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Posts tagged with 'arm'

rsalveti

Over the past month I’ve being working with John Rigby to integrate the SMSC95XX and OMAP4 EHCI patches into Linaro U-Boot, so we could deliver the network booting feature for people using Pandaboards.

Those patches are published at the U-Boot mailing list, but still as a working in progress. While we work helping the original developers to get the patches accepted upstream, we also want to deliver the functionality for our users, so all those patches are now integrated at the Linaro U-Boot tree.

You can check the patches by going at http://git.linaro.org/gitweb?p=boot/u-boot-linaro-stable.git;a=shortlog.

Testing with Pandaboard

To make it work properly, besides using Linaro U-Boot you’ll also need to use the upstream X-Loader tree, with one additional patch that’s not yet merged. You can clone the upstream tree from http://gitorious.org/x-loader/x-loader, then just apply the patch http://people.canonical.com/~rsalveti/pxe/0001-omap4-pandaboard-ehci-fref_clkout-per-board-revision.patch and build for the Pandaboard target.

If you just want to test without building your own X-Loader and U-Boot, you can just grab both files from  http://people.canonical.com/~rsalveti:

Building your TFTP + DHCP server for PXE

To build your TFTP + DCHP server just follow the instructions described at https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Desktop/PXE. Don’t worry about the ‘filename “pxelinux.0”;’ line at the dhcpd.conf file, you can remove it.

Then just create your PXE config file at the right place:

$ cat /tftpboot/pxelinux.cfg/0A2A2B0A
default panda-natty
prompt 0
timeout 3

label panda-natty
kernel panda/uImage
append console=ttyO2,115200n8 root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 ro fixrtc vram=48M omapfb.vram=0:24M mem=1G@0x80000000 text earlyprintk=ttyO2
initrd panda/uInitrd

PXE Booting

With the proper X-Loader and U-Boot files in place (at your first SD card partition), and with the TFTP + DHCP server also properly installed, you can just jump and try TFTP/PXE boot.

Stop the U-Boot autoload and call the following commands:

  • setenv pxecfg_ram 0x88000000: location in RAM to load the pxecfg file
  • setenv kernel_ram 0x80000000: location in RAM to load the kernel
  • setenv initrd_ram 0x81600000: location in RAM to load the initrd
  • setenv autoload no: disable autoload while calling bootp (so you can just set up your network without autoboot)
  • usb start: start USB and enables the SMSC95xx ethernet interface
  • bootp: initialize the network, probing the ip address settings from your DHCP server
  • pxecfg get: probe the pxecfg config file
  • pxecfg boot: boot :-)

You should get a similar output as:

Texas Instruments X-Loader 1.5.0 (Jul 11 2011 – 07:52:49)
Reading boot sector
Loading u-boot.bin from mmc

U-Boot 2011.06 (Jul 11 2011 – 02:49:51)

CPU : OMAP4430
Board: OMAP4 Panda
I2C: ready
DRAM: 1 GiB
MMC: OMAP SD/MMC: 0
Using default environment

In: serial
Out: serial
Err: serial
Net: No ethernet found.
Hit any key to stop autoboot: 0
Panda # setenv pxecfg_ram 0x88000000
Panda # setenv kernel_ram 0x80000000
Panda # setenv initrd_ram 0x81600000
Panda # setenv autoload no
Panda # usb start
(Re)start USB…
USB: Register 1313 NbrPorts 3
USB EHCI 1.00
scanning bus for devices… The request port(2) is not configured
EHCI timed out on TD – token=0x80008c80
The request port(2) is not configured
4 USB Device(s) found
scanning bus for storage devices… 0 Storage Device(s) found
scanning bus for ethernet devices… 1 Ethernet Device(s) found
Panda # bootp
Waiting for Ethernet connection… done.
BOOTP broadcast 1
DHCP client bound to address 10.42.43.10
Panda # pxecfg get
missing environment variable: pxeuuid
missing environment variable: ethaddr
Retreiving file: pxelinux.cfg/0A2A2B0A
Waiting for Ethernet connection… done.
Using sms0 device
TFTP from server 10.42.43.1; our IP address is 10.42.43.10
Filename ‘pxelinux.cfg/0A2A2B0A’.
Load address: 0x88000000
Loading: #
done
Bytes transferred = 239 (ef hex)
Config file found
Panda # pxecfg boot
Hit any key to stop autoboot: 0
Label: panda-natty
kernel: panda/uImage
append: console=ttyO2,115200n8 root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 ro fixrtc vram=48M omapfb.vram=0:24M mem=1G@0x80000000 text earlyprintk=ttyO2
initrd: panda/uInitrd
Retreiving file: panda/uInitrd
Waiting for Ethernet connection… done.
Using sms0 device
TFTP from server 10.42.43.1; our IP address is 10.42.43.10
Filename ‘panda/uInitrd’.
Load address: 0x81600000
Loading: #################################################################
#################################################################
#################################################################
#################################################################
############
done
Bytes transferred = 3982715 (3cc57b hex)
Retreiving file: panda/uImage
Waiting for Ethernet connection… done.
Using sms0 device
TFTP from server 10.42.43.1; our IP address is 10.42.43.10
Filename ‘panda/uImage’.
Load address: 0x80000000
Loading: #################################################################
#################################################################
#################################################################
#################################################################
#########################
done
Bytes transferred = 4174480 (3fb290 hex)
## Booting kernel from Legacy Image at 80000000 …
Image Name: Ubuntu Kernel
Image Type: ARM Linux Kernel Image (uncompressed)
Data Size: 4174416 Bytes = 4 MiB
Load Address: 80008000
Entry Point: 80008000
Verifying Checksum … OK
## Loading init Ramdisk from Legacy Image at 81600000 …
Image Name: Ubuntu Initrd
Image Type: ARM Linux RAMDisk Image (uncompressed)
Data Size: 3982651 Bytes = 3.8 MiB
Load Address: 00000000
Entry Point: 00000000
Verifying Checksum … OK
Loading Kernel Image … OK
OK

Starting kernel …

Uncompressing Linux… done, booting the kernel.
[ 0.000000] Initializing cgroup subsys cpuset
[ 0.000000] Initializing cgroup subsys cpu

This should be enough for you to get your Pandaboard booting with PXE. You can also script these commands at your boot.scr file that U-Boot loads automatically from your SD card, so you don’t have to call them by hand every time you reboot your board.

In case it doesn’t work for you, just ping me (rsalveti) at #linaro on freenode :-)


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brendandonegan

As discussed at last months Ubuntu Developer Summit in the session ‘ARM and other architectures certification program‘, there’s a plan to start certifying ARM hardware, or at least start investigating how we’ll do it. To this end I’ve received on loan a TI OMAP4 Pandaboard from Canonical’s ARM QA team. I’ve actually had it here in the office for quite a few weeks now but for some reason or another I haven’t got around to blogging about it yet!

So, without further adieu – here are a couple of shots of my setup:

I like it because it’s really compact and smacks of geekiness, with all the exposed circuits, yet is really quite easy to use in a lot of ways. The monitor is plugged in via the HDMI port on the right hand side (because of an issue with my monitor I can only get 640×480 out of it, so everything is very squeezed on the screen) and the wireless desktop receiver which handles my mouse and keyboard plugs right in to one of the two full sized USB 2.0 ports. The whole thing is powered by my laptop (even when it’s suspended) via USB-AC 5v connector, also on the right-hand side.

It’s running Natty/Unity 2D installed on the 8GB SDHC card on the left of the board. This means that the whole setup cost (if I had have payed for rather than borrowed it) just under $200. The white labeled chip on the top left hand side of the board is the WiFi/Bluetooth chip and that works *perfectly* out of the box – often picking up a better signal than the laptop sitting right next to it. I also have the option of plugging in my USB headset in the the same USB hub as the wireless receiver (it’s a tight squeeze but it just about fits) and that too works perfectly.

Cons are that I don’t have a USB HDD so Ubuntu is running on flash memory (notoriously bad performance) and that if I decide to power down my laptop but forget the Pandaboard has some task running on it then all is lost :( Overall though it’s a really nice piece of equipment and because of all the good work that has been done around it, I could recommend one to anyone with a bit of technical know-how (no ARM experience required!)


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rsalveti

For Maverick Meerkat we’re continuing improving the ARM support for Ubuntu. With Lucid we got the first release optimized for ARMv7 (Thumb2 and SoftFP but not NEON), and for Maverick the plan is to keep the same ARM optimizations as base, but improving board support and user experience.

Currently the main target boards are the ones based on OMAP 3 and OMAP 4, like:
BeagleBoard (C4 preferred)
BeagleBoard xM
PandaBoard (still to be released)

The main decisions to support these boards are basically the upstream support, solid community around them, easy hardware access and CPU power (standard Ubuntu is quite heavy, so we need a good and powerful machine).

At the moment we already got a good support for them, and the Beta release is somehow usable already! There are some development on-going to have a full working 3D interface (unity) for OpenGL ES much the same way we have for normal OpenGL devices. The only bad thing is that currently most of the 3D drivers for ARM (if not all) are closed source, so the development is a little bit harder than the usual.

If you just got your BeagleBoard xM, or want to try Ubuntu on your C4, please give it a try. For Maverick the idea is to give the users a pre-installed image, that you just need to ‘dd’ to your SD card, boot and adjust the environment.

Here are the instructions needed to get Ubuntu up and running at your OMAP device: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ARM/OMAPMaverickInstall

In case you don’t have any of these boards, but want to use Ubuntu with different devices remember you can always try to build a ‘rootfs’ with RootStock. You’ll only need a working and compatible kernel and boot-loader.

And please, in case of you find any bug, want to help testing and getting Ubuntu better on your ARM device, just poke us at #ubuntu-arm (freenode). We’ll for sure be happy to assist you with any problems you may find.

Note for Beagle xM users: in case you find that your Maverick Beta image doesn’t boot with your board, please check bug https://bugs.launchpad.net/bugs/628243. This means that you have a Numonyx memory chip, and unfortunately the fix didn’t make Beta. To work around it just mount the first partition of your SD card (after giving ‘dd’) and replace your MLO with http://people.canonical.com/~rsalveti/maverick/boot/xM/MLO. After this just umount the partition, put it at your board and boot it.


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