Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'cloud'

Victor Palau

First of all, I wanted to recommend the following recipe from Digital Ocean on how to rollout your own Docker Registry in Ubuntu 14.04. As with most of their stuff, it is super easy to follow.

I also wanted to share a small improvement on the recipe to include a UI front-end to the registry.

Once you have completed the recipe and have a repository secured and running, you extend your docker-compose file to look like this:

nginx:
 image: "nginx:1.9"
 ports:
 - 443:443
 - 8080:8080
 links:
 - registry:registry
 - web:web
 volumes:
 - ./nginx/:/etc/nginx/conf.d:ro

web:
 image: hyper/docker-registry-web
 ports:
 - 8000:8080
 links:
 - registry
 environment:
 REGISTRY_HOST: registry

registry:
 image: registry:2
 ports:
 - 127.0.0.1:5000:5000
 environment:
 REGISTRY_STORAGE_FILESYSTEM_ROOTDIRECTORY: /data
 volumes:
 - ./data:/data

You will also need to include a configuration file for web in the nginx folder.

file: ~/docker-registry/nginx/web.conf

upstream docker-registry-web {
 server web:8080;
 }

server {
 listen 8080;
 server_name [YOUR DOMAIN];

# SSL
 ssl on;
 ssl_certificate /etc/nginx/conf.d/domain.crt;
 ssl_certificate_key /etc/nginx/conf.d/domain.key;

location / {

# To add basic authentication to v2 use auth_basic setting plus add_header
 auth_basic "registry.localhost";
 auth_basic_user_file /etc/nginx/conf.d/registry.password;

proxy_pass http://docker-registry-web;
 proxy_set_header Host $http_host; # required for docker client's sake
 proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr; # pass on real client's IP
 proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
 proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-Proto $scheme;
 proxy_read_timeout 900;
 }
 }

docker-compose up and you should be able to have a ssl secured UI frontend in port 8080 (https://yourdomain:8080/)
If you have any improvement tips I am all ears!


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niemeyer

Over the last several months there has been noticeable and growing pain associated with the evolving integration tests around snapd, and given the project goal of being a cross-distribution platform, we are very keen on solving this problem appropriately so that stability is guaranteed everywhere.

With that mindset a more focused effort was made over the last few weeks to produce a tool that can get the project out of those problems, and onto a runway of more pleasant stability. Despite the short amount of time, I’m very happy about the Spread project which resulted from this effort.

Spread is not Jenkins or Travis, and is not a language or library either. Spread is a tool that will very conveniently ship your code to one or more systems, in parallel, and then offer the right set of options so you can run whatever you need to run to make sure the logic is working, and drive it all from the local system. That implies you can run Spread inside Travis, Jenkins, or your terminal, in a similar way to how your unit tests work.

Here is a short list of interesting facts about Spread:

  • Full-system tests with on demand machine allocation.
  • Multi-backend with Linode and LXD (for local runs) out of the box for now.
  • Multi-language since it can run arbitrary remote code.
  • Agent-less and driven via embedded ssh (kudos to Go team).
  • Convenient harness with project+backend+suite+test prepare and restore scripts.
  • Variants feature for test duplication without copy & paste.
  • Great debugging support – add -debug and stop with a shell inside every failure.
  • Reuse of servers – server allocation is fast, but not allocating is faster.
  • Reasonable test outputs with the shell’s +x mode on failures.
  • … and so forth.

This is all well documented, so I’ll just provide one example here to offer a real taste of how the system feels like.

This is spread.yaml, put in the project root to define the basics:

project: spread

backends:
    lxd:
        systems:
            - ubuntu-16.04
            - ubuntu-14.04

path: /home/test

prepare: |
    echo Entering project...
restore: |
    echo Leaving project...

suites:
    tests/: 
        summary: Integration tests
        prepare: |
            echo Entering suite...
        restore: |
            echo Leaving suite...

The suite name is also the path under which the tests are found.

Then, this is tests/hello/task.yaml:

summary: Greet the world
prepare: |
    echo "Entering task..."
restore: |
    echo "Leaving task..."
environment:
    FOO/a: one
    FOO/b: two
execute: |
    echo "Hello world!"
    [ $FOO = one ] || exit 1

The outcome should be almost obvious (intended feature :-). The one curious detail here is the FOO/a and FOO/b environment variables. This is how to introduce variants, which means this one test will in fact become two: first with FOO=one, and then with FOO=two. Now consider that such environment variables can be defined at any level – project, backend, suite, and task – and imagine how easy it is to test small variations without any copy & paste. After cascading takes place (project→backend→suite→task) all environment variables using a given variant key will be present at once on the same execution.

Now let’s try to run this configuration, including the -debug flag so we get a shell on the failures. Note how with a single test we get four different jobs, two variants over two systems, with the variant b failing as instructed:

$ spread -debug

2016/06/11 19:09:27 Allocating lxd:ubuntu-14.04...
2016/06/11 19:09:27 Allocating lxd:ubuntu-16.04...
2016/06/11 19:09:41 Waiting for LXD container to have an address...
2016/06/11 19:09:43 Waiting for LXD container to have an address...
2016/06/11 19:09:44 Allocated lxd:ubuntu-14.04.
2016/06/11 19:09:44 Connecting to lxd:ubuntu-14.04...
2016/06/11 19:09:48 Allocated lxd:ubuntu-16.04.
2016/06/11 19:09:48 Connecting to lxd:ubuntu-16.04...
2016/06/11 19:09:52 Connected to lxd:ubuntu-14.04.
2016/06/11 19:09:52 Sending project data to lxd:ubuntu-14.04...
2016/06/11 19:09:53 Connected to lxd:ubuntu-16.04.
2016/06/11 19:09:53 Sending project data to lxd:ubuntu-16.04...

2016/06/11 19:09:54 Error executing lxd:ubuntu-14.04:tests/hello:b :
-----
+ echo Hello world!
Hello world!
+ [ two = one ]
+ exit 1
-----

2016/06/11 19:09:54 Starting shell to debug...

lxd:ubuntu-14.04 ~/tests/hello# echo $FOO
two
lxd:ubuntu-14.04 ~/tests/hello# cat /etc/os-release | grep ^PRETTY
PRETTY_NAME="Ubuntu 14.04.4 LTS"
lxd:ubuntu-14.04 ~/tests/hello# exit
exit

2016/06/11 19:09:55 Error executing lxd:ubuntu-16.04:tests/hello:b :
-----
+ echo Hello world!
Hello world!
+ [ two = one ]
+ exit 1
-----

2016/06/11 19:09:55 Starting shell to debug...

lxd:ubuntu-16.04 ~/tests/hello# echo $FOO
two
lxd:ubuntu-16.04 ~/tests/hello# cat /etc/os-release | grep ^PRETTY
PRETTY_NAME="Ubuntu 16.04 LTS"
lxd:ubuntu-16.04 ~/tests/hello# exit
exit


2016/06/11 19:10:33 Discarding lxd:ubuntu-14.04 (spread-129)...
2016/06/11 19:11:04 Discarding lxd:ubuntu-16.04 (spread-130)...
2016/06/11 19:11:05 Successful tasks
2016/06/11 19:11:05 Aborted tasks: 0
2016/06/11 19:11:05 Failed tasks: 2
    - lxd:ubuntu-14.04:tests/hello:b
    - lxd:ubuntu-16.04:tests/hello:b
error: unsuccessful run

This demonstrates many of the stated goals (parallelism, clarity, convenience, debugging, …) while running on a local system. Running on a remote system is just as easy by using an appropriate backend. The snapd project on GitHub, for example, is hooked up on Travis to run Spread and then ship its tests over to Linode. Here is a real run output with the initial tests being ported, and a basic smoke test.

If you like what you see, by all means please go ahead and make good use of it.

We’re all for more stability and sanity everywhere.

@gniemeyer

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Prakash

The public cloud services market in the country is projected to grow 30.4 per cent to reach USD 1.26 billion this year as organisations are pursuing a digital business strategy, Gartner said today. According to the research firm, public cloud services market, which stood at USD 968.1 million in 2015, will reach USD 3.52 billion by 2020.

Read More: http://www.financialexpress.com/article/industry/tech/public-cloud-services-in-india-to-reach-1-26-billion-this-year-gartner/249120/

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niemeyer

As much anticipated, this week Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was released with integrated support for snaps on classic Ubuntu.

Snappy 2.0 is a modern software platform, that includes the ability to define rich interfaces between snaps that control their security and confinement, comprehensive observation and control of system changes, completion and undoing of partial system changes across restarts/reboots/crashes, macaroon-based authentication for local access and store access, preliminary development mode, a polished filesystem layout and CLI experience, modern sequencing of revisions, and so forth.

The previous post in this series described the reassuring details behind how snappy does system changes. This post will now cover Snappy interfaces, the mechanism that controls the confinement and integration of snaps with other snaps and with the system itself.

A snap interface gives one snap the ability to use resources provided by another snap, including the operating system snap (ubuntu-core is itself a snap!). That’s quite vague, and intentionally so. Software interacts with other software for many reasons and in diverse ways, and Snappy is a platform that has to mediate all of that according to user needs.

In practice, though, the mechanism is straightforward and pleasant to deal with. Without any snaps in the system, there are no interfaces available:

% sudo snap interfaces
error: no interfaces found

If we install the ubuntu-core snap alone (done implicitly when the first snap is installed), we can already see some interface slots being provided by it, but no plugs connected to them:

% sudo snap install ubuntu-core
75.88 MB / 75.88 MB [=====================] 100.00 % 355.56 KB/s 

% snap interfaces
Slot                 Plug
:firewall-control    -
:home                -
:locale-control      -
(...)
:opengl              -
:timeserver-control  -
:timezone-control    -
:unity7              -
:x11                 -

The syntax is <snap>:<slot> and <snap>:<plug>. The lack of a snap name is a shorthand notation for slots and plugs on the operating system snap.

Now let’s install an application:

% sudo snap install ubuntu-calculator-app
120.01 MB / 120.01 MB [=====================] 100.00 % 328.88 KB/s 

% snap interfaces
Slot                 Plug
:firewall-control    -
:home                -
:locale-control      -
(...)
:opengl              ubuntu-calculator-app
:timeserver-control  -
:timezone-control    -
:unity7              ubuntu-calculator-app
:x11                 -

At this point the application should work fine. But let’s instead see what happens if we take away one of these interfaces:

% sudo snap disconnect \
             ubuntu-calculator-app:unity7 ubuntu-core:unity7 

% /snap/bin/ubuntu-calculator-app.calculator
QXcbConnection: Could not connect to display :0

The application installed depends on unity7 to be able to display itself properly, which is itself based on X11. When we disconnected the interface that gave it permission to be accessing these resources, the application was unable to touch them.

The security minded will observe that X11 is not in fact a secure protocol. A number of system abuses are possible when we hand an application this permission. Other interfaces such as home would give the snap access to every non-hidden file in the user’s $HOME directory (those that do not start with a dot), which means a malicious application might steal personal information and send it over the network (assuming it also defines a network plug).

Some might be surprised that this is the case, but this is a misunderstanding about the role of snaps and Snappy as a software platform. When you install software from the Ubuntu archive, that’s a statement of trust in the Ubuntu and Debian developers. When you install Google’s Chrome or MongoDB binaries from their respective archives, that’s a statement of trust in those developers (these have root on your system!). Snappy is not eliminating the need for that trust, as once you give a piece of software access to your personal files, web camera, microphone, etc, you need to believe that it won’t be using those allowances maliciously.

The point of Snappy’s confinement in that picture is to enable a software ecosystem that can control exactly what is allowed and to whom in a clear and observable way, in addition to the same procedural care that we’ve all learned to appreciate in the Linux world, not instead of it. Preventing people from using all relevant resources in the system would simply force them to use that same software over less secure mechanisms instead of fixing the problem.

And what we have today is just the beginning. These interfaces will soon become much richer and more fine grained, including resource selection (e.g. which serial port?), and some of them will disappear completely in favor of more secure choices (Unity 8, for instance).

These are exciting times for Ubuntu and the software world.

@gniemeyer

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niemeyer

As announced last Saturday, Snappy Ubuntu Core 2.0 has just been tagged and made its way into the archives of Ubuntu 16.04, which is due for the final release in the next days. So this is a nice time to start covering interesting aspects of what is being made available in this release.

A good choice for the first post in this series is talking about how snappy performs changes in the system, as that knowledge will be useful in observing and understanding what is going on in your snappy platform. Let’s start with the first operation you will likely do when first interacting with the snappy platform — install:

% sudo snap install ubuntu-calculator-app
120.01 MB / 120.01 MB [===============================] 100.00 % 1.45 MB/s

This operation is traditionally done on analogous systems in an ephemeral way. That is, the software has either a local or a remote database of options to install, and once the change is requested the platform of choice will start acting on it with all state for the modification kept in memory. If something doesn’t go so well, such as a reboot or even a crash, the modification is lost.. in the best case. Besides being completely lost, it might also be partially applied to the system, with some files spread through the filesystem, and perhaps some of the involved hooks run. After the restart, the partial state remains until some manual action is taken.

Snappy instead has an engine that tracks and controls such changes in a persistent manner. All the recent changes, pending or not, may be observed via the API and the command line:

% snap changes
ID   Status  ...  Summary
1    Done    ...  Install "ubuntu-calculator-app" snap

(the spawn and ready date/time columns have been hidden for space)

The output gives an overview of what happened recently in the system, whether pending or not. If one of these changes is unintendedly interrupted for whatever reason, the daemon will attempt to continue the requested change at the next opportunity.

Continuing is not always possible, though, because there are external factors that such a change will generally depend upon (the snap being available, the system state remaining similar, etc). In those cases, the change will fail, and any relevant modifications performed on the system while attempting to accomplish the defined goal will be undone.

Because such partial states are possible and need to be handled properly by the system, changes are in fact broken down into finer grained tasks which are also tracked and observable while in progress or after completion. Using the change ID obtained in the former command, we can get a better picture of what that changed involved:

% snap changes 1
Status ...  Summary
Done   ...  Download snap "ubuntu-core" from channel "stable"
Done   ...  Mount snap "ubuntu-core"
Done   ...  Copy snap "ubuntu-core" data
Done   ...  Setup snap "ubuntu-core" security profiles
Done   ...  Make snap "ubuntu-core" available
Done   ...  Download snap "ubuntu-calculator-app"
Done   ...  Mount snap "ubuntu-calculator-app"
Done   ...  Copy snap "ubuntu-calculator-app" data
Done   ...  Setup snap "ubuntu-calculator-app" security profiles
Done   ...  Make snap "ubuntu-calculator-app" available

(the spawn and ready date/time columns have been hidden for space)

Here we can observe an interesting implementation detail of the snappy integration into Ubuntu: the ubuntu-core snap is at the moment ~80MB, and contains the software bundled with the snappy platform itself. Instead of having it pre-installed, it’s only pulled in when the first snap is installed.

Another interesting implementation detail that surfaces here is the fact snaps are in fact mounted rather than copied into the system as traditional packaging systems do, and they’re mounted read-only. That means the operation of having the content of a snap in the filesystem is instantaneous and atomic, and so is removing it. There are no partial states for that specific aspect, and the content cannot be modified.

Coming back into the task list, we can see above that all the tasks that the change involved are ready and did succeed, as expected from the earlier output we had seen for the change itself. Being more of an introspection view, though, this tasks view will often also show logs and error messages for the individual tasks, whether in progress or not.

The following view presents a similar change but with an error due to an intentionally corrupted system state that snappy could not recover from (path got a busy mountpoint hacked in):

% sudo snap install xkcd-webserver
[\] Make snap "xkcd-webserver" available to the system
error: cannot perform the following tasks:
- Make snap "xkcd-webserver" available to the system
  (symlink 13 /snap/xkcd-webserver/current: file exists)

% sudo snap changes 2
Status  ...  Summary
Undone  ...  Download snap "xkcd-webserver" from channel "stable"
Undone  ...  Mount snap "xkcd-webserver"
Undone  ...  Copy snap "xkcd-webserver" data
Undone  ...  Setup snap "xkcd-webserver" security profiles
Error   ...  Make snap "xkcd-webserver" available to the system

.................................................................
Make snap "xkcd-webserver" available to the system

2016-04-20T14:14:30-03:00 ERROR symlink 13
    /snap/xkcd-webserver/current: file exists

Note how reassuring that report looks. It says exactly what went wrong, at which stage of the process, and it also points out that all the prior tasks that previously succeeded had their modifications undone. The security profiles were removed, the mount point was taken down, and so on.

This sort of behavior is to be expected of modern operating systems, and is fundamental when considering systems that should work unattended. Whether in a single execution or across restarts and reboots, changes either succeed or they don’t, and the system remains consistent, reliable, observable, and secure.

In the next blog post we’ll see details about the interfaces feature in snappy, which controls aspects of confinement and integration between snaps.

@gniemeyer

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Prakash

From a numbers standpoint, Google is actually a distant fourth in the $23 billion cloud infrastructure services market, according to Synergy Research Group. AWS ranks first with 31 percent, followed by Microsoft Azure at 9 percent, IBM at 7 percent and Google Cloud Platform at 4 percent, Synergy data show. That means of Google parent Alphabet’s $75 billion in revenue, less than $1 billion came from cloud infrastructure.

Read More: http://www.cnbc.com/2016/03/23/google-aims-to-catch-amazon-microsoft-in-cloud.html

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Dustin Kirkland

tl;dr

  • Put /tmp on tmpfs and you'll improve your Linux system's I/O, reduce your carbon foot print and electricity usage, stretch the battery life of your laptop, extend the longevity of your SSDs, and provide stronger security.
  • In fact, we should do that by default on Ubuntu servers and cloud images.
  • Having tested 502 physical and virtual servers in production at Canonical, 96.6% of them could immediately fit all of /tmp in half of the free memory available and 99.2% could fit all of /tmp in (free memory + free swap).

Try /tmp on tmpfs Yourself

$ echo "tmpfs /tmp tmpfs rw,nosuid,nodev" | sudo tee -a /etc/fstab
$ sudo reboot

Background

In April 2009, I proposed putting /tmp on tmpfs (an in memory filesystem) on Ubuntu servers by default -- under certain conditions, like, well, having enough memory. The proposal was "approved", but got hung up for various reasons.  Now, again in 2016, I proposed the same improvement to Ubuntu here in a bug, and there's a lively discussion on the ubuntu-cloud and ubuntu-devel mailing lists.

The benefits of /tmp on tmpfs are:
  • Performance: reads, writes, and seeks are insanely fast in a tmpfs; as fast as accessing RAM
  • Security: data leaks to disk are prevented (especially when swap is disabled), and since /tmp is its own mount point, we should add the nosuid and nodev options (and motivated sysadmins could add noexec, if they desire).
  • Energy efficiency: disk wake-ups are avoided
  • Reliability: fewer NAND writes to SSD disks
In the interest of transparency, I'll summarize the downsides:
  • There's sometimes less space available in memory, than in your root filesystem where /tmp may traditionally reside
  • Writing to tmpfs could evict other information from memory to make space
You can learn more about Linux tmpfs here.

Not Exactly Uncharted Territory...

Fedora proposed and implemented this in Fedora 18 a few years ago, citing that Solaris has been doing this since 1994. I just installed Fedora 23 into a VM and confirmed that /tmp is a tmpfs in the default installation, and ArchLinux does the same. Debian debated doing so, in this thread, which starts with all the reasons not to put /tmp on a tmpfs; do make sure you read the whole thread, though, and digest both the pros and cons, as both are represented throughout the thread.

Full Data Treatment

In the current thread on ubuntu-cloud and ubuntu-devel, I was asked for some "real data"...

In fact, across the many debates for and against this feature in Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, ArchLinux, and others, there is plenty of supposition, conjecture, guesswork, and presumption.  But seeing as we're talking about data, let's look at some real data!

Here's an analysis of a (non-exhaustive) set of 502 of Canonical's production servers that run Ubuntu.com, Launchpad.net, and hundreds of related services, including OpenStack, dozens of websites, code hosting, databases, and more. These servers sampled are slightly biased with more physical machines than virtual machines, but both are present in the survey, and a wide variety of uptime is represented, from less than a day of uptime, to 1306 days of uptime (with live patched kernels, of course).  Note that this is not an exhaustive survey of all servers at Canonical.

I humbly invite further study and analysis of the raw, tab-separated data, which you can find at:
The column headers are:
  • Column 1: The host names have been anonymized to sequential index numbers
  • Column 2: `du -s /tmp` disk usage of /tmp as of 2016-01-17 (ie, this is one snapshot in time)
  • Column 3-8: The output of the `free` command, memory in KB for each server
  • Column 9-11: The output of the `free` command, sway in KB for each server
  • Column 12: The number of inodes in /tmp
I have imported it into a Google Spreadsheet to do some data treatment. You're welcome to do the same, or use the spreadsheet of your choice.

For the numbers below, 1 MB = 1000 KB, and 1 GB = 1000 MB, per Wikipedia. (Let's argue MB and MiB elsewhere, shall we?)  The mean is the arithmetic average.  The median is the middle value in a sorted list of numbers.  The mode is the number that occurs most often.  If you're confused, this article might help.  All calculations are accurate to at least 2 significant digits.

Statistical summary of /tmp usage:

  • Max: 101 GB
  • Min: 4.0 KB
  • Mean: 453 MB
  • Median: 16 KB
  • Mode: 4.0 KB
Looking at all 502 servers, there are two extreme outliers in terms of /tmp usage. One server has 101 GB of data in /tmp, and the other has 42 GB. The latter is a very noisy django.log. There are 4 more severs using between 10 GB and 12 GB of /tmp. The remaining 496 severs surveyed (98.8%) are using less than 4.8 GB of /tmp. In fact, 483 of the servers surveyed (96.2%) use less than 1 GB of /tmp. 454 of the servers surveyed (90.4%) use less than 100 MB of /tmp. 414 of the servers surveyed (82.5%) use less than 10 MB of /tmp. And actually, 370 of the servers surveyed (73.7%) -- the overwhelming majority -- use less than 1MB of /tmp.

Statistical summary of total memory available:

  • Max: 255 GB
  • Min: 1.0 GB
  • Mean: 24 GB
  • Median: 10.2 GB
  • Mode: 4.1 GB
All of the machines surveyed (100%) have at least 1 GB of RAM.  495 of the machines surveyed (98.6%) have at least 2GB of RAM.   437 of the machines surveyed (87%) have at least 4 GB of RAM.   255 of the machines surveyed (50.8%) have at least 10GB of RAM.    157 of the machines surveyed (31.3%) have more than 24 GB of RAM.  74 of the machines surveyed (14.7%) have at least 64 GB of RAM.

Statistical summary of total swap available:

  • Max: 201 GB
  • Min: 0.0 KB
  • Mean: 13 GB
  • Median: 6.3 GB
  • Mode: 2.96 GB
485 of the machines surveyed (96.6%) have at least some swap enabled, while 17 of the machines surveyed (3.4%) have zero swap configured. One of these swap-less machines is using 415 MB of /tmp; that machine happens to have 32 GB of RAM. All of the rest of the swap-less machines are using between 4 KB and 52 KB (inconsequential) /tmp, and have between 2 GB and 28 GB of RAM.  5 machines (1.0%) have over 100 GB of swap space.

Statistical summary of swap usage:

  • Max: 19 GB
  • Min: 0.0 KB
  • Mean: 657 MB
  • Median: 18 MB
  • Mode: 0.0 KB
476 of the machines surveyed (94.8%) are using less than 4 GB of swap. 463 of the machines surveyed (92.2%) are using less than 1 GB of swap. And 366 of the machines surveyed (72.9%) are using less than 100 MB of swap.  There are 18 "swappy" machines (3.6%), using 10 GB or more swap.

Modeling /tmp on tmpfs usage

Next, I took the total memory (RAM) in each machine, and divided it in half which is the default allocation to /tmp on tmpfs, and subtracted the total /tmp usage on each system, to determine "if" all of that system's /tmp could actually fit into its tmpfs using free memory alone (ie, without swap or without evicting anything from memory).

485 of the machines surveyed (96.6%) could store all of their /tmp in a tmpfs, in free memory alone -- i.e. without evicting anything from cache.

Now, if we take each machine, and sum each system's "Free memory" and "Free swap", and check its /tmp usage, we'll see that 498 of the systems surveyed (99.2%) could store the entire contents of /tmp in tmpfs free memory + swap available. The remaining 4 are our extreme outliers identified earlier, with /tmp usages of [101 GB, 42 GB, 13 GB, 10 GB].

Performance of tmpfs versus ext4-on-SSD

Finally, let's look at some raw (albeit rough) read and write performance numbers, using a simple dd model.

My /tmp is on a tmpfs:
kirkland@x250:/tmp⟫ df -h .
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
tmpfs 7.7G 2.6M 7.7G 1% /tmp

Let's write 2 GB of data:
kirkland@x250:/tmp⟫ dd if=/dev/zero of=/tmp/zero bs=2G count=1
0+1 records in
0+1 records out
2147479552 bytes (2.1 GB) copied, 1.56469 s, 1.4 GB/s

And let's write it completely synchronously:
kirkland@x250:/tmp⟫ dd if=/dev/zero of=./zero bs=2G count=1 oflag=dsync
0+1 records in
0+1 records out
2147479552 bytes (2.1 GB) copied, 2.47235 s, 869 MB/s

Let's try the same thing to my Intel SSD:
kirkland@x250:/local⟫ df -h .
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/dm-0 217G 106G 100G 52% /

And write 2 GB of data:
kirkland@x250:/local⟫ dd if=/dev/zero of=./zero bs=2G count=1
0+1 records in
0+1 records out
2147479552 bytes (2.1 GB) copied, 7.52918 s, 285 MB/s

And let's redo it completely synchronously:
kirkland@x250:/local⟫ dd if=/dev/zero of=./zero bs=2G count=1 oflag=dsync
0+1 records in
0+1 records out
2147479552 bytes (2.1 GB) copied, 11.9599 s, 180 MB/s

Let's go back and read the tmpfs data:
kirkland@x250:~⟫ dd if=/tmp/zero of=/dev/null bs=2G count=1
0+1 records in
0+1 records out
2147479552 bytes (2.1 GB) copied, 1.94799 s, 1.1 GB/s

And let's read the SSD data:
kirkland@x250:~⟫ dd if=/local/zero of=/dev/null bs=2G count=1
0+1 records in
0+1 records out
2147479552 bytes (2.1 GB) copied, 2.55302 s, 841 MB/s

Now, let's create 10,000 small files (1 KB) in tmpfs:
kirkland@x250:/tmp/foo⟫ time for i in $(seq 1 10000); do dd if=/dev/zero of=$i bs=1K count=1 oflag=dsync ; done
real 0m15.518s
user 0m1.592s
sys 0m7.596s

And let's do the same on the SSD:
kirkland@x250:/local/foo⟫ time for i in $(seq 1 10000); do dd if=/dev/zero of=$i bs=1K count=1 oflag=dsync ; done
real 0m26.713s
user 0m2.928s
sys 0m7.540s

For better or worse, I don't have any spinning disks, so I couldn't repeat the tests there.

So on these rudimentary read/write tests via dd, I got 869 MB/s - 1.4 GB/s write to tmpfs and 1.1 GB/s read from tmps, and 180 MB/s - 285 MB/s write to SSD and 841 MB/s read from SSD.

Surely there are more scientific ways of measuring I/O to tmpfs and physical storage, but I'm confident that, by any measure, you'll find tmpfs extremely fast when tested against even the fastest disks and filesystems.

Summary

  • /tmp usage
    • 98.8% of the servers surveyed use less than 4.8 GB of /tmp
    • 96.2% use less than 1.0 GB of /tmp
    • 73.7% use less than 1.0 MB of /tmp
    • The mean/median/mode are [453 MB / 16 KB / 4 KB]
  • Total memory available
    • 98.6% of the servers surveyed have at least 2.0 GB of RAM
    • 88.0% have least 4.0 GB of RAM
    • 57.4% have at least 8.0 GB of RAM
    • The mean/median/mode are [24 GB / 10 GB / 4 GB]
  • Swap available
    • 96.6% of the servers surveyed have some swap space available
    • The mean/median/mode are [13 GB / 6.3 GB / 3 GB]
  • Swap used
    • 94.8% of the servers surveyed are using less than 4 GB of swap
    • 92.2% are using less than 1 GB of swap
    • 72.9% are using less than 100 MB of swap
    • The mean/median/mode are [657 MB / 18 MB / 0 KB]
  • Modeling /tmp on tmpfs
    • 96.6% of the machines surveyed could store all of the data they currently have stored in /tmp, in free memory alone, without evicting anything from cache
    • 99.2% of the machines surveyed could store all of the data they currently have stored in /tmp in free memory + free swap
    • 4 of the 502 machines surveyed (0.8%) would need special handling, reconfiguration, or more swap

Conclusion


  • Can /tmp be mounted as a tmpfs always, everywhere?
    • No, we did identify a few systems (4 out of 502 surveyed, 0.8% of total) consuming inordinately large amounts of data in /tmp (101 GB, 42 GB), and with insufficient available memory and/or swap.
    • But those were very much the exception, not the rule.  In fact, 96.6% of the systems surveyed could fit all of /tmp in half of the freely available memory in the system.
  • Is this the first time anyone has suggested or tried this as a Linux/UNIX system default?
    • Not even remotely.  Solaris has used tmpfs for /tmp for 22 years, and Fedora and ArchLinux for at least the last 4 years.
  • Is tmpfs really that much faster, more efficient, more secure?
    • Damn skippy.  Try it yourself!
:-Dustin

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Louis

A little before the summer vacation, I decided that it was a good time to get acquainted with writing Juju charms.  Since I am heavily involved with the kernel crash dump tools, I thought that it would be a good start to allow Juju users to enable kernel crash dumps using a charm.  Since it means acting on existing units, a subordinate charms is the answer.

Theory of operation

Enabling kernel crash dumps on Ubuntu and Debian involves the following :

  • installing
    • kexec-tools
    • makedumpfile
    • kdump-tools
    • crash
  • Adding the crashkernel= boot parameter
  • Enabling kdump-tools in /etc/default/kdump-tools
  • Rebooting

On ubuntu, installing the linux-crashdump meta-package takes care of all the packages installation.

The crashdump subordinate charm does just that : installing the packages, enabling the crashdump= boot parameter as well as kdump-tools and reboot the unit.

Since this charm enable a kernel specific service, it can only be used in a context where the kernel itself is accessible.  This means that testing the charm using the local provider which relies on LXC will fail, since the charm needs to interact with the kernel.  One solution to that restriction is to use KVM with the local provider as outlined in the example.

Deploying the crashdump charm

the crashdump charm being a subordinate charm, it can only be used in a context where there are already existing services running. For this example, we will deploy a simple Ubuntu service :

$ juju bootstrap
$ juju deploy ubuntu --to=kvm:0
$ juju deploy crashdump
$ juju add-relation ubuntu crashdump

This will install the required packages, rebuild the grub configuration file to use the crashkernel= value and reboot the unit.

To confirm that the charm has been deployed adequately, you can run :

$ juju ssh ubuntu/0 "kdump-config show"
Warning: Permanently added '192.168.122.227' (ECDSA) to the list of known hosts.
USE_KDUMP:        1
KDUMP_SYSCTL:     kernel.panic_on_oops=1
KDUMP_COREDIR:    /var/crash
crashkernel addr: 0x17000000
current state:    ready to kdump
kexec command:
  /sbin/kexec -p --command-line="BOOT_IMAGE=/boot/vmlinuz-3.13.0-65-generic root=UUID=1ff353c2-3fed-48fb-acc0-6d18086d030b ro console=tty1 console=ttyS0 irqpoll maxcpus=1 nousb" --initrd=/boot/initrd.img-3.13.0-65-generic /boot/vmlinuz-3.13.0-65-generic

The next time a kernel panic occurs, you should find the kernel crash dump in /var/crash of the unit that failed.

Deploying from the GUI

As an alternate method for adding the crashdump subordinate charm to an existing service, you can use the Juju GUI.

In order to get the Juju GUI started, a few simple commands are needed, assuming that you do not have any environment bootstrapped :

$ juju bootstrap
$ juju deploy juju-gui
$ juju expose juju-gui
$ juju deploy ubuntu --to=kvm:0

 

Here are a few captures of the process, once the ubuntu service is started :

Juju environment with one service

Juju environment with one service

 

Locate the crashdump charm

Locate the crashdump charm

 

The charm is added to the environment

The charm is added to the environment

 

Add the relation between the charms

Add the relation between the charms

 

Crashdump is now enabled in your service

Crashdump is now enabled in your service

Do not hesitate to leave comments or question. I’ll do my best to reply in a timely manner.

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Prakash

From Forbes:

Traditionally, chief executive officers have come up through the ranks from the finance, sales or marketing side, so they don’t necessary bring an in-depth understanding of technology deployments. Not that it was necessary — the IT department ran its systems and spit out reports, while everyone else stuck to their specialties.

Now, everybody is getting into the technology act. A new study published by Deloitte finds that business executives — CEOs and CFOs — are getting directly involved in technology decisions. Maybe not studying and selecting application servers or hypervisors, but determining the technology direction that needs to be taken — whether it be moving to cloud, or deploying mobile to get closer to customers.

Close to two-thirds (62 percent) of 500 mid-market executives say their company’s C-suite leaders have “some” level of involvement in the adoption of next generation technologies such as cloud, social, analytics and mobile. In fact, nearly half (46 percent) say C-suite is “actively engaged.” A growing percentage (33 percent, compared with 20 percent in 2014) say their leadership is even “leading the charge.”

Read More: http://www.forbes.com/sites/joemckendrick/2015/09/12/should-you-trust-your-ceo-with-cloud-computing-decisions/

 

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Prakash

General Electric says it knows more about big manufacturing gear and data than any cloud provider ever will. Critics say it can’t keep up with the cloud giants of the world.

Read More: http://fortune.com/2015/08/06/ge-is-building-its-own-cloud-outsiders-wonder-why/

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Prakash

Transportation is one of the world’s largest industries. The five largest automotive companies in the world generate more than 750 billion euro in annual revenue. The names in the industry are global brands – BMW, Ford, Daimler. Yet despite its size and stature, it’s also an industry in the midst of transformation. Today, new transportation vendors like Uber, Lyft, Zipcar, and Grabtaxi are changing our relationship with cars.

Read More: https://hbr.org/2015/07/what-the-auto-industry-can-learn-from-cloud-computing

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Dustin Kirkland

tl;dr:  Your Ubuntu-based container is not a copyright violation.  Nothing to see here.  Carry on.
I am speaking for my employer, Canonical, when I say you are not violating our policies if you use Ubuntu with Docker in sensible, secure ways.  Some have claimed otherwise, but that’s simply sensationalist and untrue.

Canonical publishes Ubuntu images for Docker specifically so that they will be useful to people. You are encouraged to use them! We see no conflict between our policies and the common sense use of Docker.

Going further, we distribute Ubuntu in many different signed formats -- ISOs, root tarballs, VMDKs, AMIs, IMGs, Docker images, among others.  We take great pride in this work, and provide them to the world at large, on ubuntu.com, in public clouds like AWS, GCE, and Azure, as well as in OpenStack and on DockerHub.  These images, and their signatures, are mirrored by hundreds of organizations all around the world. We would not publish Ubuntu in the DockerHub if we didn’t hope it would be useful to people using the DockerHub. We’re delighted for you to use them in your public clouds, private clouds, and bare metal deployments.

Any Docker user will recognize these, as the majority of all Dockerfiles start with these two words....

FROM ubuntu

In fact, we gave away hundreds of these t-shirts at DockerCon.


We explicitly encourage distribution and redistribution of Ubuntu images and packages! We also embrace a very wide range of community remixes and modifications. We go further than any other commercially supported Linux vendor to support developers and community members scratching their itches. There are dozens of such derivatives and many more commercial initiatives based on Ubuntu - we are definitely not trying to create friction for people who want to get stuff done with Ubuntu.

Our policy exists to ensure that when you receive something that claims to be Ubuntu, you can trust that it will work to the same standard, regardless of where you got it from. And people everywhere tell us they appreciate that - when they get Ubuntu on a cloud or as a VM, it works, and they can trust it.  That concept is actually hundreds of years old, and we’ll talk more about that in a minute....


So, what do I mean by “sensible use” of Docker? In short - secure use of Docker. If you are using a Docker container then you are effectively giving the producer of that container ‘root’ on your host. We can safely assume that people sharing an Ubuntu docker based container know and trust one another, and their use of Ubuntu is explicitly covered as personal use in our policy. If you trust someone to give you a Docker container and have root on your system, then you can handle the risk that they inadvertently or deliberately compromise the integrity or reliability of your system.

Our policy distinguishes between personal use, which we can generalise to any group of collaborators who share root passwords, and third party redistribution, which is what people do when they exchange OS images with strangers.

Third party redistribution is more complicated because, when things go wrong, there’s a real question as to who is responsible for it. Here’s a real example: a school district buys laptops for all their students with free software. A local supplier takes their preferred Linux distribution and modifies parts of it (like the kernel) to work on their hardware, and sells them all the PCs. A month later, a distro kernel update breaks all the school laptops. In this case, the Linux distro who was not involved gets all the bad headlines, and the free software advocates who promoted the whole idea end up with egg on their faces.

We’ve seen such cases in real hardware, and in public clouds and other, similar environments.  Digital Ocean very famously published some modified and very broken Ubuntu images, outside of Canonical's policies.  That's inherently wrong, and easily avoidable.

So we simply say, if you’re going to redistribute Ubuntu to third parties who are trusting both you and Ubuntu to get it right, come and talk to Canonical and we’ll work out how to ensure everybody gets what they want and need.

Here’s a real exercise I hope you’ll try...

  1. Head over to your local purveyor of fine wines and liquors.
  2. Pick up a nice bottle of Champagne, Single Malt Scotch Whisky, Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey, or my favorite -- a rare bottle of Lambic Oude Gueze.
  3. Carefully check the label, looking for a seal of Appellation d'origine contrôlée.
  4. In doing so, that bottle should earn your confidence that it was produced according to strict quality, format, and geographic standards.
  5. Before you pop the cork, check the seal, to ensure it hasn’t been opened or tampered with.  Now, drink it however you like.
  6. Pour that Champagne over orange juice (if you must).  Toss a couple ice cubes in your Scotch (if that’s really how you like it).  Pour that Bourbon over a Coke (if that’s what you want).
  7. Enjoy however you like -- straight up or mixed to taste -- with your own guests in the privacy of your home.  Just please don’t pour those concoctions back into the bottle, shove a cork in, put them back on the shelf at your local liquor store and try to pass them off as Champagne/Scotch/Bourbon.


Rather, if that’s really what you want to do -- distribute a modified version of Ubuntu -- simply contact us and ask us first (thanks for sharing that link, mjg59).  We have some amazing tools that can help you either avoid that situation entirely, or at least let’s do everyone a service and let us help you do it well.

Believe it or not, we’re really quite reasonable people!  Canonical has a lengthy, public track record, donating infrastructure and resources to many derivative Ubuntu distributions.  Moreover, we’ve successfully contracted mutually beneficial distribution agreements with numerous organizations and enterprises. The result is happy users and happy companies.

FROM ubuntu,
Dustin

The one and only Champagne region of France

Read more
Louis

Introduction

Once in a while, I get to tackle issues that have little or no documentation other than the official documentation of the product and the product’s source code.  You may know from experience that product documentation is not always sufficient to get a complete configuration working. This article intend to flesh out a solution to customizing disk configurations using Curtin.

This article take for granted that you are familiar with Maas install mechanisms, that you already know how to customize installations and deploy workloads using Juju.

While my colleagues in the Maas development team have done a tremendous job at keeping the Maas documentation accurate (see Maas documentation), it does only cover the basics when it comes to Maas’s preseed customization, especially when it comes to Curtin’s customization.

Curtin is Maas’s fastpath installer which is meant to replace Debian’s installer (familiarly known as d-i). It does a complete machine installation much faster than with the standard debian method.  But while d-i is well known and it is easy to find example of its use on the web, Curtin does not have the same notoriety and, hence, not as much documentation.

Theory of operation

When the fastpath installer is used to install a maas unit (which is now the default), it will send the content of the files prefixed with curtin_ to the unit being installed.  The curtin_userdata contains cloud-config type commands that will be applied by cloud-init when the unit is installed. If we want to apply a specific partitioning scheme to all of our unit, we can modify this file and every unit will get those commands applied to it when it installs.

But what if we only have one or a few servers that have specific disk layout that require partitioning ?  In the following example, I will suppose that we have one server, named curtintest which has a one terabyte disk (1 TB) and that we want to partition this disk with the following partition table :

  • Partition #1 has the /boot file system and is bootable
  • Partition #2 has the root (/) file system
  • Partition #3 has a 31 Gb file system
  • Partition #4 has 32 Gb of swap space
  • Partition #5 has the remaining disk space

Since only one server has such a disk, the partitioning should be specific to that curtintest server only.

Setting up Curtin development environment

To get to a working Maas partitioning setup, it is preferable to use Curtin’s development environment to test the curtin commands. Using Maas deployment to test each command quickly becomes tedious and time consuming.  There is a description on how to set it up in the README.txt but here are more details here.

Aside from putting all the files under one single directory, the steps described here are the same as the one in the README.txt file :

$ mkdir -p download
$ DLDIR=$(pwd)/download
$ rel="trusty"
$ arch=amd64
$ burl="http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/$rel/current/"
$ for f in $rel-server-cloudimg-${arch}-root.tar.gz $rel-server-cloudimg-{arch}-disk1.img; do wget "$burl/$f" -O $DLDIR/$f; done
$ ( cd $DLDIR && qemu-img convert -O qcow $rel-server-cloudimg-${arch}-disk1.img $rel-server-cloudimg-${arch}-disk1.qcow2)
$ BOOTIMG="$DLDIR/$rel-server-cloudimg-${arch}-disk1.qcow2"
$ ROOTTGZ="$DLDIR/$rel-server-cloudimg-${arch}-root.tar.gz"
$ mkdir src
$ bzr init-repo src/curtin
$ (cd src/curtin && bzr  branch lp:curtin trunk.dist )
$ (cd src/curtin && bzr  branch trunk.dist trunk)
$ cd src/curtin/trunk

You now have an environment you can use with Curtin to automate installations. You can test it by using the following command which will start a VM and run “curtin install” in it.  Once you get the prompt, login with :

username : ubuntu
password : passw0rd

$ sudo ./tools/launch $BOOTIMG --publish $ROOTTGZ -- curtin install "PUBURL/${ROOTTGZ##*/}"

Using Curtin in the development environment

To test Curtin in its environment, simply remove  — curtin install “PUBURL/${ROOTTGZ##*/}” at the end of the statement. Once logged in, you will find the Curtin executable in /curtin/bin :

ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ sudo -s
root@ubuntu:~# /curtin/bin/curtin --help
usage: main.py [-h] [--showtrace] [--verbose] [--log-file LOG_FILE]
{block-meta,curthooks,extract,hook,in-target,install,net-meta,pac
k,swap}
...

positional arguments:
{block-meta,curthooks,extract,hook,in-target,install,net-meta,pack,swap}

optional arguments:
-h, --help            show this help message and exit
--showtrace
--verbose, -v
--log-file LOG_FILE

Each of Curtin’s commands have their own help :

ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ sudo -s
root@ubuntu:~# /curtin/bin/curtin install --help
usage: main.py install [-h] [-c FILE] [--set key=val] [source [source ...]]

positional arguments:
source what to install

optional arguments:
-h, --help show this help message and exit
-c FILE, --config FILE
read configuration from cfg
--set key=val define a config variable

 

Creating Maas’s Curtin preseed commands

Now that we have our Curtin development environment available, we can use it to come up with a set of commands that will be fed to Curtin by Maas when a unit is created.

Maas uses preseed files located in /etc/maas/preseeds on the Maas server. The curtin_userdata preseed file is the one that we will use as a reference to build our set of partitioning commands.  During the testing phase, we will use the -c option of curtin install along with a configuration file that will mimic the behavior of curtin_userdata.

We will also need to add a fake 1TB disk to Curtin’s development environment so we can use it as a partitioning target. So in the development environment, issue the following command :

$ qemu-img create -f qcow2 boot.disk 1000G Formatting ‘boot.disk’, fmt=qcow2 size=1073741824000 encryption=off cluster_size=65536 lazy_refcounts=off

sudo ./tools/launch $BOOTIMG –publish $ROOTTGZ

ubuntu: ubuntu password: passw0rd

ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ sudo -s root@ubuntu:~# cat /proc/partitions

major minor  #blocks  name

253        0    2306048 vda 253        1    2305024 vda1 253       16        426 vdb 253       32 1048576000 vdc 11        0    1048575 sr0

We can see that the 1000G /dev/vdc is indeed present.  Let’s now start to craft the conffile that will receive our partitioning commands. To test the syntax, we will use two simple commands :

root@ubuntu:~# cat << EOF > conffile 
partitioning_commands:
  builtin: []
  01_partition_make_label: ["/sbin/parted", "/dev/vdc", "-s", "'","mklabel","msdos","'"]
  02_partition_make_part: ["/sbin/parted", "/dev/vdc", "-s", "'","mkpart","primary","1049K","538M","'"] 
sources:
  01_primary: http://192.168.0.13:9923//trusty-server-cloudimg-amd64-root.tar.gz
  EOF

The sources: statement is only there to avoid having to repeat the SOURCE portion of the curtin command and is not to be used in the final Maas configuration. The URL is the address of the server from which you are running the Curtin development environment.

WARNING

The builtin [] statement is VERY important. It is there to override Curtin’s native builtin statement which is to partition the disk using “block-meta simple”.  If it is removed, Curtin will overwrite he partitioning with its default configuration. This comes straight from Scott Moser, the main developer behind Curtin.

Now let’s run the Curtin command :

root@ubuntu:~# /curtin/bin/curtin install -c conffile

Curtin will run its installation sequence and you will see a display which you should be familiar with if you installed units with Maas previously.  The command will most probably exit on error, comlaining about the fact that install-grub received an argument that was not a block device. We do not need to worry about that at the motent.

Once completed, have a look at the partitioning of the /dev/vdc device :

root@ubuntu:~# parted /dev/vdc print
Model: Virtio Block Device (virtblk)
Disk /dev/vdc: 1074GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: msdos

Number  Start   End     Size    Type      File system  Flags
1      1049kB  538MB   537MB   primary   ext4

The partitioning commands were successful and we have the /dev/vdc disk properly configured.  Now that we know that the mechanism works, let try with a complete configuration file. I have found that it was preferable to start with a fresh 1TB disk :

root@ubuntu:~# poweroff

$ rm -f boot.img

$ qemu-img create -f qcow2 boot.disk 1000G
Formatting ‘boot.disk’, fmt=qcow2 size=1073741824000 encryption=off cluster_size=65536 lazy_refcounts=off

sudo ./tools/launch $BOOTIMG –publish $ROOTTGZ

ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ sudo -s

root@ubuntu:~# cat << EOF > conffile 
partitioning_commands:
  builtin: [] 
  01_partition_announce: ["echo", "'### Partitioning disk ###'"]
  01_partition_make_label: ["/sbin/parted", "/dev/vda", "-s", "'","mklabel","msdos","'"]
  02_partition_make_part: ["/sbin/parted", "/dev/vda", "-s", "'","mkpart","primary","1049k","538M","'"]
  02_partition_set_flag: ["/sbin/parted", "/dev/vda", "-s", "'","set","1","boot","on","'"]
  04_partition_make_part: ["/sbin/parted", "/dev/vda", "-s", "'","mkpart","primary","538M","4538M","'"]
  05_partition_make_part: ["/sbin/parted", "/dev/vda", "-s", "'","mkpart","extended","4538M","1000G","'"]
  06_partition_make_part: ["/sbin/parted", "/dev/vda", "-s", "'","mkpart","logical","25.5G","57G","'"]
  07_partition_make_part: ["/sbin/parted", "/dev/vda", "-s", "'","mkpart","logical","57G","89G","'"]
  08_partition_make_part: ["/sbin/parted", "/dev/vda", "-s", "'","mkpart","logical","89G","1000G","'"]
  09_partition_announce: ["echo", "'### Creating filesystems ###'"]
  10_partition_make_fs: ["/sbin/mkfs", "-t", "ext4", "/dev/vda1"]
  11_partition_label_fs: ["/sbin/e2label", "/dev/vda1", "cloudimg-boot"]
  12_partition_make_fs: ["/sbin/mkfs", "-t", "ext4", "/dev/vda2"]
  13_partition_label_fs: ["/sbin/e2label", "/dev/vda2", "cloudimg-rootfs"]
  14_partition_mount_fs: ["sh", "-c", "mount /dev/vda2 $TARGET_MOUNT_POINT"]
  15_partition_mkdir: ["sh", "-c", "mkdir $TARGET_MOUNT_POINT/boot"]
  16_partition_mount_fs: ["sh", "-c", "mount /dev/vda1 $TARGET_MOUNT_POINT/boot"]
  17_partition_announce: ["echo", "'### Filling /etc/fstab ###'"]
  18_partition_make_fstab: ["sh", "-c", "echo 'LABEL=cloudimg-rootfs / ext4 defaults 0 0' >> $OUTPUT_FSTAB"]
  19_partition_make_fstab: ["sh", "-c", "echo 'LABEL=cloudimg-boot /boot ext4 defaults 0 0' >> $OUTPUT_FSTAB"]
  20_partition_make_swap: ["sh", "-c", "mkswap /dev/vda6"]
  21_partition_make_fstab: ["sh", "-c", "echo '/dev/vda6 none swap sw 0 0' >> $OUTPUT_FSTAB"]
sources: 01_primary: http://192.168.0.13:9923//trusty-server-cloudimg-amd64-root.tar.gz EOF

You will note that I have added a few statement like [“echo”, “‘### Partitioning disk ###'”] that will display some logs during the execution. Those are not necessary.
Now let’s try a second test with the complete configuration file :

root@ubuntu:~# /curtin/bin/curtin install -c conffile

root@ubuntu:~# parted /dev/vdc print
Model: Virtio Block Device (virtblk)
Disk /dev/vdc: 1074GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: msdos

Number  Start   End     Size    Type      File system  Flags
1      1049kB  538MB   537MB   primary   ext4         boot
2      538MB   4538MB  4000MB  primary   ext4
3      4538MB  1000GB  995GB   extended               lba
5      25.5GB  57.0GB  31.5GB  logical
6      57.0GB  89.0GB  32.0GB  logical
7      89.0GB  1000GB  911GB   logical

We now have a correctly partitioned disk in our development environment. All we need to do now is to carry that over to Maas to see if it works as expected.

Customization of Curtin execution in Maas

The section “How preseeds work in MAAS” give a good outline on how to select the name of the a preseed file to restrict its usage to specific sub-groups of nodes.  In our case, we want our partitioning to apply to only one node : curtintest.  So by following the description in the section “User provided preseeds“, we need to use the following template :

{prefix}_{node_arch}_{node_subarch}_{release}_{node_name}

The fileneme that we need to choose needs to end with our hostname, curtintest. The other elements are :

  • prefix : curtin_userdata
  • osystem : amd64
  • node_subarch : generic
  • release : trusty
  • node_name : curtintest

So according to that, our filename must be curtin_userdata_amd64_generic_trusty_curtintest

On the MAAS server, we do the following :

root@maas17:~# cd /etc/maas/preseeds

root@maas17:~# cp curtin_userdata curtin_userdata_amd64_generic_trusty_curtintest

We now edit this newly created file and add our previously crafted Curtin configuration file just after the following block :

{{if third_party_drivers and driver}}
  early_commands:
  {{py: key_string = ''.join(['\\x%x' % x for x in map(ord, driver['key_binary'])])}}
  driver_00_get_key: /bin/echo -en '{{key_string}}' > /tmp/maas-{{driver['package']}}.gpg
  driver_01_add_key: ["apt-key", "add", "/tmp/maas-{{driver['package']}}.gpg"]
  driver_02_add: ["add-apt-repository", "-y", "deb {{driver['repository']}} {{node.get_distro_series()}} main"]
  driver_03_update_install: ["sh", "-c", "apt-get update --quiet && apt-get --assume-yes install {{driver['package']}}"]
  driver_04_load: ["sh", "-c", "depmod && modprobe {{driver['module']}}"]
  {{endif}}

The complete section should look just like this :

{{if third_party_drivers and driver}}
  early_commands:
  {{py: key_string = ''.join(['\\x%x' % x for x in map(ord, driver['key_binary'])])}}
   driver_00_get_key: /bin/echo -en '{{key_string}}' > /tmp/maas-{{driver['package']}}.gpg
   driver_01_add_key: ["apt-key", "add", "/tmp/maas-{{driver['package']}}.gpg"]
   driver_02_add: ["add-apt-repository", "-y", "deb {{driver['repository']}} {{node.get_distro_series()}} main"]
   driver_03_update_install: ["sh", "-c", "apt-get update --quiet && apt-get --assume-yes install {{driver['package']}}"]
   driver_04_load: ["sh", "-c", "depmod && modprobe {{driver['module']}}"]
  {{endif}}
  partitioning_commands:
   builtin: []
   01_partition_announce: ["echo", "'### Partitioning disk ###'"]
   01_partition_make_label: ["/sbin/parted", "/dev/vda", "-s", "'","mklabel","msdos","'"]
   02_partition_make_part: ["/sbin/parted", "/dev/vda", "-s", "'","mkpart","primary","1049k","538M","'"]
   02_partition_set_flag: ["/sbin/parted", "/dev/vda", "-s", "'","set","1","boot","on","'"]
   04_partition_make_part: ["/sbin/parted", "/dev/vda", "-s", "'","mkpart","primary","538M","4538M","'"]
   05_partition_make_part: ["/sbin/parted", "/dev/vda", "-s", "'","mkpart","extended","4538M","1000G","'"]
   06_partition_make_part: ["/sbin/parted", "/dev/vda", "-s", "'","mkpart","logical","25.5G","57G","'"]
   07_partition_make_part: ["/sbin/parted", "/dev/vda", "-s", "'","mkpart","logical","57G","89G","'"]
   08_partition_make_part: ["/sbin/parted", "/dev/vda", "-s", "'","mkpart","logical","89G","1000G","'"]
   09_partition_announce: ["echo", "'### Creating filesystems ###'"]
   10_partition_make_fs: ["/sbin/mkfs", "-t", "ext4", "/dev/vda1"]
   11_partition_label_fs: ["/sbin/e2label", "/dev/vda1", "cloudimg-boot"]
   12_partition_make_fs: ["/sbin/mkfs", "-t", "ext4", "/dev/vda2"]
   13_partition_label_fs: ["/sbin/e2label", "/dev/vda2", "cloudimg-rootfs"]
   14_partition_mount_fs: ["sh", "-c", "mount /dev/vda2 $TARGET_MOUNT_POINT"]
   15_partition_mkdir: ["sh", "-c", "mkdir $TARGET_MOUNT_POINT/boot"]
   16_partition_mount_fs: ["sh", "-c", "mount /dev/vda1 $TARGET_MOUNT_POINT/boot"]
   17_partition_announce: ["echo", "'### Filling /etc/fstab ###'"]
   18_partition_make_fstab: ["sh", "-c", "echo 'LABEL=cloudimg-rootfs / ext4 defaults 0 0' >> $OUTPUT_FSTAB"]
   19_partition_make_fstab: ["sh", "-c", "echo 'LABEL=cloudimg-boot /boot ext4 defaults 0 0' >> $OUTPUT_FSTAB"]
   20_partition_make_swap: ["sh", "-c", "mkswap /dev/vda6"]
   21_partition_make_fstab: ["sh", "-c", "echo '/dev/vda6 none swap sw 0 0' >> $OUTPUT_FSTAB"]

Now that maas is properly configured for curtintest, complete the test by deploying a charm in a Juju environment where curtintest is properly comissionned.  In that example, curtintest is the only available node so maas will systematically pick it up :

caribou@avogadro:~$ juju status
environment: maas17
machines:
“0”:
agent-state: started
agent-version: 1.24.0
dns-name: state-server.maas
instance-id: /MAAS/api/1.0/nodes/node-2555c398-1bf9-11e5-a7c4-525400214658/
series: trusty
hardware: arch=amd64 cpu-cores=1 mem=1024M
state-server-member-status: has-vote
services: {}
networks:
maas-eth0:
provider-id: maas-eth0
cidr: 192.168.100.0/24

caribou@avogadro:~$ juju deploy mysql
Added charm “cs:trusty/mysql-25” to the environment.

Once the mysql charm has been deployed, connect to the unit to confirm that the partitioning was successful

caribou@avogadro:~$ juju ssh mysql/0
ubuntu@curtintest:~$ sudo -s
root@curtintest:~# parted /dev/vda print
Model: Virtio Block Device (virtblk)
Disk /dev/vda: 1074GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: msdos
 
Number  Start   End     Size    Type      File system  Flags
1      1049kB  538MB   537MB   primary   ext4         boot
2      538MB   4538MB  4000MB  primary   ext4
3      4538MB  1000GB  995GB   extended               lba
5      25.5GB  57.0GB  31.5GB  logical
6      57.0GB  89.0GB  32.0GB  logical
7      89.0GB  1000GB  911GB   logical
ubuntu@curtintest:~$ swapon -s
Filename Type Size Used Priority
/dev/vda6 partition 31249404 0 -1

Conclusion

Customizing disks and partition using curtin is possible but currently not sufficiently documented. I hope that this write up will be helpful.  Sustained development on Curtin is currently done to improve these functionalities so things will definitively get better.

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Ben Howard

With Ubuntu 12.04.2, the kernel team introduced the idea of the "hardware enablement kernel" (HWE), originally intended to support new hardware for bare metal server and desktop. In fact, the documentation indicates that HWE images are not suitable for Virtual or Cloud Computing environments.  The thought was that cloud and virtual environments provide stable hardware and that the newer kernel features would not be needed.

Time has proven this assumption painfully wrong. Take for example the need for drivers in virtual environments. Several of the Cloud providers that we have engaged with have requested the use of the HWE kernel by default. On GCE, the HWE kernels provide support for their NVME disks or multiqueue NIC support. Azure has benefited from having an updated HyperV driver stack resulting in better performance. When we engaged with VMware Air, the 12.04 kernel lacked the necessary drivers.

Perhaps more germane to our Cloud users is that containers are using kernel features. 12.04 users need to use the HWE kernel in order to make use of Docker. The new Ubuntu Fan project will be enabled for 14.04 via the HWE-V kernel for Ubuntu 14.04.3. If you use Ubuntu as your container host, you will likely consider using an HWE kernel.

And with that there has been a steady chorus of people requesting that we provide HWE image builds for AWS. The problem has never been the base builds; building the base bits is fairly easy. The hard part is that by adding base builds, each daily and release build goes form 96 images for AWS to 288 (needless to say that is quite a problem). Over the last few weeks -- largely in my spare time -- I've been working out what it would take to deliver HWE images for AWS.

I am happy to announce that as of today, we are now building HWE-U (3.16) and HWE-V (3.19) Ubuntu 14.04 images for AWS. To be clear, we are not making any behavioral changes to the standard Ubuntu 14.04 images. Unless users opt into using an HWE image on AWS they will continue to get the 3.13 kernel. However, for those who want newer kernels, they now have the choice.

For the time being, only amd64 and i386 builds are being published.. Over the next few weeks, we expect the HWE images to reach full feature parity including release promotions, and indexing. And I fully expect that the HWE-V version of 14.04 will include our recent Fan project once the SRU's complete.

Check them out at http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/trusty/current/hwe-u and http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/trusty/current/hwe-v .

As always, feedback is always welcome.

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Prakash

One of the drives to Cloud is that it is suppose to be green, but is Amazon Web Services green itself ?

Amazon Web Services has been under fire in recent weeks from a group of activist customers who are calling for the company to be more transparent in its usage of renewable energy.

In response, rather than divulge additional details about the source of power for its massive cloud infrastructure, the company has argued that using the cloud is much more energy efficient than customers powering their own data center operations.

But the whole discussion has raised the question: How green is the cloud?

Lets find out: http://www.networkworld.com/article/2936654/iaas/how-green-is-amazon-s-cloud.html

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Prakash

The latest Kilo release of the OpenStack software, made available Thursday, sports new identity (ID) federation capability that, in theory, will let a customer in California use her local OpenStack cloud for everyday work, but if the load spikes, allocate jobs to other OpenStack clouds either locally or far, far away.

“With Kilo, for the first time, you can log in on one dashboard and deploy across multiple clouds from many vendors worldwide,” Mark Collier, COO of the OpenStack Foundation, said in an interview.

Read More: http://fortune.com/2015/04/30/openstack-federation-cloud/

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Prakash

Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba is upping its investment in cloud computing in the United States, making it more of a competitor to Amazon, Google, and Microsoft than ever before.
Alibaba’s cloud division, Aliyun, has signed a series of new partnerships with the likes of Intel and data center company Equinix to localize its cloud offerings without having to build its own new data centers, CNBC’s Arjun Kharpal reports.

The slew of partnerships, which Alibaba is calling its Marketplace Alliance Program, focuses on expanding its cloud services globally, not just the US. Besides Equinix and Intel, it also signed a deal with Singtel in Singapore.

Read More: http://www.businessinsider.in/Alibaba-boosts-its-investment-in-the-cloud-wars-against-Amazon-Google-and-Microsoft/articleshow/47590813.cms

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Robbie Williamson

A buffer overflow in the virtual floppy disk controller of QEMU has been discovered. An attacker could use this issue to cause QEMU to crash or execute arbitrary code in the host’s QEMU process.

This issue is mitigated in a couple ways on Ubuntu when using libvirt to manage QEMU virtual machines, which includes OpenStack’s use of QEMU. The QEMU process in the host environment is owned by a special libvirt-qemu user which helps to limit access to resources in the host environment. Additionally, the QEMU process is confined by an AppArmor profile that significantly lessens the impact of a vulnerability such as VENOM by reducing the host environment’s attack surface.

A fix for this issue has been committed in the upstream QEMU source code tracker. Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, Ubuntu 14.10, and Ubuntu 15.04 are affected. To address the issue, ensure that qemu-kvm 1.0+noroms-0ubuntu14.22 (Ubuntu 12.04 LTS), qemu 2.0.0+dfsg-2ubuntu1.11 (Ubuntu 14.04 LTS), qemu 2.1+dfsg-4ubuntu6.6 (Ubuntu 14.10), qemu 1:2.2+dfsg-5expubuntu9.1 (Ubuntu 15.04) are installed.

For reference, the Ubuntu Security Notices website is the best place to find information on security updates and the affected supported releases of Ubuntu.  Users can get notifications via email and RSS feeds from the USN site, as well as access the Ubuntu CVE Tracker.

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Prakash

For the first time Amazon has revealed its numbers for AWS.

In its latest financial earnings report, Amazon said AWS grew 49 percent in 2014, pulling in $4.6 billion in revenue. After reaching $1.57 billion in the first quarter of this year, AWS is on track for $6.23 billion in sales by year’s end, the company said. Though its cloud business still accounted for only 7 percent of the company’s overall quarterly revenue of $22.72 billion, AWS is growing at a much faster rate than the rest of Amazon (AWS grew 49 percent, while the company’s core North American business grew 22 percent). And contrary to what the company has indicated in the past, its margins are significantly higher with AWS.

Read More: http://www.wired.com/2015/04/amazons-cloud-is-the-best-part-of-its-business-aws/

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Ben Howard

I am pleased to announce initial Vagrant images [1, 2]. These images are bit-for-bit the same as the KVM images, but have a Cloud-init configuration that allows Snappy to work within the Vagrant workflow.

Vagrant enables a cross platform developer experience on MacOS, Windows or Linux [3].

Note: due to the way that Snappy works, shared file systems within Vagrant is not possible at this time. We are working on getting the shared file system support enabled, but it will take us a little bit to get going.

If you want to use Vagrant packaged in the Ubuntu archives, in a terminal run::

  • sudo apt-get -y install vagrant
  • cd <WORKSPACE>
  • vagrant init http://goo.gl/DO7a9W 
  • vagrant up
  • vagrant ssh
If you use Vagrant from [4] (i.e Windows, Mac or install the latest Vagrant) then you can run:
  • vagrant init ubuntu/ubuntu-15.04-snappy-core-edge-amd64
  • vagrant up
  • vagrant ssh

These images are a work in progress. If you encounter any issues, please report them to "snappy-devel@lists.ubuntu.com" or ping me (utlemming) on Launchpad.net

---

[1] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/snappy/15.04/core/edge/current/core-edge-amd64-vagrant.box
[2] https://atlas.hashicorp.com/ubuntu/boxes/ubuntu-15.04-snappy-core-edge-amd64
[3] https://docs.vagrantup.com/v2/why-vagrant/index.html
[4] https://www.vagrantup.com/downloads.html

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