ approach, in the next 12 months, according to 4th annual VMware Cloud Index, a study that was conducted by Forrester Research across 12 Asia Pacific countries. -

See more at: http://www.computerworld.in/news/indian-businesses-seem-to-be-in-love-with-cloud#sthash.1Ly7KKUy.dpuf

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jono

Many of you will have heard about Ubuntu’s convergence goals on the client side — running a single, consistent code-base and experience that adapts to phones, desktops, tablets, and TVs…but are you aware of our convergence on the cloud?

Ubuntu and our cloud orchestration service, Juju, provides a platform and the tools to be able to deploy your service (from a simple blog to a full enterprise and production deployment) across a range of clouds…be it a public cloud, private cloud, or bare metal. Prototyping, staging, deploying to production, and scaling up are simple.

At the heart of Juju are the charms…the range of components that form a service (e.g. WordPress, Hadoop, Mongo, Drupal etc). Inside each charm is an encapsulation of best practice from domain experts for each component that automates how charms relate together in your service. Best practice connected to best practice in a service that easily scales is the backbone of Juju.

In much the same way we are building a consistent experience and set of features that run across phones, desktop, tablets, and TVs, we are also building a consistent experience and set of tools for delivering services across different clouds, bare metal, or local containers. Ubuntu for clouds is not merely bound to a single cloud…the point is that what matters is your service and you can easily migrate your service between public and private clouds and bare metal. Again, a converged experience across multiple services.

On the client side this convergence means a more consistent user experience with no fragmentation, consistent platform for deploying content across devices that is cheaper to deploy, and makes multiple product lines available to vendors and builds institutional knowledge across different product lines.

On the cloud side this convergence means that you are in control of your service. When you or your staff know how to use Ubuntu and the cloud orchestration tools we provide (such as Juju), you are in control of your service and you can prototype and deploy it where you want easily, whether a private or public cloud or bare metal, scale out when required, and build consistent institutional knowledge.

What makes Ubuntu on the cloud even more interesting is that Juju GUI also crosses the chasm between service topology on the office whiteboard and a running service – you can literally draw your service and everything spins up effortlessly.

Ubuntu is all about convergence and bringing simplicity and power to our devices, to our clouds, and all powered by Open Source.

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admin

  • Ubuntu Server 13.10 is available from 17th October; first fully supported release of the new OpenStack Havana, with VMWare vSphere integration, faster node installation and a new version of Juju that supports ultra-dense containerised application deployment.

Canonical today announced that the next version of Ubuntu for server and cloud environments will be released on 17 October 2013.

“Ubuntu 13.10 delivers the latest and best version of OpenStack, and is the fastest, most flexible platform for scale-out computing,” says Mark Shuttleworth, Founder of Ubuntu and VP Products for Canonical. “Ubuntu is typically used in very large scale deployments. In this release we’ve tuned the cloud deployment experience for very small clusters as well, to support dev-and-test environments.” This 13.10 release makes it possible to deploy a full OpenStack cloud on only 5 servers and offers a sophisticated Landscape dashboard for the management of Ubuntu OpenStack clouds no matter their size.

Enterprise management of OpenStack clouds and the workloads deployed on them has been a focus for Canonical in the latest development cycle. “With Landscape, we simplify the lives of enterprise compliance and administration teams, with a full suite of compliance, performance monitoring and security update tools that work on all cloud and physical environments. Now we’ve added real-time dashboards for your OpenStack cloud, too” says Federico Lucifredi, who leads Ubuntu server product management.

While Ubuntu itself is an operating system, much of the recent work by Canonical and the Ubuntu community has been to deliver complete solutions and applications on top of it. The breakthrough Juju service orchestration tool from Canonical makes it easy to design, deploy, manage and scale workloads securely from a browser or the command line. In 13.10, Juju can instantly deploy an entire software environment or service as a “bundle” directly from the easy-to-use Juju GUI, improving on the previous deployment of individual components. This reduces complexity and enables administrators to share entire complex workloads consisting of many related parts.

Ubuntu leads the way with integration between OpenStack and VMware vSphere so ESXi users can interoperate with OpenStack. “The ability to deploy Ubuntu OpenStack alongside ESXi with orchestration that spans both properties is extremely valuable, bringing OpenStack right to the centre of common enterprise virtualization practice” said Mark Shuttleworth.

13.10 introduces Juju management of LXC containers, which allow multiple services to run on the same physical or virtual machine. This gives sysadmins the option of greater density, reducing the total number of machines required to run a service, and reducing cost.

A new installer enables very rapid provisioning of thousands of nodes, typically five times faster than the best traditional Linux installation process. Ubuntu is uniquely suited to rapid provisioning and re-provisioning in large-scale data centers. The Ubuntu LXC update in 13.10 provides blindingly fast (less than one second) and efficient cloning of containers for faster scaling of containerized services, unique to Ubuntu.

Ubuntu’s OpenStack distribution brings the famous “Ubuntu Just Works” usability to complex cloud deployment; clouds are simple to design, deploy and scale for private or public purposes. Ubuntu 13.10 includes Havana, the latest version of OpenStack, with new and updated tools such as Ceilometer for metering and monitoring, and Heat for auto-scaling.

Havana is also available to customers on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS thanks to the 12.04 Cloud Archive, from Canonical. This means that LTS users can get access to the latest Ubuntu OpenStack release, tools and features while continuing to enjoy the stability and maintenance commitment that backs our current LTS.

 

Availability
Ubuntu Server 13.10 will be available for download from the 17th October 2013 at: http://www.ubuntu.com/download.  OpenStack Havana release notes: https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/ReleaseNotes/Havana

 

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Prakash

Netflix has developed s Asgard, a web interface that lets engineers and developers manage their AWS infrastructure using a GUI rather than a command line.

Netflix Asgard is open source.

Paypal a big user of OpenStack has ported Asgard to OpenStack.

Read More: http://gigaom.com/2013/10/02/paypal-has-rebuilt-netflixs-cloud-management-system-for-openstack/

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Mark Baker

The telco business has long prided itself on providing dependable services all day every day. Today, dial tones generally survive earthquakes, hurricanes, wars and power cuts and that is testimony to the service quality telcos provide. This high level of service quality runs through a telco’s DNA, which gives their applications the renowned ‘telco-grade’ high quality, highly scalable and constant availability. But creating such a culture comes at a cost.

 

The standards are a result of the tightly controlled software used by telcos which have been tested over many years. Strict processes are employed to minimise the chance of failure of any item in the service, and robust backup or failover services are provided in the advent of failure. While this is essential to deliver failsafe services, it also creates a restrictive environment in which launching new services based on new technologies is severely hampered.

 

As a result, new technology businesses are out-maneuvering telcos by being able to offer services based on the latest development frameworks. These are put together using agile processes and pushed into production by super smart DevOps who have planned application architectures assuming failures will happen. Whether it is Infrastructure As A Service (IAAS) platforms, a move towards IP based voice and data services, or mobile application delivery services that drive customer engagement and retention, startups and tech companies are all delivering strong solutions into the market and putting pressure on telcos to do the same.

The Telco Application Developer Summit in Bangkok, November 21st and 22nd, aims to try and accelerate the pace of new service delivery for telcos by enabling developers to discuss the benefits of DevOp and agile practises. With Ubuntu being at the centre of many of the recent innovations in the high tech space, be it OpenStack cloud, Platform As A Service (PAAS), Software Defined Networking (SDN) or public cloud computing, we are very excited to be a part of this conference. We will be in attendance and demonstrating technologies such as Juju, which enables services to be launched and scaled instantly. If you are involved in the delivery of application services for telcos you should check TADS out and maybe we will see you there.

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