Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with '14.10'

Ben Howard

We are pleased to announce that Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, 14.04 LTS, and 14.10 are now in beta on Google Compute Engine [1, 2, 3].

These images support both the traditional user-data as well the Google Compute Engine startup scripts. We have included the Google Cloud SDK, pre-installed as well. Users coming from other Clouds can expect to have the same great experience as on other clouds, while enjoying the features of Google Compute Engine.

From an engineering perspective, a lot of us are excited to see this launch. While we don't expect too many rough edges, it is a beta, so feedback is welcome. Please file bugs or join us in #ubuntu-server on Freenode to report any issues (ping me, utlemming, rcj or Odd_Bloke).

Finally, I wanted to thank those that have helped on this project. Launching a cloud is not an easy engineering task. You have have build infrastructure to support the new cloud, create tooling to build and publish, write QA stacks, and do packaging work. All of this spans multiple teams and disciplines. The support from Google and Canonical's Foundations and Kernel teams have been instrumental in this launch, as well the engineers on the Certified Public Cloud team.

Getting the Google Cloud SDK:

As part of the launch, Canonical and Google have been working together on packaging a version of the Google Cloud SDK. At this time, we are unable to bring it into the main archives. However, you can find it in our partner archive.

To install it run the following:

  • echo "deb http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu $(lsb_release -c -s) partner" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/partner.list
  • sudo apt-get update
  • sudo apt-get -y install google-cloud-sdk


Then follow the instruction for using the Cloud SDK at [4]


[1] https://cloud.google.com/compute/docs/operating-systems#ubuntu
[2] http://googlecloudplatform.blogspot.co.uk/2014/11/curated-ubuntu-images-now-available-on.html
[3] http://insights.ubuntu.com/2014/11/03/certified-ubuntu-images-available-on-google-cloud-platform/
[4] https://cloud.google.com/sdk/gcloud/

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Ben Howard

For years, the Ubuntu Cloud Images have been built on a timer (i.e. cronjob or Jenkins). Every week, you can reasonably expect that stable and LTS releases to be built twice a week while our development build is build once a day.  Each of these builds is given a serial in the form of YYYYMMDD. 

While time-based building has proven to be reliable, different build serials may be functionally the same, just put together at a different point in time. Many of the builds that we do for stable and LTS releases are pointless.

When the whole heartbleed fiasco hit, it put the Cloud Image team into over-drive, since it required manually triggering builds the LTS releases. When we manually trigger builds, it takes roughly 12-16 hours to build, QA, test and release new Cloud Images. Sure, most of this is automated, but the process had to be manually started by a human. This got me thinking: there has to be a better way.

What if we build the Cloud Images when the package set changes?

With that, I changed the Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) build process from time-based to archive trigger-based. Now, instead of building every day at 00:30 UTC, the build starts when the archive has been updated and the packages in the prior cloud image build is older than the archive version. In the last three days, there were eight builds for Utopic. For a development version of Ubuntu, this just means that developers don't have to wait 24 hours for the latest package changes to land in a Cloud Image.

Over the next few weeks, I will be moving the 10.04 LTS, 12.04 LTS and 14.04 LTS build processes from time to archive trigger-based. While this might result less frequent daily builds, the main advantage is that the daily builds will contain the latest package sets. And if you are trying to respond to the latest CVE, or waiting on a bug fix to land, it likely means that you'll have a fresh daily that you can use the following day.

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