For years, the Ubuntu Cloud Images have been built on a timer (i.e. cronjob or Jenkins). Every week, you can reasonably expect that stable and LTS releases to be built twice a week while our development build is build once a day.  Each of these builds is given a serial in the form of YYYYMMDD. 

While time-based building has proven to be reliable, different build serials may be functionally the same, just put together at a different point in time. Many of the builds that we do for stable and LTS releases are pointless.

When the whole heartbleed fiasco hit, it put the Cloud Image team into over-drive, since it required manually triggering builds the LTS releases. When we manually trigger builds, it takes roughly 12-16 hours to build, QA, test and release new Cloud Images. Sure, most of this is automated, but the process had to be manually started by a human. This got me thinking: there has to be a better way.

What if we build the Cloud Images when the package set changes?

With that, I changed the Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) build process from time-based to archive trigger-based. Now, instead of building every day at 00:30 UTC, the build starts when the archive has been updated and the packages in the prior cloud image build is older than the archive version. In the last three days, there were eight builds for Utopic. For a development version of Ubuntu, this just means that developers don't have to wait 24 hours for the latest package changes to land in a Cloud Image.

Over the next few weeks, I will be moving the 10.04 LTS, 12.04 LTS and 14.04 LTS build processes from time to archive trigger-based. While this might result less frequent daily builds, the main advantage is that the daily builds will contain the latest package sets. And if you are trying to respond to the latest CVE, or waiting on a bug fix to land, it likely means that you'll have a fresh daily that you can use the following day.

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