Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'canonical'

Michael Hall

Bicentennial Man PosterEver since we started building the Ubuntu SDK, we’ve been trying to find ways of bringing the vast number of Android apps that exist over to Ubuntu. As with any new platform, there’s a chasm between Android apps and native apps that can only be crossed through the effort of porting.

There are simple solutions, of course, like providing an Android runtime on Ubuntu. On other platforms, those have shown to present Android apps as second-class citizens that can’t benefit from a new platform’s unique features. Worse, they don’t provide a way for apps to gradually become first-class citizens, so chasm between Android and native still exists, which means the vast majority of apps supported this way will never improve.

There are also complicates solutions, like code conversion, that try to translate Android/Java code into the native platform’s language and toolkit, preserving logic and structure along the way. But doing this right becomes such a monumental task that making a tool to do it is virtually impossible, and the amount of cleanup and checking needed to be done by an actual developer quickly rises to the same level of effort as a manual port would have. This approach also fails to take advantage of differences in the platforms, and will re-create the old way of doing things even when it doesn’t make sense on the new platform.

Screenshot from 2014-04-19 14:44:22NDR takes a different approach to these, it doesn’t let you run our Android code on Ubuntu, nor does it try to convert your Android code to native code. Instead NDR will re-create the general framework of your Android app as a native Ubuntu app, converting Activities to Pages, for example, to give you a skeleton project on which you can build your port. It won’t get you over the chasm, but it’ll show you the path to take and give you a head start on it. You will just need to fill it in with the logic code to make it behave like your Android app. NDR won’t provide any of logic for you, and chances are you’ll want to do it slightly differently than you did in Android anyway, due to the differences between the two platforms.

Screenshot from 2014-04-19 14:44:31To test NDR during development, I chose the Telegram app because it was open source, popular, and largely used Android’s layout definitions and components. NDR will be less useful against apps such as games, that use their own UI components and draw directly to a canvas, but it’s pretty good at converting apps that use Android’s components and UI builder.

After only a couple days of hacking I was able to get NDR to generate enough of an Ubuntu SDK application that, with a little bit of manual cleanup, it was recognizably similar to the Android app’s.

This proves, in my opinion, that bootstrapping an Ubuntu port based on Android source code is not only possible, but is a viable way of supporting Android app developers who want to cross that chasm and target their apps for Ubuntu as well. I hope it will open the door for high-quality, native Ubuntu app ports from the Android ecosystem.  There is still much more NDR can do to make this easier, and having people with more Android experience than me (that would be none) would certainly make it a more powerful tool, so I’m making it a public, open source project on Launchpad and am inviting anybody who has an interest in this to help me improve it.

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jono

My apologies in advance for the shorter blog post about this, but like many other Ubuntu folks, I am absolutely exhausted right now. Everyone, across the board, has been working their collective socks off to make Ubuntu 14.04 LTS a fantastic release on desktop, server, and cloud, and pull together our next iteration of Ubuntu for smart-phones and tablets. Consequently, when the trigger is pulled to share our final product with the world, release day is often less of a blistering and energetic woo-hoo, but more of an exhausted but satisfying oh-yeah (complete with beer firmly clenched in hand).

I am hugely proud of this release. The last six months have arguably been our busiest yet. No longer are we just working on desktop and server editions of Ubuntu, but we are building for the cloud and full convergence across the client. No longer are we “just” pulling together the fruits of upstream software projects but we are building our own platform too; the Ubuntu SDK, developer eco-system, charm store, image-based updates, push notifications, app lifecycle, and more. While the work has been intense and at times frantic, it has always been measured and carefully executed. Much of this has been thanks to many of our most under-thanked people; the members of our tremendous QA and CI teams.

Today, tomorrow, and for weeks to come our users, the press, the industry, and others will assess our work in Ubuntu 14.04 across these different platforms, and I am very confident they will love what they see. Ubuntu 14.04 embodies the true spirit of Ubuntu; innovation, openness, and people.

But as we wait to see the reviews let’s take a moment for each other. Now is a great time to reach out to each other and those Ubuntu folks you know (and don’t know) and share some kudos, some thanks, and some great stories. Until we get to the day where machines make software, today software is made by people and great software is built by great people.

Thanks everyone for every ounce of effort you fed into Ubuntu and our many flavors. We just took another big leap forward towards our future.

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ssweeny

Trusty TahrAnother very exciting release of Ubuntu for desktops and phones (oh, and I guess servers and cloud too) is out the door!

This is a Long Term Support release, which means it’s supported for five years, and it’s the release I’ll be trying to install on friends’ and family’s computers at every opportunity.

As usual, you can take a tour or go straight to the download page.

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olli

Ubuntu 14.04 will be released today and you couldn’t resist the itch to go try the Unity 8 preview session on the Desktop. How underwhelming… there are almost no apps, and some don’t even work and overall it’s actually pretty unexciting… let’s change that in the next few chapters. First things first though… let’s look […]

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Ben Howard

Many of our Cloud Image users have inquired about the availability of updated Ubuntu Cloud Images in response to the Heartbleed OpenSSL Vulnerability [1]. Ubuntu released update Ubuntu packages for OpenSSL 08 April 2014 [2]. Due to the exceptional circumstances and severity of the Heartbleed OpenSSL bug, Canonical has released new 12.04.4 LTS, 12.10 and 13.10 Cloud Images at [3].

Canonical is working with Amazon to get the Quickstart and the AWS Marketplace links updated. In the meantime, you can find new AMI ID's at [3] and [4]. Also, the snapshot's for Amazon have the volume-create permission granted on the latest images.

Windows Azure [5], Joyent [6] and HP [7, 8, 9] all have updated Cloud Images in their respective galleries.

If you are running an affected version of OpenSSL on 12.04 LTS, 12.10 or 13.10, you are strongly encouraged to update. For new instances, it is recommended to either use an image with a serial newer than 20140408, or update your OpenSSL  package immediately upon launch. Finally, if you need documentation on enabling unattended upgrades, please see [10].


[1] https://www.openssl.org/news/secadv_20140407.txt
[2] http://www.ubuntu.com/usn/usn-2165-1/
[3] 12.04.4 LTS: http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/precise/release-20140408/
     12.10: http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/quantal/release-20140409/
     13.10: http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/saucy/release-20140409.1/
[4] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/locator/ec2/
[5] Azure: Ubuntu-12_04_4-LTS-amd64-server-20140408-en-us-30GB
                 Ubuntu-12_10-amd64-server-20140409-en-us-30GB
                 Ubuntu-13_10-amd64-server-20140409.1-en-us-30GB
[6] Joyent Images:
        "ubuntu-certified-12.04", fe5aa6c0-0f09-4b1f-9bad-83e453bb74f3
        "ubuntu-certified-13.10", 049dfe64-6c37-4b88-8e89-4b8aa0f129f2
[7] HP US-West-1:
          12.04.4: 27be722e-d2d0-44f0-bebe-471c4af76039
          12.10: 065bb450-e5d0-4348-997d-e4d9e359b8fb
          13.10: 9d7d22d0-7d43-481f-a7eb-d93ea2791409
[8] HP US-East-1:
          12.04.4 8672f4c6-e33d-46f5-b6d8-ebbeba12fa02
          12.10: cbb44038-2602-48d5-b609-e05f4b61be9a
          13.10: 00398423-7429-4064-b781-fa0af00449c8
[9] Waiting on HP for replication to legacy regions az-{1,2,3}
[10] https://help.ubuntu.com/community/AutomaticSecurityUpdates

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mandel

In the ubuntu download manager we are using the new connection style syntax so that if there are errors in the signal connections we will be notified at compile time. However, in recent versions of udm we have noticed that the udm tests that ensure that the qt signals are emitted correctly have started failing randomly in the build servers.

As it can be seen in the following build logs the compilation does finish with no errors but the tests raise errors at runtime (an assert was added for each of the connect calls in the project):

Some of the errors between the diff archs are the same but this feels like a coincidence. The unity-scope-click package project has had the same issue and has solved it in the following way:

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    // NOTE: using SIGNAL/SLOT macros here because new-style
    // connections are flaky on ARM.
    c = connect(impl->systemDownloadManager.data(), SIGNAL(downloadCreated(Download*)),
                this, SLOT(handleDownloadCreated(Download*)));
 
    if (!c) {
        qDebug() << "failed to connect to systemDownloadManager::downloadCreated";
 
    }

I am not the only one that have encoutered this bug within canonical (check out this bug). Apprently -Bsymbolic breaks PMF (Pointer to Member Function) comparison under ARM as it was reported in linaro. As it is explained in the Linaro mailing list a workaround to this (since the correct way would be to fix the linker) is to build with PIE support. The Qt guys have decided to drop -Bsymbolic* on anything but x86 and x86-64. I hope all this info help others that might find the same problem.

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olli

Stephen Webb & team have lead an effort to bring Unity 8 to Ubuntu 14.04, which was done in parallel of other great work the team has landed for Ubuntu 14.04, e.g. locally integrated menus, hiDPI support and Mir support in SDL. Just in time for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS the team has landed more improvements to make […]

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Kyle Nitzsche

KyleN Ubuntu

New Unity 8 Scopes Docs


I have completed and published several documents on the Ubuntu development portal, scopes section. I hope these are useful when developing Unity 8 Scopes: 
The team also published these new docs:

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beuno

This week has been bitter-sweet. On the one hand, we announced that a project many of us had poured our hearts and minds into was going to be shut down. It’s made many of us sad and some of us haven’t even figured out what to do with their files yet    :)

On the other hand, we’ve been laser-focused on making Ubuntu on phones and tablets a success, our attention has moved to making sure we have a rock-solid, scalable, secure and pleasant to use for developers and users alike. We just didn’t have the time to continue racing against other companies whose only focus is on file syncing, which was very frustrating as we saw a project we were proud of be left behind. It was hard to keep feeling proud of the service, so shutting it down felt like the right thing to do.

I am, however, very excited about open sourcing the server-side of the file syncing infrastructure. It’s a huge beast that contains many services and has scaled well into the millions of users.

We are proud of the code that is being released and in many ways we feel that the code itself was successful despite the business side of things not turning out the way we hoped for.

This will be a great opportunity to those of you who’ve been itching to have an open source service for personal cloud syncing at scale, the code comes battle-tested and with a wide array of features.

As usual, some people have taken this generous gesture “as an attempt to gain interest in a failing codebase”, which couldn’t be more wrong. The agenda here is to make Ubuntu for phones a runaway success, and in order to do that we need to double down on our efforts and focus on what matters right now.

Instead of storing away those tens of thousands of expensive man-hours of work in an internal repository somewhere, we’ve decided to share that work with the world, allow others to build on top of that work, benefit from it.

It’s hard sometimes to see some people trying to make a career out of trying to make everything that Canonical does as inherently evil, although at the end of the day what matters is making open source available to the masses. That’s what we’ve been doing for a long time and that’s the only thing that will count in the end.

 

So in the coming months we’re going to be cleaning things up a bit, trying to release the code in the best shape possible and work out the details on how to best release it to make it useful for others.

All of us who worked on this project for so many years are looking forward to sharing it and look forward to seeing many open source personal cloud syncing services blossoming from it.

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jono

I just wanted to let you folks know that I am recruiting for a community manager to join my team at Canonical.

I am looking for someone with strong technical knowledge of building Ubuntu (knowledge of how we release, how we build packages, bug management, governance etc), great community management skills, and someone who is willing to be challenged and grow in their skills and capabilities.

My goal with everyone who joins my team is not just to help them be successful in their work, but to help them be the very best at what they do in our industry. As such I am looking for someone with a passion to be successful and grow.

I think it is a great opportunity and to be part of a great team. Details of the job are available here – please apply if you are interested!?

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Cristian Parrino

Today we are announcing plans to shut down the Ubuntu One file services.  This is a tough decision, particularly when our users rely so heavily on the functionality that Ubuntu One provides.  However, like any company, we want to focus our efforts on our most important strategic initiatives and ensure we are not spread too thin.

Our strategic priority for Ubuntu is making the best converged operating system for phones, tablets, desktops and more. In fact, our user experience, developer tools for apps and scopes, and commercial relationships have been constructed specifically to highlight third party content and services (as opposed to our own); this is one of our many differentiators from our competitors.  Additionally, the free storage wars aren’t a sustainable place for us to be, particularly with other services now regularly offering 25GB-50GB free storage.  If we offer a service, we want it to compete on a global scale, and for Ubuntu One to continue to do that would require more investment than we are willing to make. We choose instead to invest in making the absolute best, open platform  and to highlight the best of our partners’ services and content.

As of today, it will no longer be possible to purchase storage or music from the Ubuntu One store. The Ubuntu One file services will not be included in the upcoming Ubuntu 14.04 LTS release, and the Ubuntu One apps in older versions of Ubuntu and in the Ubuntu, Google, and Apple stores will be updated appropriately. The current services will be unavailable from 1 June 2014; user content will remain available for download until 31 July, at which time it will be deleted.

We will work to ensure that customers have an easy path to download all their content from Ubuntu One to migrate to other personal cloud services.  Additionally, we continue to believe in the Ubuntu One file services, the quality of the code, and the user experience, so will release the code as open source software to give others an opportunity to build on this code to create an open source file syncing platform.

Customers who have an active annual subscription will have their unused fees refunded. We will calculate the refund amount from today’s announcement, even though the service will remain available until 1 June and data available for a further two months.

We will contact customers separately with additional information about what to expect.  We will also publish further blog posts with advice on how to download content and with details on the open sourcing of the code.

The shutdown will not affect the Ubuntu One single sign on service, the Ubuntu One payment service, or the backend U1DB database service.

We’ve always been inspired by the support, feedback and enthusiasm of our users and want to thank you for the support you’ve shown for Ubuntu One. We hope that you’ll continue to support us as together we bring a revolutionary experience to new devices.

 

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Michael Hall

I’ve been using Ubuntu on my only phone for over six months now, and I’ve been loving it. But all this time it’s been missing something, something I couldn’t quite put my finger on. Then, Saturday night, it finally hit me, it’s missing the community.

That’s not to say that the community isn’t involved in building it, all of the core apps have been community developed, as have several parts of our toolkit and even the platform itself. Everything about Ubuntu for phones is open source and open to the community.

But the community wasn’t on my phone. Their work was, but not the people.  I have Facebook and Google+ and Twitter, sure, but everybody is on those, and you have to either follow or friend people there to see anything from them. I wanted something that put the community of Ubuntu phone users, on my Ubuntu phone. So, I started to make one.

Community Cast

Community Cast is a very simple, very basic, public message broadcasting service for Ubuntu. It’s not instant messaging, or social networking. It doesn’t to chat rooms or groups. It isn’t secure, at all.  It does just one thing, it lets you send a short message to everybody else who uses it. It’s a place to say hello to other users of Ubuntu phone (or tablet).  That’s it, that’s all.

As I mentioned at the start, I only realized what I wanted Saturday night, but after spending just a few hours on it, I’ve managed to get a barely functional client and server, which I’m making available now to anybody who wants to help build it.

Server

The server piece is a very small Django app, with a single BroadcastMessage data model, and the Django Rest Framework that allows you to list and post messages via JSON. To keep things simple, it doesn’t do any authentication yet, so it’s certainly not ready for any kind of production use.  I would like it to get Ubuntu One authentication information from the client, but I’m still working out how to do that.  I threw this very basic server up on our internal testing OpenStack cloud already, but it’s running the built-in http server and an sqlite3 database, so if it slows to a crawl or stops working don’t be surprised.  Like I said, it’s not production ready.  But if you want to help me get it there, you can get the code with bzr branch lp:~mhall119/+junk/communitycast-server, then just run syncdb and runserver to start it.

Client

The client is just as simple and unfinished as the server (I’ve only put a few hours into them both combined, remember?), but it’s enough to use. Again there’s no authentication, so anybody with the client code can post to my server, but I want to use the Ubuntu Online Accounts to authenticate a user via their Ubuntu One account. There’s also no automatic updating, you have to press the refresh button in the toolbar to check for new messages. But it works. You can get the code for it with bzr branch lp:~mhall119/+junk/communitycast-client and it will by default connect to my test instance.  If you want to run your own server, you can change the baseUrl property on the MessageListModel to point to your local (or remote) server.

Screenshots

There isn’t much to show, but here’s what it looks like right now.  I hope that there’s enough interest from others to get some better designs for the client and help implementing them and filling out the rest of the features on both the client and server.

communitycast-client-1communitycast-client-2communitycast-client-3

Not bad for a few hours of work.  I have a functional client and server, with the server even deployed to the cloud. Developing for Ubuntu is proving to be extremely fast and easy.

 

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Michael Hall

Screenshot from 2014-03-20 21:57:06Yesterday we made a big step towards developing a native email client for Ubuntu, which uses the Ubuntu UI Toolkit and will converge between between phones, tablets and the desktop from the start.

We’re not starting from scratch though, we’re building on top of the incredible work done in the Trojitá project.  Trojitá provides a fast, light email client built with Qt, which made it ideal for using with Ubuntu. And yesterday, the first of that work was accepted into upstream, you can now build an Ubuntu Components front end to Trojitá.

None of this would have been possible without the help up Trojitá’s upstream developer Jan Kundrát, who patiently helped me learn the codebase, and also the basics of CMake and Git so that I could make this first contribution. It also wouldn’t have been possible without the existing work by Ken VanDine and Joseph Mills, who both worked on the build configuration and some initial QML code that I used. Thanks also to Dan Chapman for working together with me to get this contribution into shape and accepted upstream.

This is just the start, now comes the hard work of actually building the new UI with the Ubuntu UI Toolkit.  Andrea Del Sarto has provided some fantastic UI mockups already which we can use as a start, but there’s still a need for a more detailed visual and UX design.  If you want to be part of that work, I’ve documented how to get the code and how to contribute on the EmailClient wiki.  You can also join the next IRC meeting at 1400 UTC today in #ubuntu-touch-meeting on Freenode.

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mitechie

The Juju UI team has been hard at work making it even easier for you to get started with Juju. We’ve got a new tool for everyone that is appropriately named Juju Quickstart and when you combine it with the power of Juju bundles you’re in for something special.

Quickstart is a Juju plugin that aims to help you get up and running with Juju faster than any set of commands you can copy and paste. First, to use Quickstart you need to install it. If you’re on the upcoming Ubuntu Trusty release it’s already there for you. If you’re on an older version of Ubuntu you need to get the Juju stable ppa

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:juju/stable
sudo apt-get update

Installing Quickstart is then just:

sudo apt-get install juju-quickstart

Once you’ve got Quickstart installed you are ready to use it to deploy Juju environments. Just run it with `juju-quickstart`. Quickstart will then open a window to help walk you through setting up your first cloud environment using Juju.

Quickstart can help you configure and setup clouds using LXC (for local environments), OpenStack (which is used for HP Cloud), Windows Azure, and Amazon EC2. It knows what configuration data is required for each cloud provider and provides hints on where to find the information you’ll need.

Once you’ve configured  your cloud provider, Quickstart will bootstrap a Juju environment on it for you. This takes a while on live clouds as this is bringing up instances.

Quickstart does a couple of things to make the environment nicer than your typical bootstrap. First, it will automatically install the Juju GUI for you. It does this on the first machine brought up in the environment so that it’s co-located, which means it comes up much faster and does not incur the cost of a separate machine.  Once the GUI is up and running, Quickstart will automatically launch your browser and log you into the GUI. This saves you from having to copy and paste your admin secret to log in.

If you would like to setup additional environments you can re-launch Quickstart at any time. Use juju-quickstart -i to get back to the guided setup.

Once the environment is up Quickstart still helps you out by providing a shortcut to get back to the Juju GUI running. It will auto launch your browser, find the right IP address of the GUI, and auto log you in. Come back the next day and Quickstart is still the fastest way to get back into your environment.

Finally, Quickstart works great with the new Juju charm bundles feature. A bundle is a set of services with a specific configuration and their corresponding relations that can be deployed together via a single step. Instead of deploying a single service, they can be used to deploy an entire workload, with working relations and configuration. The use of bundles allows for easy repeatability and for sharing of complex, multi-service deployments. Quickstart can accept a bundle and will deploy that bundle for you. If the environment is not bootstrapped it will bring up the environment, install the GUI, and then deploy the bundle.

For instance, here is the one command needed to deploy a bundle that we’ve created and shared:

juju-quickstart bundle:~jorge/mongodb-cluster/1/mongodb-cluster

If the environment is already bootstrapped and running then Quickstart will just deploy the bundle. The two features together work great for testing repeatable deployments. What’s great is that the power of Juju means you can test this deployment on multiple clouds effortlessly.  For instance you can design and configure your bundle locally via LXC and, when satisfied, deploy it to a real environment, simply by changing the environment command-line option when launching Quickstart.

Try out Quickstart and bundles and let us know what you think. Feel free to hop into our irc channel #juju on Freenode if you’ve got any questions. We’re happy to help.

Make sure to check out Mat’s great YouTube video walk through as well over on the Juju GUI blog.


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David Murphy (schwuk)

Zach Holman writes about how GitHub communicates:

here’s a look at most of the communication that happened at GitHub on one random recent day: February 4, 2014

The expected methods are all there: chat (Campfire in their case), email, and – of course - GitHub itself.

One thing that piqued my interest was their internal-only social network “Team” which seems very reminiscent of how Automattic use WordPress & P2. Since I learned how Automattic use P2, I’ve been wondering if we could do something similar at Canonical. Perhaps we could use Google+  for this as we already use it for internal HangoutsUbuntu Developer Summit, and to power Ubuntu On-Air. There are ways to limit Google+ communities to members of your Google Apps domain.

(Side note: I hate having two Google+ accounts!)

I really need to finish coalescing my thoughts and put them into their own post…

The other point I noted was that their use of email was both minimal and individual – Team and GitHub itself are their primary ways of disseminating information.

It always interesting to see how others do achieve similar goals to yourself.

The post How GitHub communicates appeared first on David Murphy.

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David Murphy (schwuk)

Zach Holman writes about how GitHub communicates:

here’s a look at most of the communication that happened at GitHub on one random recent day: February 4, 2014

The expected methods are all there: chat (Campfire in their case), email, and – of course – GitHub itself.

One thing that piqued my interest was their internal-only social network “Team” which seems very reminiscent of how Automattic use WordPress & P2. Since I learned how Automattic use P2, I’ve been wondering if we could do something similar at Canonical. Perhaps we could use Google+  for this as we already use it for internal Hangouts, Ubuntu Developer Summit, and to power Ubuntu On-Air. There are ways to limit Google+ communities to members of your Google Apps domain.

(Side note: I hate having two Google+ accounts!)

I really need to finish coalescing my thoughts and put them into their own post…

The other point I noted was that their use of email was both minimal and individual – Team and GitHub itself are their primary ways of disseminating information.

It always interesting to see how others do achieve similar goals to yourself.

The post How GitHub communicates appeared first on David Murphy.

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alex

One of the key design goals we had in mind when we set out to create Ubuntu for phones and tablets (henceforth abbreviated here as Ubuntu Devices (vs Ubuntu Desktop)) was how to balance continuing our rich heritage of downstreams, be they community remixes or commercial products, against the idea of preventing platform API and UI fragmentation, which is the Android antipattern.

A while back, my boss Victor wrote a blog entry titled Differentiation without fragmentation which gives a key insight as to why fragmentation occurs:

Fragmentation occurs when the software platform fails to provide a supported mechanism to differentiate.

Victor then goes on to describe our Scopes framework which is a core design concept that spans implementation, functional, and visual layers to enable our downstreams to differentiate.

Part of my job is making what Victor says actually come true, and as we started thinking through the actual mechanics of how our downstreams would start with a default Ubuntu Device image and end up with a customized version of it, we realized that the nuts and bolts of what an OEM engineer or enthusiastic community member would have to learn and understand about our platform to actually make a working device image were too complex.

So we roughed out some ideas and after several months of iterating in private, I’m pleased to announce the preview of the Ubuntu Savvy phone customization suite. It consists of several parts:

The prototype of Tailor, our tool to manipulate the Savvy source tree and deploy to your phone is definitely in early stages. But click on the screenshots below to get a sense for where we are going. We want it to be painless and fun for anyone to make their own version of Ubuntu for devices in an officially supported manner.

tailor-1   tailor-2

If you are interested in learning more about our plans or you have ideas for ways that you’d like to customize your version of Ubuntu or you’re interested in improving code, tests, or docs, please come to our vUDS session.

Carrier/OEM Customizations on 2014-03-13 from 15:00 to 15:55 UTC.

A final note, Ubuntu Savvy builds upon a lot of work, from the fine folks in UE who helped design a flexible, decoupled image architecture, to the SDK team for providing some nice QML code for us to re-purpose, and to my entire team, both present and emeritus (such as mfisch and sfeole). Thanks to all.

We invite the broader Ubuntu community to help tinker with and tailor Ubuntu.

Upward and onward!

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mandel

This is a small tip for those thos want to use QTest and Google Mock. To ensure that the expectations are check at the end of the execution of the test function and that errors are correctly reported you have to check the expectaions manually and pass the results to a QVERIFY macro. The following examples should be good to get you started:

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void
TestBaseDownload::testStartQueued() {
    QScopedPointer<MockDownload> down(
        new MockDownload(_id, _path, _isConfined, _rootPath, _url,
            _metadata, _headers));
    down->start();
    EXPECT_CALL(*down.data(), startDownload())
            .Times(0);
 
    QVERIFY(Mock::VerifyAndClearExpectations(down.data()));
}

The important line to look at in the example is the following:

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QVERIFY(Mock::VerifyAndClearExpectations(down.data()));

There we are passing the result of Mock::VerifyAndClearExpectations, where VerifyAndClearExpectations verifies and removes the expectations on a mocked object and returls a bool if it was successful. This way if the expectations are not met the QTest will fail.

For those interested in the error output it would be somthing of the following stype:

home/mandel/Canonical/udm/upload-interface/ubuntu-download-manager-tests/test_base_download.cpp:135: Failure
Mock function called more times than expected - returning directly.
    Function call: cancelDownload()
         Expected: to be never called
           Actual: called once - over-saturated and active
FAIL!  : TestBaseDownload::testCancelNotQueued() 'Mock::VerifyAndClearExpectations(down.data())' returned FALSE. ()
   Loc: [/home/mandel/Canonical/udm/upload-interface/ubuntu-download-manager-tests/test_base_download.cpp(139)]

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alex

barcelona, 2014

john

This year was my first time attending MWC and it was quite the experience. I’ve been to some conferences before, but the sheer scale of this one was amazing.

And although it was my first time attending in person, it certainly wasn’t the first time I helped the team prep for the show on the technical side. A hectic several weeks of landing fixes and features, to an installation party on Sunday night, and rushing to the booth early Monday morning to do a final pass of updates before doors opened at 9am, the team on the ground with super support from the team on the homefront worked until the literal last minute to produce the best software build we could for a week of intensive demos. It wasn’t perfect, but no demos ever are, and I was extremely proud of the end result.

My job was to be a booth babe and give demos of Ubuntu phones and tablets to interested passers-by, but I lost my voice on Monday (possibly laryngitis) and was thus relegated to back room tech support for the rest of the week.

typical euro lovers' room
note how close the bathroom on the right is to the beds

There was also an unfortunate incident with mussels and food poisoning that I’ll not expand on here, but if you want full details, talk to my hotel roomie Cimi who got the Full 3D/HD experience at 4am. Sorry Cimi!

After the crazy week, Cimi and I spent the weekend decompressing by taking in the sights, before starting our second week in Barça, where the plan was to work remotely whilst eating as much jamón ibérico as humanly possible.

parc guell

The last time I was in town, I saw quite a lot of the major tourist attractions (thanks to turbo-mom who just pushed our family to maximize every moment), but two things we missed were the Miró museum and Montserrat. So that was Saturday and Sunday, respectively, and I’m pleased to report both were worth the wait.

In fact, I hadn’t realized what a fan of Miró I was, and speed-bingeing on the Wikipedia article on the Spanish civil war made the experience all the richer.

giant vending
world’s biggest vending machine

The remainder of the week was fairly nondescript. We enjoyed hanging out in the quiet Sant Andreu neighborhood and doing our interpretation of local life, namely sleeping in until 10am, working a bit, enjoying siesta from 1500 — 1800, eating tapas, maybe working a bit more, and saving everything else for mañana.

All the photos from the trip are in barcelona 2014, and to wrap it up, my first ever attempt at video creation is below.

Ciao!

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Kyle Nitzsche

Noting that this week I delivered three hour long sessions of interest to those interested in writing HTML5 apps for Ubuntu:




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