Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with '12.04'

Ben Howard

We are pleased to announce that Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, 14.04 LTS, and 14.10 are now in beta on Google Compute Engine [1, 2, 3].

These images support both the traditional user-data as well the Google Compute Engine startup scripts. We have included the Google Cloud SDK, pre-installed as well. Users coming from other Clouds can expect to have the same great experience as on other clouds, while enjoying the features of Google Compute Engine.

From an engineering perspective, a lot of us are excited to see this launch. While we don't expect too many rough edges, it is a beta, so feedback is welcome. Please file bugs or join us in #ubuntu-server on Freenode to report any issues (ping me, utlemming, rcj or Odd_Bloke).

Finally, I wanted to thank those that have helped on this project. Launching a cloud is not an easy engineering task. You have have build infrastructure to support the new cloud, create tooling to build and publish, write QA stacks, and do packaging work. All of this spans multiple teams and disciplines. The support from Google and Canonical's Foundations and Kernel teams have been instrumental in this launch, as well the engineers on the Certified Public Cloud team.

Getting the Google Cloud SDK:

As part of the launch, Canonical and Google have been working together on packaging a version of the Google Cloud SDK. At this time, we are unable to bring it into the main archives. However, you can find it in our partner archive.

To install it run the following:

  • echo "deb http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu $(lsb_release -c -s) partner" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/partner.list
  • sudo apt-get update
  • sudo apt-get -y install google-cloud-sdk


Then follow the instruction for using the Cloud SDK at [4]


[1] https://cloud.google.com/compute/docs/operating-systems#ubuntu
[2] http://googlecloudplatform.blogspot.co.uk/2014/11/curated-ubuntu-images-now-available-on.html
[3] http://insights.ubuntu.com/2014/11/03/certified-ubuntu-images-available-on-google-cloud-platform/
[4] https://cloud.google.com/sdk/gcloud/

Read more
Ben Howard

Cloud Images and Bash Vulnerabilities

The Ubuntu Cloud Image team has been monitoring the bash vulnerabilities. Due to the scope, impact and high profile nature of these vulnerabilties, we have published new images. New cloud images to address the lastest bash USN-2364-1 [1, 8, 9] are being released with a build serials of 20140927. These images include code to address all prior CVEs, including CVE-2014-6271 [6] and CVE-2014-7169 [7], and supersede images published in the past week which addressed those CVEs.

Please note: Securing Ubuntu Cloud Images requires users to regularly apply updates[5]; using the latest Cloud Images are insufficient. 

Addressing the full scope of the Bash vulnerability has been an iterative process. The security team has worked with the upstream bash community to address multiple aspects of the bash issue. As these fixes have become available, the Cloud Image team has published daily[2]. New released images[3] have been made available at the request of the Ubuntu Security team.

Canonical has been in contact with our public Cloud Partners to make these new builds available as soon as possible.

Cloud image update timeline

Daily image builds are automatically triggered when new package versions become available in the public archives. New releases for Cloud Images are triggered automatically when a new kernel becomes available. The Cloud Image team will manually trigger new released images when either requested by the Ubuntu Security team or when a significant defect requires.

Please note:  Securing Ubuntu cloud images requires that security updates be applied regularly [5], using the latest available cloud image is not sufficient in itself.  Cloud Images are built only after updated packages are made available in the public archives. Since it takes time to build the  images, test/QA and finally promote the images, there is time (sometimes  considerable) between public availablity of the package and updated Cloud Images. Users should consider this timing in their update strategy.

[1] http://www.ubuntu.com/usn/usn-2364-1/
[2] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/daily/server/
[3] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/
[4] https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Repositories/Ubuntu/
[5] https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Security/Upgrades/
[6] http://people.canonical.com/~ubuntu-security/cve/2014/CVE-2014-6271.html
[7] http://people.canonical.com/~ubuntu-security/cve/2014/CVE-2014-7169.html
[8] http://people.canonical.com/~ubuntu-security/cve/2014/CVE-2014-7187.html
[9] http://people.canonical.com/~ubuntu-security/cve/2014/CVE-2014-7186.html

Read more
Ben Howard

Many of our Cloud Image users have inquired about the availability of updated Ubuntu Cloud Images in response to the Heartbleed OpenSSL Vulnerability [1]. Ubuntu released update Ubuntu packages for OpenSSL 08 April 2014 [2]. Due to the exceptional circumstances and severity of the Heartbleed OpenSSL bug, Canonical has released new 12.04.4 LTS, 12.10 and 13.10 Cloud Images at [3].

Canonical is working with Amazon to get the Quickstart and the AWS Marketplace links updated. In the meantime, you can find new AMI ID's at [3] and [4]. Also, the snapshot's for Amazon have the volume-create permission granted on the latest images.

Windows Azure [5], Joyent [6] and HP [7, 8, 9] all have updated Cloud Images in their respective galleries.

If you are running an affected version of OpenSSL on 12.04 LTS, 12.10 or 13.10, you are strongly encouraged to update. For new instances, it is recommended to either use an image with a serial newer than 20140408, or update your OpenSSL  package immediately upon launch. Finally, if you need documentation on enabling unattended upgrades, please see [10].


[1] https://www.openssl.org/news/secadv_20140407.txt
[2] http://www.ubuntu.com/usn/usn-2165-1/
[3] 12.04.4 LTS: http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/precise/release-20140408/
     12.10: http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/quantal/release-20140409/
     13.10: http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/saucy/release-20140409.1/
[4] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/locator/ec2/
[5] Azure: Ubuntu-12_04_4-LTS-amd64-server-20140408-en-us-30GB
                 Ubuntu-12_10-amd64-server-20140409-en-us-30GB
                 Ubuntu-13_10-amd64-server-20140409.1-en-us-30GB
[6] Joyent Images:
        "ubuntu-certified-12.04", fe5aa6c0-0f09-4b1f-9bad-83e453bb74f3
        "ubuntu-certified-13.10", 049dfe64-6c37-4b88-8e89-4b8aa0f129f2
[7] HP US-West-1:
          12.04.4: 27be722e-d2d0-44f0-bebe-471c4af76039
          12.10: 065bb450-e5d0-4348-997d-e4d9e359b8fb
          13.10: 9d7d22d0-7d43-481f-a7eb-d93ea2791409
[8] HP US-East-1:
          12.04.4 8672f4c6-e33d-46f5-b6d8-ebbeba12fa02
          12.10: cbb44038-2602-48d5-b609-e05f4b61be9a
          13.10: 00398423-7429-4064-b781-fa0af00449c8
[9] Waiting on HP for replication to legacy regions az-{1,2,3}
[10] https://help.ubuntu.com/community/AutomaticSecurityUpdates

Read more
David Planella

I’m thrilled to announce the availability of the Ubuntu 12.04 Online Tour for local community teams to localize and use on their websites. The tour has been the result of the stunning work done by Ant Dillon from the Canonical Web Design Team and should provide a web-based first impression of Ubuntu to new users, now in their language.

It’s a great opportunity to showcase Ubuntu to your local community to celebrate release day tomorrow.

Where is it?

How can I use it for my LoCo website?

First of all, you’ll need to get set up with the right tools before you start.

Getting set up:

  • Bazaar revision control system Install bzr
  • Polib library Install polib
  • Terminal. You’ll need to run the commands below on a terminal. Simply press Ctrl+Alt+T to fire up a new terminal console.

If you’ve already translated the tour in Launchpad, you can build a localized version in 3 easy steps:

1. Get the code:

bzr branch lp:ubuntu-online-tour/12.04

2. Build the localized tour:

cd 12.04
cd translate-html/bin
./translate-html -t

3. Deploy the tour:

  • This will vary depending on your setup, so simply make sure you copy the chromeless, css, img, js, pie and videos folders along with the videoplayer.swf file to your site. In addition, you will need the en folder and the folder for your language created in the previous step.

If you haven’t finished the translation for your language in Launchpad, you will need to complete the corresponding PO file before you run step 2. Just ask on the Ubuntu translators mailing list or on Launchpad in case you need help or are not familiar with PO files.

For any issues, suggestions or enhancement, use the Online Tour’s Launchpad project to report bugs or submit improvements.

Enjoy!

The post Get the Ubuntu Online Tour on your LoCo site appeared first on David Planella.

Read more
David Planella


If you follow the Ubuntu channels, and unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ll have noticed that this coming weekend we’re organizing the Ubuntu Global Jam, a worldwide event where Ubuntu local community teams (LoCos) join in a get-together fest to have some fun while improving Ubuntu.

As we’re ramping up to a Long Term Support release, this is a particularly important UGJ and we need all hands on deck to ensure that it does not only meet, but exceeds the high quality standard of previous Ubuntu LTS releases. This is another article in the series of blog posts showcasing the events our community is organizing, brought to you by Rafael Carreras, from the Ubuntu Catalan LoCo team.

Tell us a bit about your LoCo team

Our LoCo is language-oriented, and by language I mean Catalan (a Romanic one), not Perl or Python. In fact, the Catalan LoCo Team was the first language-oriented LoCo to be approved back in 2007. We manage our day-to-day in three mailing lists: technical doubts, team work and translations and do IRC meetings twice a month. We organise Ubuntu Global Jam events every 6 months (with some minor absences) and of course great release parties every 6 months along with some other little ones in between.

What kind of event are you organizing for this Ubuntu Global Jam?

As always, we will translate some new packages, discuss translation items, a bug triage session, some install release work and even evangelization to some passing people, as we organise UGJ this time in a civic centre.

Is this the first UGJ event you’re organizing?

No, it’s not, we are running UGJs since the first one and I think we only missed last one.

How do you think UGJ events help the Ubuntu community and Ubuntu?

It’s a great opportunity for meeting people you only know by email or chat. Also, as we sit down together, there is little room for procrastination. Well, more or less, anyway.

Why do you think Jono Bacon always features pictures of the Catalan team when announcing the UGJ? Are we the most good-looking LoCo?

Yeah, definitely. It must be that.

Join the party by registering your event at the Ubuntu LoCo Portal!

p1010458 by Alex Muntada

The post Ubuntu Global Jam events: jamming Catalan style appeared first on David Planella.

Read more
Ben Howard

We are pleased to announce that Canonical has stood up official mirrors in HP Cloud's AZ-1, 2, and 3 regions.

If you are using Ubuntu Server 12.10 Cloud Images, there is no action to take; 12.10 images are by default configured to use the new mirror address.

For Ubuntu 12.04 instances, the default Ubuntu image does not automatically use the in-HP Cloud mirrors. We are currently working with HP to publish a new image that defaults to the local mirrors. If you would like to switch to the new in-HP mirrors, simply run:
          
    $ sudo sed -i -e \
            's,^archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu,nova.clouds.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu,g'  \
             /etc/apt/sources.list 

    $ sudo apt-get -y update

Note: *.clouds.archive.ubuntu.com is configured using split-horizon DNS. This means that the DNS answer to queries is based on the askering IP address; only queries originating within HP Cloud are answered with the HP Cloud mirror addresses. If your DNS resolver[s] is not based in HP Cloud, then you will be unable to benefit from these new mirrors. 
 

Read more
Ben Howard

Shortly after introducing the Vagrant images, a number of users provided very valuable feedback. The general gist was "sure this is a nice, but useless." For Cloud Images, we definitely take our user feedback to heart. 


The 12.10 and 13.04 images now include Chef, Puppet and Juju clients. Also, the 13.04 images work now that the annoying Virtualbox installation error has been fixed. Users report that Chef and Chef Solo provisioning work with out any problems.

For 12.04, providing Chef support is somewhat more difficult as there are no official Ubuntu provided versions of Chef. Policy restricts us from providing third-party software on any image hosted on ubuntu.com. However, 12.04 does include Puppet and Juju.

The inclusion of Juju was added at the request of Juju charmers. In a future blog post, I'll illustrate how to use Vagrant for Juju charm development. 

Finally, a common query that I get is about this particular error message:

[default] No guest additions were detected on the base box for this VM! Guest
additions are required for forwarded ports, shared folders, host only
networking, and more. If SSH fails on this machine, please install
the guest additions and repackage the box to continue.

This is not an error message; everything may continue to work properly,
in which case you may ignore this message.

I came up a nice long explanation as to the root cause (tl;dr: the Vagrant Cloud Images are _never_ booted and therefore the agent doesn't report to VirtualBox its information). And then the engineer in me started to think that this might be a trivial fix. Anyhow, in the next few days, this ugly error message will disappear for our daily builds (for Raring the message is gone as of today). 

In conclusion, I wanted to say thank you to all the people who have dropped me an email for feature requests, rants and feedback. As always please feel to drop me a line, and I'll take a look at making these better.  




Read more
David Duffey

Today we announced a collaborative support and engineering agreement with Dell.  As part of this agreement Canonical will add Dell 11G & 12G PowerEdge models to the Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS Certification List and Dell will add Ubuntu Server to its Linux OS Support Matrix.

In May 2012, Dell launched the OpenStack Cloud Reference Architecture using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS on select PowerEdge-C series servers. Today’s announcement expands upon that offering by combining the benefits of Ubuntu Server Certification, Ubuntu Advantage enterprise support, and Dell Hardware ProSupport across the PowerEdge line.

Dell customers can now deploy with confidence when purchasing Dell PowerEdge servers with Dell Hardware ProSupport and Ubuntu Advantage.  When these customers call into Dell, their service tag numbers will be entitled with ProSupport and Ubuntu Advantage, which will create a seamless support experience via the collaborative Dell and Canonical support and engineering relationship.

In preparation for this announcement, Canonical engineers worked with Dell to enable and validate Ubuntu Server running on Dell PowerEdge Servers.  This work resulted in improved Ubuntu Server on Dell PowerEdge support for PCIe SSD (solid state drives), 4K-block drives, EFI booting, Web Services Management, consistent network device naming, and PERC (PowerEdge RAID Controllers).

Dell hardware systems management can be done out-of-band via ipmi, iDRAC, and the Lifecycle Controller.  Dell OMSA Ubuntu packages are also available but it is recommended to use the supported out-of-band systems management tools.  Dell TechCenter is a good resource for additional technical information about running Ubuntu Server on Dell PowerEdge servers.

If you are interested in purchasing Ubuntu Advantage for your Dell PowerEdge servers, please contact the Dell Solutions team at Canonical.  If your business is already using or thinking about using a supported Ubuntu Server infrastructure in your data-center then be sure to fill out the annual Ubuntu Server and Cloud Survey to provide additional feedback.

Read more
Ben Howard

Earlier we announced[1] that Canonical had worked this cycle to enable more frequent releases to the Ubuntu Cloud Images stable and long term releases. As of today, we are pleased to announce that Ubuntu Server 10.04 LTS, 11.10, 12.04 LTS and 12.10 are now fully enabled to follow the kernel SRU schedule with automated update releases. This means that within 24 hours of most SRU kernel releases, a new Ubuntu Cloud Image will be published.

Please note: with this change, the release notes have been moved the http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases website. You can find them under <SUITE>/release/unpacked/release-notes.txt. Effective today, all emails announcing these new updates are discontinued. 

However, at this time, 12.04 LTS and 12.10 Cloud Images are not yet being promoted automatically to Windows Azure. We expect that as Windows Azure moves closer to General Availability (i.e. moves out of preview status) that automatic promotion will be enabled.

Please use either Cloud-Images[2], the AMI Finder[3], the RSS feed[4], or "ubuntu-cloudimg-query" from the Cloud-Utils packages to find the latest released images.

[1] http://blog.utlemming.org/2013/01/ubuntu-cloud-images-automated-release.html
     https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-cloud-announce/2013-January/000045.html
     https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-cloud/2013-January/000879.html
     https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!topic/ec2ubuntu/Mg-qpfguE10
[2] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases
[3] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/locator/ec2/
[4] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/rss/

Read more
Ben Howard



Traditionally, updates for the stable release and long term stable release Cloud Images have been on an ad-hoc basis; reasons for releasing new images were generally restricted to security, critical bugs, and stale images. This ad-hoc update cycle meant that updated images were only released every three months or so, and for older releases, as often as six months.

While quality has always been a concern and top priority, during this cycle, Canonical has worked to vastly improve the QA infrastructure to support our Cloud Images. For example, when a new kernel is released, the daily build for that image is now put through the complete QA process. This change in process has allowed us to identify and automatically evaluate whether or not an image is a good candidate for update release.


As such, we are pleased to announce in the next few weeks, we will be turning on automated updates for Ubuntu Server 10.04 LTS, 11.10, 12.04 LTS, and 12.10. This means that approximately every three to four weeks, a new, freshened image will be released. The release cadence will follow the kernel SRU process.

The first updated image to be released under this process was 10.04 LTS[1].

There are a variety of ways to find the released Cloud Images. The two easiest ways are to go the AMI Finder[2] or use http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/<SUITE>/release. For example, http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/lucid/release would bring you to the last AMI's for Ubuntu Server 10.04 LTS.

Due to this change, we will discontinuing the email notifications of updated images to the various email lists for updated images. At UDS-R in Copenhagen[3], we discussed email notifications and the decision was reached to discontinue them. Replacing email notification is the RSS feed[4] and release notes (example from 10.04 LTS)[5].

As Cloud Image suites are migrated to automated releases, we will follow up on this announcement.

Finally, for 12.04 LTS and later, this change will introduce lock-step update releases with Windows Azure. As Windows Azure moves towards GA, we have been working to have the same releases for the Ubuntu Server Cloud Images on both EC2 and Windows Azure.

As always, your feedback is most appreciated. Please feel free to follow on either this post or to email concerns direct to me.

[1] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/lucid/release-20130124/
[2] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/locator/ec2/
[3] http://blueprints.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+spec/servercloud-r-cloudtesting
[4] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/rss/
[5] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/lucid/release-20130124/unpacked/release_notes.txt

Read more
Ben Howard

We are pleased to announce the immediate availability of the latest 12.04.1 (Precise Pangolin) and 12.10 (Quantal Quetzal) Cloud Images on Windows Azure, Microsoft's public cloud. These images are named:
  • 12.04.1: Ubuntu-12_04_1-LTS-amd64-20121218-en-us-30GB
  • 12.10: Ubuntu-12_10-amd64-20121218-1-en-us-30GB
Please note, that due to the way that Windows Azure Gallery works, we will not be able to maintain older images on the gallery. As new images become available, we will be expiring old images. If you need a specific version/serial of a Ubuntu Cloud Image, we strongly suggest that you snapshot and use that version.
Action required: Updates for Existing Images

ACTION REQUIRED: Update existing 12.04.1 or 12.10 images

Over the last year, it has been our pleasure to work with Microsoft to build the Ubuntu Cloud Images for Windows Azure. Microsoft is making updates to Windows Azure to further increase performance and stability of Virtual Machines, currently in preview. These updates require an action - by January 15, 2013 - on custom Linux virtual machine images that fit the definition below:

  • Any gallery Linux images captured into storage accounts from a virtual machine originally created on or before December 21, 2012
  • Any of your personal Linux images uploaded to Windows Azure on or before December 21, 2012.
To learn more about the changes that Microsoft has implemented, please see Microsoft’s announcement.
All Ubuntu users who have instances running on Windows Azure need to make sure that they take action BEFORE January 15, 2013 (else, they might find the Mayan prophecy 30 days late, as far as their instances are concerned).
If, however, you want to update existing images, then we present to you, utlemming’s tl;dr update guide (or you can use Microsoft’s guide, which does the same stuff, just with more explicit commands).

utlemming’s tl;dr update guide

From a Ubuntu perspective the changes required for 12.04 and 12.10 are:
  • CHANGE the current archive mirrors to the on-site Azure mirrors. Canonical has worked to build fast and stable regional mirrors which are co-located in each Azure region. To reduce your bandwidth costs and improve the experience of installing software, all users should update to the new mirrors.
  • CHANGE bootloader configuration to include kernel parameters of “rootdelay=300 console=ttyS0″ and drop the kernel parameter "ata_piix.disable_driver" as it is no longer beneficial and will cause harm after January 15, 2013
  • ADD hv-kvp-daemon-init, which facilitates the start of the hv-kvp-daemon and supporting scripts. The hv-kvp-daemon handles hyper-visor-to-Ubuntu communication channels.
  • ADD linux-backports-hv-{precise,quantal}-virtual (lbm module). The lbm module backports the 3.7 HV stack to support new hypervisor features, as well as increase performance and stability.
  • UPDATE walinuxagent to version 1.2. Microsoft has introduced some bug fixes to the way that provisioning of Linux images work. This updated agent will reduce provisioning failures.

   
Update Ubuntu 12.04 and 12.04.1

For those running 12.04 and 12.04.1, the following steps are needed to fully update Ubuntu to Windows Azure compatibility. Complete all eight steps to update the mirror, the kernel, and the Azure agent.
  1. sudo sed -i “s,archive.ubuntu.com,azure.archive.ubuntu.com,g” /etc/apt/sources.list
    • This step updates the mirrors to point to an Azure hosted mirror.
  2. sudo apt-add-repository ‘http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu precise-backports main’
    • This step adds the repository needed to get the kernel and agent changes.
  3. sudo apt-get update
  4. sudo apt-get install linux-backports-modules-hv-precise-virtual
    • This step adds the update kernel and associated modules.
  5. sudo apt-get install hv-kvp-daemon-init walinuxagent
    • This step adds the updated agent.
  6. Perform the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT steps outlined below to adjust the boot commandline options prior to your next boot.
  7. (recommended) sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
  8. sudo reboot

Update Ubuntu 12.10

For those who have already upgraded their images and area already running 12.10,  the following steps are needed to fully update Ubuntu to Windows Azure compatibility. Complete all eight steps to update the mirror, the kernel, and the Azure agent.
  1. sudo sed -i “s,archive.ubuntu.com,azure.archive.ubuntu.com,g” /etc/apt/sources.list
    • This step updates the mirrors to point to an Azure hosted mirror.
  2. sudo apt-add-repository ‘http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu precise-backports main’
    • This step adds the repository needed to get the kernel and agent changes.
  3. sudo apt-get update
  4. sudo apt-get install linux-backports-modules-hv-precise-virtual
    • This step adds the update kernel and associated modules.
  5. sudo apt-get install hv-kvp-daemon-init walinuxagent
    • This step adds the updated agent.
  6. Perform the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT steps outlined below to adjust the boot commandline options prior to your next boot.
  7. (recommended) sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
  8. sudo reboot

Update the Boot Loader Configuration

Ubuntu instances running on Windows Azure need to be configured for a long root delay (how long Ubuntu will wait for the root device to appear) and to output kernel messages to the serial console.

Edit /etc/default/grub and make sure that the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT has “console=ttyS0 rootdelay=300” in it.  Remove any reference to "ata_piix.disable_driver". For example: 

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="console=ttyS0 rootdelay=300”Ubuntu instances running on Windows Azure should no longer be configured to disable the ata_piix driver as it is now used for simulating a CD-ROM.


An alternative to using an editor on /etc/default/grub is to just run these commands:
  1. sudo sed -i 's/GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="/GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="console=ttyS0 rootdelay=300 /g' /etc/default/grub
  2. sudo sed -i 's/atapiix.disable_driver//g' /etc/default/grub
Then run the following to process these grub linux command line changes:
  1. sudo update-grub
  2. (optional) sudo reboot

Bring-your-own-Ubuntu (BYOU)

Obviously, we would love for you to use the images that Canonical builds. After all, we have a team that has put in countless hours building, perfecting and QA’ing. But, if for some reason you can’t, then can we suggest that you start with our base images? You can find them here:
These VHD files are the exact base-bits that have been uploaded and registered in the Windows Azure environment. Even better, these are based on the 20121218 Amazon AWS EC2 official images with the same package version and set (except there are a few more packages to support Windows Azure).
TIP: If you use the VHD files for BYOU, cloud-init is installed. Cloud-init is the magic sauce in the Ubuntu Cloud Images that gives each instance of Ubuntu running in the cloud a personality; for Windows Azure, Cloud-Init and WALinuxAgent work side-by-side to offer the best Ubuntu experience. We have configured cloud-init for NoDataSource, which means that it will look for user-data in /var/lib/cloud/seed/nocloud-net/user-data. Simply drop your user-data script in there, and at boot time, it will be run. Also, you can edit /etc/cloud/cloud.cfg as well to use different mirrors, add SSH keys, etc. You can read more about cloud-init here: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/CloudInit
For the adventurous that like to spin their own bits, please make sure that you have the following packages installed.
  • hv-kvp-daemon-init: handles hypervisor communication with Ubuntu
  • walinuxagent: Windows Azure Linux provisioning agent and Azure fabric registration agent
  • A kernel based on 3.7 or backports of the HV stack Ubuntu 13.04 kernels support the HV stack normally.
  • Install the linux-tools-common package.
  • 12.04 and 12.10 Ubuntu kernels will need the linux-backports-hv-{precise,quantal}-virtual package installed. This package is a complete backport of the _entire_ HV stack from Ubuntu 13.04.
  • Set /etc/apt/sources.list to use the hosted-in-Azure Ubuntu mirrors (http://azure.archive.ubuntu.com), which will use the speedy mirrors local to your Azure virtual machine. WARNING: these mirrors are dreadfully slow outside Azure.
Follow the Windows Azure recommendations for publication.
NOTE: It is very hard to generate a VHD file that is compatible with Windows Azure using open-source tools without playing a very annoying and disk-space intensive dance. For this reason we strongly recommend using the VHD files above, or using the in-Azure images and taking a snapshot.

Special thanks

The Ubuntu Cloud Image team recognizes that the success on Windows Azure would not be possible if not for the amazing help and special talents of Adam Conrad (infinity), Andy Whitcroft (apw) and the QA and Certification staff, as well as our fine colleagues at Microsoft.

Read more
David Planella

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ll have noticed that this coming weekend we’re organizing the Ubuntu Global Jam, a worldwide event where Ubuntu local community teams (LoCos) join in a get-together fest to have some fun while improving Ubuntu. As we’re ramping up to a Long Term Support release, this is a particularly important UGJ and we need every hand on deck to ensure it not only meets but exceeds the standard of previous Ubuntu LTS releases. This is another article in the series of blog posts showcasing the events our community is organizing, brought to you by Andrej Znidarsic, from the Ubuntu Slovenian LoCo team.

Tell us a bit about your LoCo team

The Slovenian Ubuntu LoCo team was founded in 2005 and we try to spread Ubuntu mainly by translation work and help and support to Slovenian Ubuntu users who don’t have the means (either language or technical knowledger barrier) to solve problems themselves. Slovenian has been among the top translated languages for a while, which is quite impressive considering there are only 2 million native speakers and we don’t have a big pool to get translators from. We operate an IRC channel, website, forum, Facebook, Twitter and Google+ page. Offline we meet at monthly Ubuntu hours and we do Global Jams :)

What kind of event are you organizing for the upcoming Ubuntu Global Jam (UGJ)?

We are mostly going to focus on translations. This has traditionally been our strong point, as we exceeded 90% translation of Ubuntu about 2 years ago. Now we are focusing on translation quality and consistency. This time we want to put extra polish into translation for the LTS. In addition to that, a couple of people will focus on creating videos explaining how to perform basic tasks in Ubuntu (installing Ubuntu, Installing/removing software, Unity “tricks”…) and how to contribute to Ubuntu (how to start translating in Launchpad, how to report a bug, common translation mistakes in Slovenian). We will also be testdriving Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and report bugs we find on the way. More info can be found in our Ubuntu Global Jam announcement (in Slovenian only).

Is this the first UGJ event you’re organizing?

Nope. We have already organized 3 Ubuntu Global Jams. The first one was online only and the last two have been organized offline. We are quite lucky to have Kiberpipa, which has kindly been providing us a great venue with a lot of space and internet access. So we mostly need to do marketing of the event, coordinate transport and grab some pizzas :).

How do you think UGJ events help the Ubuntu community and Ubuntu?

The results of previous UGJs have typically meant about 4000-5000 translated messages for us which is amazing for one day. Good translation coverage helps to grow Ubuntu usage in Slovenia. We have also managed to report a couple of bugs which improved overall quality. More importantly, in average about 15 people attend our global jam, so we meet and hang out with people we usually only see online. This vastly improves team cohesiveness. In addition there are always some newcomers, which is fantastic for community growth. Also, it’s fun :).

The post Upcoming Ubuntu Global Jam events: here’s how the Slovenian team rolls appeared first on David Planella.

Read more
Jane Silber

Ubuntu 12.04 LTS will be released to the world this Thursday and it’s going to be fantastic. We’ve known for quite a while that Ubuntu is not only beautiful, but also usable and robust for individuals and a great platform for app developers. Those traditions continue in 12.04, with the added bonus of long term support (LTS) promise. This release will be our fourth LTS release, a significant milestone by itself, but it will also be the first in which we offer special consideration of hardware refresh cycles on the desktop and fast-moving technology developments in the cloud.

Ubuntu 12.04 LTS  is the ideal platform for organisations looking for more cost-effective alternatives to traditional desktop computing. As enterprise moves to cloud-based apps and lighter, more mobile clients, the argument for moving beyond a Windows-only environment has never been stronger. Ubuntu delivers an intuitive, responsive and above all, productive desktop experience at a fraction of the cost of its competitors.

Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS combines the world’s best open source server and cloud technologies with five years of hardware, security and maintenance updates, and of course the option of enterprise-grade commercial support. This combination of proven technologies, time-saving deployment tools and long-term support makes it a cost-effective platform for any workload from print and web serving to big data applications and the cloud.

With support guaranteed for five years, certification on a wide range of hardware and the option of enterprise-grade commercial services, Ubuntu is a proven, cost-effective enterprise platform that can be relied on for the long term for their desktop, server, and cloud needs.

On Thursday we expect to see the reliability, collaboration, freedom and yes, precision, that Ubuntu embodies delivered again, on time, and in style. I can’t wait.

Read more
Mark Baker

Today, Canonical and HP announced that Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS is to be certified and supported by HP on its Proliant Systems:

http://www.canonical.com/content/ubuntu-1204-lts-server-be-certified-supported-hp-proliant-systems

This is a huge announcement for us at Canonical. It’s also testament that HP sees real business benefits in offering certified and supported Proliant systems with Ubuntu Server. Arguably, however, the most significant aspect of the announcement is the implication that the next generation of computing requires a different model.

Big data and cloud computing are at the forefront of a move towards hyperscale distributed systems. To meet these new challenges, today’s IT departments need a proven developer-led technology that’s free from licensing restrictions.

Ubuntu Server is that technology. That’s why it is now the platform of choice for Openstack clouds and the only commercially-supported Linux distribution to be increasing its share of the online infrastructure market. Even on Amazon Web Services, Ubuntu Server reigns supreme – thanks to its technological and commercial advantages over other platforms.

HP has been working with Canonical for several years now and in that time, it has grown to understand where we sit in the IT ecosystem. The resulting announcement of support for Ubuntu on Proliant (alongside other Linux platforms) is a signal to organisations of all kinds that the IT landscape is changing.

Read more