Canonical Voices

pitti

On the last UDS we talked about migrating from upstart to systemd to boot Ubuntu, after Mark announced that Ubuntu will follow Debian in that regard. There’s a lot of work to do, but it parallelizes well once developers can run systemd on their workstations or in VMs easily and the system boots up enough to still be able to work with it.

So today I merged our systemd package with Debian again, dropped the systemd-services split (which wasn’t accepted by Debian and will be unnecessary now), and put it into my systemd PPA. Quite surprisingly, this booted a fresh 14.04 VM pretty much right away (of course there’s no Plymouth prettiness). The main two things which were missing were NetworkManager and lightdm, as these don’t have an init.d script at all (NM) or it isn’t enabled (lightdm). Thus the PPA also contains updated packages for these two which provide a proper systemd unit. With that, the desktop is pretty much fully working, except for some details like cron not running. I didn’t go through /etc/init/*.conf with a small comb yet to check which upstart jobs need to be ported, that’s now part of the TODO list.

So, if you want to help with that, or just test and tell us what’s wrong, take the plunge. In a 14.04 VM (or real machine if you feel adventurous), do

  sudo add-apt-repository ppa:pitti/systemd
  sudo apt-get update
  sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

This will replace systemd-services with systemd, update network-manager and lightdm, and a few libraries. Up to now, when you reboot you’ll still get good old upstart. To actually boot with systemd, press Shift during boot to get the grub menu, edit the Ubuntu stanza, and append this to the linux line: init=/lib/systemd/systemd.

For the record, if pressing shift doesn’t work for you (too fast, VM, or similar), enable the grub menu with

  sudo sed -i '/GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT/ s/^/#/' /etc/default/grub
  sudo update-grub

Once you are satisfied that your system boots well enough, you can make this permanent by adding the init= option to /etc/default/grub (and possibly remove the comment sign from the GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT lines) and run sudo update-grub again. To go back to upstart, just edit the file again, remove the init=sudo update-grub again.

I’ll be on the Debian systemd/GNOME sprint next weekend, so I feel reasonably well prepared now. :-)

Update: As the comments pointed out, this bricked /etc/resolv.conf. I now uploaded a resolvconf package to the PPA which provides the missing unit (counterpart to the /etc/init/resolvconf.conf upstart job) and this now works fine. If you are in that situation, please boot with upstart, and do the following to clean up:

  sudo rm /etc/resolv.conf
  sudo ln -s ../run/resolvconf/resolv.conf /etc/resolv.conf

Then you can boot back to systemd.

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Michael Hall

Bicentennial Man PosterEver since we started building the Ubuntu SDK, we’ve been trying to find ways of bringing the vast number of Android apps that exist over to Ubuntu. As with any new platform, there’s a chasm between Android apps and native apps that can only be crossed through the effort of porting.

There are simple solutions, of course, like providing an Android runtime on Ubuntu. On other platforms, those have shown to present Android apps as second-class citizens that can’t benefit from a new platform’s unique features. Worse, they don’t provide a way for apps to gradually become first-class citizens, so chasm between Android and native still exists, which means the vast majority of apps supported this way will never improve.

There are also complicates solutions, like code conversion, that try to translate Android/Java code into the native platform’s language and toolkit, preserving logic and structure along the way. But doing this right becomes such a monumental task that making a tool to do it is virtually impossible, and the amount of cleanup and checking needed to be done by an actual developer quickly rises to the same level of effort as a manual port would have. This approach also fails to take advantage of differences in the platforms, and will re-create the old way of doing things even when it doesn’t make sense on the new platform.

Screenshot from 2014-04-19 14:44:22NDR takes a different approach to these, it doesn’t let you run our Android code on Ubuntu, nor does it try to convert your Android code to native code. Instead NDR will re-create the general framework of your Android app as a native Ubuntu app, converting Activities to Pages, for example, to give you a skeleton project on which you can build your port. It won’t get you over the chasm, but it’ll show you the path to take and give you a head start on it. You will just need to fill it in with the logic code to make it behave like your Android app. NDR won’t provide any of logic for you, and chances are you’ll want to do it slightly differently than you did in Android anyway, due to the differences between the two platforms.

Screenshot from 2014-04-19 14:44:31To test NDR during development, I chose the Telegram app because it was open source, popular, and largely used Android’s layout definitions and components. NDR will be less useful against apps such as games, that use their own UI components and draw directly to a canvas, but it’s pretty good at converting apps that use Android’s components and UI builder.

After only a couple days of hacking I was able to get NDR to generate enough of an Ubuntu SDK application that, with a little bit of manual cleanup, it was recognizably similar to the Android app’s.

This proves, in my opinion, that bootstrapping an Ubuntu port based on Android source code is not only possible, but is a viable way of supporting Android app developers who want to cross that chasm and target their apps for Ubuntu as well. I hope it will open the door for high-quality, native Ubuntu app ports from the Android ecosystem.  There is still much more NDR can do to make this easier, and having people with more Android experience than me (that would be none) would certainly make it a more powerful tool, so I’m making it a public, open source project on Launchpad and am inviting anybody who has an interest in this to help me improve it.

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Rick Spencer

Adding Interactivity to a Map with Popovers

On Friday I started my app "GetThereDC". I started by adding the locations of all of the Bikeshare stations in DC to a map. Knowing where the stations are is great, but it's a bummer when you go to a station and there are no bikes, or there are no empty parking spots. Fortunately, that exact information is in the XML feed, so I just need a way to display it.  
The way I decided to do it is to make the POI (the little icons for each station on the map) clickable, and when the user clicks the POI to use the Popover feature in the Ubuntu Components toolkit to display the data.

Make the POI Clickable

When you want to make anyting "clickable" in QML, you just use a MouseArea component. Remember that each POI is constructed as a delegate in the MapItemView as an Image component. So all I have to do is add a MouseArea inside the Image and respond to the Click event. So, not my image looks like this:
           sourceItem: Image  
{
id: poiImage
width: units.gu(2)
height: units.gu(2)
source: "images/bike_poi.png"
MouseArea
{
anchors.fill: parent
onClicked:
{
print("The POI was clicked! ")
}
}
}
This can be used anywhere in QML to make an image respond to a click. MouseArea, of course, has other useful events as well, for things like onPressed, onPressAndHold, etc...

Add the Roles to the XmlListModel

I already know that I'll want something to use for a title for each station, the address, as well as the number of bikes and the number of parking slots. Looking at the XML I can see that the "name" property is the address, so that's a bonus. Additionally, I can see the other properties I want are called "nbBikes" and "nbEmptyDocks". So, all I do is add those three new roles to the XmlListModel that I constructed before:
   XmlListModel  
{
id: bikeStationModel
source: "https://www.capitalbikeshare.com/data/stations/bikeStations.xml"
query: "/stations/station"
XmlRole { name: "lat"; query: "lat/string()"; isKey: true }
XmlRole { name: "lng"; query: "long/string()"; isKey: true }
XmlRole {name: "name"; query: "name/string()"; isKey: true}
XmlRole {name: "available"; query: "nbBikes/string()"; isKey: true}
XmlRole {name: "freeSlots"; query: "nbEmptyDocks/string()"; isKey: true}
}

Make a Popover Component

The Ubuntu SDK offers some options for displaying additional information. In old school applications these might be dialog boxes, or message boxes. For the purposes of this app, Popover looks like the best bet. I suspect that over time the popover code might get a little complex, so I don't want it to be too deeply nested inside the MapItemView, as the code will become unwieldy. So, instead I decided to add a file called BikeShareStationPopover.qml to the components sub-directory. Then I copy and pasted the sample code in the documentation to get started. 

To make a popover, you start with a Component tag, and then add a popover tag inside that. Then, you can put pretty much whatever you want into that Popover. I am going to go with a Column and use ListItem components because I think it will look nice, and it's the easiest way to get started. Since I already added the XmlRoles I'll just use those roles in the construction of each popover. 

Since I know that I will be adding other kinds of POI, I decided to add a Capital Bike Share logo to the top of the list so users will know what kind of POI they clicked. I also added a close button just to be certain that users don't get confused about how to go back to the map. So, at the end of they day, I just have a column with ListItems:
 import QtQuick 2.0  
import Ubuntu.Components 0.1
import Ubuntu.Components.ListItems 0.1 as ListItem
import Ubuntu.Components.Popups 0.1
Component
{
id: popoverComponent
Popover
{
id: popover
Column
{
id: containerLayout
anchors
{
left: parent.left
top: parent.top
right: parent.right
}
ListItem.SingleControl
{
control: Image
{
source: "../images/CapitalBikeshare_Logo.jpg"
height: units.gu(5)
width: units.gu(5)
}
}
ListItem.Header { text: name}
ListItem.Standard { text: available + " bikes available" }
ListItem.Standard { text: freeSlots + " parking spots available"}
ListItem.SingleControl
{
highlightWhenPressed: false
control: Button
{
text: "Close"
onClicked: PopupUtils.close(popover)
}
}
}
}

Make the Popover Component Appear on Click

So, now that I made the component code, I just need to add it to the MapItemView and make it appear on click. So, I add the tag and give it an id to the MapQuickItem Delegate, and change the onClicked handler for the MouseArea to open the popover:
 delegate: MapQuickItem  
{
id: poiItem
coordinate: QtPositioning.coordinate(lat,lng)
anchorPoint.x: poiImage.width * 0.5
anchorPoint.y: poiImage.height
z: 9
sourceItem: Image
{
id: poiImage
width: units.gu(2)
height: units.gu(2)
source: "images/bike_poi.png"
MouseArea
{
anchors.fill: parent
onClicked:
{
PopupUtils.open(bikeSharePopover)
}
}
}
BikeShareStationPopover
{
id: bikeSharePopover
}
}
And when I run the app, I can click on any POI and see the info I want! Easy!

Code is here

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Prakash Advani

The Communications-Electronics Security Group (CESG), the group within the UK Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) that assesses operating systems and software for security issues, has found that while no end-user operating system is as secure as they’d like it to be, Ubuntu 12.04 is the best of the lot.

In late 2013, the CESG looked at the security of the most popular end-user operating systems for desktops, smartphones, and tablets [PDF Link]. This included: Android 4.2, Android 4.2 on Samsung devices; iOS 6, Blackberry 10.1, Google’s Chrome OS 26, Ubuntu 12.04, Windows 7 and 8; Windows 8 RT, and Windows Phone 8. These were judged for their security suitability for OFFICIAL level use according to the UK Government Security Classifications (PDF Link). This is the UK’s government lowest security level.

 

Read more: http://www.zdnet.com/uks-security-branch-says-ubuntu-most-secure-end-user-os-7000025312/

 

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HUD shown over terminal app with commands visible

Most expert users know how powerful the command line is on their Ubuntu system, but one of the common criticisms of it is that the commands themselves are hard to discover and remember the exact syntax for. To help a little bit with this I've created a small patch to the Ubuntu Terminal which adds entries into the HUD so that they can be searched by how people might think of the feature. Hopefully this will provide a way to introduce people to the command line, and provide experienced users with some commands that they might have not known about on their Ubuntu Phone. Let's look at one of the commands I added:

UnityActions.Action {
  text: i18n.tr("Networking Status")
  keywords: i18n.tr("Wireless;Ethernet;Access Points")
  onTriggered: ksession.sendText("\x03\nnm-tool\n")
}

This command quite simply prints out the status of the networking on the device. But some folks probably don't think of it as networking, they just want to search for the wireless status. By using the HUD keywords feature we're able to add a list of other possible search strings for the command. Now someone can type wireless status into the HUD and figure out the command that they need. This is a powerful way to discover new functionality. Plus (and this is really important) these can all be translated into their local language.

It is tradition in my family to spend this weekend looking for brightly colored eggs that have been hidden. If you update your terminal application I hope you'll be able to enjoy the same tradition this weekend.

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Rick Spencer

It's Easy and Fun to Write Map Based Apps

Yesterday I started work on an app that I personally want to use. I don't have a car, so I use services like Metro Bus, Metro Rail, Car2Go, and BikeShare around DC all the time. It's annoying to go to each different web page or app to get the information that I want, so I decided to write an app that combines it all for me in one place.

After asking around, I settled on a best practice for Ubuntu map apps, and I was pointed to this excellent code as a basis:
http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~yohanboniface/osmtouch/trunk/view/head:/OSMTouch.qml

It was so easy and fun once I got started, that I decided to show the world. So, here we go.

I started with a "Simple UI" project. Then I deleted the default column that it started with, and I set the title of the Page to an empty string. While I was at it, I changed the height and width to be more like a phone's dimensions to make testing a little easier. So my starter code for an emply Window looks like this:
 import QtQuick 2.0  
import Ubuntu.Components 0.1
import "components"
MainView {
objectName: "mainView"
applicationName: "com.ubuntu.developer.rick-rickspencer3.MapExample"
width: units.gu(40)
height: units.gu(60)
Page
{
title: i18n.tr("")
}
}
So what's missing now is a map. First I need to import the parts of Qt where I get location and map information, so I add these imports:
 import QtPositioning 5.2  
import QtLocation 5.0
Then I can use the Map tag to add a Map to the MainView. I do four things in the Map to make it show up. First, I tell it to fill it's parent (normal for any component). Then I set it's center property. I choose to do this using a coordinate. Note that you can't make a coordinate in a declarative way, you have to construct it like below. The center property tells the map the latitude and longitude to be centered on. Then I choose the zoom level, which determines the scale of the map. Finally, I need to specify the plug in. For various reasons, I choose to use the Open Street Maps plugin, though feel free to experiment with others. So, a basic funcitonal map looks like this:
   Page  
{
title: i18n.tr("")
Map
{
anchors.fill: parent
center: QtPositioning.coordinate(38.87, -77.045)
zoomLevel: 13
plugin: Plugin { name: "osm"}
}
}
When I run it, I get a lot of functionality for free. On the desktop I can drag the map, and when I run the app on my phone or tablet, I can pinch to zoom in or out. All that functionality comes for free. Of course, you are free to add mapping controls as desired, but I find that map works well out of the box, at least on a device that supports pinch and zoom.


Typically, a map displays little pinpoints. These are often referred to as Points of Interest, or more typically "POI". It's delightfully easy to populate your map with POI using our old friend XmlListModel. First, you will need some XML that has location information. For this exmaple, I am going to use the Bike Share feed for Washington, DC. It's easy to get and to parse, so it makes a nice example. You can see the feed here:
https://www.capitalbikeshare.com/data/stations/bikeStations.xml

So let's use it to set up our XmlListModel. First, of course, we need to import the XmlListModel functionality.


 import QtQuick.XmlListModel 2.0  
Next, we'll make the list model, and use the query and Roles functionality to set up the model with the latitude and longitude of each POI inside the model. This is *exactly* like using the XmlListModel for a typical list view. Very cool.
   XmlListModel  
{
id: bikeStationModel
source: "https://www.capitalbikeshare.com/data/stations/bikeStations.xml"
query: "/stations/station"
XmlRole { name: "lat"; query: "lat/string()"; isKey: true }
XmlRole { name: "lng"; query: "long/string()"; isKey: true }
}
Now that I have my list model set up, it's time to display them on the Map. We don't do that with a ListView, but rather wtih a MapItemView. This works exactly the same as a ListView, except it displays items on a map instead of in a list. Just like a ListView I need a delegate that will translate use data from the each item in the XmlListModel to create a UI element. In this case, it's a MapQuickItem instead of a ListItem (or similar). A MapQuickItem needs to know 4 things.

  1. The model where it will get the data. In this case, it's my XmlListModel, but it could be a javascript list or other model as well.
  2. A latitude and longitude for the POI, which I set up as roles in the XmlListModel.
  3. An offset for whatever I am using for POI so that it is positioned properly. In this case I have made a little pushpin image out of the bikeshare logo (I know it's bad I'll make a better one later :) ). The offset is set by anchorPoint, so I make the anchorPoint the bottom and center of of the pushpin. 
  4. Something to use for the POI. In this case, I choose to use an image. Note that it is important to use grid units, or the POI may appear too small on some devices, and too large on others. Grid Units make them "just right" on all devices, and ensure that users can click them on any device. 


So, here is my MapItemView that goes *inside* the Map tag. It's a MapItemView for the map, after all.

       MapItemView  
{
model: bikeStationModel
delegate: MapQuickItem
{
id: poiItem
coordinate: QtPositioning.coordinate(lat,lng)
anchorPoint.x: poiImage.width * 0.5
anchorPoint.y: poiImage.height
sourceItem: Image
{
id: poiImage
width: units.gu(2)
height: units.gu(2)
source: "bike_poi.png"
}
}
}
Now when I run the app, the POI are displayed. As you would expect, when the user moves the Map, the MapItemView automatically displays the correct POI. It's really that easy.


If you want to add interactivity, that's easy, you can simply add a MouseArea to the Image and then use things like Ubuntu.Components.Popups to popup additional information about the POI. 


This sample code is here: http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~rick-rickspencer3/+junk/MapExample/view/head:/MapExample.qml

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jono

My apologies in advance for the shorter blog post about this, but like many other Ubuntu folks, I am absolutely exhausted right now. Everyone, across the board, has been working their collective socks off to make Ubuntu 14.04 LTS a fantastic release on desktop, server, and cloud, and pull together our next iteration of Ubuntu for smart-phones and tablets. Consequently, when the trigger is pulled to share our final product with the world, release day is often less of a blistering and energetic woo-hoo, but more of an exhausted but satisfying oh-yeah (complete with beer firmly clenched in hand).

I am hugely proud of this release. The last six months have arguably been our busiest yet. No longer are we just working on desktop and server editions of Ubuntu, but we are building for the cloud and full convergence across the client. No longer are we “just” pulling together the fruits of upstream software projects but we are building our own platform too; the Ubuntu SDK, developer eco-system, charm store, image-based updates, push notifications, app lifecycle, and more. While the work has been intense and at times frantic, it has always been measured and carefully executed. Much of this has been thanks to many of our most under-thanked people; the members of our tremendous QA and CI teams.

Today, tomorrow, and for weeks to come our users, the press, the industry, and others will assess our work in Ubuntu 14.04 across these different platforms, and I am very confident they will love what they see. Ubuntu 14.04 embodies the true spirit of Ubuntu; innovation, openness, and people.

But as we wait to see the reviews let’s take a moment for each other. Now is a great time to reach out to each other and those Ubuntu folks you know (and don’t know) and share some kudos, some thanks, and some great stories. Until we get to the day where machines make software, today software is made by people and great software is built by great people.

Thanks everyone for every ounce of effort you fed into Ubuntu and our many flavors. We just took another big leap forward towards our future.

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ssweeny

Trusty TahrAnother very exciting release of Ubuntu for desktops and phones (oh, and I guess servers and cloud too) is out the door!

This is a Long Term Support release, which means it’s supported for five years, and it’s the release I’ll be trying to install on friends’ and family’s computers at every opportunity.

As usual, you can take a tour or go straight to the download page.

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Mark Baker

Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

Today is a big day for Ubuntu and a big day for cloud computing: Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is released. Everyone involved with Ubuntu can’t help but be impressed and stirred about the significance of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

We are impressed because Ubuntu is gaining extensive traction outside of the tech luminaries such as Netflix, Snapchat and wider DevOP community; it is being adopted by mainstream enterprises such as BestBuy. Ubuntu is dominant in public cloud with typically 60% market share of Linux workloads in the major cloud providers such as Amazon, Azure and Joyent. Ubuntu Server also is the fastest growing platform for scale out web computing having overtaken CentOS some six months ago. So Ubuntu server is growing up and we are proud of what it has become. We are stirred up by how the adoption of Ubuntu, coupled with the adoption of cloud and scale out computing is set grow enormously as it fast becomes an ‘enterprise’ technology.

Recently 70% of CIOs stated that they are going to change their technology and sourcing relationships within the next two or three years. This is in large part due to their planned transition to cloud, be it on premise using technologies such as Ubuntu OpenStack, in a public cloud or, most commonly, using combinations of both. Since the beginning of Ubuntu Server we have been preparing for this time, the time when a wholesale technology infrastructure change occurs and Ubuntu 14.04 arrives just as the change is starting to accelerate beyond the early adopters and technology companies. Enterprises now moving parts of their infrastructure to cloud can choose the technology best suited for the job: Ubuntu 14.04 LTS:

Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS at a glance

  • Based on version 3.13 of the Linux kernel

  • Includes the Icehouse release of OpenStack

  • Both Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS and OpenStack are supported until April 2019

  • Includes MAAS for automated hardware provisioning

  • Includes Juju for fast service deployment of 100+ common scale out applications such as MongoDB, Hadoop, node.js, Cloudfoundry, LAMP stack and Elastic Search

  • Ceph Firefly support

  • Openvswitch  2.0.x

  • Docker included & Docker’s own repository now populated with official     Ubuntu 14.04 images

  • Optimised Ubuntu 14.04 images certified for use on all leading public cloud     platforms – Amazon AWS, Microsoft Azure, Joyent Cloud, HP Cloud, Rackspace Cloud, CloudSigma and many others.

  • Runs on key hardware architectures: x86, x64,  Avoton, ARM64, POWER Systems

  • 50+ systems certified at launch from leading hardware vendors such as HP, Dell, IBM, Cisco and SeaMicro.

The advent of OpenStack, the switch to scale out computing and the move towards public cloud providers presents a perfect storm out of which Ubuntu is set to emerge the technology used ubiquitously for the next decade. That is why we are impressed and stirred by Ubuntu 14.04. We hope you are too. Download 14.04 LTS here

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Prakash Advani

Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is here.  Torrent is the preferred method for me.

Ubuntu 14.04
Torrent Links Direct Downloads
Ubuntu Desktop 14.04 64-Bit Torrent Main Server
Ubuntu Desktop 14.04 32-Bit Torrent Main Server
Ubuntu Server 14.04 64-Bit Torrent Main Server
Ubuntu Server 14.04 32-Bit Torrent Main Server

Other releases.

http://releases.ubuntu.com/14.04/ (Ubuntu Desktop and Server)
http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/14.04/release/ (Ubuntu Cloud Server)
http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/netboot/14.04/ (Ubuntu Netboot)
http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/edubuntu/releases/14.04/release/ (Edubuntu)

As always Have fun :)

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olli

Ubuntu 14.04 will be released today and you couldn’t resist the itch to go try the Unity 8 preview session on the Desktop. How underwhelming… there are almost no apps, and some don’t even work and overall it’s actually pretty unexciting… let’s change that in the next few chapters. First things first though… let’s look […]

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facundo

Primer cumpleaños de Male


El domingo pasado le festejamos el cumple del primer añito a Malena.

Lo hicimos en un salón, pero todo muy informal; la idea era que al aire libre iba a estar muy fresco, y necesitábamos mucho lugar para todos los invitados.

Lo pasamos bárbaro. Incluso Male, que tuvo un poco de fiebre durante un rato (estaba justo cortando dos muelas y un diente) se notó que jugó y disfrutó.

Moni y Male

Moni estuvo muchas semanas antes del cumple haciendo millón de cositas de decoración, y los últimos días, conmigo, armamos todo lo que es comida (excepto el pollo para los sanguchitos, de la madre de Moni, y las empanadas de atún, de mi vieja). ¡Es que en el cumpleaños era todo casero! Desde los sánguches de miga, hasta lo dulce.

Por mi parte, además de comestibles, me ocupé de la cartelera que pueden ver acá abajo (similar a la que había hecho para el año de Felu), y los videos (pueden ver el cortito y más emotivo haciendo click en la cartelera).

Un año, foto a foto

La verdad es que nos encanta hacer los cumpleaños así, pero es un esfuerzo descomunal. Ya para el quinto de Felu, en Octubre, supongo que cambiaremos la metodología... pero no estamos seguros :)

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Joseph Salisbury

Meeting Minutes

IRC Log of the meeting.

Meeting minutes.

Agenda

20140415 Meeting Agenda


ARM Status

Nothing new to report this week


Release Metrics and Incoming Bugs

Release metrics and incoming bug data can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kt-meeting.txt


Milestone Targeted Work Items

   apw    core-1311-kernel    4 work items   
      core-1311-cross-compilation    2 work items   
      core-1311-hwe-plans    1 work item   
   ogasawara    core-1403-hwe-stack-eol-notifications    2 work items   
   smb    servercloud-1311-openstack-virt    3 work items   


Status: Trusty Development Kernel

The 3.13.0-24.46 Ubuntu kernel in the Trusty archive is currently based on the v3.13.9 upstream stable kernel. The kernel is currently frozen
in preparation for our final 14.04 release this Thurs Apr 17. kernel.
We do not anticipate any uploads between now and Thurs. All patches
from here on out are subject to our Ubuntu SRU policy.
—–
Important upcoming dates:
Thurs Apr 17 – Ubuntu 14.04 Final Release (~2 days away)


Status: CVE’s

The current CVE status can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/cve/pkg/ALL-linux.html


Status: Stable, Security, and Bugfix Kernel Updates – Saucy/Raring/Quantal/Precise/Lucid

Status for the main kernels, until today (Mar. 25):

  • Lucid – Verification and Testing
  • Precise – Verification and Testing
  • Quantal – Verification and Testing
  • Saucy – Verification and Testing

    Current opened tracking bugs details:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kernel-sru-workflow.html

    For SRUs, SRU report is a good source of information:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/sru-report.html

    Schedule:

    cycle: 30-Mar through 26-Apr
    ====================================================================
    28-Mar Last day for kernel commits for this cycle
    30-Mar – 05-Apr Kernel prep week.
    06-Apr – 12-Apr Bug verification & Regression testing.
    17-Apr 14.04 Released
    13-Apr – 26-Apr Regression testing & Release to -updates.


Vote on upload rights for kamal.

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/KamalMostafa/KernelPPUApplication

(ogasawara> <apw) "kamal has shown himself to have a keen eye for detail, and a
strong sense of when to ask for help. I have no hesitations in
accepting him into the team. +1"
^^ from apw

Application approved.


Open Discussion or Questions? Raise your hand to be recognized

No open discussion.

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Nicholas Skaggs

As promised, here is your reminder that we are indeed fast approaching the final image for trusty. It's release week, which means it's time to put your energy and focus into finding and getting the remaining bugs documented or fixed in time for the release.

We need you!
The images are a culmination of effort from everyone. I know many have already tested and installed trusty and reported any issues encountered. Thank you! If you haven't yet tested, we need to hear from you!

How to help
The final milestone and images are ready; click here to have a look.

Execute the testcases for ubuntu and your favorite flavor images. Install or upgrade your machine and keep on the lookout for any issues you might find, however small.

I need a guide!
Sound scary? It's simpler than you might think. Checkout the guide and other links at the top of the tracker for help.

I got stuck!
Help is a simple email away, or for real-time help try #ubuntu-quality on freenode. Here are all the ways of getting ahold of the quality team who would love to help you.

Community
Plan to help test and verify the images for trusty and take part in making ubuntu! You'll join a community of people who do there best everyday to ensure ubuntu is an amazing experience. Here's saying thanks, from me and everyone else in the community for your efforts. Happy testing!

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Ben Howard

Many of our Cloud Image users have inquired about the availability of updated Ubuntu Cloud Images in response to the Heartbleed OpenSSL Vulnerability [1]. Ubuntu released update Ubuntu packages for OpenSSL 08 April 2014 [2]. Due to the exceptional circumstances and severity of the Heartbleed OpenSSL bug, Canonical has released new 12.04.4 LTS, 12.10 and 13.10 Cloud Images at [3].

Canonical is working with Amazon to get the Quickstart and the AWS Marketplace links updated. In the meantime, you can find new AMI ID's at [3] and [4]. Also, the snapshot's for Amazon have the volume-create permission granted on the latest images.

Windows Azure [5], Joyent [6] and HP [7, 8, 9] all have updated Cloud Images in their respective galleries.

If you are running an affected version of OpenSSL on 12.04 LTS, 12.10 or 13.10, you are strongly encouraged to update. For new instances, it is recommended to either use an image with a serial newer than 20140408, or update your OpenSSL  package immediately upon launch. Finally, if you need documentation on enabling unattended upgrades, please see [10].


[1] https://www.openssl.org/news/secadv_20140407.txt
[2] http://www.ubuntu.com/usn/usn-2165-1/
[3] 12.04.4 LTS: http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/precise/release-20140408/
     12.10: http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/quantal/release-20140409/
     13.10: http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/saucy/release-20140409.1/
[4] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/locator/ec2/
[5] Azure: Ubuntu-12_04_4-LTS-amd64-server-20140408-en-us-30GB
                 Ubuntu-12_10-amd64-server-20140409-en-us-30GB
                 Ubuntu-13_10-amd64-server-20140409.1-en-us-30GB
[6] Joyent Images:
        "ubuntu-certified-12.04", fe5aa6c0-0f09-4b1f-9bad-83e453bb74f3
        "ubuntu-certified-13.10", 049dfe64-6c37-4b88-8e89-4b8aa0f129f2
[7] HP US-West-1:
          12.04.4: 27be722e-d2d0-44f0-bebe-471c4af76039
          12.10: 065bb450-e5d0-4348-997d-e4d9e359b8fb
          13.10: 9d7d22d0-7d43-481f-a7eb-d93ea2791409
[8] HP US-East-1:
          12.04.4 8672f4c6-e33d-46f5-b6d8-ebbeba12fa02
          12.10: cbb44038-2602-48d5-b609-e05f4b61be9a
          13.10: 00398423-7429-4064-b781-fa0af00449c8
[9] Waiting on HP for replication to legacy regions az-{1,2,3}
[10] https://help.ubuntu.com/community/AutomaticSecurityUpdates

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Daniel Holbach

Shortly before the submission deadline last night we had some small technical hiccups in the Ubuntu Software Store. This was fixed resolved very quickly (thanks a lot everyone who worked on this!), but we decided to give everyone another day to make up for it.

The new deadline is today, 10th April 2014, 23:59 UTC.

Please all verify that your app still works, everythings is tidy, you submitted it to the store and filled out the submission form correctly. Here’s how.

Submit your app

This is obviously the most important bit and needs to happen first. Don’t leave this to the last minute. Your app might have to go through a couple of reviews before it’s accepted in the store. So plan in some time for that. Once it’s accepted and published in the store, you can always, much more quickly, publish an update.

Submit your app.

Register your participation

Once your app is in the store, you need to register your participation in the App Showdown. To make sure your application is registered for the contest and judges review it, you’ll need to fill in the participation form. You can start filling it in already and until the submission deadline, it should only take you 2 minutes to complete.

Fill out the submission form.

Questions?

If you have questions or need help, reach out (also rather sooner than later) to our great community of Ubuntu App Developers.

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Greg Lutostanski

We (the Canonical OIL dev team) are about to finish the production roll out of our OpenStack Interoperability Lab (OIL). It’s been an awesome time getting here so I thought I would take the opportunity to get everyone familiar, at a high level, with what OIL is and some of the cool technology behind it.

So what is OIL?

For starters, OIL is essentially continuous integration of the entire stack, from hardware preparation, to Operating System deployment, to orchestration of OpenStack and third party software, all while running specific tests at each point in the process. All test results and CI artifacts are centrally stored for analysis and monthly report generation.

Typically, setting up a cloud (particularly OpenStack) for the first time can be frustrating and time consuming. The potential combinations and permutations of hardware/software components and configurations can quickly become mind-numbing. To help ease the process and provide stability across options we sought to develop an interoperability test lab to vet as much of the ecosystem as possible.

To accomplish this we developed a CI process for building and tearing down entire OpenStack deployments in order to validate every step in the process and to make sure it is repeatable. The OIL lab is comprised of a pool of machines (including routers/switches, storage systems, and computer servers) from a large number of partners. We continually pull available nodes from the pool, setup the entire stack, go to town testing, and then tear it all back down again. We do this so many times that we are already deploying around 50 clouds a day and expect to scale this by a factor of 3-4 with our production roll-out. Generally, each cloud is composed of about 5-7 machines each but we have the ability to scale each test as well.

But that’s not all, in addition to testing we also do bug triage, defect analysis and work both internally and with our partners on fixing as many things as we can. All to ensure that deploying OpenStack on Ubuntu is as seamless a process as possible for both users and vendors alike.

Underlying Technology

We didn’t want to reinvent the wheel so, we are leveraging the latest Ubuntu technologies as well as some standard tools to do all of this. In fact the majority of the OIL infrastructure is public code you can get and start playing with right away!

Here is a small list of what we are using for all this CI goodness:

  • MaaS — to do the base OS install
  • Juju — for all the complicated OpenStack setup steps — and linking them together
  • Tempest — the standard test suite that pokes and prods OpenStack to ensure everything is working
  • Machine selections & random config generation code — to make sure we get a good hardware/software cross sections
  • Jenkins — gluing everything together

Using all of this we are able to manage our hardware effectively, and with a similar setup you can easily too. This is just a high-level overview so we will have to leave the in-depth technological discussions for another time.

More to come

We plan on having a few more blog posts cover some of the more interesting aspects (both results we are getting from OIL and some underlying technological discussions).

We are getting very close to OIL’s official debut and are excited to start publishing some really insightful data.

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mandel

In the ubuntu download manager we are using the new connection style syntax so that if there are errors in the signal connections we will be notified at compile time. However, in recent versions of udm we have noticed that the udm tests that ensure that the qt signals are emitted correctly have started failing randomly in the build servers.

As it can be seen in the following build logs the compilation does finish with no errors but the tests raise errors at runtime (an assert was added for each of the connect calls in the project):

Some of the errors between the diff archs are the same but this feels like a coincidence. The unity-scope-click package project has had the same issue and has solved it in the following way:

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    // NOTE: using SIGNAL/SLOT macros here because new-style
    // connections are flaky on ARM.
    c = connect(impl->systemDownloadManager.data(), SIGNAL(downloadCreated(Download*)),
                this, SLOT(handleDownloadCreated(Download*)));
 
    if (!c) {
        qDebug() << "failed to connect to systemDownloadManager::downloadCreated";
 
    }

I am not the only one that have encoutered this bug within canonical (check out this bug). Apprently -Bsymbolic breaks PMF (Pointer to Member Function) comparison under ARM as it was reported in linaro. As it is explained in the Linaro mailing list a workaround to this (since the correct way would be to fix the linker) is to build with PIE support. The Qt guys have decided to drop -Bsymbolic* on anything but x86 and x86-64. I hope all this info help others that might find the same problem.

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olli

Stephen Webb & team have lead an effort to bring Unity 8 to Ubuntu 14.04, which was done in parallel of other great work the team has landed for Ubuntu 14.04, e.g. locally integrated menus, hiDPI support and Mir support in SDL. Just in time for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS the team has landed more improvements to make […]

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Robie Basak

2014-04-08 Meeting Minutes

A few last pieces are being worked in the last couple of days to final
freeze.

  • James Page is struggling to find a release team member to review the docker.io feature freeze exception request (bug 1295093).
  • The juju-quickstart MIR is deferred; Robie will upload some final bugfixes soon.
  • Louis is working on some last minute fixes to sosreport.
  • Parameswaran reports that all smoke tests are passing.
  • Stefan is polishing some last pieces in Xen and libvirt.

Full minutes: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/MeetingLogs/Server/20140408
Log: http://ubottu.com/meetingology/logs/ubuntu-meeting/2014/ubuntu-meeting.2014-04-08-16.01.log.html

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