Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'canonical'

K. Tsakalozos

When was the last time you had one of those “I wish I knew about that <time period> ago” moments? One of mine was when I saw MAAS (Metal as a Service). Back at the University, as a member of the MADgIK lab, I had to administer a couple of racks. These were the days of Xen paravirtualization, Eucaliptus and the GRID. Interesting times, but I now realise that if I had MAAS and Juju back then, I would have finished with that adventure a couple of years sooner!

Was told blogs with figures are more attractive. There you go!

From a high level MAAS will render your physical cluster into an IaaS cloud that provisions physical instead of virtual machines. As you might expect a PXE server will serve the images you ask via a good looking web UI. MAAS will discover what is on your network and make it dead simple to set VLANs and network spaces. Juju can use your MaaS deployment as if it were a cloud. This enables you to deploy OpenStack, Kubernetes and BigData solutions directly onto your hardware. It is a really powerful combination that can save you time (in the range of years in my case).

Lets do it!

Do not waste any more time on this blog, go and try MAAS on QEMU instances on your own machine. This play list will get you started. At the end you will have a (virtual) cluster on QEMU. One of the machines will act as the MAAS controller, the rest will be the cluster nodes.

Your virtual cluster.
MAAS nodes

Next step is to use MAAS from Juju.

Just to show off :)

Conclusion

I am off to the shop to get more RAM. No wonder this is such a short blog.

Resources

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admin

Hello MAASters!

I’m happy to announce that MAAS 2.3.0 Beta 2 has now been released and it is currently available in PPA and as a snap.
PPA Availability
For those running Ubuntu Xenial and would like to use beta 2, please use the following PPA:
ppa:maas/next
Snap Availability
For those running from the snap, or would like to test the snap, please use the Beta channel on the default track:
sudo snap install maas –devmode —beta
 

MAAS 2.3.0 (beta 2)

Issues fixed in this release

https://launchpad.net/maas/+milestone/2.3.0beta2

  • LP: #1711760    [2.3] resolv.conf is not set (during commissioning or testing)

  • LP: #1721108    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Machine details cards – Don’t show “see results” when no tests have been run on a machine

  • LP: #1721111    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Machine details cards – Storage card doesn’t match CPU/Memory one

  • LP: #1721548    [2.3] Failure on controller refresh seem to be causing version to not get updated

  • LP: #1710092    [2.3, HWTv2] Hardware Tests have a short timeout

  • LP: #1721113    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Machine details cards – Storage – If multiple disks, condense the card instead of showing all disks

  • LP: #1721524    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] When upgrading from older MAAS, Storage HW tests are not mapped to the disks

  • LP: #1721587    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Commissioning logs (and those of v2 HW Tests) are not being shown

  • LP: #1719015    $TTL in zone definition is not updated

  • LP: #1721276    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Hardware Test tab – Table alignment for the results doesn’t align with titles

  • LP: #1721525    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Storage card on machine details page missing red bar on top if there are failed tests

  • LP: #1722589    syslog full of “topology hint” logs

  • LP: #1719353    [2.3a3, Machine listing] Improve the information presentation of the exact tasks MAAS is running when running hardware testing

  • LP: #1719361    [2.3 alpha 3, HWTv2] On machine listing page, remove success icons for components that passed the tests

  • LP: #1721105    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Remove green success icon from Machine listing page

  • LP: #1721273    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Storage section on Hardware Test tab does not describe each disk to match the design

Read more
admin

MAAS 2.3.0 (beta1)

New Features & Improvements

Hardware Testing

MAAS 2.3 beta overhauls and improves the visibility of hardware test results and information. This includes various changes across MAAS:

  • Machine Listing page
    • Surface progress and failures of hardware tests, actively showing when a test is pending, running, successful or failed.
  • Machine Details page
    • Summary tab – Provide hardware testing information about the different components (CPU, Memory, Storage)
    • Hardware Tests tab – Completely re-design of the Hardware Test tab. It now shows a list of test results per component. Adds the ability to view more details about the test itself.
    • Storage tab – Ability to view tests results per storage component.

UI Improvements

Machines, Devices, Controllers

MAAS 2.3 beta 1 introduces a new design for the node summary pages:

  • “Summary tab” now only shows information of the machine, in a complete new design.
  • “Settings tab” has been introduced. It now includes the ability to edit such node.
  • “Logs tab” now consolidates the commissioning output and the installation log output.

Other UI improvements

Other UI improvements that have been made for MAAS 2.3 beta 1 includes:

  • Add DHCP status column on the ‘Subnet’s tab.
  • Add architecture filters
  • Update VLAN and Space details page to no longer allow inline editing.
  • Update VLAN page to include the IP ranges tables.
  • Convert the Zones page into AngularJS (away from YUI).
  • Add warnings when changing a Subnet’s mode (Unmanaged or Managed).

Rack Controller Deployment

MAAS beta 1 now adds the ability to deploy any machine with the rack controller, which is only available via the API.

API Improvements

MAAS 2.3 beta 1 introduces API output for volume_groups, raids, cache_sets, and bcaches field to the machines endpoint.

Known issues:

The following are a list of known UI issues affecting hardware testing:

Issues fixed in this release

https://launchpad.net/maas/+milestone/2.3.0beta1

  • #1711320    [2.3, UI] Can’t ‘Save changes’ and ‘Cancel’ on machine/device details page
  • #1696270    [2.3] Toggling Subnet from Managed to Unmanaged doesn’t warn the user that behavior changes
  • #1717287    maas-enlist doesn’t work when provided with serverurl with IPv6 address
  • #1718209    PXE configuration for dhcpv6 is wrong
  • #1718270    [2.3] MAAS improperly determines the version of some installs
  • #1718686    [2.3, master] Machine lists shows green checks on components even when no tests have been run
  • #1507712    cli: maas logout causes KeyError for other profiles
  • #1684085    [2.x, Accessibility] Inconsistent save states for fabric/subnet/vlan/space editing
  • #1718294    [packaging] dpkg-reconfigure for region controller refers to an incorrect network topology assumption

Read more
admin

Hello MAASters!

This past week, the MAAS team met face to face in NYC! The week was concentrated on finalizing the improvements that users will be able to enjoy in MAAS 2.3 and preparing the for the first beta release. While MAAS 2.3.0 beta 1 will be announced separately, we wanted to bring you an update of the work the team has been doing over the past couple weeks.

MAAS 2.3 (current development release)

  • Hardware Testing Phase 2
    • Backend work to support the new UX changes for hardware testing. This includes websockets handlers, directives and triggers.
    • UI – Add ability to upload custom hardware tests scripts.
    • UI – Update the machine listing page to show hardware status. This shows status of hardware testing while pending, running, failed, degraded, timed out, etc.
    • UI – Implement new designs for Hardware Testing:
      • Add cards (new design) on node details pages that include metrics (if tests have been run) and hardware test information.
      • Add a new Hardware Test tab that better surfaces status of hardware tests per component
      • Add a more detailed log view of hardware test results.
      • Surface hardware test results per storage device on each of the block devices (on the machines details page).
      • Add ability to view all test results performed on each of the components overtime.
  • Switch Support
    • Add actions to switch listing page (still under a feature flag)
    • Fetch Wedge 100 switch metadata using the FRUID API endpoint on the BMC.
    • UI – Add websockets and triggers to support the UI changes for switches.
    • UI – Update the UI to display the vendor and model on the switch listing page (behind feature flag)

  • UI improvements
    • Add DHCP status column on the ‘Subnet’s tab.
    • Add architecture filters
    • Implement a new design for node details page:
      • Consolidate all of machine, devices, controllers, switches Summary tab into cards.
      • Add a new Settings tab, combined with the Power tab to allow editing different components of machines, devices, controllers, etc.
      • Consolidate commissioning output and installation logs in a “Log” tab.
    • Update VLAN and Space details page to no longer allow inline editing.
    • Update VLAN page to include the IP ranges tables.
    • Convert the Zones page into AngularJS (away from YUI).
    • Add warnings when changing a Subnet’s mode (Unmanaged or Managed).

  • Rack controller deployment
    • Add ability to deploy any machine as a rack controller via the API.

  • API changes:
    • Add volume_groups, raids, cache_sets, and bcaches field to the Machine API output.

  • Issues fixed:
    • #1711320    [2.3, UI] Can’t ‘Save changes’ and ‘Cancel’ on machine/device details page
    • #1696270    [2.3] Toggling Subnet from Managed to Unmanaged doesn’t warn the user that behavior changes
    • #1717287    maas-enlist doesn’t work when provided with serverurl with IPv6 address
    • #1718209    PXE configuration for dhcpv6 is wrong
    • #1718270    [2.3] MAAS improperly determines the version of some installs
    • #1718686    [2.3, master] Machine lists shows green checks on components even when no tests have been run
    • #1507712    cli: maas logout causes KeyError for other profiles
    • #1684085    [2.x, Accessibility] Inconsistent save states for fabric/subnet/vlan/space editing
    • #1718294    [packaging] dpkg-reconfigure for region controller refers to an incorrect network topology assumption

Libmaas

We have improved the library to allow the managing of block devices and partitions.

  • Add ability to list machine’s block devices.
  • Add ability to update, create and delete block devices.
  • Add ability to list machine’s partitions.
  • Add ability to update, create and delete partitions.
  • Add ability to format/unformat partitions and block devices.
  • Add ability to mount/unmount partitions and block devices.

The release of a new version of libmaas will be announced separately.

CLI

MAAS has been working on a new CLI that’s based (and uses) MAAS’ python client library. The work that has been done includes:

  • Add ability to log in/log out via user and password.
  • Add ability to switch between profiles.
  • Add support for interactive login.
  • Add help command.
  • Ability to list nodes, machines, devices, controllers.
  • Ability to list all components in the networking model (subnets, vlans, spaces, fabrics).
  • Ability to obtain details on machines, devices and controllers.
  • Ability to obtain details on subnets, vlans, spaces, fabrics.
  • Ability to perform actions on machines (with the exception of testing and rescue mode).
  • Add ability to perform actions for multiple nodes
  • Add a ‘maas ssh’ command.
  • When listing, add support for automatic paging.
  • Add ability to view output in different formats (pretty, plain, json, yaml, csv).
  • Show progress indication on actions that are synchronous or blocking.

The release of the new CLI will be announced separately.

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jdstrand

Finding your VMs and containers via DNS resolution so you can ssh into them can be tricky. I was talking with Stéphane Graber today about this and he reminded me of his excellent article: Easily ssh to your containers and VMs on Ubuntu 12.04.

These days, libvirt has the `virsh dominfo` command and LXD has a slightly different way of finding the IP address.

Here is an updated `~/.ssh/config` that I’m now using (thank you Stéphane for the update for LXD):

Host *.lxd
    #User ubuntu
    #StrictHostKeyChecking no
    #UserKnownHostsFile /dev/null
    ProxyCommand nc $(lxc list -c s4 $(echo %h | sed "s/\.lxd//g") %h | grep RUNNING | cut -d' ' -f4) %p
 
Host *.vm
    #StrictHostKeyChecking no
    #UserKnownHostsFile /dev/null
    ProxyCommand nc $(virsh domifaddr $(echo %h | sed "s/\.vm//g") | awk -F'[ /]+' '{if (NR>2 && $5) print $5}') %p

You may want to uncomment `StrictHostKeyChecking` and `UserKnownHostsFile` depending on your environment (see `man ssh_config`) for details.

With the above, I can ssh in with:

$ ssh foo.vm uptime
16:37:26 up 50 min, 0 users, load average: 0.00, 0.00, 0.00
$ ssh bar.lxd uptime
21:37:35 up 12:39, 2 users, load average: 0.55, 0.73, 0.66

Enjoy!


Filed under: canonical, ubuntu, ubuntu-server

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admin

MAAS 2.3.0 (alpha3)

New Features & Improvements

Hardware Testing (backend only)

MAAS has now introduced an improved hardware testing framework. This new framework allows MAAS to test individual components of a single machine, as well as providing better feedback to the user for each of those tests. This feature has introduced:

  • Ability to define a custom testing script with a YAML definition – Each custom test can be defined with YAML that will provide information about the test. This information includes the script name, description, required packages, and other metadata about what information the script will gather. This information can then be displayed in the UI.

  • Ability to pass parameters – Adds the ability to pass specific parameters to the scripts. For example, in upcoming beta releases, users would be able to select which disks they want to test if they don’t want to test all disks.

  • Running test individually – Improves the way how hardware tests are run per component. This allows MAAS to run tests against any individual component (such a single disk).

  • Adding additional performance tests

    • Added a CPU performance test with 7z.

    • Added a storage performance test with fio.

Please note that individual results for each of the components is currently only available over the API. Upcoming beta release will include various UI improvements that will allow the user to better surface and interface with these new features.

Rack Controller Deployment in Whitebox Switches

MAAS has now the ability to install and configure a MAAS rack controller once a machine has been deployed. As of today, this feature is only available when MAAS detects the machine is a whitebox switch. As such, all MAAS certified whitebox switches will be deployed with a MAAS rack controller. Currently certified switches include the Wedge 100 and the Wedge 40.

Please note that this features makes use of the MAAS snap to configure the rack controller on the deployed machine. Since snap store mirrors are not yet available, this will require the machine to have access to the internet to be able to install the MAAS snap.

Improved DNS Reloading

This new release introduces various improvements to the DNS reload mechanism. This allows MAAS to be smarter about when to reload DNS after changes have been automatically detected or made.

UI – Controller Versions & Notifications

MAAS now surfaces the version of each running controller, and notifies the users of any version mismatch between the region and rack controllers. This helps administrators identify mismatches when upgrading their MAAS on a multi-node MAAS cluster, such as a HA setup.

Issues fixed in this release

  • #1702703    Cannot run maas-regiond without /bin/maas-rack
  • #1711414    [2.3, snap] Cannot delete a rack controller running from the snap
  • #1712450    [2.3] 500 error when uploading a new commissioning script
  • #1714273    [2.3, snap] Rack Controller from the snap fails to power manage on IPMI
  • #1715634    ‘tags machines’ takes 30+ seconds to respond with list of 9 nodes
  • #1676992    [2.2] Zesty ISO install fails on region controller due to postgresql not running
  • #1703035    MAAS should warn on version skew between controllers
  • #1708512    [2.3, UI] DNS and Description Labels misaligned on subnet details page
  • #1711700    [2.x] MAAS should avoid updating DNS if nothing changed
  • #1712422    [2.3] MAAS does not report form errors on script upload
  • #1712423    [2.3] 500 error when clicking the ‘Upload’ button with no script selected.
  • #1684094    [2.2.0rc2, UI, Subnets] Make the contextual menu language consistent across MAAS
  • #1688066    [2.2] VNC/SPICE graphical console for debugging purpose on libvirt pod created VMs
  • #1707850    [2.2] MAAS doesn’t report cloud-init failures post-deployment
  • #1711714    [2.3] cloud-init reporting not configured for deployed ubuntu core systems
  • #1681801    [2.2, UI] Device discovery – Tooltip misspelled
  • #1686246    [CLI help] set-storage-layout says Allocated when it should say Ready
  • #1621175    BMC acc setup during auto-enlistment fails on Huawei model RH1288 V3

For full details please visit:

https://launchpad.net/maas/+milestone/2.3.0alpha3

Read more
admin

Hello MAASters! This is the development summary for the past couple of weeks:

MAAS 2.3 (current development release)

  • Hardware Testing Phase 2
    • Added parameters form for script parameters validation.
    • Accept and validate results from nodes.
    • Added hardware testing 7zip CPU benchmarking builtin script.
    • WIP – ability to send parameters to test scripts and process results of individual components. (e.g. will provide the ability for users to select which disk they want to test, and capture results accordingly)
    • WIP – disk benchmark test via Fio.
  • Network beaconing & better network discovery
    • MAAS controllers now send out beacon advertisements every 30 seconds, regardless of whether or not any solicitations were received.
  • Switch Support
    • Backend changes to automatically detect switches (during commissioning) and make use of the new switch model.
    • Introduce base infrastructure for NOS drivers, similar to the power management one.
    • Install the Rack Controller when deploying a supported Switch (Wedge 40, Wedge 100)
    • UI – Add a switch listing tab behind a feature flag.
  • Minor UI improvements
    • The version of MAAS installed on each controller is now reported on the controller details page.
  • python-libmaas
    • Added ability to power on, power off, and query the power state of a machine.
    • Added PowerState enum to make it easy to check the current power state of a machine.
    • Added ability to reference the children and parent interfaces of an interface.
    • Added ability to reference the owner of node.
    • Added base level `Node` object that `Machine`, `Device`, `RackController`, and `RegionController` extend from.
    • Added `as_machine`, `as_device`, `as_rack_controller`, and `as_region_controller` to the Node object. Allowing the ability to convert a `Node` into the type you need to perform an action on.
  • Bug fixes:
    • LP: #1676992 – force Postgresql restart on maas-region-controller installation.
    • LP: #1708512 – Fix DNS & Description misalignment
    • LP: #1711714 – Add cloud-init reporting for deployed Ubuntu Core systems
    • LP: #1684094 – Make context menu language consistent for IP ranges.
    • LP: #1686246 – Fix docstring for set-storage-layout operation
    • LP: #1681801 – Device discovery – Tooltip misspelled
    • LP: #1688066 – Add Spice graphical console to pod created VM’s
    • LP: #1711700 – Improve DNS reloading so its happens only when required.
    • LP: #1712423, #1712450, #1712422 – Properly handle a ScriptForm being sent an empty file.
    • LP: #1621175 – Generate password for BMC’s with non-spec compliant password policy
    • LP: #1711414 – Fix deleting a rack when it is installed via the snap
    • LP: #1702703 – Can’t run region controller without a rack controller installed.

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K.Tsakalozos

Sometimes we miss the forest for the trees.

It’s all about portability

Take a step back and think about how much of your effort goes into your product’s portability. A lot, I’d wager. You don’t wait to see what hardware your customer is on before you start coding your app. Widely accepted architectures give you a large customer base, so you target those. You skip optimisations in order to maximize compatibility. The language you are using ensures you can move to another platform/architecture.

Packaging your application is also important if you want to broaden your audience. The latest trend here is to use containers such as docker. Essentially containers (much like VMs) are another layer of abstraction for the sake of portability. You can package your app such that it will run anywhere.

https://medium.com/media/e87190de95f6f33f07f75beb4c8e7f39/href

Things go wrong

When you first create a PoC, even a USB stick is enough to distribute it! After that you should take things more seriously. I see products “dockerised” so that they run everywhere, yet the deployment story is limited to a single cloud. You do all the work to deliver your app everywhere only to fail when you actually need to deliver it! It doesn’t make sense — or to put it more accurately it only makes sense in the short term.

The overlooked feature

Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK) will deploy exactly the same Kubernetes in all major clouds (AWS, GCE, Azure, VMware, Openstack, Joynet), bare metal, or even your local machine (using lxd). When you first evaluate CDK you may think: “I do not need this”, or even “I hate these extra two lines where I decide the cloud provider because I already know I am going full AWS”. At that point you are tempted to take the easy way out and get pinned to a single Kubernetes provider. However, soon you will find yourself in need of feature F from cloud C or Kubernetes version vX.Y.Z. Worse is when your potential customer is on a different platform and you discover the extent of dependencies you have on your provider.

Before you click off this tab thinking I am exaggerating, think about this: the best devops are done by the devs themselves. How easy is it to train all devs to use AWS for spawning containers? It is trivial, right? Suppose you get two more customers, one on Azure and one on GCE. How easy is it to train your team to perform devops against two additional clouds? You now have to deal with three different monitoring and logging mechanisms. That might still be doable since AWS, GCE, and Azure are all well behaved. What if a customer wants their own on-prem cluster? You are done — kiss your portability and velocity goodbye. Your team will be constantly firefighting, chasing after misaligned versions, and emulating features across platforms.

How is it done

Under the hood of CDK you will find Juju. Juju abstracts the concepts of IaaS. It will provision everything from bare metal machines in your rack, to VMs on any major cloud, to lxd containers on your laptop. On top of these units Juju will deploy Kubernetes thus keeping the deployment agnostic to the underlying provider. Two points here:

  1. Juju has been here for years and is used both internally and externally by Canonical to successfully deliver solutions such as Openstack and Big Data.
  2. Since your Kubernetes is built on IaaS cloud offerings you are able to tailor node properties to match your needs. You may also find it is more cost effective.

Also check out Conjure-up, an easy-to-use wizard that will get your Kubernetes cluster up-and-running in minutes.

To conclude

I am sure you have your reasons to “dockerize” your application and then deliver it on a single cloud. It is just counter-intuitive. If you want to make the most from your portability decisions you should consider CDK.

References:

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Dustin Kirkland

Earlier this month, I spoke at ContainerDays, part of the excellent DevOpsDays series of conferences -- this one in lovely Portland, Oregon.

I gave a live demo of Kubernetes running directly on bare metal.  I was running it on an 11-node Ubuntu Orange Box -- but I used the exact same tools Canonical's world class consulting team uses to deploy Kubernetes onto racks of physical machines.
You see, the ability to run Kubernetes on bare metal, behind your firewall is essential to the yin-yang duality of Cloud Native computing.  Sometimes, what you need is actually a Native Cloud.
Deploying Kubernetes into virtual machines in the cloud is rather easy, straightforward, with dozens of tools now that can handle that.

But there's only one tool today, that can deploy the exact same Kubernetes to AWS, Azure, GCE, as well as VMware, OpenStack, and bare metal machines.  That tools is conjure-up, which acts as a command line front end to several essential Ubuntu tools: MAAS, LXD, and Juju.

I don't know if the presentation was recorded, but I'm happy to share with you my slides for download, and embedded here below.  There are a few screenshots within that help convey the demo.




Cheers,
Dustin

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Dustin Kirkland

Back in March, we asked the HackerNews community, “What do you want to see in Ubuntu 17.10?”: https://ubu.one/AskHN

A passionate discussion ensued, the results of which are distilled into this post: http://ubu.one/thankHN

In fact, you can check that link, http://ubu.one/thankHN and see our progress so far this cycle.  We already have a beta code in 17.10 available for your testing for several of those:

And several others have excellent work in progress, and will be complete by 17.10:

In summary -- your feedback matters!  There are hundreds of engineers and designers working for *you* to continue making Ubuntu amazing!

Along with the switch from Unity to GNOME, we’re also reviewing some of the desktop applications we package and ship in Ubuntu.  We’re looking to crowdsource input on your favorite Linux applications across a broad set of classic desktop functionality.

We invite you to contribute by listing the applications you find most useful in Linux in order of preference. To help us parse your input, please copy and paste the following bullets with your preferred apps in Linux desktop environments.  You’re welcome to suggest multiple apps, please just order them prioritized (e.g. Web Browser: Firefox, Chrome, Chromium).  If some of your functionality has moved entirely to the web, please note that too (e.g. Email Client: Gmail web, Office Suite: Office360 web).  If the software isn’t free/open source, please note that (e.g. Music Player: Spotify client non-free).  If I’ve missed a category, please add it in the same format.  If your favorites aren’t packaged for Ubuntu yet, please let us know, as we’re creating hundreds of new snap packages for Ubuntu desktop applications, and we’re keen to learn what key snaps we’re missing.

  • Web Browser: ???
  • Email Client: ???
  • Terminal: ???
  • IDE: ???
  • File manager: ???
  • Basic Text Editor: ???
  • IRC/Messaging Client: ???
  • PDF Reader: ???
  • Office Suite: ???
  • Calendar: ???
  • Video Player: ???
  • Music Player: ???
  • Photo Viewer: ???
  • Screen recording: ???

In the interest of opening this survey as widely as possible, we’ve cross-posted this thread to HackerNews, Reddit, and Slashdot.  We very much look forward to another friendly, energetic, collaborative discussion.

Or, you can fill out the survey here: https://ubu.one/apps1804

Thank you!
On behalf of @Canonical and @Ubuntu

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Dustin Kirkland


I met up with the excellent hosts of the The Changelog podcast at OSCON in Austin a few weeks back, and joined them for a short segment.

That podcast recording is now live!  Enjoy!


The Changelog 256: Ubuntu Snaps and Bash on Windows Server with Dustin Kirkland
Listen on Changelog.com



Cheers,
Dustin

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Dustin Kirkland

Thank you to Oracle Cloud for inviting me to speak at this month's CloudAustin Meetup hosted by Rackspace.

I very much enjoyed deploying Canonical Kubernetes on Ubuntu in the Oracle Cloud, and then exploring Kubernetes a bit, how it works, the architecture, and a simple workload within.  I'm happy to share my slides below, and you can download a PDF here:


If you're interested in learning more, check out:
It was a great audience, with plenty of good questions, pizza, and networking!

I'm pleased to share my slide deck here.

Cheers,
Dustin

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K.Tsakalozos

Juju Made the Deadline

Ok… I am exaggerating. Juju did not make the deadline, Panagiotis and his co-authors with their hard work made the deadline. Ah, ok you caught me lying again… One of Panagiotis co-authors (me) did not work hard, actually he did not work on the paper at all! Normally, I would publicly apologize, but let me first explain why I am in the author’s list.

Panagiotis is a PhD researcher at the University of Athens. He is also a member of the Madgik lab, which is where I know him from. Panagiotis is interested in Graphs, so he is into Apache Giraph and GraphX for Apache Spark. Knowing how frustrating his work may get, I felt obliged to introduce him to Juju. The goal was to save him some time from deploying and configuring infrastructures and have him focus on real work.

Juju offers an often overlooked feature that proves to be immensely useful to researchers and people who just want to experiment with some software without committing to it. You can deploy an infrastructure on your local machine in less than 10 minutes, take it for a test drive, and then when you are happy, move to a cloud and test at scale. In the case of the Madgik lab, where Panagiotis is, getting cloud resources includes contacting the IT department and wait for them to find time and resources. I think I saw a spark in Panagiotis eyes when I showed him my laptop, or was it the reflection of the Spark infrastructure running in LXC containers, I don’t remember. He immediately showed me a Spark deployment of his own with a bunch of worker nodes that took him a week to set up. After all this time, he was still not sure if that configuration was appropriate for running tests and publishing results. What if he had misconfigured something? What if a minor config change (e.g.: cache size) would skew the results? That is not to say Juju has a magic way to optimally tune the infrastructure for your needs, but we try to choose sensible configuration variables based on the feedback we get from the community.

Panagiotis office looked chaotic, computer towers, screens and keyboards all over the place. Funny how he had prepared a VM for us to work on! Setting up Juju was flawless. Deploying a mapreduce processing bundle and scaling it within the limits of 48GB of RAM and 16 cores was a piece of cake. We even double checked that after a reboot all nodes would come up. All this under the eye of George, the head of the lab’s IT. After an hour or so, we said our goodbyes.

A few weeks later, I received an email titled SocInf 2016 submission and my name in the author’s list. Surprised, I asked, “Why?” The response was that, “without Juju we wouldn’t have made the deadline!”

So… you will find us at the 2nd International Workshop on Social Influence Analysis, co-located with the International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI 2016) in NY on the 9th of July. The paper is titled Pinpointing Influence in Pinterest. Kudos to Panagiotis Liakos, Katia Papakonstantinopoulou, Michael Sioutis, Alex Delis and the Juju Big Data team.

Original article

Originally published at insights.ubuntu.com on June 15, 2016.

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Michael Hall

After a little over 6 years, I am embarking on a new adventure. Today is my last day at Canonical, it’s bitter sweet saying goodbye precisely because it has been such a joy and an honor to be working here with so many amazing, talented and friendly people. But I am leaving by choice, and for an opportunity that makes me as excited as leaving makes me sad.

Goodbye Canonical

maltaI’ve worked at Canonical longer than I’ve worked at any company, and I can honestly say I’ve grown more here both personally and professionally than I have anywhere else. It launched my career as a Community Manager, learning from the very best in the industry how to grow, nurture, and excite a world full of people who share the same ideals. I owe so many thanks (and beers) to Jono Bacon, David Planella, Daniel Holbach, Jorge Castro, Nicholas Skaggs, Alan Pope, Kyle Nitzsche and now also Martin Wimpress. I also couldn’t have done any of this without the passion and contributions of everybody in the Ubuntu community who came together around what we were doing.

As everybody knows by now, Canonical has been undergoing significant changes in order to set it down the road to where it needs to be as a company. And while these changes aren’t the reason for my leaving, it did force me to think about where I wanted to go with my future, and what changes were needed to get me there. Canonical is still doing important work, I’m confident it’s going to continue making a huge impact on the technology and open source worlds and I wish it nothing but success. But ultimately I decided that where I wanted to be was along a different path.

Of course I have to talk about the Ubuntu community here. As big of an impact as Canonical had on my life, it’s only a portion of the impact that the community has had. From the first time I attended a Florida LoCo Team event, I was hooked. I had participated in open source projects before, but that was when I truly understood what the open source community was about. Everybody I met, online or in person, went out of their way to make me feel welcome, valuable, and appreciated. In fact, it was the community that lead me to work for Canonical in the first place, and it was the community work I did that played a big role in me being qualified for the job. I want to give a special shout out to Daniel Holbach and Jorge Castro, who built me up from a random contributor to a project owner, and to Elizabeth Joseph and Laura Faulty who encouraged me to take on leadership roles in the community. I’ve made so many close and lasting friendships by being a part of this amazing group of people, and that’s something I will value forever. I was a community member for years before I joined Canonical, and I’m not going anywhere now. Expect to see me around on IRC, mailing lists and other community projects for a long time to come.

Hello Endless

EndlessNext week I will be joining the team at Endless as their Community Manager. Endless is an order of magnitude smaller than Canonical, and they have a young community that it still getting off the ground. So even though I’ll have the same role I had before, there will be new and exciting challenges involved. But the passion is there, both in the company and the community, to really explode into something big and impactful. In the coming months I will be working to setup the tools, processes and communication that will be needed to help that community grow and flourish. After meeting with many of the current Endless employees, I know that my job will be made easier by their existing commitment to both their own community and their upstream communities.

What really drew me to Endless was the company’s mission. It’s not just about making a great open source project that is shared with the world, they have a specific focus on social good and improving the lives of people who the current technology isn’t supporting. As one employee succinctly put it to me: the whole world, empowered. Those who know me well will understand why this resonates with me. For years I’ve been involved in open source projects aimed at early childhood education and supporting those in poverty or places without the infrastructure that most modern technology requires. And while Ubuntu covers much of this, it wasn’t the primary focus. Being able to work full time on a project that so closely aligned with my personal mission was an opportunity I couldn’t pass up.

Broader horizons

Over the past several months I’ve been expanding the number of communities I’m involved in. This is going to increase significantly in my new role at Endless, where I will be working more frequently with upstream and side-stream projects on areas of mutual benefit and interest. I’ve already started to work more with KDE, and I look forward to becoming active in GNOME and other open source desktops soon.

I will also continue to grow my independent project, Phoenicia, which has a similar mission to Endless but a different technology and audience. Now that this is no longer competing in the XPRIZE competition, it releases some restrictions that we had to operate under and frees us to investigate new areas of innovation and collaboration. If you’re interested in game development, or making an impact on the lives of children around the world, come and see what we’re doing.

If anybody wants to reach out to me to chat, you can still reach me at mhall119@ubuntu.com and soon at mhall119@endlessm.com, tweet me at @mhall119, connect on LinkedIn, chat on Telegram or circle me on Google+. And if we’re ever at a conference together give me a shout, I’d love to grab a drink and catch up.

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admin

I’m happy to announce that MAAS 2.2.0 (final) has now been released, and it introduces quite a few exciting features:

  • MAAS Pods – Ability to dynamically create a machine on demand. This is reflected in MAAS’ support for Intel Rack Scale Design.
  • Hardware Testing
  • DHCP Relay Support
  • Unmanaged Subnets
  • Switch discovery and deployment on Facebook’s Wedge 40 & 100.
  • Various improvements and minor features.
  • MAAS Client Library
  • Intel Rack Scale Design support.

For more information, please read the release notes are available here.

Availability
MAAS 2.2.0 is currently available in the following MAAS team PPA.
ppa:maas/next
Please note that MAAS 2.2 will replace the MAAS 2.1 series, which will go out of support. We are holding MAAS 2.2 in the above PPA for a week, to provide enough notice to users that it will replace 2.1 series. In the following weeks, MAAS 2.2 will be backported into Ubuntu Xenial.

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Michael Hall

Late last year Amazon introduce a new EC2 image customized for Machine Learning (ML) workloads. To make things easier for data scientists and researchers, Amazon worked on including a selection of ML libraries into these images so they wouldn’t have to go through the process of downloading and installing them (and often times building them) themselves.

But while this saved work for the researchers, it was no small task for Amazon’s engineers. To keep offering the latest version of these libraries they had to repeat this work every time there was a new release , which was quite often for some of them. Worst of all they didn’t have a ready-made way to update those libraries on instances that were already running!

By this time they’d heard about Snaps and the work we’ve been doing with them in the cloud, so they asked if it might be a solution to their problems. Normally we wouldn’t Snap libraries like this, we would encourage applications to bundle them into their own Snap package. But these libraries had an unusual use-case: the applications that needed them weren’t mean to be distributed. Instead the application would exist to analyze a specific data set for a specific person. So as odd as it may sound, the application developer was the end user here, and the library was the end product, which made it fit into the Snap use case.

Screenshot from 2017-03-23 16-43-19To get them started I worked on developing a proof of concept based on MXNet, one of their most used ML libraries. The source code for it is part C++, part Python, and Snapcraft makes working with both together a breeze, even with the extra preparation steps needed by MXNet’s build instructions. My snapcraft.yaml could first compile the core library and then build the Python modules that wrap it, pulling in dependencies from the Ubuntu archives and Pypi as needed.

This was all that was needed to provide a consumable Snap package for MXNet. After installing it you would just need to add the snap’s path to your LD_LIBRARY_PATH and PYTHONPATH environment variables so it would be found, but after that everything Just Worked! For an added convenience I provided a python binary in the snap, wrapped in a script that would set these environment variables automatically, so any external code that needed to use MXNet from the snap could simply be called with /snap/bin/mxnet.python rather than /usr/bin/python (or, rather, just mxnet.python because /snap/bin/ is already in PATH).

I’m now working with upstream MXNet to get them building regular releases of this snap package to make it available to Amazon’s users and anyone else. The Amazon team is also seeking similar snap packages from their other ML libraries. If you are a user or contributor to any of these libraries, and you want to make it easier than ever for people to get the latest and greatest versions of them, let’s get together and make it happen! My MXNet example linked to above should give you a good starting point, and we’re always happy to help you with your snapcraft.yaml in #snapcraft on rocket.ubuntu.com.

If you’re just curious to try it out ourself, you can download my snap and then follow along with the MXNet tutorial, using the above mentioned mxnet.python for your interactive python shell.

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Michael Hall

Java is a well established language for developing web applications, in no small part because of it’s industry standard framework for building them: Servlets and JSP.  Another important part of this standard is the Web Archive, or WAR, file format, which defines how to provide a web application’s executables and how they should be run in a way that is independent of the application server that will be running  them.

application-server-market-share-2015WAR files make life easier for developers by separate the web application from the web server. Unfortunately this doesn’t actually make it easier to deploy a webapp, it only shifts some of the burden off of the developers and on to the user, who still needs to setup and configure an application server to host it. One popular option is Apache’s Tomcat webapp server, which is both lightweight and packs enough features to support the needs of most webapps.

And here is where Snaps come in. By combining both the application and the server into a single, installable package you get the best of both, and with a little help from Snapcraft you don’t have to do any extra work.

Snapcraft supports a modular build configuration by having multiple “parts“, each of which provides some aspect of your complete runtime environment in a way that is configurable and reusable. This is extended to a feature called “remote parts” which are pre-defined parts you can easily pull into your snap by name. It’s this combination of reusable and remote parts that are going to make snapping up java web applications incredibly easy.

The remote part we are going to use is the “tomcat” part, which will build the Tomcat application server from upstream source and bundle it in your snap ready to go. All that you, as the web developer, need to provide is your .war file. Below is an simple snapcraft.yaml that will bundle Tomcat’s “sample” war file into a self-contained snap package.

name: tomcat-sample
version: '0.1'
summary: Sample webapp using tomcat part
description: |
 This is a basic webapp snap using the remote Tomcat part

grade: stable
confinement: strict

parts:
  my-part:
    plugin: dump
    source: .
    organize:
      sample.war: ./webapps/sample.war
    after: [tomcat]

apps:
  tomcat:
    command: tomcat-launch
    daemon: simple
    plugs: [network-bind]

The important bits are the ones in bold, let’s go through them one at a time starting with the part named “my-part”. This uses the simple “dump” plugin which is just going to copy everything in it’s source (current directory in this case) into the resulting snap. Here we have just the sample.war file, which we are going to move into a “webapps” directory, because that is where the Tomcat part is going to look for war files.

Now for the magic, by specifying that “my-part” should come after the “tomcat” part (using after: [tomcat]) which isn’t defined elsewhere in the snapcraft.yaml, we will trigger Snapcraft to look for a remote part by that same name, which conveniently exists for us to use. This remote part will do two things, first it will download and build the Tomcat source code, and then it will generate a “tomcat-launch” shell script that we’ll use later. These two parts, “my-part” and “tomcat” will be combined in the final snap, with the Tomcat server automatically knowing about and installing the sample.war webapp.

The “apps” section of the snapcraft.yaml defines the application to be run. In this simple example all we need to execute is the “tomcat-launch” script that was created for us. This sets up the Tomcat environment variables and runtime directories so that it can run fully confined within the snap. And by declaring it to be a simple daemon we are additionally telling it to auto-start as soon as it’s installed (and after any reboot) which will be handled by systemd.

Now when you run “snapcraft” on this config, you will end up with the file tomcat-sample_0.1_amd64.snap which contains your web application, the Tomcat application server, and a headless Java JRE to run it all. That way the only thing your users need to do to run your app is to “snap install tomcat-sample” and everything will be up and running at http://localhost:8080/sample/ right away, no need to worry about installing dependencies or configuring services.

Screenshot from 2017-03-21 14-16-59

If you have a webapp that you currently deploy as a .war file, you can snap it yourself in just a few minutes, use the snapcraft.yaml defined above and replace the sample data with your own. To learn more about Snaps and Snapcraft in general you can follow this tutorial as well as learning how to publish your new snap to the store.

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Dustin Kirkland


Canonical announced the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) release almost 5 years ago, on April 26, 2012. As with all LTS releases, Canonical has provided ongoing security patches and bug fixes for a period of 5 years. The Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Long Term Support) period will end on Friday, April 28, 2017.

Following the end-of-life of Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, Canonical is offering Ubuntu 12.04 ESM (Extended Security Maintenance), which provides important security fixes for the kernel and the most essential user space packages in Ubuntu 12.04.  These updates are delivered in a secure, private archive exclusively available to Ubuntu Advantage customers on a per-node basis.

All Ubuntu 12.04 LTS users are encouraged to upgrade to Ubuntu 14.04 LTS or Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. But for those who cannot upgrade immediately, Ubuntu 12.04 ESM updates will help ensure the on-going security and integrity of Ubuntu 12.04 systems.

Users interested in Ubuntu 12.04 ESM updates can purchase Ubuntu Advantage at http://buy.ubuntu.com/   Credentials for the private archive will be available by the end-of-life date for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (April 28, 2017).

Questions?  Post in the comments below and join us for a live webinar, "HOWTO: Ensure the Ongoing Security Compliance of your Ubuntu 12.04 Systems", on Wednesday, March 22nd at 4pm GMT / 12pm EDT / 9am PDT.  Here, we'll discuss Ubuntu 12.04 ESM and perform a few live upgrades of Ubuntu 12.04 LTS systems.

Cheers,
Dustin

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abeato

In the conclusions to my last post, “Modifying System Call Arguments With ptrace”, I mentioned that one of the main drawbacks of the explained approach for modifying system call arguments was that there is a process switch for each system call performed by the tracee. I also suggested a possible approach to overcome that issue using ptrace jointly with seccomp, with the later making sure the tracer gets only the system calls we are interested in. In this post I develop this idea further and show how this can be achieved.

For this, I have created a little example that can be found in github, along the example used in the previous post. The main idea is to use seccomp with a Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF) that will specify the conditions under which the tracer gets interrupted.

Now we will go through the source code, with emphasis on the parts that differ from the original example. Skipping the include directives and the forward declarations we get to main():

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    pid_t pid;
    int status;

    if (argc < 2) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s <prog> <arg1> ... <argN>\n", argv[0]);
        return 1;
    }

    if ((pid = fork()) == 0) {
        /* If open syscall, trace */
        struct sock_filter filter[] = {
            BPF_STMT(BPF_LD+BPF_W+BPF_ABS, offsetof(struct seccomp_data, nr)),
            BPF_JUMP(BPF_JMP+BPF_JEQ+BPF_K, __NR_open, 0, 1),
            BPF_STMT(BPF_RET+BPF_K, SECCOMP_RET_TRACE),
            BPF_STMT(BPF_RET+BPF_K, SECCOMP_RET_ALLOW),
        };
        struct sock_fprog prog = {
            .filter = filter,
            .len = (unsigned short) (sizeof(filter)/sizeof(filter[0])),
        };
        ptrace(PTRACE_TRACEME, 0, 0, 0);
        /* To avoid the need for CAP_SYS_ADMIN */
        if (prctl(PR_SET_NO_NEW_PRIVS, 1, 0, 0, 0) == -1) {
            perror("prctl(PR_SET_NO_NEW_PRIVS)");
            return 1;
        }
        if (prctl(PR_SET_SECCOMP, SECCOMP_MODE_FILTER, &prog) == -1) {
            perror("when setting seccomp filter");
            return 1;
        }
        kill(getpid(), SIGSTOP);
        return execvp(argv[1], argv + 1);
    } else {
        waitpid(pid, &status, 0);
        ptrace(PTRACE_SETOPTIONS, pid, 0, PTRACE_O_TRACESECCOMP);
        process_signals(pid);
        return 0;
    }
}

The main change here when compared to the original code is the set-up of a BPF in the tracee, right after performing the call to fork(). BPFs have an intimidating syntax at first glance, but once you grasp the basic concepts behind they are actually quite easy to read. BPFs are defined as a sort of virtual machine (VM) which has one data register or accumulator, one index register, and an implicit program counter (PC). Its “assembly” instructions are defined as a structure with format:

struct sock_filter {
    u_short code;
    u_char  jt;
    u_char  jf;
    u_long k;
};

There are codes (opcodes) for loading into the accumulator, jumping, and so on. jt and jf are increments on the program counter that are used in jump instructions, while k is an auxiliary value which usage depends on the code number.

BPFs have an addressable space with data that is in the networking case a packet datagram, and for seccomp the following structure:

struct seccomp_data {
    int   nr;                   /* System call number */
    __u32 arch;                 /* AUDIT_ARCH_* value
                                   (see <linux/audit.h>) */
    __u64 instruction_pointer;  /* CPU instruction pointer */
    __u64 args[6];              /* Up to 6 system call arguments */
};

So basically what BPFs do in seccomp is to operate on this data, and return a value that tells the kernel what to do next: allow the process to perform the call (SECCOMP_RET_ALLOW), kill it (SECCOMP_RET_KILL), or other options as specified in the seccomp man page.

As can be seen, struct seccomp_data contains more than enough information for our purposes: we can filter based on the system call number and on the arguments.

With all this information we can look now at the filter definition. BPFs filters are defined as an array of sock_filter structures, where each entry is a BPF instruction. In our case we have

BPF_STMT(BPF_LD+BPF_W+BPF_ABS, offsetof(struct seccomp_data, nr)),
BPF_JUMP(BPF_JMP+BPF_JEQ+BPF_K, __NR_open, 0, 1),
BPF_STMT(BPF_RET+BPF_K, SECCOMP_RET_TRACE),
BPF_STMT(BPF_RET+BPF_K, SECCOMP_RET_ALLOW),

BPF_STMT and BPF_JUMP are a couple of simple macros that fill the sock_filter structure. They differ in the arguments, which include jumping offsets in BPF_JUMP. The first argument is in both cases the “opcode”, which is built with macros as a mnemonics help: for instance the first one is for loading into the accumulator (BPF_LD) a word (BPF_W) using absolute addressing (BPF_ABS). More about this can be read here, for instance.

Analysing now in more detail the filter, the first instruction is asking the VM to load the call number, nr, to the accumulator. The second one compares that to the number for the open syscall, and asks the VM to not modify the counter if they are equal (PC+0), so the third instruction is run, or jump to PC+1 otherwise, which would be the 4th instruction (when executing this instruction the PC points already to the 3rd instruction). So if this is an open syscall we return SECCOMP_RET_TRACE, which will invoke the tracer, otherwise we return SECCOMP_RET_ALLOW, which will let the tracee run the syscall without further impediment.

Moving forward, the first call to prctl sets PR_SET_NO_NEW_PRIVS, which impedes child processes to have more privileges than those of the parent. This is needed to make the following call to prctl, which sets the seccomp filter using the PR_SET_SECCOMP option, succeed even when not being root. After that, we call execvp() as in the ptrace-only example.

Switching to what the parent does, we see that changes are very few. In main(), we set the PTRACE_O_TRACESECCOMP option, that makes the tracee stop when a filter returns SECCOMP_RET_TRACE and signals the event to the tracer. The other change in this function is that we do not need to set anymore PTRACE_O_TRACESYSGOOD, as we are being interrupted by seccomp, not because of system calls.

Moving now to the next function,

static void process_signals(pid_t child)
{
    const char *file_to_redirect = "ONE.txt";
    const char *file_to_avoid = "TWO.txt";

    while(1) {
        char orig_file[PATH_MAX];

        /* Wait for open syscall start */
        if (wait_for_open(child) != 0) break;

        /* Find out file and re-direct if it is the target */

        read_file(child, orig_file);
        printf("[Opening %s]\n", orig_file);

        if (strcmp(file_to_avoid, orig_file) == 0)
            redirect_file(child, file_to_redirect);
    }
}

we see here that now we invoke wait_for_open() only once. Differently to when we are tracing each syscall, which interrupted the tracer before and after the execution of the syscall, seccomp will interrupt us only before the call is processed. We also add here a trace for demonstration purposes.

After that, we have

static int wait_for_open(pid_t child)
{
    int status;

    while (1) {
        ptrace(PTRACE_CONT, child, 0, 0);
        waitpid(child, &status, 0);
        printf("[waitpid status: 0x%08x]\n", status);
        /* Is it our filter for the open syscall? */
        if (status >> 8 == (SIGTRAP | (PTRACE_EVENT_SECCOMP << 8)) &&
            ptrace(PTRACE_PEEKUSER, child,
                   sizeof(long)*ORIG_RAX, 0) == __NR_open)
            return 0;
        if (WIFEXITED(status))
            return 1;
    }
}

Here we use PTRACE_CONT instead of PTRACE_SYSCALL. We get interrupted every time there is a match in the BPF as we have set the PTRACE_O_TRACESECCOMP option, and we let the tracer run until that happens. The other change here, besides a trace, is how we check if we have received the event we are interested in, as obviously the status word is different. The details can be seen in ptrace’s man page. Note also that we could actually avoid the test for __NR_open as the BPF will interrupt us only for open syscalls.

The rest of the code, which is the part that actually changes the argument to the open syscall is exactly the same. Now, let’s check if this works as advertised:

$ git clone https://github.com/alfonsosanchezbeato/ptrace-redirect.git
$ cd ptrace-redirect/
$ cat ONE.txt 
This is ONE.txt
$ cat TWO.txt 
This is TWO.txt
$ gcc redir_filter.c -o redir_filter
$ ./redir_filter cat TWO.txt 
[waitpid status: 0x0000057f]
[waitpid status: 0x0007057f]
[Opening /etc/ld.so.cache]
[waitpid status: 0x0007057f]
[Opening /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6]
[waitpid status: 0x0007057f]
[Opening /usr/lib/locale/locale-archive]
[waitpid status: 0x0007057f]
[Opening TWO.txt]
This is ONE.txt
[waitpid status: 0x00000000]

It does indeed! Note that traces show that the tracer gets interrupted only by the open syscall (besides an initial trap and when the child exits). If we added the same traces to the ptrace-only program we would see many more calls.

Finally, a word of caution regarding call numbers: in this post and in the previous one we are assuming an x86-64 architecture, so the programs would need to be adapted if we want to use it in different archs. There is also an important catch here: we are implicitly assuming that the child process that gets run by the execvp() call is also x86-64, as we are filtering by using the syscall number for that arch. This implies that this will not work in the case that the child program is compiled for i386. To make this example work properly also in that case, we must check the architecture in the BPF, by looking at “arch” in seccomp_data, and use the appropriate syscall number in each case. We would also need to check the arch before looking at the tracee registers, see an example on how to do this here (alternatively we could make the BPF return this data in the SECCOMP_RET_DATA bits of its return value, which can be retrieved by the tracer via PTRACE_GETEVENTMSG). Needless to say, for arm64/32 we would have similar issues.

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Dustin Kirkland

Mobile World Congress is simply one of the biggest trade shows in the entire world.

It's also, perhaps, the best place in the world to see how encompassing the Ubuntu ecosystem actually is.

Canonical and our partners demonstrated Ubuntu running on dozens of devices -- from robots, to augmented reality headsets, digital signs, vending machines, IoT Gateways, cell tower base stations, phones, tablets, servers, from super computers to tiny, battery powered embedded controllers.

But that was only a tiny fraction of the Ubuntu running at MWC!

We saw Ubuntu at the heart of demos from Dell, AMD, Intel, IBM, Deutsche Telekom, DJI, and hundreds of other booths, running autonomous drones, national telephone networks, self driving cars, smart safety helmets, inflight entertainment systems, and so, so, so much more.

Among the thousands of customers, prospects, fans, competitors, students, and industry executives, we even received a visit from (the somewhat controversial?) King of Spain!

It was an incredible week, with no fewer than 12 hours per day, on our feet, telling the Ubuntu story.
And what a story it is... I hope you enjoy.

Cheers,
Dustin





































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