Canonical Voices

jono

My apologies in advance for the shorter blog post about this, but like many other Ubuntu folks, I am absolutely exhausted right now. Everyone, across the board, has been working their collective socks off to make Ubuntu 14.04 LTS a fantastic release on desktop, server, and cloud, and pull together our next iteration of Ubuntu for smart-phones and tablets. Consequently, when the trigger is pulled to share our final product with the world, release day is often less of a blistering and energetic woo-hoo, but more of an exhausted but satisfying oh-yeah (complete with beer firmly clenched in hand).

I am hugely proud of this release. The last six months have arguably been our busiest yet. No longer are we just working on desktop and server editions of Ubuntu, but we are building for the cloud and full convergence across the client. No longer are we “just” pulling together the fruits of upstream software projects but we are building our own platform too; the Ubuntu SDK, developer eco-system, charm store, image-based updates, push notifications, app lifecycle, and more. While the work has been intense and at times frantic, it has always been measured and carefully executed. Much of this has been thanks to many of our most under-thanked people; the members of our tremendous QA and CI teams.

Today, tomorrow, and for weeks to come our users, the press, the industry, and others will assess our work in Ubuntu 14.04 across these different platforms, and I am very confident they will love what they see. Ubuntu 14.04 embodies the true spirit of Ubuntu; innovation, openness, and people.

But as we wait to see the reviews let’s take a moment for each other. Now is a great time to reach out to each other and those Ubuntu folks you know (and don’t know) and share some kudos, some thanks, and some great stories. Until we get to the day where machines make software, today software is made by people and great software is built by great people.

Thanks everyone for every ounce of effort you fed into Ubuntu and our many flavors. We just took another big leap forward towards our future.

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ssweeny

Trusty TahrAnother very exciting release of Ubuntu for desktops and phones (oh, and I guess servers and cloud too) is out the door!

This is a Long Term Support release, which means it’s supported for five years, and it’s the release I’ll be trying to install on friends’ and family’s computers at every opportunity.

As usual, you can take a tour or go straight to the download page.

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Mark Baker

Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

Today is a big day for Ubuntu and a big day for cloud computing: Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is released. Everyone involved with Ubuntu can’t help but be impressed and stirred about the significance of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

We are impressed because Ubuntu is gaining extensive traction outside of the tech luminaries such as Netflix, Snapchat and wider DevOP community; it is being adopted by mainstream enterprises such as BestBuy. Ubuntu is dominant in public cloud with typically 60% market share of Linux workloads in the major cloud providers such as Amazon, Azure and Joyent. Ubuntu Server also is the fastest growing platform for scale out web computing having overtaken CentOS some six months ago. So Ubuntu server is growing up and we are proud of what it has become. We are stirred up by how the adoption of Ubuntu, coupled with the adoption of cloud and scale out computing is set grow enormously as it fast becomes an ‘enterprise’ technology.

Recently 70% of CIOs stated that they are going to change their technology and sourcing relationships within the next two or three years. This is in large part due to their planned transition to cloud, be it on premise using technologies such as Ubuntu OpenStack, in a public cloud or, most commonly, using combinations of both. Since the beginning of Ubuntu Server we have been preparing for this time, the time when a wholesale technology infrastructure change occurs and Ubuntu 14.04 arrives just as the change is starting to accelerate beyond the early adopters and technology companies. Enterprises now moving parts of their infrastructure to cloud can choose the technology best suited for the job: Ubuntu 14.04 LTS:

Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS at a glance

  • Based on version 3.13 of the Linux kernel

  • Includes the Icehouse release of OpenStack

  • Both Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS and OpenStack are supported until April 2019

  • Includes MAAS for automated hardware provisioning

  • Includes Juju for fast service deployment of 100+ common scale out applications such as MongoDB, Hadoop, node.js, Cloudfoundry, LAMP stack and Elastic Search

  • Ceph Firefly support

  • Openvswitch  2.0.x

  • Docker included & Docker’s own repository now populated with official     Ubuntu 14.04 images

  • Optimised Ubuntu 14.04 images certified for use on all leading public cloud     platforms – Amazon AWS, Microsoft Azure, Joyent Cloud, HP Cloud, Rackspace Cloud, CloudSigma and many others.

  • Runs on key hardware architectures: x86, x64,  Avoton, ARM64, POWER Systems

  • 50+ systems certified at launch from leading hardware vendors such as HP, Dell, IBM, Cisco and SeaMicro.

The advent of OpenStack, the switch to scale out computing and the move towards public cloud providers presents a perfect storm out of which Ubuntu is set to emerge the technology used ubiquitously for the next decade. That is why we are impressed and stirred by Ubuntu 14.04. We hope you are too. Download 14.04 LTS here

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Prakash Advani

Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is here.  Torrent is the preferred method for me.

Ubuntu 14.04
Torrent Links Direct Downloads
Ubuntu Desktop 14.04 64-Bit Torrent Main Server
Ubuntu Desktop 14.04 32-Bit Torrent Main Server
Ubuntu Server 14.04 64-Bit Torrent Main Server
Ubuntu Server 14.04 32-Bit Torrent Main Server

Other releases.

http://releases.ubuntu.com/14.04/ (Ubuntu Desktop and Server)
http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/14.04/release/ (Ubuntu Cloud Server)
http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/netboot/14.04/ (Ubuntu Netboot)
http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/edubuntu/releases/14.04/release/ (Edubuntu)

As always Have fun :)

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olli

Ubuntu 14.04 will be released today and you couldn’t resist the itch to go try the Unity 8 preview session on the Desktop. How underwhelming… there are almost no apps, and some don’t even work and overall it’s actually pretty unexciting… let’s change that in the next few chapters. First things first though… let’s look […]

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facundo

Primer cumpleaños de Male


El domingo pasado le festejamos el cumple del primer añito a Malena.

Lo hicimos en un salón, pero todo muy informal; la idea era que al aire libre iba a estar muy fresco, y necesitábamos mucho lugar para todos los invitados.

Lo pasamos bárbaro. Incluso Male, que tuvo un poco de fiebre durante un rato (estaba justo cortando dos muelas y un diente) se notó que jugó y disfrutó.

Moni y Male

Moni estuvo muchas semanas antes del cumple haciendo millón de cositas de decoración, y los últimos días, conmigo, armamos todo lo que es comida (excepto el pollo para los sanguchitos, de la madre de Moni, y las empanadas de atún, de mi vieja). ¡Es que en el cumpleaños era todo casero! Desde los sánguches de miga, hasta lo dulce.

Por mi parte, además de comestibles, me ocupé de la cartelera que pueden ver acá abajo (similar a la que había hecho para el año de Felu), y los videos (pueden ver el cortito y más emotivo haciendo click en la cartelera).

Un año, foto a foto

La verdad es que nos encanta hacer los cumpleaños así, pero es un esfuerzo descomunal. Ya para el quinto de Felu, en Octubre, supongo que cambiaremos la metodología... pero no estamos seguros :)

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Joseph Salisbury

Meeting Minutes

IRC Log of the meeting.

Meeting minutes.

Agenda

20140415 Meeting Agenda


ARM Status

Nothing new to report this week


Release Metrics and Incoming Bugs

Release metrics and incoming bug data can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kt-meeting.txt


Milestone Targeted Work Items

   apw    core-1311-kernel    4 work items   
      core-1311-cross-compilation    2 work items   
      core-1311-hwe-plans    1 work item   
   ogasawara    core-1403-hwe-stack-eol-notifications    2 work items   
   smb    servercloud-1311-openstack-virt    3 work items   


Status: Trusty Development Kernel

The 3.13.0-24.46 Ubuntu kernel in the Trusty archive is currently based on the v3.13.9 upstream stable kernel. The kernel is currently frozen
in preparation for our final 14.04 release this Thurs Apr 17. kernel.
We do not anticipate any uploads between now and Thurs. All patches
from here on out are subject to our Ubuntu SRU policy.
—–
Important upcoming dates:
Thurs Apr 17 – Ubuntu 14.04 Final Release (~2 days away)


Status: CVE’s

The current CVE status can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/cve/pkg/ALL-linux.html


Status: Stable, Security, and Bugfix Kernel Updates – Saucy/Raring/Quantal/Precise/Lucid

Status for the main kernels, until today (Mar. 25):

  • Lucid – Verification and Testing
  • Precise – Verification and Testing
  • Quantal – Verification and Testing
  • Saucy – Verification and Testing

    Current opened tracking bugs details:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kernel-sru-workflow.html

    For SRUs, SRU report is a good source of information:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/sru-report.html

    Schedule:

    cycle: 30-Mar through 26-Apr
    ====================================================================
    28-Mar Last day for kernel commits for this cycle
    30-Mar – 05-Apr Kernel prep week.
    06-Apr – 12-Apr Bug verification & Regression testing.
    17-Apr 14.04 Released
    13-Apr – 26-Apr Regression testing & Release to -updates.


Vote on upload rights for kamal.

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/KamalMostafa/KernelPPUApplication

(ogasawara> <apw) "kamal has shown himself to have a keen eye for detail, and a
strong sense of when to ask for help. I have no hesitations in
accepting him into the team. +1"
^^ from apw

Application approved.


Open Discussion or Questions? Raise your hand to be recognized

No open discussion.

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Nicholas Skaggs

As promised, here is your reminder that we are indeed fast approaching the final image for trusty. It's release week, which means it's time to put your energy and focus into finding and getting the remaining bugs documented or fixed in time for the release.

We need you!
The images are a culmination of effort from everyone. I know many have already tested and installed trusty and reported any issues encountered. Thank you! If you haven't yet tested, we need to hear from you!

How to help
The final milestone and images are ready; click here to have a look.

Execute the testcases for ubuntu and your favorite flavor images. Install or upgrade your machine and keep on the lookout for any issues you might find, however small.

I need a guide!
Sound scary? It's simpler than you might think. Checkout the guide and other links at the top of the tracker for help.

I got stuck!
Help is a simple email away, or for real-time help try #ubuntu-quality on freenode. Here are all the ways of getting ahold of the quality team who would love to help you.

Community
Plan to help test and verify the images for trusty and take part in making ubuntu! You'll join a community of people who do there best everyday to ensure ubuntu is an amazing experience. Here's saying thanks, from me and everyone else in the community for your efforts. Happy testing!

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Ben Howard

Many of our Cloud Image users have inquired about the availability of updated Ubuntu Cloud Images in response to the Heartbleed OpenSSL Vulnerability [1]. Ubuntu released update Ubuntu packages for OpenSSL 08 April 2014 [2]. Due to the exceptional circumstances and severity of the Heartbleed OpenSSL bug, Canonical has released new 12.04.4 LTS, 12.10 and 13.10 Cloud Images at [3].

Canonical is working with Amazon to get the Quickstart and the AWS Marketplace links updated. In the meantime, you can find new AMI ID's at [3] and [4]. Also, the snapshot's for Amazon have the volume-create permission granted on the latest images.

Windows Azure [5], Joyent [6] and HP [7, 8, 9] all have updated Cloud Images in their respective galleries.

If you are running an affected version of OpenSSL on 12.04 LTS, 12.10 or 13.10, you are strongly encouraged to update. For new instances, it is recommended to either use an image with a serial newer than 20140408, or update your OpenSSL  package immediately upon launch. Finally, if you need documentation on enabling unattended upgrades, please see [10].


[1] https://www.openssl.org/news/secadv_20140407.txt
[2] http://www.ubuntu.com/usn/usn-2165-1/
[3] 12.04.4 LTS: http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/precise/release-20140408/
     12.10: http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/quantal/release-20140409/
     13.10: http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/saucy/release-20140409.1/
[4] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/locator/ec2/
[5] Azure: Ubuntu-12_04_4-LTS-amd64-server-20140408-en-us-30GB
                 Ubuntu-12_10-amd64-server-20140409-en-us-30GB
                 Ubuntu-13_10-amd64-server-20140409.1-en-us-30GB
[6] Joyent Images:
        "ubuntu-certified-12.04", fe5aa6c0-0f09-4b1f-9bad-83e453bb74f3
        "ubuntu-certified-13.10", 049dfe64-6c37-4b88-8e89-4b8aa0f129f2
[7] HP US-West-1:
          12.04.4: 27be722e-d2d0-44f0-bebe-471c4af76039
          12.10: 065bb450-e5d0-4348-997d-e4d9e359b8fb
          13.10: 9d7d22d0-7d43-481f-a7eb-d93ea2791409
[8] HP US-East-1:
          12.04.4 8672f4c6-e33d-46f5-b6d8-ebbeba12fa02
          12.10: cbb44038-2602-48d5-b609-e05f4b61be9a
          13.10: 00398423-7429-4064-b781-fa0af00449c8
[9] Waiting on HP for replication to legacy regions az-{1,2,3}
[10] https://help.ubuntu.com/community/AutomaticSecurityUpdates

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Daniel Holbach

Shortly before the submission deadline last night we had some small technical hiccups in the Ubuntu Software Store. This was fixed resolved very quickly (thanks a lot everyone who worked on this!), but we decided to give everyone another day to make up for it.

The new deadline is today, 10th April 2014, 23:59 UTC.

Please all verify that your app still works, everythings is tidy, you submitted it to the store and filled out the submission form correctly. Here’s how.

Submit your app

This is obviously the most important bit and needs to happen first. Don’t leave this to the last minute. Your app might have to go through a couple of reviews before it’s accepted in the store. So plan in some time for that. Once it’s accepted and published in the store, you can always, much more quickly, publish an update.

Submit your app.

Register your participation

Once your app is in the store, you need to register your participation in the App Showdown. To make sure your application is registered for the contest and judges review it, you’ll need to fill in the participation form. You can start filling it in already and until the submission deadline, it should only take you 2 minutes to complete.

Fill out the submission form.

Questions?

If you have questions or need help, reach out (also rather sooner than later) to our great community of Ubuntu App Developers.

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Greg Lutostanski

We (the Canonical OIL dev team) are about to finish the production roll out of our OpenStack Interoperability Lab (OIL). It’s been an awesome time getting here so I thought I would take the opportunity to get everyone familiar, at a high level, with what OIL is and some of the cool technology behind it.

So what is OIL?

For starters, OIL is essentially continuous integration of the entire stack, from hardware preparation, to Operating System deployment, to orchestration of OpenStack and third party software, all while running specific tests at each point in the process. All test results and CI artifacts are centrally stored for analysis and monthly report generation.

Typically, setting up a cloud (particularly OpenStack) for the first time can be frustrating and time consuming. The potential combinations and permutations of hardware/software components and configurations can quickly become mind-numbing. To help ease the process and provide stability across options we sought to develop an interoperability test lab to vet as much of the ecosystem as possible.

To accomplish this we developed a CI process for building and tearing down entire OpenStack deployments in order to validate every step in the process and to make sure it is repeatable. The OIL lab is comprised of a pool of machines (including routers/switches, storage systems, and computer servers) from a large number of partners. We continually pull available nodes from the pool, setup the entire stack, go to town testing, and then tear it all back down again. We do this so many times that we are already deploying around 50 clouds a day and expect to scale this by a factor of 3-4 with our production roll-out. Generally, each cloud is composed of about 5-7 machines each but we have the ability to scale each test as well.

But that’s not all, in addition to testing we also do bug triage, defect analysis and work both internally and with our partners on fixing as many things as we can. All to ensure that deploying OpenStack on Ubuntu is as seamless a process as possible for both users and vendors alike.

Underlying Technology

We didn’t want to reinvent the wheel so, we are leveraging the latest Ubuntu technologies as well as some standard tools to do all of this. In fact the majority of the OIL infrastructure is public code you can get and start playing with right away!

Here is a small list of what we are using for all this CI goodness:

  • MaaS — to do the base OS install
  • Juju — for all the complicated OpenStack setup steps — and linking them together
  • Tempest — the standard test suite that pokes and prods OpenStack to ensure everything is working
  • Machine selections & random config generation code — to make sure we get a good hardware/software cross sections
  • Jenkins — gluing everything together

Using all of this we are able to manage our hardware effectively, and with a similar setup you can easily too. This is just a high-level overview so we will have to leave the in-depth technological discussions for another time.

More to come

We plan on having a few more blog posts cover some of the more interesting aspects (both results we are getting from OIL and some underlying technological discussions).

We are getting very close to OIL’s official debut and are excited to start publishing some really insightful data.

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mandel

In the ubuntu download manager we are using the new connection style syntax so that if there are errors in the signal connections we will be notified at compile time. However, in recent versions of udm we have noticed that the udm tests that ensure that the qt signals are emitted correctly have started failing randomly in the build servers.

As it can be seen in the following build logs the compilation does finish with no errors but the tests raise errors at runtime (an assert was added for each of the connect calls in the project):

Some of the errors between the diff archs are the same but this feels like a coincidence. The unity-scope-click package project has had the same issue and has solved it in the following way:

123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
 
    // NOTE: using SIGNAL/SLOT macros here because new-style
    // connections are flaky on ARM.
    c = connect(impl->systemDownloadManager.data(), SIGNAL(downloadCreated(Download*)),
                this, SLOT(handleDownloadCreated(Download*)));
 
    if (!c) {
        qDebug() << "failed to connect to systemDownloadManager::downloadCreated";
 
    }

I am not the only one that have encoutered this bug within canonical (check out this bug). Apprently -Bsymbolic breaks PMF (Pointer to Member Function) comparison under ARM as it was reported in linaro. As it is explained in the Linaro mailing list a workaround to this (since the correct way would be to fix the linker) is to build with PIE support. The Qt guys have decided to drop -Bsymbolic* on anything but x86 and x86-64. I hope all this info help others that might find the same problem.

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olli

Stephen Webb & team have lead an effort to bring Unity 8 to Ubuntu 14.04, which was done in parallel of other great work the team has landed for Ubuntu 14.04, e.g. locally integrated menus, hiDPI support and Mir support in SDL. Just in time for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS the team has landed more improvements to make […]

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Robie Basak

2014-04-08 Meeting Minutes

A few last pieces are being worked in the last couple of days to final
freeze.

  • James Page is struggling to find a release team member to review the docker.io feature freeze exception request (bug 1295093).
  • The juju-quickstart MIR is deferred; Robie will upload some final bugfixes soon.
  • Louis is working on some last minute fixes to sosreport.
  • Parameswaran reports that all smoke tests are passing.
  • Stefan is polishing some last pieces in Xen and libvirt.

Full minutes: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/MeetingLogs/Server/20140408
Log: http://ubottu.com/meetingology/logs/ubuntu-meeting/2014/ubuntu-meeting.2014-04-08-16.01.log.html

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Joseph Salisbury

Meeting Minutes

IRC Log of the meeting.

Meeting minutes.

Agenda

20140408 Meeting Agenda


ARM Status

T/master-next: LP1303657 (“Cannot boot trusty kernel on qemu-system-arm”) – we
were missing the correct dtb (wasn’t necessary in S) and qemu was waiting for a
console over jtag (HVC_DCC) that would never show up – waiting for a
confirmation from the reporter before sending the patches.


Release Metrics and Incoming Bugs

Release metrics and incoming bug data can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kt-meeting.txt


Milestone Targeted Work Items

   apw    core-1311-kernel    4 work items   
      core-1311-cross-compilation    2 work items   
      core-1311-hwe-plans    1 work item   
   ogasawara    core-1403-hwe-stack-eol-notifications    2 work items   
   smb    servercloud-1311-openstack-virt    3 work items   


Status: Trusty Development Kernel

We entered into Kernel Freeze for Trusty last Thurs and have uploaded
what we intend to be the final kernel for Trusty, 3.13.0-23.45. All
patches from here on out are subject to our Ubuntu SRU policy and only
critical bug fixes will warrant an upload before release next week.
—–
Important upcoming dates:
Thurs Apr 17 – Ubuntu 14.04 Final Release (~1 week away)


Status: CVE’s

The current CVE status can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/cve/pkg/ALL-linux.html


Status: Stable, Security, and Bugfix Kernel Updates – Saucy/Raring/Quantal/Precise/Lucid

Status for the main kernels, until today (Mar. 25):

  • Lucid – Verification and Testing
  • Precise – Verification and Testing
  • Quantal – Verification and Testing
  • Saucy – Verification and Testing

    Current opened tracking bugs details:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kernel-sru-workflow.html

    For SRUs, SRU report is a good source of information:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/sru-report.html

    Schedule:

    cycle: 30-Mar through 26-Apr
    ====================================================================
    28-Mar Last day for kernel commits for this cycle
    30-Mar – 05-Apr Kernel prep week.
    06-Apr – 12-Apr Bug verification & Regression testing.
    17-Apr 14.04 Released
    13-Apr – 26-Apr Regression testing & Release to -updates.


Open Discussion or Questions? Raise your hand to be recognized

No open discussion.

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Daniel Holbach

image-app-showdown

Here’s the final reminder. The App Showdown is almost over and you can win some beautiful devices if you get your app in tomorrow, Wednesday, April 9th 2014 (23:59 UTC).

Getting your app in is very easy: just follow these two steps.

Submit your app

This is obviously the most important bit and needs to happen first. Don’t leave this to the last minute. Your app might have to go through a couple of reviews before it’s accepted in the store. So plan in some time for that. Once it’s accepted and published in the store, you can always, much more quickly, publish an update.

Submit your app.

Register your participation

Once your app is in the store, you need to register your participation in the App Showdown. To make sure your application is registered for the contest and judges review it, you’ll need to fill in the participation form. You can start filling it in already and until the submission deadline, it should only take you 2 minutes to complete.

Fill out the submission form.

Questions?

If you have questions or need help, reach out (also rather sooner than later) to our great community of Ubuntu App Developers.

Good luck everyone, we’re looking forward to lots and lots of great apps! :-)

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Rupinder Mann

Ubuntu is entering the mobile industry with smartphones coming to market in 2014. The Ubuntu app ecosystem is growing consistently, as is app development across multiple platforms, and we want to hear your views on what factors contribute to your choice of developing on Ubuntu.

Our friends at Vision Mobile have launched their 7th Developer Economics survey, providing mobile developers with the opportunity to be heard on the top app developer issues, and how Ubuntu continuously strives to make development as efficient as possible – contribute to the research and find out how your opinion stack against other developers.

Participants who complete the short survey have the chance to win some fantastic prizes, including an iPhone 5s, a Galaxy S5, a Sphero, a Lego Mindstorm robot, a Raspberry Pi Ultimate Starter Ki, a Das Keyboard – and more!

The survey results will be available for free download on July 2014.  Don’t miss out, complete the 10-minute survey now click here

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bmichaelsen

“I fought the law and the law won”

– Sonny Curtis and the Crickets — prominently covered by the Clash

So in a few minutes, I will be leaving for the meeting at Open Knowledge Lab in Hamburg for Code for Germany in Hamburg — but I dont want to show up empty-handed. Earlier I learned about BundesGit which is a project to put all federal german laws in a git repository in easily parsable markdown language. This project was featured prominently e.g. on Wired, Heise and got me wondering that having all those laws available at the tip of your hand would be quite useful for lawyers. So here I went and quickly wrote an extension to do just that. When you install the extension:

  • it downloads all the german federal laws from github and indexes them on the next restart of LibreOffice (completely in the background without annoying the user)
  • that takes about ~5 minutes (and it only checks for updates on the next start, so no redownload)
  • once indexed you can insert a part of a law easily in any text in Writer using the common abbreviations that lawyers use for these:
  • Type the abbreviation of the paragraph on an otherwise empty line, e.g. “gg 1″ for the first Artikel of the Grundgesetz
  • press Ctrl-Shift-G (G for Git, Gesetz or whatever you intend it to mean)
  • LibreOffice will replace the abbreviation with the part of that law
BundesGit for LibreOffice

BundesGit for LibreOffice

Now this is still a proof-of-concept:

  • It requires a recent version (1.9 or higher) of git in the path. While that is for example true in the upcoming version of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, other distributions might still have older versions of git, or — on Windows — none at all: Packing a git binary into the extension is left as an exercise for the reader.
  • I have not checked it to parse all the different laws and find all the paragraphs. It also ignores some non-text content in the repository for now. Patches welcome!
  • While it stays in the background most of the time intentionally to not get into the way of the user, it could use some error reporting or logging, so users are not left in the dark if it fails to work.

On the other hand, the extension is a good example what you can do with less than 300 lines of Python3 (including tests) in LibreOffice extensions. Thus the code was hopefully verbosely enough commented and was uploaded to sdk-examples repository, where it lives alongside this LibreOffice does print on Tuesdays extension that also serves as an example. Of course, if there other useful repositories of texts online, it can be quickly adapted to provide those too.

So download BundesGit for LibreOffice and test it on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (trusty).

 

addendum: This has been featured on golem.de and linux-magazin.de (both german).

 


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Kyle Nitzsche

KyleN Ubuntu

New Unity 8 Scopes Docs


I have completed and published several documents on the Ubuntu development portal, scopes section. I hope these are useful when developing Unity 8 Scopes: 
The team also published these new docs:

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beuno

This week has been bitter-sweet. On the one hand, we announced that a project many of us had poured our hearts and minds into was going to be shut down. It’s made many of us sad and some of us haven’t even figured out what to do with their files yet    :)

On the other hand, we’ve been laser-focused on making Ubuntu on phones and tablets a success, our attention has moved to making sure we have a rock-solid, scalable, secure and pleasant to use for developers and users alike. We just didn’t have the time to continue racing against other companies whose only focus is on file syncing, which was very frustrating as we saw a project we were proud of be left behind. It was hard to keep feeling proud of the service, so shutting it down felt like the right thing to do.

I am, however, very excited about open sourcing the server-side of the file syncing infrastructure. It’s a huge beast that contains many services and has scaled well into the millions of users.

We are proud of the code that is being released and in many ways we feel that the code itself was successful despite the business side of things not turning out the way we hoped for.

This will be a great opportunity to those of you who’ve been itching to have an open source service for personal cloud syncing at scale, the code comes battle-tested and with a wide array of features.

As usual, some people have taken this generous gesture “as an attempt to gain interest in a failing codebase”, which couldn’t be more wrong. The agenda here is to make Ubuntu for phones a runaway success, and in order to do that we need to double down on our efforts and focus on what matters right now.

Instead of storing away those tens of thousands of expensive man-hours of work in an internal repository somewhere, we’ve decided to share that work with the world, allow others to build on top of that work, benefit from it.

It’s hard sometimes to see some people trying to make a career out of trying to make everything that Canonical does as inherently evil, although at the end of the day what matters is making open source available to the masses. That’s what we’ve been doing for a long time and that’s the only thing that will count in the end.

 

So in the coming months we’re going to be cleaning things up a bit, trying to release the code in the best shape possible and work out the details on how to best release it to make it useful for others.

All of us who worked on this project for so many years are looking forward to sharing it and look forward to seeing many open source personal cloud syncing services blossoming from it.

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