Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'canonical'

Michael Hall

The Ubuntu Core Apps project has proven that the Ubuntu community is not only capable of building fantastic software, but they’re capable of the meeting the same standards, deadlines and requirements that are expected from projects developed by employees. One of the things that I think made Core Apps so successful was the project management support that they all received from Alan Pope.

Project management is common, even expected, for software developed commercially, but it’s just as often missing from community projects. It’s time to change that. I’m kicking off a new personal[1] project, I’m calling it the Ubuntu Incubator.

get_excited_banner_banner_smallThe purpose of the Incubator is to help community projects bootstrap themselves, obtain the resources they need to run their project, and put together a solid plan that will set them on a successful, sustainable path.

To that end I’m going to devote one month to a single project at a time. I will meet with the project members regularly (weekly or every-other week), help define a scope for their project, create a spec, define work items and assign them to milestones. I will help them get resources from other parts of the community and Canonical when they need them, promote their work and assist in recruiting contributors. All of the important things that a project needs, other than direct contributions to the final product.

I’m intentionally keeping the scope of my involvement very focused and brief. I don’t want to take over anybody’s project or be a co-founder. I will take on only one project at a time, so that project gets all of my attention during their incubation period. The incubation period itself is very short, just one month, so that I will focus on getting them setup, not on running them.  Once I finish with one project, I will move on to the next[2].

How will I choose which project to incubate? Since it’s my time, it’ll be my choice, but the most important factor will be whether or not a project is ready to be incubated. “Ready” means they are more than just an idea: they are both possible to accomplish and feasible to accomplish with the person or people already involved, the implementation details have been mostly figured out, and they just need help getting the ball rolling. “Ready” also means it’s not an existing project looking for a boost, while we need to support those projects too, that’s not what the Incubator is for.

So, if you have a project that’s ready to go, but you need a little help taking that first step, you can let me know by adding your project’s information to this etherpad doc[3]. I’ll review each one and let you know if I think it’s ready, needs to be defined a little bit more, or not a good candidate. Then each month I’ll pick one and reach out to them to get started.

Now, this part is important: don’t wait for me! I want to speed up community innovation, not slow it down, so even if I add your project to the “Ready” queue, keep on doing what you would do otherwise, because I have no idea when (or if) I will be able to get to yours. Also, if there are any other community leaders with project management experience who have the time and desire to help incubate one of these project, go ahead and claim it and reach out to that team.

[1] While this compliments my regular job, it’s not something I’ve been asked to do by Canonical, and to be honest I have enough Canonical-defined tasks to consume my working hours. This is me with just my community hat on, and I’m inclined to keep it that way.

[2] I’m not going to forget about projects after their month is up, but you get 100% of the time I spend on incubation during your month, after that my time will be devoted to somebody else.

[3] I’m using Etherpad to keep the process as lightweight as possible, if we need something better in the future we’ll adopt it then.

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Dustin Kirkland

Try These 7 Tips in Your Next Blog Post


In a presentation to my colleagues last week, I shared a few tips I've learned over the past 8 years, maintaining a reasonably active and read blog.  I'm delighted to share these with you now!

1. Keep it short and sweet


Too often, we spend hours or days working on a blog post, trying to create an epic tome.  I have dozens of draft posts I'll never finish, as they're just too ambitious, and I should really break them down into shorter, more manageable articles.

Above, you can see Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, from November 19, 1863.  It's merely 3 paragraphs, 10 sentences, and less than 300 words.  And yet it's one of the most powerful messages ever delivered in American history.  Lincoln wrote it himself on the train to Gettysburg, and delivered it as a speech in less than 2 minutes.

2. Use memorable imagery


Particularly, you need one striking image at the top of your post.  This is what most automatic syndicates or social media platforms will pick up and share, and will make the first impression on phones and tablets.

3. Pen a catchy, pithy title


More people will see or read your title than the post itself.  It's sort of like the chorus to that song you know, but you don't know the rest of the lyrics.  A good title attracts readers and invites re-shares.

4. Publish midweek


This is probably more applicable for professional, rather than hobbyist, topics, but the data I have on my blog (1.7 million unique page views over 8 years), is that the majority of traffic lands on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday.  While I'm writing this very post on a rainy Saturday morning over a cup of coffee, I've scheduled it to publish at 8:17am (US Central time) on the following Tuesday morning.

5. Share to your social media circles


My posts are generally professional in nature, so I tend to share them on G+, Twitter, and LinkedIn.  Facebook is really more of a family-only thing for me, but you might choose to share your posts there too.  With the lamentable death of the Google Reader a few years ago, it's more important than ever to share links to posts on your social media platforms.

6. Hope for syndication, but never expect it

So this is the one "tip" that's really out of your control.  If you ever wake up one morning to an overflowing inbox, congratulations -- your post just went "viral".  Unfortunately, this either "happens", or it "doesn't".  In fact, it almost always "doesn't" for most of us.

7. Engage with comments only when it makes sense


If you choose to use a blog platform that allows comments (and I do recommend you do), then be a little careful about when and how to engage in the comments.  You can easily find yourself overwhelmed with vitriol and controversy.  You might get a pat on the back or two.  More likely, though, you'll end up under a bridge getting pounded by a troll.  Rather than waste your time fighting a silly battle with someone who'll never admit defeat, start writing your next post.  I ignore trolls entirely.

A Case Study

As a case study, I'll take as an example the most successful post I've written: Fingerprints are Usernames, Not Passwords, with nearly a million unique page views.

  1. The entire post is short and sweet, weighing in at under 500 words and about 20 sentences
  2. One iconic, remarkable image at the top
  3. A succinct, expressive title
  4. Published on Tuesday, October 1, 2013
  5. 1561 +1's on G+, 168 retweets on Twitter
  6. Shared on Reddit and HackerNews (twice)
  7. 434 comments, some not so nice
Cheers!
Dustin


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Dustin Kirkland


I had the great pleasure to deliver a 90 minute talk at the USENIX LISA14 conference, in Seattle, Washington.

During the course of the talk, we managed to:

  • Deploy OpenStack Juno across 6 physical nodes, on an Orange Box on stage
  • Explain all of the major components of OpenStack (Nova, Neutron, Swift, Cinder, Horizon, Keystone, Glance, Ceilometer, Heat, Trove, Sahara)
  • Explore the deployed OpenStack cloud's Horizon interface in depth
  • Configured Neutron networking with internal and external networks, as well as a gateway and a router
  • Setup our security groups to open ICMP and SSH ports
  • Upload an SSH keypair
  • Modify the flavor parameters
  • Update a bunch of quotas
  • Add multiple images to Glance
  • Launch some instances until we max out our hypervisor limits
  • Scale up the Nova Compute nodes from 3 units to 6 units
  • Deploy a real workload (Hadoop + Hive + Kibana + Elastic Search)
  • Then, we deleted the entire environment, and ran it all over again from scratch, non-stop
Slides and a full video are below.  Enjoy!




Cheers,
Dustin

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Michael Hall

When things are moving fast and there’s still a lot of work to do, it’s sometimes easy to forget to stop and take the time to say “thank you” to the people that are helping you and the rest of the community. So every November 20th we in Ubuntu have a Community Appreciation Day, to remind us all of the importance of those two little words. We should of course all be saying it every day, but having a reminder like this helps when things get busy.

Like so many who have already posted their appreciation have said, it would be impossible for me to thank everybody I want to thank. Even if I spent all day on this post, I wouldn’t be able to mention even half of them.  So instead I’m going to highlight two people specifically.

First I want to thank Scarlett Clark from the Kubuntu community. In the lead up to this last Ubuntu Online Summit we didn’t have enough track leads on the Users track, which is one that I really wanted to see more active this time around. The track leads from the previous UOS couldn’t do it because of personal or work schedules, and as time was getting scarce I was really in a bind to find someone. I put out a general call for help in one of the Kubuntu IRC channels, and Scarlett was quick to volunteer. I really appreciated her enthusiasm then, and even more the work that she put in as a first-time track lead to help make the Users track a success. So thank you Scarlett.

Next, I really really want to say thank you to Svetlana Belkin, who seems to be contributing in almost every part of Ubuntu these days (including ones I barely know about, like Ubuntu Scientists). She was also a repeat track lead last UOS for the Community track, and has been contributing a lot of great feedback and ideas on ways to make our amazing community even better. Most importantly, in my opinion, is that she’s trying to re-start the Ubuntu Leadership team, which I think is needed now more than ever, and which I really want to become more active in once I get through with some deadline-bound work. I would encourage anybody else who is a leader in the community, or who wants to be one, to join her in that. And thank you, Svetlana, for everything that you do.

It is both a joy and a privilege to be able to work with people like Scarlett and Svetlana, and everybody else in the Ubuntu community. Today more than ever I am reminded about how lucky I am to be a part of it.

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Michael Hall

Last week was our second ever Ubuntu Online Summit, and it couldn’t have gone better. Not only was it a great chance for us in Canonical to talk about what we’re working on and get community members involved in the ongoing work, it was also an opportunity for the community to show us what they have been working on and give us an opportunity to get involved with them.

Community Track leads

This was also the second time we’ve recruited track leads from among the community. Traditionally leading a track was a responsibility given to one of the engineering managers within Canonical, and it was up to them to decide what sessions to put on the UDS schedule. We kept the same basic approach when we went to online vUDS. But starting with UOS 14.06, we asked leaders in the community to help us with that, and they’ve done a phenomenal job. This time we had Nekhelesh RamananthanJosé Antonio ReySvetlana BelkinRohan GargElfy, and Scarlett Clark take up that call, and they were instrumental in getting even more of the community involved

Community Session Hosts

uos_creatorsMore than a third of those who created sessions for this UOS were from the community, not Canonical. For comparison, in the last in-person UDS, less than a quarter of session creators were non-Canonical. The shift online has been disruptive, and we’ve tried many variations to try and find what works, but this metric shows that those efforts are starting to pay off. Community involvement, indeed community direction, is higher in these Online Summits than it was in UDS. This is becoming a true community event: community focused, community organized, and community run.

Community Initiatives

The Ubuntu Online Summit wasn’t just about the projects driven by Canonical, such as the Ubuntu desktop and phone, there were many sessions about projects started and driven by members of the community. Last week we were shown the latest development on Ubuntu MATE and KDE Plasma 5 from non-Canonical lead flavors. We saw a whole set of planning sessions for community developed Core Apps and an exciting new Component Store for app developers to share bits of code with each other. For outreach there were sessions for providing localized ISOs for loco teams and expanding the scope of the community-lead Start Ubuntu project. Finally we had someone from the community kick off a serious discussion about getting Ubuntu running on cars. Cars! All of these exciting sessions were thought up by, proposed by, and run by members of the community.

Community Improvements

This was a great Ubuntu Online Summit, and I was certainly happy with the increased level of community involvement in it, but we still have room to make it better. And we are going to make it better with help from the community. We will be sending out a survey to everyone who registered as attending for this UOS to gather feedback and ideas, please take the time to fill it out when you get the link. If you attended but didn’t register there’s still time, go to the link above, log in and save your attendance record. Finally, it’s never too early to start thinking about the next UOS and what sessions you might want to lead for it, so that you’re prepared when those track leads come knocking at your door.

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mitechie

A couple of people have reached out to me via LinkedIn and reminded me that my three year work anniversary happened last Friday. Three years since I left my job at a local place to go work for the Canonical where I got the chance to be paid to work on open source software and better my Python skills with the team working on Launchpad. My wife wasn’t quite sure. “You’ve only been at your job a year and a half, and your last one was only two years. What makes this different?”

What’s amazing, looking back, is just how *right* the decision turned out to be. I was nervous at the time. I really wasn’t Launchpad’s biggest fan. However, the team I interviewed with held this promise of making me a better developer. They were doing code reviews of every branch that went up to land. They had automated testing, and they firmly believed in unit and functional tests of the code. It was a case of the product didn’t excite me, but the environment, working with smart developers from across the globe, was exactly what I felt like I needed to move forward with my career, my craft.

2013-09-02 18.17.47

I joined my team on Launchpad in a squad of four other developers. It was funny. When I joined I felt so lost. Launchpad is an amazing and huge bit of software, and I knew I was in over my head. I talked with my manager at the time, Deryck, and he told me “Don’t worry, it’ll take you about a year to get really productive working on Launchpad.” A year! Surely you jest, and if you’re not jesting…wtf did I just get myself into?

It was a long road and over time I learned how to take a code review (a really hard skill for many of us), how to do one, and how to talk with other smart and opinionated developers. I learned the value of the daily standup, how to manage work across a kanban board. I learned to really learn from others. Up until this point I’d always been the big fish in a small pond and suddenly I was the minnow hiding in the shallows. Forget books on how to code, just look at the diff in the code review you’re reading right now. Learn!

My boss was right, it was nearly ten months before I really felt like I could be asked to do most things in Launchpad and get them done in an efficient way. Soon our team was moved on from Launchpad to other projects. It was actually pretty great. On the one hand, “Hey! I just got the hang of this thing” but, on the other hand, we were moving on to new things. Development life here has never been one of sitting still. We sit down and work on the Ubuntu cycle of six month plans, and it’s funny because even that is such a long time. Do you really know what you’ll be doing six months from now?

P1100197.jpg

Since that time in Launchpad I’ve gotten work on several different projects and I ended up switching teams to work on the Juju Gui. I didn’t really know a lot about this Juju thing, but the Gui was a fascinating project. It’s a really large scale JavaScript application. This is no “toss some jQuery on a web page” thing here.

I also moved to work under a new manager Gary. As my second manager since starting at Canonical and I was amazed at my luck. Here I’ve had two great mentors that made huge strides in teaching me how to work with other developers, how to do the fun stuff, the mundane, and how to take pride in the accomplishments of the team. I sit down at my computer every day and I’ve got the brain power of amazing people at my disposal over irc, Google Hangouts, email, and more. It’s amazing to think that at these sprints we do, I’m pretty much never the smartest person in the room. However, that’s what’s so great. It’s never boring and when there’s a problem the key is that we put our joint brilliant minds to the problem. In every hard problem we’ve faced I’ve never found that a single person had the one true solution. What we come up with together is always better than what any of us had apart.

When Gary left and there was a void for team lead and it was something I was interested in. I really can’t say enough awesome things about the team of folks I work with. I wanted to keep us all together and I felt like it would be great for us to try to keep things going. It was kind of a “well I’ll just try not to $#@$@# it up” situation. That was more than nine months ago now. Gary and Deryck taught me so much, and I still have to bite my tongue and ask myself “What would Gary do” at times. I’ve kept some things the same, but I’ve also brought my own flavor into the team a bit, at least I like to think so. These days my Github profile doesn’t show me landing a branch a day, but I take great pride in the progress of the team as a whole each and every week.

The team I run now is as awesome a group of people, the best I could hope to work for. I do mean that, I work for my team. It’s never the other way around and that’s one lesson I definitely picked up from my previous leads. The projects we’re working on are exciting and new and are really important to Canonical. I get to sit in and have discussions and planning meetings with Canonical super genius veterans like Kapil, Gustavo, and occasionally Mark Shuttleworth himself.

Looking back I’ve spent the last three years becoming a better developer, getting an on the job training course on leading a team of brilliant people, and crash course on thinking about the project, not just as the bugs or features for the week, but for the project as it needs to exist in three to six months. I’ve spent three years bouncing between “what have I gotten myself into, this is beyond my abilities” to “I’ve got this. You can’t find someone else to do this better”. I always tell people that if you’re not swimming as hard as you can to keep up, find another job. I feel like three years ago I did that and I’ve been swimming ever since.

P1040511.jpg

Three years is a long time in a career these days. It’s been a wild ride and I can’t thank the folks that let me in the door, taught me, and have given me the power to do great things with my work enough. I’ve worked by butt off in Budapest, Copenhagen, Cape Town, Brussels, North Carolina, London, Vegas, and the bay area a few times. Will I be here three years from now? Who knows, but I know I’ve got an awesome team to work with on Monday and we’ll be building an awesome product to keep building. I’m going to really enjoy doing work that’s challenging and fulfilling every step of the way.

DSC00329


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Dustin Kirkland

Earlier this week, here in Paris, at the OpenStack Design Summit, Mark Shuttleworth and Canonical introduced our vision and proof of concept for LXD.

You can find the official blog post on Canonical Insights, and a short video introduction on Youtube (by yours truly).

Our Canonical colleague Stephane Graber posted a bit more technical design detail here on the lxc-devel mailing list, which was picked up by HackerNews.  And LWN published a story yesterday covering another Canonical colleague of ours, Serge Hallyn, and his work on Cgroups and CGManager, all of which feeds into LXD.  As it happens, Stephane and Serge are upstream co-maintainers of Linux Containers.  Tycho Andersen, another colleague of ours, has been working on CRIU, which was the heart of his amazing demo this week, live migrating a container running the cult classic 1st person shooter, Doom! between two containers, back and forth.


Moreover, we've answered a few journalists' questions for excellent articles on ZDnet and SynergyMX.  Predictably, El Reg is skeptical (which isn't necessarily a bad thing).  But unfortunately, The Var Guy doesn't quite understand the technology (and unfortunately uses this article to conflate LXD with other random Canonical/Ubuntu complaints).

In any case, here's a bit more about LXD, in my own words...

Our primary design goal with LXD, is to extend containers into process based systems that behave like virtual machines.

We love KVM for its total machine abstraction, as a full virtualization hypervisor.  Moreover, we love what Docker does for application level development, confinement, packaging, and distribution.

But as an operating system and Linux distribution, our customers are, in fact, asking us for complete operating systems that boot and function within a Linux Container's execution space, natively.

Linux Containers are essential to our reference architecture of OpenStack, where we co-locate multiple services on each host.  Nearly every host is a Nova compute node, as well as a Ceph storage node, and also run a couple of units of "OpenStack overhead", such as MySQL, RabbitMQ, MongoDB, etc.  Rather than running each of those services all on the same physical system, we actually put each of them in their own container, with their own IP address, namespace, cgroup, etc.  This gives us tremendous flexibility, in the orchestration of those services.  We're able to move (migrate, even live migrate) those services from one host to another.  With that, it becomes possible to "evacuate" a given host, by moving each contained set of services elsewhere, perhaps a larger or smaller system, and then shut down the unit (perhaps to replace a hard drive or memory, or repurpose it entirely).

Containers also enable us to similarly confine services on virtual machines themselves!  Let that sink in for a second...  A contained workload is able, then, to move from one virtual machine to another, to a bare metal system.  Even from one public cloud provider, to another public or private cloud!

The last two paragraphs capture a few best practices that what we've learned over the last few years implementing OpenStack for some of the largest telcos and financial services companies in the world.  What we're hearing from Internet service and cloud providers is not too dissimilar...  These customers have their own customers who want cloud instances that perform at bare metal equivalence.  They also want to maximize the utilization of their server hardware, sometimes by more densely packing workloads on given systems.

As such, LXD is then a convergence of several different customer requirements, and our experience deploying some massively complex, scalable workloads (a la OpenStack, Hadoop, and others) in enterprises. 

The rapid evolution of a few key technologies under and around LXC have recently made this dream possible.  Namely: User namespaces, Cgroups, SECCOMP, AppArmorCRIU, as well as the library abstraction that our external tools use to manage these containers as systems.

LXD is a new "hypervisor" in that it provides (REST) APIs that can manage Linux Containers.  This is a step function beyond where we've been to date: able to start and stop containers with local commands and, to a limited extent, libvirt, but not much more.  "Booting" a system, in a container, running an init system, bringing up network devices (without nasty hacks in the container's root filesystem), etc. was challenging, but we've worked our way all of these, and Ubuntu boots unmodified in Linux Containers today.

Moreover, LXD is a whole new semantic for turning any machine -- Intel, AMD, ARM, POWER, physical, or even a virtual machine (e.g. your cloud instances) -- into a system that can host and manage and start and stop and import and export and migrate multiple collections of services bundled within containers.

I've received a number of questions about the "hardware assisted" containerization slide in my deck.  We're under confidentiality agreements with vendors as to the details and timelines for these features.

What (I think) I can say, is that there are hardware vendors who are rapidly extending some of the key features that have made cloud computing and virtualization practical, toward the exciting new world of Linux Containers.  Perhaps you might read a bit about CPU VT extensions, No Execute Bits, and similar hardware security technologies.  Use your imagination a bit, and you can probably converge on a few key concepts that will significantly extend the usefulness of Linux Containers.

As soon as such hardware technology is enabled in Linux, you have our commitment that Ubuntu will bring those features to end users faster than anyone else!

If you want to play with it today, you can certainly see the primitives within Ubuntu's LXC.  Launch Ubuntu containers within LXC and you'll start to get the general, low level idea.  If you want to view it from one layer above, give our new nova-compute-flex (flex was the code name, before it was released as LXD), a try.  It's publicly available as a tech preview in Ubuntu OpenStack Juno (authored by Chuck Short, Scott Moser, and James Page).  Here, you can launch OpenStack instances as LXC containers (rather than KVM virtual machines), as "general purpose" system instances.

Finally, perhaps lost in all of the activity here, is a couple of things we're doing different for the LXD project.  We at Canonical have taken our share of criticism over the years about choice of code hosting (our own Bazaar and Launchpad.net), our preferred free software licence (GPLv3/AGPLv3), and our contributor license agreement (Canonical CLA).   [For the record: I love bzr/Launchpad, prefer GPL/AGPL, and am mostly ambivalent on the CLA; but I won't argue those points here.]
  1. This is a public, community project under LinuxContainers.org
  2. The code and design documents are hosted on Github
  3. Under an Apache License
  4. Without requiring signatures of the Canonical CLA
These have been very deliberate, conscious decisions, lobbied for and won by our engineers leading the project, in the interest of collaborating and garnering the participation of communities that have traditionally shunned Canonical-led projects, raising the above objections.  I, for one, am eager to see contribution and collaboration that too often, we don't see.

Cheers!
:-Dustin

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Michael Hall

A couple of weeks ago we announced the start of a contest to write new Unity Scopes. These are the Dash plugins that let you search for different kinds of content from different sources. Last week Alan Pope posted his Scopes Wishlist detailing the ones he would like to see. And while I think they’re all great ideas, they didn’t particularly resonate with my personal use cases. So I’ve decided to put together a wishlist of my own:

Ubuntu Community

I’ve started on one of these in the past, more to test-drive the Scope API and documentation (both of which have changed somewhat since then), but our community has a rather large amount of content available via open APIs or feeds, that could be combined into making one really great scope. My attempt used the LoCo Team Portal API, but there is also the Planet Ubuntu RSS feed (also feeds from a number of other websites), iCal feeds from Summit, a Google calendar for UbuntuOnAir, etc. There’s a lot of community data out there just waiting to be surfaced to Ubuntu users.

Open States

My friend Paul Tagliamante works for the Sunlight Foundation, which provides access to a huge amount of local law and political data (open culture + government, how cool is that?), including the Open States website which provides more local information for those of us in the USA. Now only could a scope use these APIs to make it easy for us citizens to keep up with that’s going on in our governments, it’s a great candidate to use the Location information to default you to local data no matter where you are.

Desktop

This really only has a purpose on Unity 8 on the desktop, and even then only for a short term until a normal desktop is implemented. But for now it would be a nice way to view your desktop files and such. I think that a Scope’s categories and departments might provide a unique opportunity to re-think how we use the desktop too, with the different files organized by type, sorted by date, and displayed in a way that suits it’s content.

There’s potential here to do some really interesting things, I’m just not sure what they are. If one of you intrepid developers has some good ideas, though, give it a shot.

Comics

Let’s be honest, I love web comics, you love web comics, we all love web comic. Wouldn’t it be super awesome if you got the newest, best webcomics on your Dash? Think about it, get your XKCD, SMBC or The Oatmeal delivered every day. Okay, it might be a productivity killer, but still, I’d install it.

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Michael Hall

Next week we will be kicking off the November 2014 Ubuntu Online Summit where people from the Ubuntu community and Canonical will be hosting live video sessions talking about what is being worked on, what is currently available, and what the future holds across all of the Ubuntu ecosystem.

uos_scheduleWe are in the process of recruiting sessions and filling out the Summit Schedule for this event, which should be finalized at the start of next week. You can register that you are attending on the Summit website, where you can also mark specific sessions that you are interested in and get a personalized view of your schedule (and an available iCal feed too!) UOS is designed for participation, not just consumption. Every session will have active IRC channel that goes along with it where you can speak directly to the people on video. For discussion sessions, you’re encouraged to join the video yourself when you want to join the conversation.

Moreover, we want you to host sessions! Anybody who has an idea for a good topic for conversation, presentation, or planning and is willing to host the video (meaning you need to run a Google On-Air Hangout) can propose a session. You don’t need to be a Canonical employee, project leader, or even an Ubuntu member to run a session, all you need is a topic and a willingness to be the person to drive it. And don’t worry, we have track leads who have volunteered to help you get it setup.

These sessions will be split into tracks, so you can follow along with the topics that interest you. Or you can jump from track to track to see what everybody else in the community is doing. And if you want to host a session yourself, you can contact any one of the friendly Track Leads, who will help you get it registered and on the schedule.

Ubuntu Development

Those who have participated in the Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) in the past will find the same kind of platform-focused topics and discussions in the Ubuntu Development track. This track covers everything from the kernel to packaging, desktops and all of the Ubuntu flavors.

The track leads are: Will CookeŁukasz ZemczakSteve LangasekAntonio Rosales, and Rohan Garg

App & Scope Development

For developers who are targeting the Ubuntu platform, for both apps and Unity scopes, we will be featuring a number of presentations on the current state of the tools, APIs and documentation, as well as gathering feedback from those who have been using them to help us improve upon them in Ubuntu 15.04. You will also see a lot of planning for the Ubuntu Core Apps, and some showcases of other apps or technologies that developers are creating.

The track leads are: Tim PeetersMichael HallAlan Pope, and Nekhelesh Ramananthan

Cloud & DevOps

Going beyond the core and client side, Ubuntu is making a lot of waves in the cloud and server market these days, and there’s no better place to learn about what we’re building (and help us build it) that the Cloud & Devops track. Whether you want to roll out your own OpenStack cloud, or make your web service easy to deploy and scale out, you will find topics here that interest you.

The track leads are: Antonio RosalesMarco CeppiPatricia Gaughen, and José Antonio Rey

Community

The Ubuntu Online Summit is itself a community coordinated event, and we’ve got a track dedicated to helping us improve and grow the whole community. You can use this to showcase the amazing work that your team has been doing, or plan out new events and projects for the coming cycle. The Community Team from canonical will be there, as well as members of the various councils, flavors and boards that provide governance for the Ubuntu project.

The track leads are: David PlanellaDaniel HolbachSvetlana Belkin, and José Antonio Rey

Users

And of course we can’t forget about our millions or users, we have a whole track setup just to provide them with resources and presentations that will help them make the most out Ubuntu. If you have been working on a project for Ubuntu, you should think about hosting a session on this track to show it off. We’ll also be hosting several feedback session to hear directly from users about what works, what doesn’t, and how we can improve.

The track leads are: Nicholas SkaggsElfy, and Scarlett Clark

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Dustin Kirkland

Say it with me, out loud.  Lex.  See.  Lex-see.  LXC.

Now, change the "see" to a "dee".  Lex.  Dee.  Lex-dee.  LXD.

Easy!

Earlier this week, here in Paris, at the OpenStack Design Summit, Mark Shuttleworth and Canonical introduced our vision and proof of concept for LXD.

You can find the official blog post on Canonical Insights, and a short video introduction on Youtube (by yours truly).

Our Canonical colleague Stephane Graber posted a bit more technical design detail here on the lxc-devel mailing list, which was picked up by HackerNews.  And LWN published a story yesterday covering another Canonical colleague of ours, Serge Hallyn, and his work on Cgroups and CGManager, all of which feeds into LXD.  As it happens, Stephane and Serge are upstream co-maintainers of Linux Containers.  Tycho Andersen, another colleague of ours, has been working on CRIU, which was the heart of his amazing demo this week, live migrating a container running the cult classic 1st person shooter, Doom! between two containers, back and forth.



Moreover, we've answered a few journalists' questions for excellent articles on ZDnet and SynergyMX.  Predictably, El Reg is skeptical (which isn't necessarily a bad thing).  But unfortunately, The Var Guy doesn't quite understand the technology (and unfortunately uses this article to conflate LXD with other random Canonical/Ubuntu complaints).

In any case, here's a bit more about LXD, in my own words...

Our primary design goal with LXD, is to extend containers into process based systems that behave like virtual machines.

We love KVM for its total machine abstraction, as a full virtualization hypervisor.  Moreover, we love what Docker does for application level development, confinement, packaging, and distribution.

But as an operating system and Linux distribution, our customers are, in fact, asking us for complete operating systems that boot and function within a Linux Container's execution space, natively.

Linux Containers are essential to our reference architecture of OpenStack, where we co-locate multiple services on each host.  Nearly every host is a Nova compute node, as well as a Ceph storage node, and also run a couple of units of "OpenStack overhead", such as MySQL, RabbitMQ, MongoDB, etc.  Rather than running each of those services all on the same physical system, we actually put each of them in their own container, with their own IP address, namespace, cgroup, etc.  This gives us tremendous flexibility, in the orchestration of those services.  We're able to move (migrate, even live migrate) those services from one host to another.  With that, it becomes possible to "evacuate" a given host, by moving each contained set of services elsewhere, perhaps a larger or smaller system, and then shut down the unit (perhaps to replace a hard drive or memory, or repurpose it entirely).

Containers also enable us to similarly confine services on virtual machines themselves!  Let that sink in for a second...  A contained workload is able, then, to move from one virtual machine to another, to a bare metal system.  Even from one public cloud provider, to another public or private cloud!

The last two paragraphs capture a few best practices that what we've learned over the last few years implementing OpenStack for some of the largest telcos and financial services companies in the world.  What we're hearing from Internet service and cloud providers is not too dissimilar...  These customers have their own customers who want cloud instances that perform at bare metal equivalence.  They also want to maximize the utilization of their server hardware, sometimes by more densely packing workloads on given systems.

As such, LXD is then a convergence of several different customer requirements, and our experience deploying some massively complex, scalable workloads (a la OpenStack, Hadoop, and others) in enterprises. 

The rapid evolution of a few key technologies under and around LXC have recently made this dream possible.  Namely: User namespaces, Cgroups, SECCOMP, AppArmorCRIU, as well as the library abstraction that our external tools use to manage these containers as systems.

LXD is a new "hypervisor" in that it provides (REST) APIs that can manage Linux Containers.  This is a step function beyond where we've been to date: able to start and stop containers with local commands and, to a limited extent, libvirt, but not much more.  "Booting" a system, in a container, running an init system, bringing up network devices (without nasty hacks in the container's root filesystem), etc. was challenging, but we've worked our way all of these, and Ubuntu boots unmodified in Linux Containers today.

Moreover, LXD is a whole new semantic for turning any machine -- Intel, AMD, ARM, POWER, physical, or even a virtual machine (e.g. your cloud instances) -- into a system that can host and manage and start and stop and import and export and migrate multiple collections of services bundled within containers.

I've received a number of questions about the "hardware assisted" containerization slide in my deck.  We're under confidentiality agreements with vendors as to the details and timelines for these features.

What (I think) I can say, is that there are hardware vendors who are rapidly extending some of the key features that have made cloud computing and virtualization practical, toward the exciting new world of Linux Containers.  Perhaps you might read a bit about CPU VT extensions, No Execute Bits, and similar hardware security technologies.  Use your imagination a bit, and you can probably converge on a few key concepts that will significantly extend the usefulness of Linux Containers.

As soon as such hardware technology is enabled in Linux, you have our commitment that Ubuntu will bring those features to end users faster than anyone else!

If you want to play with it today, you can certainly see the primitives within Ubuntu's LXC.  Launch Ubuntu containers within LXC and you'll start to get the general, low level idea.  If you want to view it from one layer above, give our new nova-compute-flex (flex was the code name, before it was released as LXD), a try.  It's publicly available as a tech preview in Ubuntu OpenStack Juno (authored by Chuck Short, Scott Moser, and James Page).  Here, you can launch OpenStack instances as LXC containers (rather than KVM virtual machines), as "general purpose" system instances.

Finally, perhaps lost in all of the activity here, is a couple of things we're doing different for the LXD project.  We at Canonical have taken our share of criticism over the years about choice of code hosting (our own Bazaar and Launchpad.net), our preferred free software licence (GPLv3/AGPLv3), and our contributor license agreement (Canonical CLA).   [For the record: I love bzr/Launchpad, prefer GPL/AGPL, and am mostly ambivalent on the CLA; but I won't argue those points here.]
  1. This is a public, community project under LinuxContainers.org
  2. The code and design documents are hosted on Github
  3. Under an Apache License
  4. Without requiring signatures of the Canonical CLA
These have been very deliberate, conscious decisions, lobbied for and won by our engineers leading the project, in the interest of collaborating and garnering the participation of communities that have traditionally shunned Canonical-led projects, raising the above objections.  I, for one, am eager to see contribution and collaboration that too often, we don't see.

Cheers!
:-Dustin

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beuno

As the pieces start to come together and we get closer to converging mobile and desktop in Ubuntu, Click packages running on the desktop start to feel like they will be a reality soon (Unity 8 brings us Click packages). I think it's actually very exciting, and I thought I'd talk a bit about why that is.

First off: security. The Ubuntu Security team have done some pretty mind-blowing work to ensure Click packages are confined in a safe, reliable but still flexible manner. Jamie has explained how and why in a very eloquent manner. This will only push further an OS that is already well known and respected for being a safe place to do computing for all levels of computer skills.
My second favorite thing: simplification for app developers. When we started sketching out how Clicks would work, there was a very sharp focus on enabling app developers to have more freedom to build and maintain their apps, while still making it very easy to build a package. Clicks, by design, can't express any external dependencies other than a base system (called a "framework"). That means that if your app depends on a fancy library that isn't shipped by default, you just bundle it into the Click package and you're set. You get to update it whenever it suits you as a developer, and have predictability over how it will run on a user's computer (or device!). That opens up the possibility of shipping newer versions of a library, or just sticking with one that works for you. We exchange that freedom for some minor theoretical memory usage increases and extra disk space (if 2 apps end up including the same library), but with today's computing power and disk space cost, it seems like a small price to pay to empower application developers.
Building on top of my first 2 favorite things comes the third: updating apps outside of the Ubuntu release cycle and gaining control as an app developer. Because Click packages are safer than traditional packaging systems, and dependencies are more self-contained, app developers can ship their apps directly to Ubuntu users via the software store without the need for specialized reviewers to review them first. It's also simpler to carry support for previous base systems (frameworks) in newer versions of Ubuntu, allowing app developers to ship the same version of their app to both Ubuntu users on the cutting edge of an Ubuntu development release, as well as the previous LTS from a year ago. There have been many cases over the years where this was an obvious problem, OwnCloud being the latest example of the tension that arises from the current approach where app developers don't have control over what gets shipped.
I have many more favorite things about Clicks, some more are:
- You can create "fat" packages where the same binary supports multiple architectures
- Updated between versions is transactional so you never end up with a botched app update. No more holding your breath while an update installs, hoping your power doesn't drop mid-way
- Multi-user environments can have different versions of the same app without any problems
- Because Clicks are so easy to introspect and verify their proper confinement, the process for verifying them has been easy to automate enabling the store to process new applications within minutes (if not seconds!) and make them available to users immediately

The future of Ubuntu is exciting and it has a scent of a new revolution.

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Ben Howard

We are pleased to announce that Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, 14.04 LTS, and 14.10 are now in beta on Google Compute Engine [1, 2, 3].

These images support both the traditional user-data as well the Google Compute Engine startup scripts. We have included the Google Cloud SDK, pre-installed as well. Users coming from other Clouds can expect to have the same great experience as on other clouds, while enjoying the features of Google Compute Engine.

From an engineering perspective, a lot of us are excited to see this launch. While we don't expect too many rough edges, it is a beta, so feedback is welcome. Please file bugs or join us in #ubuntu-server on Freenode to report any issues (ping me, utlemming, rcj or Odd_Bloke).

Finally, I wanted to thank those that have helped on this project. Launching a cloud is not an easy engineering task. You have have build infrastructure to support the new cloud, create tooling to build and publish, write QA stacks, and do packaging work. All of this spans multiple teams and disciplines. The support from Google and Canonical's Foundations and Kernel teams have been instrumental in this launch, as well the engineers on the Certified Public Cloud team.

Getting the Google Cloud SDK:

As part of the launch, Canonical and Google have been working together on packaging a version of the Google Cloud SDK. At this time, we are unable to bring it into the main archives. However, you can find it in our partner archive.

To install it run the following:

  • echo "deb http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu $(lsb_release -c -s) partner" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/partner.list
  • sudo apt-get update
  • sudo apt-get -y install google-cloud-sdk


Then follow the instruction for using the Cloud SDK at [4]


[1] https://cloud.google.com/compute/docs/operating-systems#ubuntu
[2] http://googlecloudplatform.blogspot.co.uk/2014/11/curated-ubuntu-images-now-available-on.html
[3] http://insights.ubuntu.com/2014/11/03/certified-ubuntu-images-available-on-google-cloud-platform/
[4] https://cloud.google.com/sdk/gcloud/

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Nicholas Skaggs

Sprinting in DC: Friday

This week, my team and I are sprinting with many of the core app developers and other folks inside of Ubuntu Engineering. Each day I'm attempting to give you a glimpse of what's happening.

Friday brings an end to an exciting week, and the faces of myself and those around me reflect the discussions, excitement, fun and lack of sleep this week has entailed.

Bubbles!
The first session of the day involved hanging out with the QA team while they heard feedback from various teams on issues with quality and process within there project. Always fun to hear about what causes different teams the most issues when it comes to testing.

Next I spent some time interviewing a couple folks for publishing later. In my case I interviewed Thomi from the QA team and Zoltan from the SDK team about the work going on within there teams and how the last cycle went. The team as a whole has been conducting interviews all week. Look for these interviews to appear on youtube in the coming weeks.

Thursday night while having a look through a book store, I came across an ad for ubuntu in Linux Voice magazine. It made me smile. The dream of running ubuntu on all my devices is becoming closer every day.


I'd like to thank all the community core app developers who joined us this week. Thanks for hanging out with us, providing feedback, and most of all for the creating the wonderful apps we have for the ubuntu phone. Your work has helped shaped the device and turn it into what it is today.

Looking back over the schedule there were sessions I wish I had been able to attend, and it was wonderful catching up with everyone. Sadly my flight home prevented me from attending the closing session and presumably getting a summary of some of these sessions. I can say I was delighted to talk and interact with the unity8 team on the next steps for unity8 on the desktop. I trust next cycle we as a community can do more around testing there work.

As I head to the airport for home, it's time to celebrate the release of utopic unicorn!

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ssweeny

Ubuntu 14.10

I’m at a sprint in Washington, DC with my fellow Canonicalers gearing up for the commercial release of our phone OS (more on that later) but that doesn’t mean we’ve forgotten about the desktop and cloud.

Yesterday was another Ubuntu release day! We released Ubuntu 14.10, codenamed the Utopic Unicorn. Look for lots of subtle improvements to the desktop as we prepare some big things to come soon.

As usual, you can take a tour or go straight to the download page.

And while we’re at it, here’s to another 10 years of Ubuntu!

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Nicholas Skaggs

Sprinting in DC: Thursday

This week, my team and I are sprinting with many of the core app developers and other folks inside of Ubuntu Engineering. Each day I'm attempting to give you a glimpse of what's happening.

Today started with some UOS planning which is happening in a couple short weeks. If you haven't yet put it on your calendar, please do so! And plan to not only attend, but consider submitting a session as well. The users track might be just the place for your session. Session topics can be about anything ubuntu related you might want to share or discuss with others.

As the week has progressed I've enjoyed getting to know the core apps developers better. Today we met with all of them to hear feedback on how the projects have been going. Lots of good discussion was had discussing how things like meetings and reviews work, individual project needs and actions that could be taken to improve all of the projects. It's wonderful to have everyone in the same place and able to talk.


After lunch the QA team discussed manual testing and proposed utilizing moztrap for some of the manual testing they are undertaking as part of the CI process for ubuntu touch images. While it is too early to say what implications this will have on manual testing from a community perspective, I'm happy to see the conversation has begun around the current issues facing manual tests. I'm also happy someone else is willing to be a guinea pig for changes like this! For image testing, the qatracker has served us well and will continue to do so, but I hope in the future we can improve the experience. In fact, we have done work in this area recently, and would love to hear from anyone who wants to help improve the qatracker experience. So, whether or not a migration to moztrap occurs at some point, the future looks bright.

The core app developers also got a chance to both get and receive feedback from the SDK and design teams. The deep dives into applications like calendar were very much appreciated and I expect those suggestions will filter into the applications in the near future. As usual the core apps developers came prepared with suggestions and grievances for the SDK team, as well as praises for things done well.

Finally to end the day, we discussed developer mode on the device. Rather than talk about the history of how it was implemented, let me share with you the future. Rather than locking adb access via a password, we'll utilize certificates. The password based solution already will ensure your locked device isn't vulnerable to nefarious humans who might want to connect and steal your data or reflash your phone. However, things like passwordless sudo will be possible with using certificates. In addition if security is the bane of your existence, you will be able to enable developer mode without setting a password at all.

Whew, today was very full!

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Nicholas Skaggs

Sprinting in DC: Wednesday

This week, my team and I are sprinting with many of the core app developers and other folks inside of Ubuntu Engineering. Each day I'm attempting to give you a glimpse of what's happening.

To kick off the day, I led a session on something that has been wreaking havoc for application test writers within the core apps -- environment setup. In theory, setting up the environment to run your test should be easy. In practice, I've found it increasingly difficult. The music, calendar, clock, reminders, file manager and other teams have all been quite affected by this and the canonical QA team and myself have all pitched in to help, but struggled as well. In short, a test should be easy to launch, be well behaved and not delete any user data, and be easy to setup and feed test data into for the test process. I'm happy to report that the idea of a permanent solution has been reached. Now we must implement it of course, but the result should be drastically easier and more reliable test setup for you the test author.

I also had the chance to list some grievances for application developers with the QA team. We spoke about wanting to expand the documentation on testing and specifically targeted the need to create better templates in the ubuntu sdk for new projects. When you start a new project you should have well functioning tests, and we should teach you about how to run them too!



Just before lunch the community core app developers were able to discuss post-RTM plans and features. A review of the apps was undertaken and some desire for new designs or features were discussed. Terminal is being rebuilt to be more aligned with upstream. Music is currently undergoing a re-design which is coming along great. Calculator is anxious to get some design love. Reminders potential for offline notetaking as well as potential name changes were all discussed. Overall, an amazing accomplishment by all the developers!

After lunch, I spent time confirming the fix for a longstanding bug within autopilot. The merge proposal for fixing this bug has been simmering all summer and it's time to get it fixed. The current test suites for calendar and clock have been impacted by this and have already had regressions occur that could have been caught had tests been able to be written for this area. Having myself, the autopilot team, and the calendar developers in one place made fixing this possible.

To end the day, I spent some time attending sessions for changes to CI and learning more about the coming changes to CI within ubuntu. In summary the news is wonderful. CI will test using autopkgtest, and all of ubuntu will come under this umbrella -- phone, desktop, everything. If it's a package and it has tests, we will do all of the autopkgtest goodness currently being done for the distro.

The evening closed with a bit of fun provided by a game making hackathon using bacon2d and the hilariously horrible "Turkish Star Wars". We could always use more games in the ubuntu app store, and I hear there might even still be a pioneers t-shirt or two left if you get it in early!

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Nicholas Skaggs

Sprinting in DC: Tuesday

This week, my team and I are sprinting with many of the core app developers and other folks inside of Ubuntu Engineering. Each day I'm attempting to give you a glimpse of what's happening.

On Tuesday I was finally able to sit down with the team and plan our week. In addition I was able to plan some of the work I had in mind with the community folks working on the core apps. Being obsessed with testing, my primary goals this week are centered around quality. Namely I want to make it easier for developers to write tests. Asking them to write tests is much easier when it's easy to do so. Fortunately, I think (hope?) all of the community core apps developers recognize the benefits to tests and thus are motivated to drive maturity into the testing story.

I'm also keen to work on the manual testing story. The community is imperative in helping test images for not only ubuntu, but also all of it's flavors. Seriously, you should say thank you to those folks helping make sure your install of ubuntu works well. They are busy this week helping make sure utopic is as good as it can be. Rock on image testers! But the tools and process used weigh on my mind, and I'm keen to chat later in the week with the canonical QA team and get there feedback.

During the day I attended sessions regarding changes and tweaks to the CI process. For core apps developers, errors in jenkins should be easier to replicate after these changes. CI will be moving to utilizing adt-run (autopkgtest) for there test execution (and you should too!). They will also provide the exact commands used to run the test. That means you can easily duplicate the results on the dashboard locally and fix the issues found. No more works on my box excuses!

I also met the team responsible for the application store and gave them feedback on the application submission process. Submitting apps is already so simple, but even more cool things are happening on this front.

The end of the evening found us shuffling into cab's for a team dinner. We had a long table of folks eating Italian food and getting to know each other better.


After dinner, I pressured a few folks into having some dessert and ordered a sorbet for myself. After receiving no less than 4 fruit sorbets due to a misunderstanding, I began carving the fruits and sending plates of sorbet down the table. My testcase failed however when the plates all came back :-(



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Nicholas Skaggs

Sprinting in DC: Monday

This week, my team and I are sprinting in Washington DC with many of the core app developers and other folks inside of Ubuntu Engineering. Sprints are always busy, but the work tends to be a mix of social and technical. I get to assign names (IRC nicknames mostly) to faces as well as get to know my co-workers and other community members better.

I thought it might be useful to give writeups each day of what's going on, at least from my perspective during the sprint. I won't yammer on too much about quality and instead bring you pictures of what you really want. And some of this too. Whoops, here's one.

Pictures of people taking pictures . . .
Monday was the first day of the sprint, and also the day of my arrival! Personally I'm busy at home during this week, so it's tough to get away. That said, I can't imagine being anywhere else for the week. The sprints are a wonderful source of respite for everyone.

Monday itself consisted of making sure everything is ready for the week, planning events, and icebreakers. In typical fashion, an opening plenary set the bar for the week with notes about the progress being made on the phone as well as the future of the desktop. Lots of meetings and a few blurry jet lagged hours later, everyone was ready to sit for a bit and have some non-technical conversation!

Fortunately for us there was an event planned to meet both our social and hunger needs. After being split randomly into teams of bugs (love the play on quality), we played a bit of trivia. After each round teams were scored not only on the correct response, but also how quickly they responded. The questions varied from the obscure to fun bits about ubuntu. The final round centered around Canonical itself which was fun trip down memory lane to remember.

As I crawled into bed I still had the wonderfully cheesy announcer playing trivia questions in my head.


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Michael Hall

Will CookeThis is a guest post from Will Cooke, the new Desktop Team manager at Canonical. It’s being posted here while we work to get a blog setup on unity.ubuntu.com, which is where you can find out more about Unity 8 and how to get involved with it.

Intro

Understandably, most of the Ubuntu news recently has focused around phones. There is a lot of excitement and anticipation building around the imminent release of the first devices.  However, the Ubuntu Desktop has not been dormant during this time.  A lot of thought and planning has been given to what the desktop will become in the future; who will use it and what will they use it for.  All the work which is going in to the phone will be directly applicable to the desktop as well, since they will use the same code.  All the apps, the UI tweaks, everything which makes applications secure and stable will all directly apply to the desktop as well.  The plan is to have the single converged operating system ready for use on the desktop by 16.04.

The plan

We learned some lessons during the early development of Unity 7. Here’s what happened:

  • 11.04: New Unity as default
  • 11.10: New Unity version
  • 12.04: Unity in First LTS

What we’ve decided to do this time is to keep the same, stable Unity 7 desktop as the default while we offer users who want to opt-in to Unity8 an option to use that desktop. As development continues the Unity 8 desktop will get better and better.  It will benefit from a lot of the advances which have come about through the development of the phone OS and will benefit from continual improvements as the releases happen.

  • 14.04 LTS: Unity 7 default / Unity 8 option for the first time
  • 14.10: Unity 7 default / Unity 8 new rev as an option
  • 15.04: Unity 7 default / Unity 8 new rev as an option
  • 15.10: Potentially Unity 8 default / Unity 7 as an option
  • 16.04 LTS: Unity 8 default / Unity 7 as an option

As you can see, this gives us a full 2 cycles (in addition to the one we’ve already done) to really nail Unity 8 with the level of quality that people expect. So what do we have?

How will we deliver Unity 8 with better quality than 7?

Continuous Integration is the best way for us to achieve and maintain the highest quality possible.  We have put a lot of effort in to automating as much of the testing as we can, the best testing is that which is performed easily.  Before every commit the changes get reviewed and approved – this is the first line of defense against bugs.  Every merge request triggers a run of the tests, the second line of defense against bugs and regressions – if a change broke something we find out about it before it gets in to the build.

The CI process builds everything in a “silo”, a self contained & controlled environment where we find out if everything works together before finally landing in the image.

And finally, we have a large number of tests which run against those images. This really is a “belt and braces” approach to software quality and it all happens automatically.  You can see, we are taking the quality of our software very seriously.

What about Unity 7?

Unity 7 and Compiz have a team dedicated to maintenance and bug fixes and so the quality of it continues to improve with every release.  For example; windows switching workspaces when a monitor gets unplugged is fixed, if you have a mouse with 6 buttons it works, support for the new version of Metacity (incase you want to use the Gnome2 desktop) – added (and incidentally, a lot of that work was done by a community contributor – thanks Alberts!)

Unity 7 is the desktop environment for a lot of software developers, devops gurus, cloud platform managers and millions of users who rely on it to help them with their everyday computing.  We don’t want to stop you being able to get work done.  This is why we continue to maintain Unity 7 while we develop Unity 8.  If you want to take Unity 8 for a spin and see how its coming along then you can; if you want to get your work done, we’re making that experience better for you every day.  Best of all, both of these options are available to you with no detriment to the other.

Things that we’re getting in the new Ubuntu Desktop

  1. Applications decoupled from the OS updates.  Traditionally a given release of Ubuntu has shipped with the versions of the applications available at the time of release.  Important updates and security fixes are back-ported to older releases where required, but generally you had to wait for the next release to get the latest and greatest set of applications.  The new desktop packaging system means that application developers can push updates out when they are ready and the user can benefit right away.
  2. Application isolation.  Traditionally applications can access anything the user can access; photos, documents, hardware devices, etc.  On other platforms this has led to data being stolen or rendered otherwise unusable.  Isolation means that without explicit permission any Click packaged application is prevented from accessing data you don’t want it to access.
  3. A full SDK for writing Ubuntu apps.  The SDK which many people are already using to write apps for the phone will allow you to write apps for the desktop as well.  In fact, your apps will be write once run anywhere – you don’t need to write a “desktop” app or a “phone” app, just an Ubuntu app.

What we have now

The easiest way to try out the Unity 8 Desktop Preview is to use the daily Ubuntu Desktop Next live image:   http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-desktop-next/daily-live/current/   This will allow you to boot into a Unity 8 session without touching your current installation.  An easy 10 step way to write this image to a USB stick is:

  1. Download the ISO
  2. Insert your USB stick in the knowledge that it’s going to get wiped
  3. Open the “Disks” application
  4. Choose your USB stick and click on the cog icon on the righthand side
  5. Choose “Restore Disk Image”
  6. Browse to and select the ISO you downloaded in #1
  7. Click “Start restoring”
  8. Wait
  9. Boot and select “Try Ubuntu….”
  10. Done *

* Please note – there is currently a bug affecting the Unity 8 greeter which means you are not automatically logged in when you boot the live image.  To log in you need to:

  1. Switch to vt1 (ctrl-alt-f1)
  2. type “passwd” and press enter
  3. press enter again to set the current password to blank
  4. enter a new password twice
  5. Check that the password has been successfully changed
  6. Switch back to vt7 (ctrl-alt-f7)
  7. Enter the new password to login

 

Here are some screenshots showing what Unity 8 currently looks like on the desktop:

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The team

The people working on the new desktop are made up of a few different disciplines.  We have a team dedicated to Unity 7 maintenance and bug fixes who are also responsible for Unity 8 on the desktop and feed in a lot of support to the main Unity 8 & Mir teams. We have the Ubuntu Desktop team who are responsible for many aspects of the underlying technologies used such as GNOME libraries, settings, printing etc as well as the key desktop applications such as Libreoffice and Chromium.  The Ubuntu desktop team has some of the longest serving members of the Ubuntu family, with some people having been here for the best part of ten years.

How you can help

We need to log all the bugs which need to be fixed in order to make Unity 8 the best desktop there is.  Firstly, we need people to test the images and log bugs.  If developers want to help fix those bugs, so much the better.  Right now we are focusing on identifying where the work done for the phone doesn’t work as expected on the desktop.  Once those bugs are logged and fixed we can rely on the CI system described above to make sure that they stay fixed.

Link to daily ISOs:  http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-desktop-next/daily-live/current/

Bugs:  https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/unity8-desktop-session

IRC:  #ubuntu-desktop on Freenode

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Michael Hall

screenshot_1.0So it’s finally happened, one of my first Ubuntu SDK apps has reached an official 1.0 release. And I think we all know what that means. Yup, it’s time to scrap the code and start over.

It’s a well established mantra, codified by Fred Brooks, in software development that you will end up throwing away the first attempt at a new project. The releases between 0.1 and 0.9 are a written history of your education about the problem, the tools, or the language you are learning. And learn I did, I wrote a whole series of posts about my adventures in writing uReadIt. Now it’s time to put all of that learning to good use.

Often times projects still spend an extremely long time in this 0.x stage, getting ever closer but never reaching that 1.0 release.  This isn’t because they think 1.0 should wait until the codebase is perfect, I don’t think anybody expects 1.0 to be perfect. 1.0 isn’t the milestone of success, it’s the crossing of the Rubicon, the point where drastic change becomes inevitable. It’s the milestone where the old code, with all it’s faults, dies, and out of it is born a new codebase.

So now I’m going to start on uReadIt 2.0, starting fresh, with the latest Ubuntu UI Toolkit and platform APIs. It won’t be just a feature-for-feature rewrite either, I plan to make this a great Reddit client for both the phone and desktop user. To that end, I plan to add the following:

  • A full Javascript library for interacting with the Reddit API
  • User account support, which additionally will allow:
    • Posting articles & comments
    • Reading messages in your inbox
    • Upvoting and downvoting articles and comments
  • Convergence from the start, so it’s usable on the desktop as well
  • Re-introduce link sharing via Content-Hub
  • Take advantage of new features in the UITK such as UbuntuListView filtering & pull-to-refresh, and left/right swipe gestures on ListItems

Another change, which I talked about in a previous post, will be to the license of the application. Where uReadIt 1.0 is GPLv3, the next release will be under a BSD license.

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