Canonical Voices

Joseph Salisbury

Meeting Minutes

IRC Log of the meeting.

Meeting minutes.

Agenda

20140916 Meeting Agenda


Release Metrics and Incoming Bugs

Release metrics and incoming bug data can be reviewed at the following link:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kt-meeting.txt


Status: Utopic Development Kernel

The Utopic kernel remains based on a v3.16.2 upstream stable kernel and
is uploaded to the archive, ie. linux-3.16.0-15.21. Please test and let
us know your results.
I’d also like to point out that our Utopic kernel freeze date is about 3
weeks away on Thurs Oct 9. Please don’t wait until the last minute to
submit patches needing to ship in the Utopic 14.10 release.
—–
Important upcoming dates:
Mon Sep 22 – Utopic Final Beta Freeze (~1 weeks away)
Thurs Sep 25 – Utopic Final Beta (~1 weeks away)
Thurs Oct 9 – Utopic Kernel Freeze (~3 weeks away)
Thurs Oct 16 – Utopic Final Freeze (~4 weeks away)
Thurs Oct 23 – Utopic 14.10 Release (~5 weeks away)


Status: CVE’s

The current CVE status can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/cve/pkg/ALL-linux.html


Status: Stable, Security, and Bugfix Kernel Updates – Trusty/Precise/Lucid

Status for the main kernels, until today (Sept. 16):

  • Lucid – verification & testing
  • Precise – verification & testing
  • Trusty – verification & testing

    Current opened tracking bugs details:

  • http://kernel.ubuntu.com/sru/kernel-sru-workflow.html

    For SRUs, SRU report is a good source of information:

  • http://kernel.ubuntu.com/sru/sru-report.html

    Schedule:

    cycle: 29-Aug through 20-Sep
    ====================================================================
    29-Aug Last day for kernel commits for this cycle
    31-Aug – 06-Sep Kernel prep week.
    07-Sep – 13-Sep Bug verification & Regression testing.
    14-Sep – 20-Sep Regression testing & Release to -updates.


Open Discussion or Questions? Raise your hand to be recognized

No open discussion.

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David Owen

A circular sector is the part of a circle bounded by two radii and an arc connecting them. Determining whether a point lies in a sector is not quite as easy as rectangular bounds-checking. There are a few different approaches: θ-comparison, line-sides, and dot-products.
Continue reading "Bounds-checking with a circular sector"

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Michael Hall

Last week I attended FOSSETCON, a new open source convention here in central Florida, and I had the opportunity to give a couple of presentations on Ubuntu phones and app development. Anybody who knows me knows that I love talking about these things, but a lot fewer people know that doing it in front of a room of people I don’t know still makes me extremely nervous. I’m an introvert, and even though I have a public-facing job and work with the wider community all the time, I’m still an introvert.

I know there are a lot of other introverts out there who might find the idea of giving presentations to be overwhelming, but they don’t have to be.  Here I’m going to give my personal experiences and advice, in the hope that it’ll encourage some of you to step out of your comfort zones and share your knowledge and talent with the rest of us at meetups and conferences.

You will be bad at it…

Public speaking is like learning how to ride a bicycle, everybody falls their first time. Everybody falls a second time, and a third. You will fidget and stutter, you will lose your train of thought, your voice will sound funny. It’s not just you, everybody starts off being bad at it. Don’t let that stop you though, accept that you’ll have bruises and scrapes and keep getting back on that bike. Coincidentally, accepting that you’re going to be bad at the first ones makes it much less frightening going into them.

… until you are good at it

I read a lot of things about how to be a good and confident public speaker, the advice was all over the map, and a lot of it felt like pure BS.  I think a lot of people try different things and when they finally feel confident in speaking, they attribute whatever their latest thing was with giving them that confidence. In reality, you just get more confident the more you do it.  You’ll be better the second time than the first, and better the third time than the second. So keep at it, you’ll keep getting better. No matter how good or bad you are now, you will keep getting better if you just keep doing it.

Don’t worry about your hands

You’ll find a lot of suggestions about how to use your hands (or not use them), how to walk around (or not walk around) or other suggestions about what to do with yourself while you’re giving your presentation. Ignore them all. It’s not that these things don’t affect your presentation, I’ll admit that they do, it’s that they don’t affect anything after your presentation. Think back about all of the presentations you’ve seen in your life, how much do you remember about how the presenter walked or waved their hands? Unless those movements were integral to the subject, you probably don’t remember much. The same will happen for you, nobody is going to remember whether you walked around or not, they’re going to remember the information you gave them.

It’s not about you

This is the one piece of advice I read that actually has helped me. The reason nobody remembers what you did with your hands is because they’re not there to watch you, they’re there for the information you’re giving them. Unless you’re an actual celebrity, people are there to get information for their own benefit, you’re just the medium which provides it to them.  So don’t make it about you (again, unless you’re an actual celebrity), focus on the topic and information you’re giving out and what it can do for the audience. If you do that, they’ll be thinking about what they’re going to do with it, not what you’re doing with your hands or how many times you’ve said “um”. Good information is a good distraction from the things you don’t want them paying attention to.

It’s all just practice

Practicing your presentation isn’t nearly as stressful as giving it, because you’re not worried about messing up. If you mess up during practice you just correct it, make a note to not make the same mistake next time, and carry on. Well if you plan on doing more public speaking there will always be a next time, which means this time is your practice for that one. Keep your eye on the presentation after this one, if you mess up now you can correct it for the next one.

 

All of the above are really just different ways of saying the same thing: just keep doing it and worry about the content not you. You will get better, your content will get better, and other people will benefit from it, for which they will be appreciative and will gladly overlook any faults in the presentation. I guarantee that you will not be more nervous about it than I was when I started.

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pitti

Last week’s autopkgtest 3.5 release (in Debian sid and Ubuntu Utopic) brings several new features which I’d like to announce.

Tests that reboot

For testing low-level packages like init or the kernel it is sometimes desirable to reboot the testbed in the middle of a test. For example, I added a new boot_and_services systemd autopkgtest which configures grub to boot with systemd as pid 1, reboots, and then checks that the most important services like lightdm, D-BUS, NetworkManager, and cron come up as expected. (This test will be expanded a lot in the future to cover other areas like the journal, logind, etc.)

In a testbed which supports rebooting (currently only QEMU) your test will now find an “autopkgtest-reboot” command which the test calls with an arbitrary “marker” string. autopkgtest will then reboot the testbed, save/restore any files it needs to (like the tests file tree or previously created artifacts), and then re-run the test with ADT_REBOOT_MARK=mymarker.

The new “Reboot during a test” section in README.package-tests explains this in detail with an example.

Implicit test metadata for similar packages

The Debian pkg-perl team recently discussed how to add package tests to the ~ 3.000 Perl packages. For most of these the test metadata looks pretty much the same, so they created a new pkg-perl-autopkgtest package which centralizes the logic. autopkgtest 3.5 now supports an implicit debian/tests/control control file to avoid having to modify several thousand packages with exactly the same file.

An initial run already looked quite promising, 65% of the packages pass their tests. There will be a few iterations to identify common failures and fix those in pkg-perl-autopkgtest and autopkgtestitself now.

There is still some discussion about how implicit test control files go together with the DEP-8 specification, as other runners like sadt do not support them yet. Most probably we’ll declare those packages XS-Testsuite: autopkgtest-pkg-perl instead of the usual autopkgtest.

In the same vein, Debian’s Ruby maintainer (Antonio Terceiro) added implicit test control support for Ruby packages. We haven’t done a mass test run with those yet, but their structure will probably look very similar.

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facundo


¿Cómo es que llegaste a leer esto? En algún momento apretaste un botón y la computadora se prendió. Luego hiciste un click y se abrió el navegador. Hiciste otro click o escribiste algo, y entraste a mi blog.

Esos son ejemplos de causas y consecuencias. Estamos muy acostumbrados a vivir en un mundo donde las causas y las consecuencias están firmemente atadas. Lo vemos todo así, aunque no estemos todo el tiempo razonándolo. Ejemplo: vemos una hoja en el piso. Sabemos que la hoja vino de un árbol, aunque no razonamos toda la secuencia: la hoja estaba en el árbol, la hoja se desprendió, fue cayendo y desplazándose por efecto de la gravedad y el aire, hasta que cayó donde la vemos.

Incluso, podríamos hacer el razonamiento al revés: vemos la hoja, está ahí porque cayó del árbol, cayó porque se desprendió, etc. En general, sin embargo no hacemos estos razonamientos de forma consciente.

Todo esto es común para vos, y no presenta mayor sorpresa, ¿cierto? Eso es porque estamos acostumbrados a la causa y consecuencia, forma parte de nuestra experiencia como humanos, es la forma en que nuestro cerebro interpreta todo lo que nos pasa. Desde que nacemos estamos expuestos a lo que nuestros sensores capturan (ojos, oídos, piel, etc), y formamos una imagen de la realidad en base a esa información.

Pero esa realidad que nosotros percibimos, y que nos es común (en el sentido en que la vivimos siempre, y en que es la misma que viven el resto de los humanos), es sólo parte de todo lo que realmente existe. Es decir, sólo interpretamos parte de la realidad, sentimos sólo una parte de lo que realmente existe. Y todo aquello que está fuera de nuestra experiencia es muy difícil de entender, porque nuestro cerebro no está acostumbrado a procesarlo.

Una de esas cosas es el tiempo. Y no estoy hablando de si llueve o mañana va a ser un día soleado (o sea, el clima) sino el tiempo como lo que pasa entre el "antes", el "ahora" y el "después". Nosotros creemos que entendemos qué pasa con el tiempo, porque en general estamos expuestos a siempre lo mismo con respecto a esa variable física. Siempre sentimos parte de la realidad, aquella en la que la flecha del tiempo es reversible. Por eso a partir de la situación del ahora se puede deducir la situación del después. O incluso sabiendo el estado actual podemos saber como estaba el sistema antes.

Pongamos un ejemplo para entenderlo mejor: soltemos una pelota en el aire...

La pelota, antes de soltarla

En el momento de soltar la pelota, la misma está quieta y a una altura determinada. Si yo te pregunto, qué pasa luego de soltar la pelota, me contestarías fácilmente. Obviamente, momentos después, la pelota está más abajo, y cayendo a una velocidad determinada...

La pelota, un rato después

También, si en lugar de mostrarte las dos imágenes al mismo tiempo, te muestro la segunda, te podés imaginar la primera. Es como en el caso de ver la hoja del árbol en el piso, sabés que antes estaba en una rama.

Implícito en todo esto está la reversibilidad del tiempo. Viendo la primera imagen (que está sacada en "tiempo cero") podemos imaginar el avance del tiempo y predecir que va a pasar después (con tiempo t‚, obviamente mayor que cero) , o viendo la segunda imagen podemos predecir que pasaría si el tiempo retrocediese e imaginar la primera imagen.

Lo vemos incluso en las ecuaciones que describen este modelo simple. Vayamos por ejemplo a las posiciones... la ecuación para esto es:

  e = ½.a.t²

Eso es: el espacio recorrido (h‚ - h, en el dibujo) es la mitad de la aceleración multiplicada por el tiempo que pasó al cuadrado. Si entre la primera y segunda imagen pasaron 2 segundos, siendo la aceleración 9.81m/s² (más o menos, acá en la Tierra), tenemos que el espacio es 19.62m. O sea, viendo la primera imagen podemos deducir que 2 segundos después la pelota va a estar casi 20 metros más abajo... y si vemos la segunda imagen, podemos deducir que 2 segundos antes (o sea, usando t=-2s en la ecuación) la pelota estaba esa distancia más arriba (el espacio lo recorremos en la dirección contraria, porque el resultado de la ecuación nos dio negativo).

Más allá de la complejidad matemática (?) todo esto que te estoy contando no te parece muy loco, ¿no? No. Pero ojo... no todo es tan simple en esta vida (bah, en este Universo).

Y no es tan simple, porque esto de poder ir para adelante y para atrás en el tiempo ,en nuestra mente, en nuestros razonamientos, ¡sorpresivamente no siempre se cumple!

Vayamos con otro ejemplo sencillo (aunque un poco más difícil de construir)... mirá el siguiente dibujo.

Foton loco, viaje de ida

Eso es una lamparita que tira de a un fotón (la mínima unidad de luz, su partícula elemental), una superficie semiespejada (la explico abajo), y un detector de fotones (que nos va a decir si el fotón llegó ahí).

La superficie semiespejada es un instrumento óptico que tiene el siguiente efecto: deja pasar la mitad de la luz, y la otra mitad la refleja. O sea, si lo iluminamos con un millón de fotones, la mitad sigue derecho, y la otra mitad rebota. En el caso de nuestro experimento, que le tiramos de a un sólo fotón, podemos decir que ese fotón tiene la mitad de chance de ser reflejado, y la mitad de chance de seguir derecho. [0]

Entonces, veamos qué pasa cuando la lamparita emite un fotón. Este va derechito hasta el espejo (recorrido A-B), y como dijimos puede seguir su camino o reflejarse e irse para la pared. Podemos decir que el recorrido A-B-C tiene un 50% de probabilidad de que suceda, y el recorrido A-B-D tiene la otra mitad. Piénsenlo como las dos fases del ejemplo anterior, el de la pelota: viendo el fotón saliendo de la lamparita como estado inicial, se pueden imaginar que va a pasar después (o sea, avanzando en el tiempo): que el fotón pegue en el detector, o que pegue en la pared.

Pero ahora hagamos la pregunta inversa: arranquemos de la segunda imagen, y tratemos de deducir la primera. O sea, tratemos de imaginar qué pasó antes (retrocediendo en el tiempo), arrancando nuestra visualización desde el fotón impactando en el detector. Para eso voy dibujo el mismo experimento, pero con otros recorridos...

Fotón loco, viaje de vuelta

¿Cómo se entiende este nuevo dibujo? Como decía, tenemos que pensar para atrás. Si nosotros sabemos que el detector recibió un fotón, la trayectoria B-C seguro se cumplió; entonces, al punto B del semiespejo el fotón llego de uno de dos lados posibles: o de la lamparita en A (atravesando el semiespejo), o desde un nuevo punto D (reflejándose en el semiespejo).

Acá me dirás que le estoy pifiando conceptualmente... ¿cómo puede ser que el fotón salga desde el punto D, que arranque desde una pared? Pues claro, ¡el fotón no puede venir nunca de ahí! Eso hace que la trayectoria E-B-C no sea realmente posible. En otras palabras, el fotón salió sí o sí de la lamparita: la trayectoria A-B-C se recorrió seguro (un 100% de probabilidad).

No te sientas frustrada/o si tenés que leer dos o tres veces la explicación para entender que pasa, es bastante avanzado a nivel de física. Yo, la primera vez, lo tuve que leer como cinco veces ;). Una de las razones por la que cuesta entenderlo, y hasta aceptarlo es que, justamente, todo eso está por afuera de lo que nosotros sentimos del universo, no forma parte de nuestra experiencia.

En fin, resumiendo los dos análisis: si hacemos que el tiempo se desarrolle para adelante, arrancando con el fotón desde A, vemos que puede recorrer dos trayectorias, A-B-C o A-B-D, con un 50% de chances cada una. Pero si hacemos que el tiempo se desarrolle para atrás, arrancando con el fotón desde C, tenemos que sólo pudo recorrer un camino: A-B-C.

¡Esta es una muestra de que el fotón atravesando el semiespejo no se comporta de una forma reversible en el tiempo! El tener dos posibles recorridos cuando hacemos correr el tiempo para adelante, y uno solo cuando lo hacemos recorrer para atrás, es totalmente distinto a lo que veíamos en el primer experimento, y totalmente distinto a la forma en que vemos normalmente a nuestro entorno, a la forma en que experimentamos el Universo.

La razón de este comportamiento se explica en las bases de la mecánica cuántica, donde se ve y entiende que hay todo un modelo que explica nuestro Universo con el tiempo reversible, pero hay toda una parte donde el tiempo no lo es. O sea, hay toda una rama de la física donde en las ecuaciones no podemos cambiarle alegremente el signo a t.

Respirá aliviada/o, no voy a meterme en toda esa explicación ;) [1]. Pero lo que te quería mostrar es que ahí afuera, aunque no lo veamos, aunque no forme parte de nuestra experiencia como humanos, hay todo un Universo al que sólo podemos acceder con el poder de nuestros cerebros y su capacidad de pensamiento abstracto. Es una herramienta maravillosa, ¡la tenemos que entrenar más y mejor!


[0] Para usar terminología adecuada, tenemos que decir que hay una amplitud de uno sobre raíz cuadrada de dos de que el fotón esté en un lado y la misma amplitud de que esté en el otro... eso es hablando de distribución de amplitudes con respecto a las posiciones... el módulo del cuadrado de eso nos da la probabilidad de que el fotón esté en un punto o el otro, que es .5 en cada caso.

[1] Pero si te interesa, hay un libro que es GENIAL y que habla de esto en tres o cuatro páginas del medio millar que tiene: The Emperor's New Mind, de Roger Penrose

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Jane Silber

Cycling in London

As the CEO of Canonical, I am proud of the growth of the team in London.  From a team of 5 around a kitchen table in London 10 years ago, the business has grown to 650 employees globally of which over 100 are based in London.

Like many businesses in London, one of the most popular modes of transport to the office is cycling and an even larger proportion of the team would cycle to the office if they felt it was safer than it is now.

We value employee satisfaction, health and freedom and firmly endorse the Mayor’s Vision for Cycling in London. We specifically support the cross London plans from City Hall to create new segregated routes through the heart of the city.

These plans are good for London and Londoners, making it a more attractive and productive city in which we can build a business and serve customers.

Proposed Farringdon Road route. Image from Transport For London 2014.

 

I encourage everyone to respond directly to TFL about these proposals. This particularly applies to businesses whose support for cycling is often not registered.

I know that there many business leaders like me who feel the same and will be speaking up over the coming days.

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Prakash Advani

An independent survey of 200 UK-based CIOs has revealed that they are only using about half of the cloud capacity they’ve bought and paid for, and that 90 percent of them see over-provisioning as a necessary evil.

Cloud provider ElasticHosts, which commissioned the survey, says: “Essentially, bad habits like over-provisioning and sacrificing peak performance are being carried from the on-premise world into the cloud, partly because people are willing to accept these limitations.”

Read More: http://www.zdnet.com/cloud-customers-are-still-paying-for-twice-as-much-as-they-need-7000033369/

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Giorgio Venturi

Canonical and Ubuntu at dConstruct

Brighton is not just a lovely seaside town, mostly known for being overcrowded in Summer by Londoners in search for a bit of escapism, but also the home of a thriving community of designers, makers and entrepreneurs. Some of these people run dConstruct, a gathering where creative minds of all sorts converge every year to discuss important themes around digital innovation and culture.

When I found out that we were sponsoring the conference this year, I promptly jumped in to help my colleagues in the Phone, Web and Juju design teams. Our stand was situated in the foyer of the Brighton Dome, flashing the orange banner of Ubuntu and a number of origami unicorns.

The Ubuntu Stand

Origami Unicorns

We had an incredibly positive response from the attendees, as our stand was literally teeming with Ubuntu enthusiasts who were really keen to check our progress with the phone. We had a few BQ phones on display where we showed the new features and designs.

Testing the phone

For us, it was a great occasion to gather fresh impressions of the user experience on the phone and across a variety of apps. After a few moments, people started to understand the edge interactions and began to swipe left and right, giving positive feedback on the responsiveness of the UI. Our pre-release models of BQ phones don’t have the final shell and they still display softkeys, as a result some people found this confusing. We took the opportunity to quickly design our own custom BQ phone by using a bunch of Ubuntu stickers…and viola, problem solved! ;)

Ubuntu phone - customised

Our ‘Make your Unicorn’ competition had a fantastic response. To celebrate the coming release of Utopic Unicorn and of the BQ phone, the maker of the best origami unicorn being awarded a new phone. The crowd did not hesitate to tackle the complex paper-bending challenge and came up with a bunch of creative outcomes. We were very impressed to see how many people managed to complete the instructions, as I didn’t manage to go beyond step 15..

Ubuntu fans

Twitter   Search - #dconstruct #ubuntu

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Prakash Advani

After the  iPhone 6 vs Android: Samsung Galaxy S5, HTC M8 and Xiaomi MI3,  I am now comparing the Phablets: iPhone 6 Plus, Samsung Galaxy Note 4 and LG G3, Sony Xperia Z3 and Note 3 Neo. I picked the top Phablets and also the budget Note 3 Neo.

Features iPhone 6 Plus Note 4 LG G3 Sony Xperia Z3 Note 3 Neo
 FingerPrint Sensor  Yes  Yes No No No
Shatter Proof  No No No Yes Yes
Screen Size 5.5″  5.7″ 5.5″ 5.2″ 5.5″
Resolution 1080 x 1920 1440×2560  1440×2560 1080 x 1920 720 x 1280
RAM 2 GB  3 GB  2/3 GB  3 GB 2 GB
 Memory Card Slot No  Yes Yes Yes Yes
Primary Camera 8 MP  16 MP  13 MP 20.7 MP 8 MP
Selfie Camera 1.2 MP  3.7 MP 2.1 MP  2.2 MP 2 MP
CPU Dual-core
1.4 GHz
Octacore
2.7 GHz+
1.3 GHz
 Quad-core
2.5 GHz
 Quad-core
2.5 GHz
 Hexa Core
1.7 GHZ+
1.3 GHz
64 Bit ? 64 Bit 32-Bit 32-Bit 32-Bit 32-Bit
 FM Radio No TBC Yes (in D855) Yes No

Still want an Apple ?









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Dustin Kirkland


This little snippet of ~200 lines of YAML is the exact OpenStack that I'm deploying tonight, at the OpenStack Austin Meetup.

Anyone with a working Juju and MAAS setup, and 7 registered servers should be able to deploy this same OpenStack setup, in about 12 minutes, with a single command.


$ wget http://people.canonical.com/~kirkland/icehouseOB.yaml
$ juju-deployer -c icehouseOB.yaml
$ cat icehouseOB.yaml

icehouse:
overrides:
openstack-origin: "cloud:trusty-icehouse"
source: "distro"
services:
ceph:
charm: "cs:trusty/ceph-27"
num_units: 3
constraints: tags=physical
options:
fsid: "9e7aac42-4bf4-11e3-b4b7-5254006a039c"
"monitor-secret": AQAAvoJSOAv/NRAAgvXP8d7iXN7lWYbvDZzm2Q==
"osd-devices": "/srv"
"osd-reformat": "yes"
annotations:
"gui-x": "2648.6688842773438"
"gui-y": "708.3873901367188"
keystone:
charm: "cs:trusty/keystone-5"
num_units: 1
constraints: tags=physical
options:
"admin-password": "admin"
"admin-token": "admin"
annotations:
"gui-x": "2013.905517578125"
"gui-y": "75.58013916015625"
"nova-compute":
charm: "cs:trusty/nova-compute-3"
num_units: 3
constraints: tags=physical
to: [ceph=0, ceph=1, ceph=2]
options:
"flat-interface": eth0
annotations:
"gui-x": "776.1040649414062"
"gui-y": "-81.22811031341553"
"neutron-gateway":
charm: "cs:trusty/quantum-gateway-3"
num_units: 1
constraints: tags=virtual
options:
ext-port: eth1
instance-mtu: 1400
annotations:
"gui-x": "329.0572509765625"
"gui-y": "46.4658203125"
"nova-cloud-controller":
charm: "cs:trusty/nova-cloud-controller-41"
num_units: 1
constraints: tags=physical
options:
"network-manager": Neutron
annotations:
"gui-x": "1388.40185546875"
"gui-y": "-118.01156234741211"
rabbitmq:
charm: "cs:trusty/rabbitmq-server-4"
num_units: 1
to: mysql
annotations:
"gui-x": "633.8120727539062"
"gui-y": "862.6530151367188"
glance:
charm: "cs:trusty/glance-3"
num_units: 1
to: nova-cloud-controller
annotations:
"gui-x": "1147.3269653320312"
"gui-y": "1389.5643157958984"
cinder:
charm: "cs:trusty/cinder-4"
num_units: 1
to: nova-cloud-controller
options:
"block-device": none
annotations:
"gui-x": "1752.32568359375"
"gui-y": "1365.716194152832"
"ceph-radosgw":
charm: "cs:trusty/ceph-radosgw-3"
num_units: 1
to: nova-cloud-controller
annotations:
"gui-x": "2216.68212890625"
"gui-y": "697.16796875"
cinder-ceph:
charm: "cs:trusty/cinder-ceph-1"
num_units: 0
annotations:
"gui-x": "2257.5515747070312"
"gui-y": "1231.2130126953125"
"openstack-dashboard":
charm: "cs:trusty/openstack-dashboard-4"
num_units: 1
to: "keystone"
options:
webroot: "/"
annotations:
"gui-x": "2353.6898193359375"
"gui-y": "-94.2642593383789"
mysql:
charm: "cs:trusty/mysql-1"
num_units: 1
constraints: tags=physical
options:
"dataset-size": "20%"
annotations:
"gui-x": "364.4567565917969"
"gui-y": "1067.5167846679688"
mongodb:
charm: "cs:trusty/mongodb-0"
num_units: 1
constraints: tags=physical
annotations:
"gui-x": "-70.0399979352951"
"gui-y": "1282.8224487304688"
ceilometer:
charm: "cs:trusty/ceilometer-0"
num_units: 1
to: mongodb
annotations:
"gui-x": "-78.13333225250244"
"gui-y": "919.3128051757812"
ceilometer-agent:
charm: "cs:trusty/ceilometer-agent-0"
num_units: 0
annotations:
"gui-x": "-90.9158582687378"
"gui-y": "562.5347595214844"
heat:
charm: "cs:trusty/heat-0"
num_units: 1
to: mongodb
annotations:
"gui-x": "494.94012451171875"
"gui-y": "1363.6024169921875"
ntp:
charm: "cs:trusty/ntp-4"
num_units: 0
annotations:
"gui-x": "-104.57728099822998"
"gui-y": "294.6641273498535"
relations:
- - "keystone:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "nova-cloud-controller:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "nova-cloud-controller:amqp"
- "rabbitmq:amqp"
- - "nova-cloud-controller:image-service"
- "glance:image-service"
- - "nova-cloud-controller:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "glance:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "glance:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "cinder:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "cinder:amqp"
- "rabbitmq:amqp"
- - "cinder:cinder-volume-service"
- "nova-cloud-controller:cinder-volume-service"
- - "cinder:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "neutron-gateway:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "neutron-gateway:amqp"
- "rabbitmq:amqp"
- - "neutron-gateway:quantum-network-service"
- "nova-cloud-controller:quantum-network-service"
- - "openstack-dashboard:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "nova-compute:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "nova-compute:amqp"
- "rabbitmq:amqp"
- - "nova-compute:image-service"
- "glance:image-service"
- - "nova-compute:cloud-compute"
- "nova-cloud-controller:cloud-compute"
- - "cinder:storage-backend"
- "cinder-ceph:storage-backend"
- - "ceph:client"
- "cinder-ceph:ceph"
- - "ceph:client"
- "nova-compute:ceph"
- - "ceph:client"
- "glance:ceph"
- - "ceilometer:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "ceilometer:amqp"
- "rabbitmq:amqp"
- - "ceilometer:shared-db"
- "mongodb:database"
- - "ceilometer-agent:container"
- "nova-compute:juju-info"
- - "ceilometer-agent:ceilometer-service"
- "ceilometer:ceilometer-service"
- - "heat:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "heat:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "heat:amqp"
- "rabbitmq:amqp"
- - "ceph-radosgw:mon"
- "ceph:radosgw"
- - "ceph-radosgw:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "neutron-gateway:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "ceph:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "keystone:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "nova-compute:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "nova-cloud-controller:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "rabbitmq:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "glance:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "cinder:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "ceph-radosgw:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "openstack-dashboard:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "mysql:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "mongodb:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "ceilometer:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "heat:juju-info"
series: trusty

:-Dustin

Read more
Prakash Advani

I was watching the iPhone 6 launch last night and was wonder what the fuss is all about? Well it’s from Apple and people may be drooling.

Lets find out how the iPhone 6 compares with the Leading Android phones. I am only comparing the specifications and features and not the actually quality which is very subjective.

Here is Apple iPhone vs Samsung Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 and Xiaomi MI3. Galaxy S5 and One M8 are the premium Android phones while the MI3 is the poor man’s option or the rich mans budget phone which ever way you look at it.

Features iPhone 6 Galaxy S5 One M8 MI3
 FingerPrint Sensor  Yes  Yes No No
 Dust Resistant  No  Yes  No  No
 Water Resistant   No  Yes  No  No
 Screen Size  4.7″  5.1″  5.0″  5.0″
 Resolution  750 x 1334  1080 x 1920  1080 x 1920  1080 x 1920
 Full HD  No  Yes  Yes  Yes
 RAM  1 GB  2 GB  2 GB  2 GB
 Memory Card Slot No  Yes Yes No
Primary Camera 8 MP  16 MP  Dual 4MP  13 MP
Selfie Camera 1.2 MP  2 MP   5MP  2MP
CPU Dual-core
1.4 GHz
Quad-core
2.5 GHz
 Quad-core
2.3/2.5 GHz
 Quad-core
2.3 GHz
 FM Radio No No Yes Yes
4G LTE Yes Yes Yes No

As you can see the Android variants are leading in almost all the specifications which does matter. This includes the inexpensive Xiaomi Rather than innovating, Apple seems to only playing catch-up. Apply skillfully hides the finer specifications. Its your choice to stand in the queue for iPhone 6 or go with an Android at a cheaper price.

 

 







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Corey Bryant

Meeting Actions
  • none
U Development
  • Final beta freeze is 9/25
  • The one bug that is >= high in importance and not fixed is bug 1350810 in byobu, reminder sent to kirkland
  • Everyone reminded to review assigned blueprints for any features that need to be postponed for 14.10 release, since we’re beyond feature freeze
Server & Cloud Bugs (caribou)
  • no updates
Weekly Updates & Questions for the QA Team (psivaa)
  • no updates
Weekly Updates & Questions for the Kernel Team (smb, sforshee, arges)
  • coreycb added arges to agenda
  • arges reported to kickinz1 that bcache bug is fixed upstream, so that should trickle down soon
Ubuntu Server Team Events
  • There are a few sprints going on at the moment.
Open Discussion
  • no updates
Agree on next meeting date and time
Next meeting will be on Tuesday, Sept 16th at 16:00 UTC in #ubuntu-meeting. Chaired by arosales.

Read more
Joseph Salisbury

Meeting Minutes

IRC Log of the meeting.

Meeting minutes.

Agenda

20140909 Meeting Agenda


Release Metrics and Incoming Bugs

Release metrics and incoming bug data can be reviewed at the following link:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kt-meeting.txt


Status: Utopic Development Kernel

The Utopic kernel has been rebased to the v3.16.2 upstream stable kernel
and uploaded to the archive, ie. linux-3.16.0-14.20. Please test
and let us know your results.
I’d also like to point out that our Utopic kernel freeze date is about 4
weeks away on Thurs Oct 9. Please don’t wait until the last minute to
submit patches needing to ship in the Utopic 14.10 release.
—–
Important upcoming dates:
Mon Sep 22 – Utopic Final Beta Freeze (~2 weeks away)
Thurs Sep 25 – Utopic Final Beta (~2 weeks away)
Thurs Oct 9 – Utopic Kernel Freeze (~4 weeks away)
Thurs Oct 16 – Utopic Final Freeze (~5 weeks away)
Thurs Oct 23 – Utopic 14.10 Release (~6 weeks away)


Status: CVE’s

The current CVE status can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/cve/pkg/ALL-linux.html


Status: Stable, Security, and Bugfix Kernel Updates – Trusty/Precise/Lucid

Status for the main kernels, until today (Sept. 9):

  • Lucid – verification & testing
  • Precise – verification & testing
  • Trusty – verification & testing

    Current opened tracking bugs details:

  • http://kernel.ubuntu.com/sru/kernel-sru-workflow.html

    For SRUs, SRU report is a good source of information:

  • http://kernel.ubuntu.com/sru/sru-report.html

    Schedule:

    cycle: 29-Aug through 20-Sep
    ====================================================================
    29-Aug Last day for kernel commits for this cycle
    31-Aug – 06-Sep Kernel prep week.
    07-Sep – 13-Sep Bug verification & Regression testing.
    14-Sep – 20-Sep Regression testing & Release to -updates.


Open Discussion or Questions? Raise your hand to be recognized

No open discussion.

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Robin Winslow

On 10th September 2014, Canonical are joining in with Internet Slowdown day to support the fight for net neutrality.

Along with Reddit, Tumblr, Boing Boing, Kickstarter and many more sites, we will be sporting banners on our main sites, www.ubuntu.com and www.canonical.com.

Net neutrality

From Wikipedia:

Net neutrality is the principle that Internet service providers and governments should treat all data on the Internet equally, not discriminating or charging differentially by user, content, site, platform, application, type of attached equipment, and modes of communication.

Internet Slowdown day

#InternetSlowdown day is in protest to the FCC’s plans to allow ISPs in America to offer “paid prioritization” of their traffic to certain companies.

If large companies were allowed to pay ISPs to prioritise their traffic, it would be much harder for competing companies to enter the market, effectively giving large corporations a greater monopoly.

I believe that internet service providers should conform to common carrier laws where the carrier is required to provide service to the general public without discrimination.

If you too support net neutrality, please consider signing the Battle for the net petition.

Also posted on my blog.

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Dustin Kirkland

What would you say if I told you, that you could continuously upload your own Software-as-a-Service  (SaaS) web apps into an open source Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) framework, running on top of an open source Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud, deployed on an open source Metal-as-a-Service provisioning system, autonomically managed by an open source Orchestration-Service… right now, today?

“An idea is resilient. Highly contagious. Once an idea has taken hold of the brain it's almost impossible to eradicate.”

“Now, before you bother telling me it's impossible…”

“No, it's perfectly possible. It's just bloody difficult.” 

Perhaps something like this...

“How could I ever acquire enough detail to make them think this is reality?”

“Don’t you want to take a leap of faith???”
Sure, let's take a look!

Okay, this looks kinda neat, what is it?

This is an open source Java Spring web application, called Spring-Music, deployed as an app, running inside of Linux containers in CloudFoundry


Cloud Foundry?

CloudFoundry is an open source Platform-as-a-Service (PAAS) cloud, deployed into Linux virtual machine instances in OpenStack, by Juju.


OpenStack?

Juju?

OpenStack is an open source Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IAAS) cloud, deployed by Juju and Landscape on top of MAAS.

Juju is an open source Orchestration System that deploys and scales complex services across many public clouds, private clouds, and bare metal servers.

Landscape?

MAAS?

Landscape is a systems management tool that automates software installation, updates, and maintenance in both physical and virtual machines. Oh, and it too is deployed by Juju.

MAAS is an open source bare metal provisioning system, providing a cloud-like API to physical servers. Juju can deploy services to MAAS, as well as public and private clouds.

"Ready for the kick?"

If you recall these concepts of nesting cloud technologies...

These are real technologies, which exist today!

These are Software-as-a-Service  (SaaS) web apps served by an open source Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) framework, running on top of an open source Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud, deployed on an open source Metal-as-a-Service provisioning system, managed by an open source Orchestration-Service.

Spring Music, served by CloudFoundry, running on top of OpenStack, deployed on MAAS, managed by Juju and Landscape!

“The smallest seed of an idea can grow…”

Oh, and I won't leave you hanging...you're not dreaming!


:-Dustin

Read more

(Also posted on the Canonical blog)

On 10th September 2014, Canonical are joining in with Internet Slowdown day to support the fight for net neutrality.

Along with Reddit, Tumblr, Boing Boing, Kickstarter and many more sites, we will be sporting banners on our main sites, www.ubuntu.com and www.canonical.com.

Net neutrality

From Wikipedia:

Net neutrality is the principle that Internet service providers and governments should treat all data on the Internet equally, not discriminating or charging differentially by user, content, site, platform, application, type of attached equipment, and modes of communication.

Internet Slowdown day

#InternetSlowdown day is in protest to the FCC’s plans to allow ISPs in America to offer “paid prioritization” of their traffic to certain companies.

If large companies were allowed to pay ISPs to prioritise their traffic, it would be much harder for competing companies to enter the market, effectively giving large corporations a greater monopoly.

I believe that internet service providers should conform to common carrier laws where the carrier is required to provide service to the general public without discrimination.

If you too support net neutrality, please consider signing the Battle for the net petition.

Read more
Louis

After three years of hard work, it is time to retire my 8440p and let the family enjoy its availability. For my new workhorse, I have chosen the HP Elitebook EVO 850 that fit my budget and performance requirement.

TL;DR : The Elitebook EVO 850 basic functionalities work fine with Ubuntu 14.04.1

Before hosing the Windows 7 installation, I thought of testing the basic functionalities. So after booting Win7 I checked that most of the thing (sound, light, webcam, etc) did work as expected.

Never underestimate the power of the bug : if there is some hardware issue, then it is better to do a first diagnostic on Windows. The HP tech will love you for that (been there, done that). Otherwise, there will always be a doubt that Ubuntu is the culprit & they will not try to look any further.

After a successful Windows boot, I created a bootable USB stick with the latest Ubuntu release on it to verify that Ubuntu itself runs fine. No need to wipe out Windows and install Ubuntu on it only to find out that the hardware fails miserably. Here is the command I used to create the bootable USB stick, since the USB creator has been buggy for years on Ubuntu :

$ dd if=ubuntu-14.04.1-desktop-amd64.iso of=/dev/sdc bs=4M

One important note : this is a laptop that is factory installed with a secure boot configuration in the BIOS. I did not have to change anything to boot Ubuntu so you should not have to.

Since everything looked good, I went ahead & restarted the laptop & installed Ubuntu Trusty Tahr 14.04..1 on the laptop, using a full disk install with full disk encryption.  Installation was flawless and completed in less than five minutes, thanks to the 250Gb SSD drive !

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Prakash Advani

At CloudOpen, a Linux Foundation tradeshow held in conjunction with LinuxCon, the Foundation announced that an online survey of open-source cloud professionals found OpenStack to be the most popular overall project.

That wasn’t surprising. Although OpenStack is only four years old, the Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud project is very popular with support from such industry giants HP, Red Hat, and VMware. What was somewhat surprising was that number two was Docker, the just-over-a-year old container technology.

Read More: http://www.zdnet.com/most-popular-open-source-cloud-projects-of-2014-7000032856/

 

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Nicholas Skaggs

Autopilot Test Runners

In my last next post, I discussed will discuss notable autopilot features and talk about how autopilot has matured since it became an independent project.

In the meantime I would be remiss if I didn't also talk about the different test runners commonly used with autopilot tests. In addition to the autopilot binary which can be executed to run the tests, different tools have cropped up to make running tests easier.

autopilot-sandbox-run
This tool ships with autopilot itself and was developed as a way to run autopilot test suites on your desktop in a sane manner. Run the autopilot3-sandbox-run command with --help to see all the options available. By default, the tests will run in an Xvfb server, all completely behind the scenes with the results being reported to you upon completion. This is a great way to run tests with no interference on your desktop. If you are a visual person like me, you may instead wish to pass -X to enable the test runs to occur in a Xephyr window allowing you to see what's happening, but still retaining control of your mouse and keyboard.

I need this tool!
sudo apt-get install python3-autopilot

I want to run tests on my desktop without losing control of my mouse!
autopilot3-sandbox-run my_testsuite_name

I want to run tests on my desktop without losing control of my mouse, but I still want to see what's happening!
autopilot3-sandbox-run -X my_testsuite_name

Autopkgtest
Autopkgtest was developed as a means to automatically test Debian packages, "as-installed". Recently support was added to also test click packages and to run on phablet devices. Autopkgtest will take care of dependencies, setting up autopilot, and unlocking the device. You can literally plug in a device and wait for the results. You should really checkout the README pages, including those on running tests. That said, here's a quick primer on running tests using autopkgtest.

I need this tool!
sudo apt-get install autopkgtest
If you are on trusty, grab and install the utopic deb from here.

I want to run tests for a click package installed on my device!
Awesome. This one is simple. Connect the device and then run:
adt-run --click my.click.name --- ssh -s adb

For example,
adt-run --click com.ubuntu.music --- ssh -s adb

will run the tests for the installed version of the music app on your device. You don't need to do anything else. For the curious, this works by reading the manifest file all click packages have. Read more here.

I want to run the tests I wrote/modified against an installed click package!
For this you need to also pass your local folder containing the tests. You will also want to make sure you installed the new version of the click package if needed.

adt-run my-folder/ --click my.click.name --- ssh -s adb

Autopkgtest can also run in a lxc container, QEMU, a chroot, and other fun targets. In the examples above, I passed --- ssh -s adb as the target, instructing autopkgtest to use ssh and adb and thus run the tests on a connected phablet device. If you want to run autopilot tests on a phablet device, I recommend using autopkgtest as it handles everything for you.

phablet-test-run
This tool is part of the greater phablet-tools package. It was originally developed as an easy way to execute tests on your phablet device. Note however that copying the tests and any dependencies to the phablet device is left to you. The phablet-tools package provides some other useful utilities to help you with this (checkout phablet-click-test-setup for example).

I need this tool!
sudo apt-get install phablet-tools

I want to run the tests I wrote/modified against an installed click package!
First copy the tests to the device. You can use the ubuntu sdk or click-buddy for this, or even do it manually via adb. Then run phablet-test-run. It takes the same arguments as autopilot itself.

phablet-test-run -v my_testsuite

Note the tools looks for the testsuite and any dependencies of the testsuite inside the /home/phablet/autopilot folder. It's up to you to make sure everything that is needed to run your tests are located there or else it will fail.

other ways
There are of course other possible test runners that wrap around autopilot to make executing tests easier. Perhaps you've written a script yourself. Just remember at the end of the day the autopilot binary will be running the tests. It simply needs to be able to find the testsuite and all of it's dependencies in order to run. For this reason, don't be afraid to execute autopilot3 and run the tests yourself. Happy test runs!

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Daniel Holbach

We just created a new Ubuntu mailing list called ubuntu-community-team.

As we didn’t have a place like this before, we created it so we can

  • have discussions around planning community events
  • start all kinds of initiatives around Ubuntu
  • allow enthusiasts of the Ubuntu community to kick around new ideas
  • bring people from all parts of our community together so we can learn from each other
  • hang out and have fun

We are looking forward to seeing you on the list as well, sign up on this page.

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