Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'apple'

Prakash Advani

After the  iPhone 6 vs Android: Samsung Galaxy S5, HTC M8 and Xiaomi MI3,  I am now comparing the Phablets: iPhone 6 Plus, Samsung Galaxy Note 4 and LG G3, Sony Xperia Z3 and Note 3 Neo. I picked the top Phablets and also the budget Note 3 Neo.

Features iPhone 6 Plus Note 4 LG G3 Sony Xperia Z3 Note 3 Neo
 FingerPrint Sensor  Yes  Yes No No No
Shatter Proof  No No No Yes Yes
Screen Size 5.5″  5.7″ 5.5″ 5.2″ 5.5″
Resolution 1080 x 1920 1440×2560  1440×2560 1080 x 1920 720 x 1280
RAM 2 GB  3 GB  2/3 GB  3 GB 2 GB
 Memory Card Slot No  Yes Yes Yes Yes
Primary Camera 8 MP  16 MP  13 MP 20.7 MP 8 MP
Selfie Camera 1.2 MP  3.7 MP 2.1 MP  2.2 MP 2 MP
CPU Dual-core
1.4 GHz
Octacore
2.7 GHz+
1.3 GHz
 Quad-core
2.5 GHz
 Quad-core
2.5 GHz
 Hexa Core
1.7 GHZ+
1.3 GHz
64 Bit ? 64 Bit 32-Bit 32-Bit 32-Bit 32-Bit
 FM Radio No TBC Yes (in D855) Yes No

Still want an Apple ?









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Prakash

I was watching the iPhone 6 launch last night and was wonder what the fuss is all about? Well it’s from Apple and people may be drooling.

Lets find out how the iPhone 6 compares with the Leading Android phones. I am only comparing the specifications and features and not the actually quality which is very subjective.

Here is Apple iPhone vs Samsung Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 and Xiaomi MI3. Galaxy S5 and One M8 are the premium Android phones while the MI3 is the poor man’s option or the rich mans budget phone which ever way you look at it.

Features iPhone 6 Galaxy S5 One M8 MI3
 FingerPrint Sensor  Yes  Yes No No
 Dust Resistant  No  Yes  No  No
 Water Resistant   No  Yes  No  No
 Screen Size  4.7″  5.1″  5.0″  5.0″
 Resolution  750 x 1334  1080 x 1920  1080 x 1920  1080 x 1920
 Full HD  No  Yes  Yes  Yes
 RAM  1 GB  2 GB  2 GB  2 GB
 Memory Card Slot No  Yes Yes No
Primary Camera 8 MP  16 MP  Dual 4MP  13 MP
Selfie Camera 1.2 MP  2 MP   5MP  2MP
CPU Dual-core
1.4 GHz
Quad-core
2.5 GHz
 Quad-core
2.3/2.5 GHz
 Quad-core
2.3 GHz
 FM Radio No No Yes Yes
4G LTE Yes Yes Yes No

As you can see the Android variants are leading in almost all the specifications which does matter. This includes the inexpensive Xiaomi Rather than innovating, Apple seems to only playing catch-up. Apply skillfully hides the finer specifications. Its your choice to stand in the queue for iPhone 6 or go with an Android at a cheaper price.

 

 







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Dustin Kirkland

It's hard for me to believe that I have sat on a this draft blog post for almost 6 years.  But I'm stuck on a plane this evening, inspired by Elon Musk and Tesla's (cleverly titled) announcement, "All Our Patents Are Belong To You."  Musk writes:

Yesterday, there was a wall of Tesla patents in the lobby of our Palo Alto headquarters. That is no longer the case. They have been removed, in the spirit of the open source movement, for the advancement of electric vehicle technology.
When I get home, I'm going to take down a plaque that has proudly hung in my own home office for nearly 10 years now.  In 2004, I was named an IBM Master Inventor, recognizing sustained contributions to IBM's patent portfolio.

Musk continues:
When I started out with my first company, Zip2, I thought patents were a good thing and worked hard to obtain them. And maybe they were good long ago, but too often these days they serve merely to stifle progress, entrench the positions of giant corporations and enrich those in the legal profession, rather than the actual inventors. After Zip2, when I realized that receiving a patent really just meant that you bought a lottery ticket to a lawsuit, I avoided them whenever possible.
And I feel the exact same way!  When I was an impressionable newly hired engineer at IBM, I thought patents were wonderful expressions of my own creativity.  IBM rewarded me for the work, and recognized them as important contributions to my young career.  Remember, in 2003, IBM was defending the Linux world against evil SCO.  (Confession: I think I read Groklaw every single day.)

Yeah, I filed somewhere around 75 patents in about 4 years, 47 of which have been granted by the USPTO to date.

I'm actually really, really proud of a couple of them.  I was the lead inventor on a couple of early patents defining the invention you might know today as Swype (Android) or Shapewriter (iPhone) on your mobile devices.  In 2003, I called it QWERsive, as the was basically applying "cursive handwriting" to a "qwerty keyboard."  Along with one of my co-inventors, we actually presented a paper at the 27th UNICODE conference in Berlin in 2005, and IBM sold the patent to Lenovo a year later.  (To my knowledge, thankfully that patent has never been enforced, as I used Swype every single day.)

QWERsive

But that enthusiasm evaporated very quickly between 2005 and 2007, as I reviewed thousands of invention disclosures by my IBM colleagues, and hundreds of software patents by IBM competitors in the industry.

I spent most of 2005 working onsite at Red Hat in Westford, MA, and came to appreciate how much more efficiently innovation happened in a totally open source world, free of invention disclosures, black out periods, gag orders, and software patents.  I met open source activists in the free software community, such as Jon maddog Hall, who explained the wake of destruction behind, and the impending doom ahead, in a world full of software patents.

Finally, in 2008, I joined an amazing little free software company called Canonical, which was far too busy releasing Ubuntu every 6 months on time, and building an amazing open source software ecosystem, to fart around with software patents.  To my delight, our founder, Mark Shuttleworth, continues to share the same enlightened view, as he states in this TechCrunch interview (2012):
“People have become confused,” Shuttleworth lamented, “and think that a patent is incentive to create at all.” No one invents just to get a patent, though — people invent in order to solve problems. According to him, patents should incentivize disclosure. Software is not something you can really keep secret, and as such Shuttleworth’s determination is that “society is not benefited by software patents at all.”Software patents, he said, are a bad deal for society. The remedy is to shorten the duration of patents, and reduce the areas people are allowed to patent. “We’re entering a third world war of patents,” Shuttleworth said emphatically. “You can’t do anything without tripping over a patent!” One cannot possibly check all possible patents for your invention, and the patent arms race is not about creation at all.
And while I'm still really proud of some of my ideas today, I'm ever so ashamed that they're patented.

If I could do what Elon Musk did with Tesla's patent portfolio, you have my word, I absolutely would.  However, while my name is listed as the "inventor" on four dozen patents, all of them are "assigned" to IBM (or Lenovo).  That is to say, they're not mine to give, or open up.

What I can do, is speak up, and formally apologize.  I'm sorry I filed software patents.  A lot of them.  I have no intention on ever doing so again.  The system desperately needs a complete overhaul.  Both the technology and business worlds are healthier, better, more innovative environment without software patents.

I do take some consolation that IBM seems to be "one of the good guys", in so much as our modern day IBM has not been as litigious as others, and hasn't, to my knowledge, used any of the patents for which I'm responsible in an offensive manner.

No longer hanging on my wall.  Tucked away in a box in the attic.
But there are certainly those that do.  Patent trolls.

Another former employer of mine, Gazzang was acquired earlier this month (June 3rd) by Cloudera -- a super sharp, up-and-coming big data open source company with very deep pockets and tremendous market potential.  Want to guess what happened 3 days later?  A super shady patent infringement lawsuit is filed, of course!
Protegrity Corp v. Gazzang, Inc.
Complaint for Patent InfringementCivil Action No. 3:14-cv-00825; no judge yet assigned. Filed on June 6, 2014 in the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut;Patents in case 7,305,707: “Method for intrusion detection in a database system” by Mattsson. Prosecuted by Neuner; George W. Cohen; Steven M. Edwards Angell Palmer & Dodge LLP. Includes 22 claims (2 indep.). Was application 11/510,185. Granted 12/4/2007.
Yuck.  And the reality is that happens every single day, and in places where the stakes are much, much higher.  See: Apple v. Google, for instance.

Musk concludes his post:
Technology leadership is not defined by patents, which history has repeatedly shown to be small protection indeed against a determined competitor, but rather by the ability of a company to attract and motivate the world’s most talented engineers. We believe that applying the open source philosophy to our patents will strengthen rather than diminish Tesla’s position in this regard.
What a brave, bold, ballsy, responsible assertion!

I've never been more excited to see someone back up their own rhetoric against software patents, with such a substantial, palpable, tangible assertion.  Kudos, Elon.

Moreover, I've also never been more interested in buying a Tesla.   Coincidence?

Maybe it'll run an open source operating system and apps, too.  Do that, and I'm sold.

:-Dustin

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Prakash

Apple may be considering switching from Intel processors to ARM chips used in iPhones and iPads for its range of Mac personal computers, said a media report. Published in Bloomberg, the report cited three anonymous sources who said Apple believes that the processors used in its mobile devices will be robust enough to power its line of computers. Intel chips have been used in Mac computers since 2005, while ARM’s processors have been used in iPhones and iPads since their respective launches in 2007 and 2010.

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Prakash

I have been quotes in this article.

Apple released a feature of its Mac OS named LaunchPad. LaunchPad is a development, bug tracking platform of Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu. Canonical doesn’t seem to have deep pockets to sue Apple over the usage of name LaunchPad. Canonical’s Prakash Advani told our editor that “We are glad Apple likes our brand name! The purpose of Canonical’s Launchpad.net and Apple’s Launch pad are different, hence non-competing.” No surprises two years from now Apple sues Canonical over LaunchPad.

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Prakash

A while back, my friend Ramnath forwarded me this interesting flow chart, It holds true for iPad and may apply to many of our wants [not needs].

A few people who owned iPads, [althought many would not admit], were finding their iPad had diminishing marignal utility. After a few days of use, they were not find much utility for it.

Are tablets good computing devices or just for browsing and viewing? Are tablets going to replace the netbook? Well lets wait to have more tablet options based on Android platform. In fact Android team says Android is not designed for Tablets and Android 3.0 expected by end of the year, is expected is suppose to be tablet ready.

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Prakash

To all the people rushing to buy an iPad, you should know that Apple makes as much as 52% profit margin on the iPad. The devil is in the details.

BOM (Bill of Material) for iPad.

16GB iPad with WiFI costs US$270 which retails for $499. The margins go up further if you add a 3G Module or high capacity.

Here is the link for a detailed breakup.

Expect other vendors to launch products to compete with iPad with more aggressive pricing.

Marvell has already announced a $99 tablet!

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