Elevating the collective consciousness

Let’s talk about revision control for a while. It’s great. Everyone uses it. People love the power and flexibility it provides.

However, if you read about happenings from over ten years ago or so, we find that the situation was quite different. Seasoned developers were against revision control. They would flat out refuse to use it and instead just put everything on a shared network drive or used something crazier, such as the revision control shingle.

Thankfully we as a society have gone forwards. Not using revision control is a firing offense. Most people would flat out refuse to accept a job that does not use revision control regardless of anything short of a few million euros in cash up front. Everyone accepts that revision control is the building block of quality. This is good.

It is unfortunate that this view is severely lacking in other aspects of software development. Let’s take as an example tests. There are actually people, in visible places, that publicly and vocally speak against writing tests. And for some reason we as a whole sort of accept that rather and not immediately flag that out as ridiculous nonsense.

A first example was told to me by a friend working on a quite complex piece of mathematical code. When he discovered that there were no tests at all measuring that it worked he was replied this: “If you are smart enough to be hired to work on this code, you are smart enough not to need tests.” I really wish this were an isolated incident, but in my heart I know that is not the case.

The second example is a posting made a while back by a well known open source developer. It had a blanket statement saying that test driven development is bad and harmful. The main point seemed to be a false dichotomy between good software with no tests and poor software with tests.

Even if testing is done, the implementation may be just a massive bucketful of fail. As an example, here you can read how people thought audio codecs should be tested.

As long as this kind of thinking is tolerated, no matter how esteemed a person says it, we are in the same place as medicine was during the age of bloodletting and leeches. This is why software is considered to be unreliable, buggy piece of garbage that costs hundreds of millions. And the only way out of it is a change of collective attitude. Unfortunately those often take quite a long time to happen, but a man can dream, can he not?