The true source of quality

Software quality has received a lot of attention recently. There have been tons of books, blog posts, conferences and the like on improving quality. Tools and practices such as TDD, automatic builds, agile methods, pair programming and static code analysers are praised for improving code quality.

And, indeed, that is what they have done.

But one should never mix the tool with the person using it. All these wonderful tools are just that: tools. They are not the source of quality, only facilitators of it. The true essence of quality does not flow from them. It comes from somewhere else entirely. When distilled down to its core, there is only one source of true quality.

Caring.

The only way to get consistently high quality code is that the people who generate it care about it. This means that they have a personal interest in their code tree. They want it to succeed and flourish. In the best case they are even proud of it. This is the foundation all quality tools lie on.

If caring does not exist, even the best of tools can not help. This is due to the fact that human beings are very, very good at avoiding work they don’t want to do. As an example, let’s look at code review. A caring person will review code to the best of their abilities because he wants the end result be the best it can be. A non-caring one will shrug, think “yeah, sure, fine, whatever” and push the accept button, because it’s less work for him and he knows that his merge requests will go in easier if there is a general (though unspoken) consensus of doing things half-assed.

Unfortunately caring is not something you can buy, it is something you must birth. Free food and other services provided by companies such as Valve and Google can be seen as one way of achieving quality. If a company sincerely cares about its employees, they will in return care about the quality of their work.

All that said, here is my proposal for a coder’s mascot: