Canonical Voices

Canonical

Have you submitted your app for the App Showdown contest? With just under one week to go, there’s still time to enter and have the opportunity to win a Nexus/Meizu device with your app running on the handset. Deadline for submissions is Wednesday 9th April, 2014.

Here are the details once again:

The contest is open to everyone. The four dedicated categories that you can enter:

  1. QML: original apps written in QML or those with a combination of QML and JavaScript/C++

  2. HTML5: original apps written using web technologies, be it pure HTML (and CSS/JavaScript) or with platform access using Apache Cordova

  3. Ported: apps ported from another platform, regardless of the technology used

  4. Chinese apps: apps in this category will have to be original and specific to China and the Chinese culture. They will be judged by three native experts in our jury.

To enter the competition and get further information click here.

Winning entries will be announced by Canonical once the judging process has been completed – anticipated to be end of April 2014.  Good luck!

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Daniel Holbach

image-app-showdown

The app showdown is still in full swing and we have seen lots and lots of activity already. The competition is going to end on Wednesday, April 9th 2014 (23:59 UTC). So what do you need to do to enter and submit the app?

It’s actually quite easy. It takes three steps.

Submit your app

This is obviously the most important bit and needs to happen first. Don’t leave this to the last minute. Your app might have to go through a couple of reviews before it’s accepted in the store. So plan in some time for that. Once it’s accepted and published in the store, you can always, much more quickly, publish an update.

Submit your app.

Register your participation

Once your app is in the store, you need to register your participation in the App Showdown. To make sure your application is registered for the contest and judges review it, you’ll need to fill in the participation form. You can start filling it in already and until the submission deadline, it should only take you 2 minutes to complete.

Fill out the submission form.

 

Questions?

If you have questions or need help, reach out (also rather sooner than later) to our great community of Ubuntu App Developers.

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jono

At the last Ubuntu Developer Summit we discussed the idea of making our regular online summit serve more than just developers. We are interested in showcasing not just the developer-orientated discussion sessions that we currently have, but also including content such as presentations, demos, tutorials, and other topics.

I just wanted to give everyone a heads up that the first Ubuntu Online Summit will happen from 10th – 12th June 2014. The website is not yet updated (we are going to keep everything on summit.ubuntu.com and uds.ubuntu.com can point there, and Michael is making the changes to bring over the static content).

We are really keen to get ideas for how the event can run so I am scheduling a hangout on Thurs 10th April at 5pm UTC on Ubuntu On Air where I would welcome ideas and input. I hope to see you there!

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Joseph Salisbury

Meeting Minutes

IRC Log of the meeting.

Meeting minutes.

Agenda

20140402 Meeting Agenda


ARM Status

Nothing new to report this week


Release Metrics and Incoming Bugs

Release metrics and incoming bug data can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kt-meeting.txt


Milestone Targeted Work Items

   apw    core-1311-kernel    4 work items   
      core-1311-cross-compilation    2 work items   
      core-1311-hwe-plans    1 work item   
   ogasawara    core-1311-kernel    1 work item   
      core-1403-hwe-stack-eol-notifications    2 work items   
   smb    servercloud-1311-openstack-virt    3 work items   


Status: Trusty Development Kernel

The 3.13.0-21.43 Trusty kernel has been uploaded to the archive. With
kernel freeze about to go into effect this Thurs Apr 3, I do not
anticipate another upload between now and then. After kernel freeze,
all patches are subject to our Ubuntu SRU policy and only critical bug
fixes will warrant an upload before release.
—–
Important upcoming dates:
Thurs Apr 03 – Kernel Freeze (~2 days away)
Thurs Apr 17 – Ubuntu 14.04 Final Release (~2 weeks away)


Status: CVE’s

The current CVE status can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/cve/pkg/ALL-linux.html


Status: Stable, Security, and Bugfix Kernel Updates -

Saucy/Raring/Quantal/Precise/Lucid (bjf/henrix/kamal)
Status for the main kernels, until today (Mar. 25):

  • Lucid – Prep week
  • Precise – Prep week
  • Quantal – Prep week
  • Saucy – Prep week

    Current opened tracking bugs details:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kernel-sru-workflow.html

    For SRUs, SRU report is a good source of information:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/sru-report.html

    Schedule:

    cycle: 30-Mar through 26-Apr
    ====================================================================
    28-Mar Last day for kernel commits for this cycle
    30-Mar – 05-Apr Kernel prep week.
    06-Apr – 12-Apr Bug verification & Regression testing.
    17-Apr 14.04 Released
    13-Apr – 26-Apr Regression testing & Release to -updates.


Open Discussion or Questions? Raise your hand to be recognized

No open discussions.

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bmichaelsen

Document Liberation has been announced today, but a picture says more than a thousand words, so I created one based on the beautiful work of Paulo José. Enjoy!

Document Liberation

Document Liberation (CC-by-sa 3.0 Paulo Jose, Bjoern Michaelsen)


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Daniel Holbach

Got any plans for the weekend?

maps

This weekend (4-6 April) the Ubuntu community is celebrating another Ubuntu Global Jam! The goal, as always, is to get together as a team and make Ubuntu better, get people involved and have fun. In the past we all focused on packaging, fixing bugs, translations, documentation and testing. The most recent addition to the mix are App Dev School events.

The goal of App Dev Schools is to have a look at developing apps for Ubuntu together. We made this a lot easier by providing presentation material and virtualbox images and instructions for how to run an event. If you have a bit of programming experience, it should be easy for you to run the sessions with just a bit of preparation time.

Why is this exciting and probably a good idea to discuss in the team? Simple: it has never been easier to write apps for Ubuntu and publish them. You can choose between Qt/QML apps and HTML5 apps – both are easy to put together and packaging/publishing an app is a matter of a couple of a clicks. Awesome!

Check out the Ubuntu Global Jam page and find out how have your own local event. If it’s just you and a couple of friends meeting up – don’t worry – it’s still a jam!

Have a great weekend everyone!

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Jane Silber

Today we are announcing plans to shut down the Ubuntu One file services.  This is a tough decision, particularly when our users rely so heavily on the functionality that Ubuntu One provides.  However, like any company, we want to focus our efforts on our most important strategic initiatives and ensure we are not spread too thin.

Our strategic priority for Ubuntu is making the best converged operating system for phones, tablets, desktops and more. In fact, our user experience, developer tools for apps and scopes, and commercial relationships have been constructed specifically to highlight third party content and services (as opposed to our own); this is one of our many differentiators from our competitors.  Additionally, the free storage wars aren’t a sustainable place for us to be, particularly with other services now regularly offering 25GB-50GB free storage.  If we offer a service, we want it to compete on a global scale, and for Ubuntu One to continue to do that would require more investment than we are willing to make. We choose instead to invest in making the absolute best, open platform  and to highlight the best of our partners’ services and content.

As of today, it will no longer be possible to purchase storage or music from the Ubuntu One store. The Ubuntu One file services will not be included in the upcoming Ubuntu 14.04 LTS release, and the Ubuntu One apps in older versions of Ubuntu and in the Ubuntu, Google, and Apple stores will be updated appropriately. The current services will be unavailable from 1 June 2014; user content will remain available for download until 31 July, at which time it will be deleted.

We will work to ensure that customers have an easy path to download all their content from Ubuntu One to migrate to other personal cloud services.  Additionally, we continue to believe in the Ubuntu One file services, the quality of the code, and the user experience, so will release the code as open source software to give others an opportunity to build on this code to create an open source file syncing platform.

Customers who have an active annual subscription will have their unused fees refunded. We will calculate the refund amount from today’s announcement, even though the service will remain available until 1 June and data available for a further two months.

We will contact customers separately with additional information about what to expect.  We will also publish further blog posts with advice on how to download content and with details on the open sourcing of the code.

The shutdown will not affect the Ubuntu One single sign on service, the Ubuntu One payment service, or the backend U1DB database service.

We’ve always been inspired by the support, feedback and enthusiasm of our users and want to thank you for the support you’ve shown for Ubuntu One. We hope that you’ll continue to support us as together we bring a revolutionary experience to new devices.

 

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Cristian Parrino

Today we are announcing plans to shut down the Ubuntu One file services.  This is a tough decision, particularly when our users rely so heavily on the functionality that Ubuntu One provides.  However, like any company, we want to focus our efforts on our most important strategic initiatives and ensure we are not spread too thin.

Our strategic priority for Ubuntu is making the best converged operating system for phones, tablets, desktops and more. In fact, our user experience, developer tools for apps and scopes, and commercial relationships have been constructed specifically to highlight third party content and services (as opposed to our own); this is one of our many differentiators from our competitors.  Additionally, the free storage wars aren’t a sustainable place for us to be, particularly with other services now regularly offering 25GB-50GB free storage.  If we offer a service, we want it to compete on a global scale, and for Ubuntu One to continue to do that would require more investment than we are willing to make. We choose instead to invest in making the absolute best, open platform  and to highlight the best of our partners’ services and content.

As of today, it will no longer be possible to purchase storage or music from the Ubuntu One store. The Ubuntu One file services will not be included in the upcoming Ubuntu 14.04 LTS release, and the Ubuntu One apps in older versions of Ubuntu and in the Ubuntu, Google, and Apple stores will be updated appropriately. The current services will be unavailable from 1 June 2014; user content will remain available for download until 31 July, at which time it will be deleted.

We will work to ensure that customers have an easy path to download all their content from Ubuntu One to migrate to other personal cloud services.  Additionally, we continue to believe in the Ubuntu One file services, the quality of the code, and the user experience, so will release the code as open source software to give others an opportunity to build on this code to create an open source file syncing platform.

Customers who have an active annual subscription will have their unused fees refunded. We will calculate the refund amount from today’s announcement, even though the service will remain available until 1 June and data available for a further two months.

We will contact customers separately with additional information about what to expect.  We will also publish further blog posts with advice on how to download content and with details on the open sourcing of the code.

The shutdown will not affect the Ubuntu One single sign on service, the Ubuntu One payment service, or the backend U1DB database service.

We’ve always been inspired by the support, feedback and enthusiasm of our users and want to thank you for the support you’ve shown for Ubuntu One. We hope that you’ll continue to support us as together we bring a revolutionary experience to new devices.

 

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Inayaili de León Persson

This post is part of the series ‘Making ubuntu.com responsive‘.

At this point in time, once the pilot projects were either completed or underway, we had already:

We had a better understanding of what was involved in working on this type of project, with different constraints and work flows. With lots of ideas and questions floating in our minds, we decided that the best next step was for designers and front-end developers to spend two or three days right after the release of the new canonical.com website to discuss and capture the findings.

It’s important to take time to take in the pros and cons of certain approaches we try as a team, so that we can try to avoid repeating past mistakes and keep doing more of the things that make projects run smoothly and produce great results.

Developers sprintingDevelopers sprinting and a wall of sticky notes

Things we learned

Make sure you have a solid grid

Our new responsive grid seemed to adapt well from large to small screens (I will be publishing a post on this later in the series, so stay tuned!) and this was mostly because when we initially created the CSS and HTML we opted for using percentage and relative units rather than absolute units (like pixels).

Use Modernizr for feature detection

The introduction of Modernizr to our developer tools proved essential to easily detect features across browsers, such as SVG support, and provide adequate fallbacks and is something we’ll keep using in the future.

SVG icons and pictograms

We started the move from bitmap-based images to SVG for things like pictograms and UI elements. This was easy from a design perspective, as all of our icons and pictograms are already created as SVGs (as well as other formats). There were some hiccups when we tested the PNG fallback solution in some operating systems and browsers, like Opera Mini. But more on this in an upcoming post dedicated to images!

Things we had to work on

Defining visual layout across screen sizes

We were used to creating large, desktop-focused visuals and we had the tools to do so quickly — our style guide. Because the deadlines were looming, we decided we wouldn’t create lots of different mockups for each page in canonical.com and instead create flat mockups for large screen and work alongside the developers on how that would scale and flow in small and medium sized screens.

The wireframes were kept as linear as possible — they were more of a content and hierarchy overview to guide the visual designers — , and the content was produced so that it wasn’t too long for small screens.

Canonical wireframeA wireframe created for canonical.com

The problem with this approach was that, even though we all agreed with the general ways in which the content and visual elements would reflow from small to large screens, by creating comps for the large screen problems invariably arose and reflows that sounded great in our own minds didn’t really work as easily or smoothly as we thought.

It’s important that you define how you’re going to tackle this issue: in this case, canonical.com was designed from scratch, so it was more difficult to visualise how a large design could adapt to a small screen across the team. In the case of ubuntu.com, though, the tight scope means we’re adapting existing designs, so it makes sense to work almost exclusively in the browser and test it at the same time.

Canonical prototypesInitial small screen canonical.com prototypes: ‘needs work’

In the future, when we need to produce mockups we will make sure they are created initially for smaller screens and then for larger screens. When mockups aren’t necessary — for example, if we’re creating pages based on existing patterns — we are already building directly in code, for small screens first, and enhancements are added as the available screen space gets bigger.

Animations

Even though the addition of CSS animations to our repertoire made for more interesting pages, making sure that they are designed to work well and look good across different screen sizes proved harder than expected.

In the future, we’ll need to carefully think about how having (or not having) an animation impacts small screens, how the animation should work from small to large screens, and what the fallback(s) should be, instead of assuming that the developers can simply rescale them.

The process going forward

As a final note, it’s important to mention that in a fast-paced project, where decisions need to be made quickly and several people are involved in the project, you should keep a register of those decisions in a central location, where everyone can access them. This could be anything from a solution for a bug to even the decision of not fixing an issue, along with the reasoning behind it.

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John Zannos

Canonical and Cisco share a common vision around the direction of the cloud and the application-driven datacentre.  We believe both need to quickly respond to an application’s needs and be highly elastic.

Cisco’s announcement of an open approach with OpFlex is a great step towards to an application centric cloud and datacenter. Cisco Application Centric Infrastructure policy engine (APIC) makes the policy model APIs and documentation open to the marketplace. These policies will be freely usable by an emerging ecosystem that is adopting an open policy model. Canonical and Cisco are aligned in efforts to leverage open models to accelerate innovation in the cloud and datacenter.

Cisco’s ACI operational model will drive multi-vendor innovation, bringing greater agility, simplicity and scale.  Opening the ACI policy engine (APIC) to multi-vendor infrastructure is a positive step to open source cloud and datacenter operations.  This aligns with the Canonical open strategy for the cloud and datacenter.  Canonical is a firm believer in a strong and open ecosystem.  We take great pride that you can build an OpenStack cloud on Ubuntu from all the major participants in the OpenStack ecosystem (Cisco, Dell, HP, Mirantis and more).  The latest OpenStack Foundation survey of production OpenStack deployments found 55% of them on Ubuntu – that’s over twice the number of deployments than the next operating system. We believe a healthy and open ecosystem is the best way to ensure great choice for our collective customers.

Canonical is pleased to be a member of Cisco’s OpFlex ecosystem.  Canonical and Cisco intend to collaborate in the standards process. As the standard is finalised, Cisco and Canonical will integrate their company’s technology to improve the customer experience. This includes alignment of Canonical’s Juju and KVM with Cisco’s ACI model.

Cisco and Canonical believe there are opportunities to leverage Ubuntu, Ubuntu OpenStack and Juju, Canonical’s service orchestration, with Cisco’s ACI policy-based model.  We see many companies moving to Ubuntu and Ubuntu OpenStack that use Cisco network and compute technology. The collaboration of Canonical with Cisco towards an application centric cloud and datacenter is an opportunity for our mutual customers.

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Nicholas Skaggs

Time to test trusty!

Say that three times fast. Time to test trusty,
time to test trusty, time to test trusty!
Ahh it's my favorite time of the cycle. This is the part were we all get serious, go a little bit crazy, and end super excited to release a new version of ubuntu into the world. This time it's even more special as the new version is a brand new LTS, which we look forward to supporting for the next 5 years.


The developers and early adopters have been working hard all cycle to put forth the best version of ubuntu to date. For you! For all of us! It's time to fix bugs, do last minute polish and prepare for the release candidate which will occur around April 11th.

We need you!
This is were you dear reader come in. You see despite their good looks and wonderful sense of humor and charm, the release team doesn't like to release final images of ubuntu that haven't been thoroughly tested.

The release team is ready to pounce on untested images
We need testing, and further, we need the results of that testing! We need to hear from you. Passing test results matter just as much as failures. The way to record these results is via the isotracker; we can't read your mind sadly!

How to help
Mark your calendars now for April 11th - April 16th. Pick a good date for you and plan to download and test the release candidate image. You'll see a new milestone on the tracker, and an announcement here as well when the image is ready. I won't let you forget, promise!

Execute the testcases for ubuntu and your favorite flavor images. Install or upgrade your machine and keep on the lookout for any issues you might find, however small.

I need a guide!
Sound scary? It's simpler than you might think. Checkout the guide and other links at the top of the tracker for help.

I got stuck!
Help is a simple email away, or for realtime help try #ubuntu-quality on freenode. Here's all the ways of getting ahold of the quality team who would love to help.

Community
Plan to help test and verify the images for trusty and take part in making ubuntu! You'll join a community of people who do there best everyday to ensure ubuntu is an amazing experience. Here's saying thanks, from me and everyone else in the community for your efforts. Happy testing!

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Mark Shuttleworth

Every detail matters, and building great software means taking time to remove the papercuts. Ubuntu has over the past 5 years been refined in many ways to feel amazingly comfortable on the cloud. In the very early days of EC2 growth the Ubuntu team recognised how many developers were enjoying fast access to infrastructure on demand, and we set about polishing up Ubuntu to be amazing on the cloud.

This was a big program of work; the Linux experience had many bad assumptions baked in – everything had been designed to be installed once on a server then left largely untouched for as long as possible, but cloud infrastructure was much more dynamic than that.

We encouraged our team to use the cloud as much as possible, which made the work practical and motivated people to get it right themselves. If you want to catch all the little scratchy bits, make it part of your everyday workflow. Today, we have added OpenStack clouds to the mix, as well as the major public clouds. Cloud vendors have taken diverse approaches to IAAS so we find ourselves encouraging developers to use all of them to get a holistic view, and also to address any cloud-specific issues that arise. But the key point is – if it’s great for us, that’s a good start on making it great for everybody.

Then we set about interviewing cloud users and engaging people who were deep into cloud infrastructure to advise on what they needed. We spent a lot of time immersing ourselves in the IAAS experience through the eyes of cloud users – startups and industrial titans, universities and mid-sized, everyday companies. We engaged the largest and fastest-moving cloud users like Netflix, who have said they enjoy Ubuntu as a platform on the cloud. And that in turn drove our prioritisation of paper-cuts and significant new features for cloud users.

We also looked at the places people actually spend time developing. Lots of them are on Ubuntu desktops, but Windows and MacOS are popular too, and it takes some care to make it very easy for folks there to have a great devops experience.

All of this is an industrial version of the user experience design process that also powers our work on desktop, tablet and phone – system interfaces and applications. Devops, sysadmins, developers and their managers are humans too, so human-centric design principles are just as important on the infrastructure as they are on consumer electronics and consumer software. Feeling great at the command line, being productive as an operator and a developer, are vital to our community and our ecosystem. We keep all the potency of Linux with the polish of a refined, designed environment.

Along the way we invented and designed a whole raft of key new pieces of Ubuntu. I’ll write about one of them, cloud-init, next. The net effect of that work makes Ubuntu really useful on every cloud. That’s why the majority of developers using IAAS do so on Ubuntu.

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facundo

PyCamp 2014


Se fue otro PyCamp. Como siempre, genial. Lo charlaba con Moni, es notable como el formato del evento no decae año a año, ¡siguen siendo bárbaros!

Eso sí, voy a tratar de innovar en lo que es la descripción del mismo, escaparme de hacer una cronología, y orientar más el relato a las situaciones.


Llegando y saliendo

Los viajes bien. Como el año pasado, me quedé hasta "cerrar el evento", y también como el año pasado, luego de vaciar el lugar, entregar la llave y eso, nos quedamos algunos tomando unas cervezas en el bar del lugar, hasta que íbamos partiendo en función del horario de bondi de cada uno.

La diferencia estuvo en la llegada, ya que este año no tuvimos al Joven Ocupado en la Accesibilidad y Conectividad (JOAC), así que tuvimos que armar toda la infraestructura de red sin saber demasiado. Viajé con Nico Demarchi, así que al llegar nos pusimos con eso... y aunque no es rocket science, tampoco es trivial, y estuvimos como tres horas para dejar todo lindo!

Una Antena Sable Laser


Proyectos

El proyecto mío en el que más trabajé fue Encuentro, en parte en esta biblioteca para parsear SWFs que vengo necesitando, pero también porque para este proyecto se anotaron varias personas... ¡y metieron un montón de laburo! Tres branches de Mica Bressan, dos de Nico y uno de Emiliano Dalla Verde Marcozzi, y creo que hay otro más dando vuelta por ahí.

También trabajé en un proyecto nuevo, que arrancó en este PyCamp. Es WeFree, un proyecto para almacenar colaborativamente claves de redes, de manera de hacer que tu computadora o teléfono se conecte automáticamente en todos los lados posibles. Participé todo el primer día, en el diseño general y luego armé la interfaz gráfica para la compu (no toda, pero sí la base, dejando algo usable).

Algo en lo que también trabajé desde cero, pero que no sé si se puede calificar como proyecto, fue algo así como la "búsqueda del testrunner perfecto", que describí en este post. Con la ayuda de Martín Gaitán atacamos como base a nose, y le fuimos agregando plugins y probándolos. El experimento fue un éxito, logramos todo lo que queríamos, ya voy a poner un post acá explicando bien el detalle.

Hubo un proyecto que llevé pero en el que yo no trabajé, que fue Linkode, pero Seba Alvarez estuvo haciendo cosas copadas con la interfaz, me tiene que mandar el código.

Finalmente, arranqué ayudando a un par de chicos a migrar código a Python 3, pero no hicimos mucho de eso (aunque aprendimos algunos detalles interesantes).

Laburando en Encuentro con Nico, Mica y Emi (que sacó la foto)


Las noches

Sólo tres, porque el último día uno viaja, pero las aprovechamos a full :)... la gente se va a dormir sorprendentemente tarde luego de lo arduo que son los días. Bah, más sorprendente es que muchos al otro día nos levantamos temprano :p

La primer noche jugué a un juego que no conocía, el Munchkin, ¡y gané!. Está bueno el juego, pero es uno de esos que tenés que leer mil cartitas, entonces las primeras diez veces que jugás se hace un poco lento.

El sábado fue la reunión de PyAr, y después charlé con gente y programé algo, no jugué a nada.

La tercer noche fue doble... Munchkin primero (ganó Matías), y luego jugamos al Carrera de Mente. Hacía como 15 años que no jugaba un Carrera de Mente, no me acordaba que fuese tan divertido! Nos reimos mucho.

Carrera de Mente


Notas de color

Este año Alecu no pudo venir... y Diego Sarmentero se le ocurrió la idea de nombrarlo Lider Inspiracional, y mandó a imprimir dos cuadros, uno para tenerlo durante el día, y otro para tenerlo luego de las cenas.

A nivel de "actividades al aire libre", este año volvimos a repetir la caminata del año pasado hasta el río (fuimos un grupito de unos 10), y también hice paddle con Hugo Ruscitti, Emilio Ramirez y Hernán Lozano. ¡Jugamos un montón! Bah, menos de dos horas, pero nos arreglamos para meter dos partidos (cinco sets rápidos).

También hicimos una key signing party, y Juanjo Ciarlante nos charló un poco de seguridad y buenas costumbres.

Todos


Conclusión

Bien simple, lo afirmo una vez más: ¡PyCamp es el mejor evento del año! (todas las fotos acá).

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Colin Ian King

In the last 6 months the Firmware Test Suite (fwts) has seen a lot of development and bug fixing activity in preparation for the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Trusty release.  It is timely to give a brief overview of new features and improvements that have landed in this busy development cycle:

UEFI uefidump, additional support for:

  • KEK, KEKDefault, PK, PKDefault global variables scan
  • db, dbx, dbt variables scan
  • messaging device path: add Fibre Channel Ex subtype-21, ATA subtype-18, Fibre Channel Ex subtype-21, USB WWID subtype-16, VLAN subtype-20, Device Logical Unit subtype-17, SAS Ex subtype-22, iSCSI subtype-19, NVM Express namespace subtype-23, Media Protocol subtype-5, PIWG Firmware File subtype-6, PIWG Firmware Volume subtype-7 and extend the Messaging Device Path type Vendor subtype-10.
ACPI related:
  • Update to ACPICA version 20140325 
  • Add S3 hybrid suspend / resume support with new --s3-hybrid option 
  • Improved reporting of errors on ACPI evaluation errors
  • New _PLD, _CRS and _PRS dump utilities
  • New General Purpose Events (GPE) dump utility
  • --disassemble-aml option accepts an output directory argument
  • Add DBG2, DBGP, SPCR and MCHI tables to acpidump utility 
  • Add -R, --rsdp option to specify the RSDP address
  • _IFT, _SRV, _PIC, _UDP, _UPP, _PMM, _MSG, _GAI, _CID, _CDM and _CBA checks added to method test
SMBIOS:
  • dmicheck: add more checks for invalid DMI fields
Architecture related:
  • Support for i386 amd64 armel armhf aarch64 ppc64 ppc64e.  fwts support for aarch64 was a notable achievement
Kernel Log Scanning:
  • Sync klog scanning with 3.13 kernel error messages
Miscellaneous:
  • Remove unused LaunchPad bug tagging
  • Add Ivybridge and Haswell MSRs to msr test
  • Check CPU maximum frequencies
The fwts regression tests have been incorporated into the fwts repository and can be run with "make check". These tests are automatically run at build time to catch regressions.  fwts is now being regularly checked with static code analysis tools smatch, cppcheck and Coverity Scan and this has helped find memory leaks and numerous corner case bugs.  We also exercise fwts with a database of ACPI tables from real hardware and synthetically generated broken tables to check for regressions. 

Contributors to fwts in the current release cycle are (in alphabetical order):  Alex Hung, Colin King, Ivan Hu, Jeffrey Bastian, Keng-Yu Lin, Matt Fleming.  Also, thanks to Naresh Bhat for testing and feedback for the aarch64 port and to Robert Moore for the on-going work with ACPICA.

As ever, all contributions are welcome, including bug reports and feature requests.  Visit the fwts wiki page for more details.

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Maarten Ectors

A few months ago, Canonical started to work with a set of partners to address the challenges around single sign-on for new services within an organisation. We created a committee to develop a solution that would ensure service authentication could happen instantaneously, saving organisations often months in the roll out of new services.

Today, we’re announcing that two of our partners, Gluu and ForgeRock, will lead the Committee to develop the standards which will enable organisations to integrate any enterprise-grade security infrastructure in minutes with any compliant application. The Committee will define the relationships needed to enable orchestration between applications and common security components, like user provisioning systems, authentication services, and API access management. Where possible, we’ll use existing standards and best practices. For example, OpenID Connect could be adopted for authentication, the Simple Cloud Identity Management (SCIM) API for user provisioning, and the User Managed Access protocol (UMA) for API access management.

Juju is already saving enterprises time by enabling rapid deployment, integration and scaling of sophisticated applications across a number of different platforms. With the work of the Committee, Juju  could have a significant impact on how organisations design and deploy a cloud infrastructure that scales to meet modern security requirements, making it easier for developers to move away from managing user accounts and for domains to offer stronger authentication and trust elevation.

“By providing a standard Juju framework for application security, we can reduce the ‘last mile’ cost that organisations face when securing an ever-expanding array of  websites and mobile applications.” said Lasse Andresen CTO at ForgeRock. “Driving down the deployment and operational costs are essential for improving security on the Internet.”

“The Juju labs project will enable businesses of all sizes to implement an enterprise-grade security infrastructure,” said Mike Schwartz, CEO at Gluu. “Our vendor agnostic and interoperable approach will support open source, SaaS and commercial applications. We want to give domains as much flexibility as possible to choose a security solution that makes sense for their requirements, and to integrate a wide array of applications quickly and easily. Canonical is a clear industry leader in orchestration, which is key to driving down the cost and complexity of domain security.”

More information

Gluu
Juju Labs

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Inayaili de León Persson

Latest from the web team — March 2014

Spring has officially (but not technically…) arrived, and we’re getting busier and busier in preparation for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS release next month.

In the last few weeks we’ve worked on:

  • Ubuntu Resources: we’ve just launched a new version of the site
  • Ubuntu.com: we’ve launched a localised Chinese homepage that highlights Ubuntu Kylin
  • Juju GUI: Matthieu has worked on a new icon set for charms which will be released in the next few weeks
  • Fenchurch: we completely rewrote the Juju charm that updates canonical.com
  • Landscape sprint: Carla has been to Rome for the Landscape team’s sprint, where she helped to wireframe changes for 14.04 and beyond

And we’re currently working on:

  • Ubuntu Resources: we’re now working on expanding the styles of the site to accommodate desktop screen sizes and adding even more features
  • Ubuntu 14.04 release: we’re reskinning the OpenStack Horizon dashboard for the OpenStack 14.04 release, and we’ve started working on updated images for the release
  • Responsive ubuntu.com: we’ve been testing on various devices and fixing lots of little rendering issues; we’ve also been tackling larger challenges like the navigation and footer; you can follow our progress in the series of posts we’re publishing on this blog!
  • Fenchurch: we’re currently updating the contributions and download pages so that it works on Fenchurch
  • Juju: we’re doing some user research to understand engineer workflows
  • Cloud section: we’ve finished wireframing and the first round of designs for the 14.04 refresh of www.ubuntu.com’s cloud section
  • Partners section of ubuntu.com: we’re at the wireframing stage of this project

This month we’ve also welcomed a new member of the team: Robin is our new back-end developer.

Testing Ubuntu Resources on a Kindle Fire HDTesting Ubuntu Resources on a Kindle Fire HD

Have you got any questions or suggestions for us? Would you like to hear about any of these projects and tasks in more detail? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

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Mark Baker

It is pretty well known that most of the OpenStack clouds running in production today are based on Ubuntu. Companies like Comcast, NTT, Deutsche Telekom, Bloomberg and HP all trust Ubuntu Server as the right platform to run OpenStack. A fair proportion of the Ubuntu OpenStack users out there also engage Canonical to provide them with technical support, not only for Ubuntu Server but OpenStack itself. Canonical provides full Enterprise class support for both Ubuntu and OpenStack and has been supporting some of the largest, most demanding customers and their OpenStack clouds since early 2011. This gives us a unique insight into what it takes to support a production OpenStack environment.

For example, in the period January 1st 2014 to end of March, Canonical processed hundreds of OpenStack support tickets averaging over 100 per month. During that time we closed 92 bugs whilst customers opened 99 new ones. These are bugs found by real customers running real clouds and we are pleased that they are brought to our attention, especially the hard ones as it helps makes OpenStack better for everyone.

The type of support tickets we see is interesting as core OpenStack itself only represents about 12% of the support traffic. The majority of problems arise between the interaction of OpenStack, the operating system and other infrastructure components – fibre channel drivers used by nova volume, or, QEMU/libvirt issues during upgrades for example. Fixing these problems requires deep expertise Ubuntu as well as OpenStack which is why customers choose Canonical to support them.

In my next post I’ll dig a little deeper into supporting OpenStack and how this contributes to the OpenStack ecosystem.

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Inayaili de León Persson

Ubuntu Resources — beta 2!

A new version of the Ubuntu Resources site is now live, with many tweaks and layout improvements targeted mainly at visitors using medium-sized screens, such as tablets.

Resources homepage on a Kindle Fire HDUbuntu Resources homepage viewed on a Kindle Fire HD

Filtered search

If you search for a specific term, you can now filter the search results by topic (such as cloud, phone, support, etc.) or type (case study, white paper, event, etc.). Further down the line, we’d like to expand this so people are able to sort the results by date, popularity and more, and filter by date, language and other options.

Search result filtersSearch results filters

Still on the subject of search, some users mentioned that their phones didn’t necessarily show a “Go” button in the keypad when typing inside the search box, so we’ve added a search icon which doubles as a “Go” button inside the input field but doesn’t get in the way if you have no need for it.

Search input field on a Nexus 7Search input field, viewed on a Nexus 7

Layout and font sizes

We’ve added a maximum width to text areas instead of the full width text blocks that were optimised for small screen view, so visitors to the site using tablets and other medium sized screens won’t have to deal with really long text lines. This can be seen in screens such as the homepage and topic landing pages, but most importantly in single article views, where we’ve also moved the content that followed the article text to the right hand side. In future versions of the site, we might review the order in which these right column elements appear and perhaps their content too.

News page on iPadA news page with sidebar viewed on an iPad

Following the typographic scale that we introduced in the new canonical.com website, the font sizes and spacing between elements in medium sized views have also been updated: everything is slightly larger, as there is more screen real estate and elements can have a little more breathing space.

We’ve made some tweaks to the spacing between elements, namely in the homepage and landing pages, like adding more space between articles to make lists clearer to understand.

‘Add to’

We’ve also added links to “Add to Instapaper” and “Add to Pocket” in single article view screens, which we hope will be useful for anyone that wants to save a resource for later.

Colour consistency

A hardly noticeable change, but one that we thought was important in order to keep consistency across different Ubuntu products and platforms was the update of the grey colour we were using in tags, labels and event details. The new grey now matches the new phone greys: we went from #AEA79F to a slightly darker and more readable #888888. If warm grey is used on dark aubergine, the HEX reference is now #B2B2B2.

Darker grey textDarker grey in event details

Even more changes

We’ve also fixed many other bugs and issues like 404 pages, incorrect tagging, elements’ positioning, incorrect title tags, errors in the email sharing default text, and more.

Next steps

In the next few weeks we’ll be focusing on extending our styles to accommodate larger screens nicely and improving the medium screen size layouts based on the feedback we’ll receive from users.

We hope you have a look at the updated site and let us know your thoughts on it. You can use the handy feedback link at the bottom of the site or just comment here!

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Daniel Holbach

ubuntu-phone-three-1

There is lots of excitement around Ubuntu on phones and tablets. Especially with two handsets coming out later this year and features and more beauty landing every single week, it’s a lot of fun to watch the whole story unfold.

What many haven’t realised yet, is how easy it is to write apps for Ubuntu and that new apps are not only going to run on phones and tablets, but also on the desktop as well. To remedy that we put some work into making it easy to go out to events and give talks about Ubuntu and its app ecosystem.

What we have available now is:

  • improved presentation materials,
  • we made it easier for newcomers to step in, learn and present,
  • we reach out to app developer communities and our LoCo teams at the same time.

We have two great sets of events coming up soon: the Ubuntu Global Jam coming up in just 2 weeks and soon followed by the 14.04 release and its release parties.

Interested? So how do you prepare? Easy:

  • As somebody who can organise events, but might need to find a speaker: Ask in #ubuntu-app-devel on Freenode or on the ubuntu-app-devel@ mailing list, to see if anyone is in your area to give a talk. Ask on your LoCo’s or LUG’s mailing list as well. Even if somebody who’s into programming hasn’t developed using Ubuntu’s SDK yet, they should be able to familiarise themselves with the technologies quite easily.
  • As somebody who has written code before and didn’t find the Ubuntu app development materials too challenging, but might need to find some help with organising the event: Ask on the loco-contacts@ mailing list. There are LoCos all around the world and most of them will be happy to see somebody give a talk at an event.

Whichever camp you’re in:

  • Check out our docs. They explain what’s required to make the event a success.
  • Join our Q&A session. It’ll be at 27 March 2014, 18:00 UTC on Ubuntu on Air. (The video of session today is up here.)
  • Talk to us. Just comment on the blog post and we can surely help you out somehow.

Let’s make this happen together. Writing apps for Ubuntu and publishing them has never been easier, and they’ll make Ubuntu on phones/tablets much more interesting, and will run on the desktop as well.

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Nicholas Skaggs

It may be hard to believe but the next, and dare I say, best, LTS for ubuntu is releasing very soon. We need your help in polishing out critical bugs and issues!

How can I help? 
To help test, visit the iso tracker milestone page for 'Trusty Beta 2'.  The goal is to verify the images in preparation for the release. Find those bugs! The information at the top of the page will help you if you need help reporting a bug or understanding how to test. 

So what's new? 
Besides the usual slew of updates to the applications, stack and kernel, unity has new goodies like minimize on click, menus in toolbar, new lockscreen, and borderless windows!

What if I'm late?
The testing runs through this Thursday March 27th, when the the images for beta 2 will be released. If you miss the deadline we still love getting results! Test against the daily image milestone instead.

Thanks and happy testing everyone!

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