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Tim Peeters

Return of the Ubuntu UI Toolkit

Next month will be the release of Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet) for desktop, and this version of Ubuntu will soon become the version that will be installed on Ubuntu phones as well. With the release of 15.04, we also release a new version of our UI toolkit: Ubuntu.Components 1.2. Below are some of the new features that it will have.

Hasta la vista, toolbar!

In Ubuntu.Components 1.1, the bottom-edge toolbar was replaced by a new header that can be used for navigating the app and trigger actions. Actions that used to be in the  toolbar were automatically moved to the header, and a useDeprecatedToolbar property was added to the MainView for developers that liked to keep the toolbar. In 1.2, the toolbar and useDeprecatedToolbar property are definitely gone which enabled us to clean up the MainView and header code, so that we can give you a fresh new visual design and more control over the looks and behavior of the header very soon.

One ListItem to rule them all

ListItem leading actions

There are many different list items in Ubuntu.Components.ListItems, but they are not always easy to customize and the performance when you use thousands of them in your app is not optimal. Therefore, we now introduce the all-new ListItem component. It replaces all of the old list items, is super-fast (even when you have ten thousands of them), you can swipe them left and right to reveal actions, they offer selection mode (to quickly select a subset of all the list items), and the user can re-order the items in a list. Awesome :)

 

Ubuntu Shape up (doo doo doo)

Image with transparent background in UbuntuShape

The UbuntuShape is now in the best shape ever! It has been refactored to optimize performance (for example, the rendering is now "batched" so even a lot of them can be rendered fast), semi-transparent images and colored backgrounds are supported, you can use all the fill modes and tiling that the Image component supports, there is 2D transformation support, and the implementation was made extensible so that new features can be added more easily.

Here is the code for the app that was used for the two screenshots above:

import QtQuick 2.4
import Ubuntu.Components 1.2

MainView {
    width: units.gu(40)
    height: units.gu(50)
    //useDeprecatedToolbar: false // terminated

    Page {
        title: "Return of the UITK"

        ListItemActions {
            id: exampleLeadingActions
            actions: [
                Action {
                    iconName: "tick"
                },
                Action {
                    iconName: "delete"
                }
            ]
        }

        ListView {
            anchors.fill: parent
            model: 10
            delegate: ListItem {
                id: listItem
                Label {
                    anchors {
                        left: parent.left
                        leftMargin: units.gu(2)
                        verticalCenter: parent.verticalCenter
                    }
                    text: "List item "+index
                }
                leadingActions: exampleLeadingActions

                UbuntuShape {
                    anchors {
                        right: parent.right
                        top: parent.top
                        bottom: parent.bottom
                        margins: units.gu(0.5)
                    }
                    backgroundMode: listItem.highlighted ?
                                        UbuntuShape.VerticalGradient :
                                        UbuntuShape.SolidColor
                    backgroundColor: listItem.highlighted ?
                                         UbuntuColors.blue :
                                         UbuntuColors.lightGrey
                    secondaryBackgroundColor: UbuntuColors.green
                    source: Image {
                        source: "logo.png"
                    }
                    sourceFillMode: UbuntuShape.PreserveAspectFit
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Besides these new features, we fixed a whole bunch of bugs and we are working hard on the next version of the UI toolkit that we will be blogging about in the near future, so stay tuned for more good stuff!

 

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Zoltán Balogh

So if you are new to QtCreator the first thing that freaks you out will be the concept of Kits. Yes it does look complicated, big and you might want to ask why do I need this.

Right, let’s take few steps back and look at the bigger picture.

Most programmers start their hobby or carrier with basic (not that one) pc programming. You have the compiler and libraries on your machine, you start hacking around with your code and once you think it will pass at least the syntax check you go to the terminal, compile the code and be happy when you see the binary executable. If it runs without segfaults then you start to gain confidence and you are the happiest kid on Earth once the program does what you coded it for.

That is a fairly simple and common scenario, still it has all the components what actually make an SDK. And i guess you know that in the SDK, the K stands for Kit.

Let’s continue with this thinking. You want to show the program to your friends. That is nothing strange, even coders are social beings. If your program is using dynamically linked libraries from the system then your friends need a bit of luck to have the very same system libraries on their machine as you have on yours. Not to mention that you compiled your program for one specific processor architecture and nothing guarantees that your friends have the same architecture as you had.

So, we are safe and good as long our program stays on our computer but trouble with libraries, binary compatibility and processor architecture will pop up when we want to move our program around without recompiling it again. And imagine, we are still talking about PC to PC porting. Let’s raise the bar.

How does it go when you want to write an application for a mobile device? Most likely your computer is an x86 based PC and these days most mobile devices have some sort of ARM processor. So, here we go, our native local compiler what made us so happy just few paragraphs back is now obsolete and we will need a compiler what can produce an ARM binary for the specific device. It could be armv6, armv7 or whatever exotic ARM processor your target device is built with. Good, we now have a compiler but our code is still using a bunch of libraries. In the Ubuntu world and specially with the ultimate convergence on our roadmap this part of the story is a bit easier and will get even better soon. But still if your PC is running the LTS Ubuntu release (14.04 right now) you do not necessarily expect the same libraries and header files being present on your machine as on a target device what is on 15.04 or even newer.

I guess at this point many would say with a disappointed tone that after you learned that your good old compiler is obsolete now all your locally installed development libraries and header files are useless too. Think of Borat saying “nice”.

Okay, so we are left without compiler, libraries and header files. But they should come from somewhere, right?

And that is where the Kits come into the picture. The official definition of the QtCreator Kits sure sounds a bit academic and dry, so let’s skip it. In short, Kits are the set of values that define one environment, such as a device, compiler, Qt version, debugger command, and some metadata.

I love bicycling so I use cycling analogies whenever it is possible. Imagine that you are in the mood to have a ride downhill in the forest. You will take your mountain bike, knee and elbow pad, lots of water, some snacks and your clothes what take dirt better, a massive helmet and your camera. If you just cycle to your office you take your city bike, lighter helmet and you put on regular street wear. Different target, different set of equipment. How cool it would be just to snap your finger and say out loud “ride to the city”  and all the equipment would just appear in front of you.

 

That is exactly what happens when you have Kits set up in your QtCreator and you are building your application for and running them on different targets.

QtCreator is an IDE and developers who choose to work with IDEs do expect a certain level of comfort. For example we do not want to resolder and rewire our environment just because we want to build our project for a different target. We want to flip a switch and expect that the new binaries are made with a different compiler against a different set of libraries and headers. That is what QtCreator’s target selector is for. You simply change from the LTS Desktop Kit to the 15.04 based armhf target and you have a whole different compiler toolchain and API set at your service.

At this point Kits looks pretty and easy. You might ask what is the catch then. Why IDEs and SDKs do not come with such cool and well integrated Kits? Well there is a price for every cool feature.  At this moment each Kit in ready for action state is about 1.7GB. So kits are big and the SDK does not know what Kits you want to use. What means is that if we want to install all kits you might use the SDK would be 8-10GB easily.

Why kits are so big and can they be made smaller?

That is a fair question I got very often. First of all, the kits are fully functional chroots in the case of the Ubuntu SDK. It means that other than the compiler toolchain we have all the bells and whistles one needs when entering a chroot. Just enter the click chroot and issue the dpkg -l command to see that yes, we do have a full blown Ubuntu under the hood. In our SDK model the toolchain and the native developer tools live in the click chroots and these chroots are bootstrapped just as any other chroot. It means that each library, development package and API is installed as if it were installed on a desktop Ubuntu. And that means pulling in a good bunch of dependencies you might not need ever. Yes, we are working on making the Kits smaller and we are considering to support static kits next to the present dynamic bootstrapped kits.

Alright, so far we have covered what Kits are, what they contain. The most important question is do you need to care about all of these? Do you need to to configure and set up these kits yourself. Luckily the answer to these questions is no.

In the Ubuntu SDK these Kits are created on the first start of the SDK and set up automatically when a new emulator is deployed or a new device is plugged in. Of course you can visit the builder chroots under the Ubuntu and Build & Run sections in the dialog what opens with the Tools->Options… menu. But most of the application developers can be productive without knowing anything about these. Of course understanding what they are is good and if you are into development tools and SDKs then it is fun to look behind the curtains a bit.

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David Callé

Announcing the Ubuntu Porting guide 2.0

In the last few weeks, Ubuntu has reached a major milestone with the first flash sales of the BQ Aquarius - Ubuntu Edition. This is only the beginning of seeing Ubuntu on a wider selection of phones and tablets, and thanks to an incredibly enthusiast porting community, more devices have been part of that show. Some of these skilled porters have even set up their own image server to provide updates over-the-air!

To ease the porting process, the Porting Guide has been updated to reflect the current procedure of enabling new devices. From setting up your dev environment, to configuring the kernel and debugging AppArmor, it covers the main points of making a fully working port. Currently focusing on AOSP ports, it will be extended in due time to detail CyanogenMod-specific processes.

If you are interested in porting, please make sure you provide feedback on any issues and roadblocks that could arise, either on Launchpad or on the ubuntu-phone mailing-list.

Thank you and good work, fellow devices adventurers!

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David Planella

This is a guest post from Jordi Allue, Senior SW Architect at Tuso technologies
 
In September 2014, Ubuntu invited Tuso Technologies to be one of the first Ubuntu Phone OS developers with a version of Fiabee’s Cloud-Mobile Collaboration, Synchronisation and Sharing App for the new Ubuntu Phone OS. We jumped at the opportunity because it was in line with Tuso Technologies’ cross-platform compatibility strategy and found it to be an interesting challenge. The process was far simpler and faster than we originally expected, and the results exceeded our expectations.

Fiabee is a carrier-grade, enterprise caliber, cloud-mobile Collaboration, Synchronization and Sharing Software-as-a-Service (SaaS). With Fiabee, Telecom Operators, Internet Service Providers and other Managed Service Providers generate new revenues and reduce churn by taking market share away from large OTT App (Over The Top Application) providers.

Ubuntu Phone Apps are created natively or in HTML5 within a WebApp. Fiabee’s existing HTML5 app, which includes CSS3 and Javascript, was the ideal match for Ubuntu Phone.

We started the process by installing Ubuntu’s Software Development Kit (SDK) and making ourselves familiar with it. The installation was straight forward with a simple "apt-get install ubuntu-sdk" instruction. Although we had no prior experience with Ubuntu’s Integration Development Environment (IDE), based on Qt Creator, the tutorials available on Ubuntu’s website helped us create our first HTML5 trial app. Next we tested the app directly on an Ubuntu Phone, getting familiar with Ubuntu’s Operating System (OS) and IDE was the most challenging of the tasks. That said, it only took us a few days to prepare the infrastructure to develop our own app. For those who don’t have an Ubuntu Phone, Ubuntu’s SDK provides a mobile device emulator.

From there on, it was easy to adapt Fiabee’s web application to Ubuntu’s environment. With the help of the SDK instructions and manuals, we integrated the Web app into the development project, ran it on the device and created the deployment package. After configuration, we adapted the visual appearance and operation to Ubuntu’s standards.

We were amazed to find that the functions of Fiabee’s App which are often difficult to adapt were almost automatic with Ubuntu Phone, such as accessing the phone’s file system, interacting with third party Apps or opening documents downloaded from the cloud. This demonstrates that Ubuntu OS is truly “open”. During the last steps of creating the package and uploading it to the Ubuntu App Directory, we had a minor problem with the definition of the App’s security policies but that was quickly resolved with the help of Ubuntu’s App Directory Tech Support team.

From our perspective, bringing Fiabee to Ubuntu Phones was a piece of cake. It was a quicker and an easier experience than we’ve had with other platforms, despite it being new and notably different from the others with its App interaction menu. We were able to carry over all the functionalities of the Fiabee App without losing any, as was the case with other platforms, and without having to invest re-development time. It was as simple as tweeking Fiabee’s existing web app. With Fiabee’s App for Ubuntu Phones, we continue to deliver a good user experience to Fiabee users with a further extended range of mobile devices with which to access our service.

About Tuso technologies SL. Founded in late 2008, with offices in Barcelona, Spain, and Palo Alto, USA, Tuso Technologies develops carrier-grade, enterprise-caliber, cloud-mobile Value-Added-Services (VAS), including Fiabee, Locategy & Open API, selected by leading Mobile Network Operators, ISV and corporations such as Telefonica (Movistar), France Telecom (Orange) , Ono (Vodafone), R Cable, Panda Security, Applus+ among others.

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XiaoGuo, Liu

为Ubuntu Scope创建online account

有许多的Web services需要登陆个人用户账号才可以访问自己账号里的数据。在文章“如何使用online account来创建微博Scope”中,它详细地介绍了如何在Scope中使用Ubuntu平台所提供的online account来访问微博的个人数据,并展示该数据。该文章中,有一个简单的例程显示从微博个人账号中获取的图片及信息并展示。

 

       

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niemeyer

This post provides the background for a deliberate and important decision in the design of gopkg.in that people often wonder about: while the service does support full versions in tag and branch names (as in “v1.2″ or “v1.2.3″), the URL must contain only the major version (as in “gopkg.in/mgo.v2″) which gets mapped to the best matching version in the repository.

As will be detailed, there are multiple reasons for that behavior. The critical one is ensuring all packages in a build tree that depend on the same API of a given dependency (different majors means different APIs) may use the exact same version of that dependency. Without that, an application might easily get multiple copies unnecessarily and perhaps incorrectly.

Consider this example:

  • Application A depends on packages B and C
  • Package B depends on D 3.0.1
  • Package C depends on D 3.0.2

Under that scenario, when someone executes go get on application A, two independent copies of D would be embedded in the binary. This happens because both B and C have exact control of the version in use. When everybody can pick their own preferred version, it’s easy to end up with multiple of these.

The current gopkg.in implementation solves that problem by requiring that both B and C necessarily depend on the major version which defines the API version they were coded against. So the scenario becomes:

  • Application A depends on packages B and C
  • Package B depends on D 3.*
  • Package C depends on D 3.*

With that approach, when someone runs go get to import the application it would get the newest version of D that is still compatible with both B and C (might be 3.0.3, 3.1, etc), and both would use that one version. While by default this would just pick up the most recent version, the package might also be moved back to 3.0.2 or 3.0.1 without touching the code. So the approach in fact empowers the person assembling the binary to experiment with specific versions, and gives package authors a framework where the default behavior tends to remain sane.

This is the most important reason why gopkg.in works like this, but there are others. For example, to encode the micro version of a dependency on a package, the import paths of dependent code must be patched on every single minor release of the package (internal and external to the package itself), and the code must be repositioned in the local system to please the go tool. This is rather inconvenient in practice.

It’s worth noting that the issues above describe the problem in terms of minor and patch versions, but the problem exists and is intensified when using individual source code revision numbers to refer to import paths, as it would be equivalent in this context to having a minor version on every single commit.

Finally, when you do want exact control over what builds, godep may be used as a complement to gopkg.in. That partnership offers exact reproducibility via godep, and gives people stable APIs they can rely upon over longer periods with gopkg.in. Good match.

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Alan Pope ㋛

Year End Core Apps Hack Days

As we come to the end of 2014, looking forward to new devices running Ubuntu in our immediate future, it’s time for one last set of Hack Days of the year.

Next week, from Monday 8th December till Friday 12th we’re going to be having another set of Core Apps Hack Days. We’ve had a few of these this year which have been a great way to focus attention on specific applications and their dependent components in the platform. They’re also a nice gateway for getting new people into the Core Apps project and Ubuntu development in general.

The Core Apps are community maintained Free Software applications which were created for Ubuntu devices, but also work on the Ubuntu desktop. We welcome new developers, testers, autopilot writers, artists and translators to get involved in these exciting projects.

The schedule

As with previous hack days we’re going to focus on specific apps on each day, which we run from 9:00 UTC until 21:00 UTC. In summary our schedule looks like this:-

Monday 8th – Calculator, Terminal & Clock

Tuesday 9th – File Manager & Calendar

Wednesday 10th – Music & Document Viewer – QA Day Workshop: writing tests for the core apps (18:00UTC)

Thursday 11th – Shorts & Reminders

Friday 12th – Weather & Dekko (email)

A QA treat

Creating core apps involves close coordination between developers and designers to provide the right set of features, high usability and appealing visuals. All these would be nothing without a suite of automated tests that are run to ensure the features are rock-solid and that no regressions are introduced with new development.

All core apps include Autopilot and QML tests that we are constantly expanding to increase test coverage. Writing tests for core apps is a nice way to get started contributing. All you’ll need is some Python knowledge for Autopilot tests or QML for QML tests. Our quality man, Nicholas Skaggs will be running a live video workshop on Wednesday Dec 10th, at 18:00UTC, as an on-ramp to learn how to create tests.

Join the fest

The Hack Days will be happening live at the #ubuntu-app-devel IRC channel on Freenode

The QA Workshop will be happening also live on Ubuntu On Air. You can watch the video and ask your questions on the same IRC channel.

We’ll blog more details about the apps each day next week with links to specific bugs, tasks and goals, so stay tuned!

As always we greatly appreciate all contributions to the Core Apps project during the Hack Days, but welcome community efforts all year round, so if this week doesn’t work for you, feel free to drop by #ubuntu-app-devel on Freenode any time and speak to me, popey.

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Alan Pope

Ubuntu Core Apps
As we come to the end of 2014, looking forward to new devices running Ubuntu in our immediate future, it’s time for one last set of Hack Days of the year.

Next week, from Monday 8th December till Friday 12th we’re going to be having another set of Core Apps Hack Days. We’ve had a few of these this year which have been a great way to focus attention on specific applications and their dependent components in the platform. They’re also a nice gateway for getting new people into the Core Apps project and Ubuntu development in general.

The Core Apps are community maintained Free Software applications which were created for Ubuntu devices, but also work on the Ubuntu desktop. We welcome new developers, testers, autopilot writers, artists and translators to get involved in these exciting projects.

The schedule

As with previous hack days we’re going to focus on specific apps on each day, which we run from 9:00 UTC until 21:00 UTC. In summary our schedule looks like this:-

  • Monday 8th – Calculator, Terminal & Clock
  • Tuesday 9th – File Manager & Calendar
  • Wednesday 10th – Music & Document Viewer – QA Day Workshop: writing tests for the core apps (18:00UTC)
  • Thursday 11th – Shorts & Reminders
  • Friday 12th – Weather & Dekko (email)

A QA treat

Creating core apps involves close coordination between developers and designers to provide the right set of features, high usability and appealing visuals. All these would be nothing without a suite of automated tests that are run to ensure the features are rock-solid and that no regressions are introduced with new development.

All core apps include Autopilot and QML tests that we are constantly expanding to increase test coverage. Writing tests for core apps is a nice way to get started contributing. All you’ll need is some Python knowledge for Autopilot tests or QML for QML tests. Our quality man, Nicholas Skaggs will be running a live video workshop on Wednesday Dec 10th, at 18:00UTC, as an on-ramp to learn how to create tests.

Join the fest

The Hack Days will be happening live at the #ubuntu-app-devel IRC channel on Freenode

The QA Workshop will be happening also live on Ubuntu On Air. You can watch the video and ask your questions on the same IRC channel.

We’ll blog more details about the apps each day next week with links to specific bugs, tasks and goals, so stay tuned!

As always we greatly appreciate all contributions to the Core Apps project during the Hack Days, but welcome community efforts all year round, so if this week doesn’t work for you, feel free to drop by #ubuntu-app-devel on Freenode any time and speak to me, popey.

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David Planella

image-phone-naturallyneat-medium

The 5 weeks after the Ubuntu Scopes Showdown announcement are coming to an end, it’s time to start putting the pencils down and submitting your scopes for the judges to do their reviews.

While you’ve still got two days to fix some bugs and do some final polish, the 3rd of December is the last day for submissions to be accepted for the Showdown. Remember that to qualify, you’ll need to:

  • Register your scope for the contest
  • Submit your scope to the Ubuntu Software Store

Registering your scope

To register your scope for the judges’ review, you’ll simply need a couple of minutes to fill in the registration form. It might be worth filling it in advance, even if you are planning to upload your app at the last minute.

You can submit the form now and still upload new revisions of your app until the 3rd of December.

Register your scope for participation

Submitting your scope

Submitting your scope to the store should also be quick and easy. The upload workflow is exactly the same as for apps, and with automated reviews it takes just a few minutes from upload to your scope being available for everyone on the Ubuntu Software Store.

To ensure your scope is discoverable and looks good, you might want to check out the scope upload tips ›

And when you’re ready to start the upload, you can follow the 5-step process to get it published ›

Need help?

If you need help with any of the above, feel free to reach out in any of the channels below:

Looking forward to seeing your scopes in the store!

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David Callé

Now that your scope is in a working state, it’s time to get it ready for publication. In this tutorial you will learn how to make your scope look good when the user is browsing the store or the list of scopes installed on the phone.

In the next steps, we are going to prepare a few graphics, edit the <scope>.ini file located in the data directory of your project and package the scope for the store.

Read…

scope_prev_all

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David Callé

 
Now that your scope is in a working state, it’s time to get it ready for publication. In this tutorial you will learn how to make your scope look good when the user is browsing the store or the list of scopes installed on the phone.
 
In the next steps, we are going to prepare a few graphics, edit the <scope>.ini file located in the data directory of your project and package the scope for the store.

 

 

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David Planella

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image-phone-naturallyneat-medium

This is a week full of exciting events in the Ubuntu world! Following on the series of Ubuntu Scopes Workshops for the Ubuntu Scopes Showdown, we’re thrilled to announce more Scopes Workshops sessions as part of the Ubuntu Online Summit.

Scopes workshops: learn more and ask your questions

In order to support participants of the Scope Showdown, we’re organizing a series of workshops around different topics on writing scopes. These will be 1 hour hands-on sessions where the presenter will be demonstrating the topic live on video, with real code and using the Ubuntu SDK.

These are also meant to be interactive, so during and after the session the presenter will be answering the questions posted in real time by developers on the chat widget on each session page. Here’s the schedule for the workshops:

Workshop Time Presenter
Online Accounts for Scopes Developers Thursday, 13th Nov at 14:00UTC Alberto Mardegan
Scope Development How-Tos Thursday, 13th Nov at 15:00UTC Thomas Strehl & the Unity API Team

In a nutshell:

  • WHAT: Scopes workshops at the Ubuntu Online Summit
  • WHEN: Thursday, 13th November, starting at 14:00 UTC
  • WHERE: At the Ubuntu Online Summit

Looking forward to seeing you there!

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David Callé

Departments are a way for the user to navigate the data source exposed by a scope. A music scope can use them to allow browsing by genre, a Youtube scope could list channels and playlists, a news scope could use them for listing topics, etc. Departments can also display a full hierarchy of sub-departments.

In this tutorial, you are going to learn how to create and add them to your scope.

Read…

scope_dep8 scope_dep9

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David Planella

More content coming up for app and scope developers targeting Ubuntu on devices: this time around Online Accounts!

Learn the concepts on how to write account providers for online services using the Ubuntu Online Accounts API (UOA), and let the API take care of all the complexity and security for you, so that you can concentrate on your code.

Go to the Online Accounts Developer Guide >

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Daniel Holbach

New developer guide: Online Accounts

More content coming up for app and scope developers targeting Ubuntu on devices: this time around Online Accounts!

Learn the concepts on how to write account providers for online services using the Ubuntu Online Accounts API (UOA), and let the API take care of all the complexity and security for you, so that you can concentrate on your code.

Go to the Online Accounts Developer Guide >

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Rupinder Mann

The Ubuntu scopes contest has kicked off and we’re getting you geared up on how to develop scopes with on air workshops. We’re now bringing you another opportunity to share your views on Ubuntu development by entering the latest Developer Economics Survey.

Our friends at Vision Mobile are aiming the latest survey at mobile and IoT developers. We’d like to invite you to take part in this 10-minute survey and contribute your thoughts on Ubuntu development.

The key findings from the survey will become available as a free research report in February 2015.  Enter the survey now and you’ll also have the chance to win some great prizes, including an iPhone 6, an Oculus Rift DevKit, and a Samsung Gear Smartwatch! Don’t miss out, complete the 10-minute survey now!

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David Planella

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image-phone-naturallyneat-medium

Hot on the heels of the Ubuntu Scopes Showdown start, we’re thrilled to announce the Scopes Workshops sessions to get developers kickstarted and ask all of their questions!

Scopes workshops: learn and ask your questions

In order to support participants of the Scope Showdown, we’re organizing a series of workshops around different topics on writing scopes. These will be 1 hour hands-on sessions where the presenter will be demonstrating the topic live on video, with real code and using the Ubuntu SDK.

These are also meant to be interactive, so during and after the session the presenter will be answering the questions posted in real time by developers on the chat widget on Ubuntu on air. Here’s the schedule for the workshops:

Workshop Time Presenter
Setting up your scopes development environment Thursday, 6th Nov at 16:00UTC David Planella
Introduction to scopes development Thursday, 6th Nov at 17:00UTC David Callé
Adding location support to your scope Thursday, 6th Nov at 18:00UTC Kyle Nitzsche

In a nutshell:

  • WHAT: Scopes workshops
  • WHEN: Thursday, 6th November, starting at 16:00 UTC
  • WHERE: On Ubuntu on air

More on scopes at the Ubuntu Online Summit

Next week another key event in the Ubuntu world is coming: the Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS): 3 days of discussions, workshops and presentations about the upcoming work and plans for the next Ubuntu release.

As part of UOS, we’ll be running another set of workshops, so stay tuned for the schedule to learn more about scopes. Register to attend UOS >

Looking forward to seeing the scopes everyone comes up with!

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David Callé

Ubuntu has a solid location stack, allowing users to select which applications have access to the device location. This also applies to scopes and is very easy to add to your code.

In this short tutorial, you are going to learn how to bring location awareness to your scope.

Read…

scope-blue1scope-blue0

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Michael Hall

With all of the new documentation coming to support the development of Unity Scopes, it’s time for us to have another development shodown! Contestants will have five (5) weeks to develop a project, from scratch, and submit it to the Ubuntu Store. But this time all of the entries must be Scopes.

Be sure to update to the latest SDK packages to ensure that you have the correct template and tools. You should also create a new Click chroot to get the latest build and runtime packages.

Prizes

prizesWe’ve got some great prizes lined up for the winners of this competition.

  • 1st place will win a new Dell XPS 13 Laptop, Developer Edition (preloaded with Ubuntu)
  • Runners up will receive one of:
    • Logitech UE Boom Bluetooth speakers
    • Nexus 7 running Ubuntu
    • An Ubuntu bundle, featuring:
      • Ubuntu messenger bag
      • Ubuntu Touch Infographic T-shirt
      • Ubuntu Neoprene Laptop Sleeve
    • An Ubuntu bundle, featuring:
      • Ubuntu backpack
      • Ubuntu Circle of Friends Dot Design T-shirt
      • Ubuntu Neoprene Laptop Sleeve

Judging

Scope entries will be reviewed by a panel of judges from a variety of backgrounds and specialties, all of whom will evaluate the scope based on the following criteria:

  • General Interest – Scopes that are of more interest to general phone users will be scored higher. We recommend identifying what kind of content phone users want to have fast, easy access to and then finding an online source where you can query for it
  • Creativity – Scopes are a unique way of bringing content and information to a user, and we’ve only scratched the surface of what they can do. Thinking outside the box and providing something new and exciting will lead to a higher score for your Scope
  • Features – There’s more to scopes than basic searching, take advantage of the departments, categories and settings APIs to enhance the functionality of your Scope
  • Design – Scopes offer a variety of ways to customize the way content is displayed, from different layouts to visual styling. Take full advantage of what’s possible to provide a beautiful presentation of your results.
  • Awareness / Promotion – we will award extra points to those of you who blog, tweet, facebook, Google+, reddit, and otherwise share updates and information about your scope as it progresses.

The judges for this contest are:

  • Chris Wayne developer behind a number of current pre-installed Scopes
  • Joey-Elijah Sneddon Author and editor of Omg!Ubuntu!
  • Victor Thompson Ubuntu Core Apps developer
  • Jouni Helminen Designer at Canonical
  • Alan Pope from the Ubuntu Community Team at Canonical

Learn how to write Ubuntu Scopes

To get things started we’ve recently introduced a new Unity Scope project template into the Ubuntu SDK, you can use this to get a working foundation for your code right away. Then you can follow along with our new SoundCloud scope tutorial to learn how to tailor your code to a remote data source and give your scope a unique look and feel that highlights both the content and the source. To help you out along the way, we’ll be scheduling a series of online Workshops that will cover how to use the Ubuntu SDK and the Scope APIs. In the last weeks of the contest we will also be hosting a hackathon on our IRC channel (#ubuntu-app-devel on Freenode) to answer any last questions and help you get your c If you cannot join those, you can still find everything you need to know in our scope developer documentation.

How to participate

If you are not a programmer and want to share some ideas for cool scopes, be sure to add and vote for scopes on our reddit page. The contest is free to enter and open to everyone. The five week period starts on the Thursday 30th October and runs until Wednesday 3rd December 2014! Enter the Ubuntu Scope Showdown >

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David Callé

A scope can provide persistent settings for simple customizations, such as allowing the user to configure an email address or select a distance unit as metric or imperial.

In this tutorial, you well learn how to add settings to your scope and allow users to customize their experience.

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