Canonical Voices

facundo


Vengo a comentarles sobre una serie que vi parcialmente hace mucho tiempo, y que volví a ver recientemente para verla completa, porque recordaba me había gustado bastante.

Y confirmé, la serie me gusta mucho. Así y todo es bastante desconocida, y tuvo sólo una (corta) temporada. Se llama Keen Eddie.

La serie me gusta en varios planos, aunque más allá del ritmo que tiene y de ciertos trucos visuales que son interesantes para contar la historia, lo mejor son las relaciones interpersonales, de las cuales está plagada.

A Eddie (estereotipo de policía/detective yanqui desastre) lo mandan a trabajar a Londres por una temporada, y hay todo un choque cultural, que a mí me gusta bastante. Y toda la dinámica entre Eddie y su "compañera forzada de casa", Eddie y su perro, su perro y su compañera de casa, Eddie y su pareja-detective, Eddie y su jefe, ...

... y Eddie y la señorita Moneypenny.

Y acá hago un aparte, porque más allá de cierta tensión subrepticia entre Eddie y Moneypenny (que cabe aclarar, no se llama realmente así, sino que Eddie la llama así en homenaje al conocido personaje de ficción) durante la serie hay algunos segundos en la mayoría de los capítulos donde la interacción entre ambos se escapa de los parámetros normales, pero todo en la imaginación de Eddie, aunque eso a él no le queda tan claro... y a veces tampoco nos queda tan claro a nosotros :)

En esta lista de YouTube están separadas estas partes, pero con demasiado contexto (un tiempo antes y un tiempo después de los detalles en cuestión).

Yo me permití hacer una recopilación (con video de mejor calidad), y más enfocada en lo que quería mostrar (e incluso dejé en la secuencia la parte correspondiente al capítulo donde esta interacción rara NO pasa, ya que en ese capítulo todo sale al reves).

Eddie y la señorita Moneypenny

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maria

Familiarising with MAAS

Recently a number of new designers and developers joined our team – welcome Caleb, Lyubomir, Michael, Thomas and Shivam!

As part of the introduction to Canonical and the Design team, each member of the team gives an overview of the products we design for. As the Lead UX designer for MAAS I did so by explaining the functionality of MAAS on a high level, which was inevitably followed by a lot of questions for more details. In order to provide a complete MAAS introduction I put together a small list of resources that would help the newcomers but also the veterans in our team dig deeper into this metal world..

I am now sharing this list with you and hope that it will help you get started with MAAS.

Happy reading!

Introduction

There are various sources where you can get information about MAAS and the concepts it involves; the Ubuntu websites, Wikipedia, youtube and blogs are all places you can find bits and pieces that will help you understand more about MAAS.

Then there are also a lot of people working on MAAS; myself and the other designers and of course the MAAS engineering team would be happy to help with any questions you might have. You can reach MAAS-ters on the public IRC channel (Freenode #maas) and the Ask Ubuntu website.

You can also follow the development of MAAS and contact the team by registering to the MAAS mailing list at https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/maas-devel (maas-devel@lists.ubuntu.com).

Here is a list that I think might be a good start to understand what MAAS does, its features and concepts as well as some of the functionality. It is sorted from high to low-level information and it allows you to go as deep as you want.

Chapter I – MAAS and server provisioning

If you are a server provisioning novice, you can start with some sources for understanding what server provisioning is, which is the main thing that MAAS is used for. If you already know about server provisioning you can move to the next section that explains what MAAS is.

  • A recent Webinar takes you through the steps of how to get cloud-ready servers in minutes with MAAS. By Dariush Marsh-Mossadeghi (Consulting Architect) and Chris Wilder (Cloud Content).
  • Canonical’s e-book on What you need to know about server provisioning is also quite insightful. It contains a lot of content from the maas.io homepage and the How it works page and some additional information.
  • Take a look at the tour page to get an overview of the functionality and pick up terms that you can search further to find out what they mean.

And here is a couple of videos explaining what MAAS is

Metal As A Service – the model (you can jump to 2:13 where the model starts getting explained)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I3nfiRKzNSw

MAAS

If you have more questions this factsheet answers the top 10 questions about MAAS.

Chapter II – Technical information that MAAS involves

Now, you can stop if you had enough or you can go deeper into the technical details.

Here are some videos and wiki entries explaining concepts and functionality that MAAS includes.

Servers & hardware

  • PXE booting

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preboot_Execution_Environment

  • Network Interfaces

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_interface

  • BMC & IPMI

http://searchnetworking.techtarget.com/definition/baseboard-management-controller

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intelligent_Platform_Management_Interface

  • KVM hypervisor

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kernel-based_Virtual_Machine

Services

  • DNS  (video)

Intro to DNS

  • DHCP  (video)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_Host_Configuration_Protocol

Intro to DHCP

Networking

  • Introduction to networking (video – basic intro)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rL8RSFQG8do&index=1&list=PLF360ED1082F6F2A5

  • VLANs and Subnet (video)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twYeSRvdEtc

  • The OSI model (video – explains difference between layer 2 and 3 networking)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEEnLZV2wGI&list=PLF360ED1082F6F2A5&index=5

  • TCP IP / Subnet masking (video – explains IPv4)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EkNq4TrHP_U

  • IPv4 vs IPV6 (video)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aor29pGhlFE

  • Fabric

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched_fabric

Last but not least, the MAAS docs would also be a useful source. You can search terms and functionality specific to MAAS:

https://docs.ubuntu.com/maas/2.2/en/?_ga=2.208312085.683565088.1508226045-405342743.1460033629

Now that you are more familiar with MAAS’s basics, how about seeing it in action? MAAS is free and open source and you can install it in 6 simple steps. The maas.io install page will guide you through them or if you prefer this video shows the installation process. Happy provisioning!

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admin

Hello MAASters!

I’m happy to announce that MAAS 2.3.0 RC1 has now been released and it is currently available in PPA and as a snap.
PPA Availability
For those running Ubuntu Xenial and would like to use RC1, please use the following PPA:
ppa:maas/next
Snap Availability
For those running from the snap, or would like to test the snap, please use the Beta channel on the default track:
sudo snap install maas –devmode —beta
 

MAAS 2.3.0 (RC1)

Issues fixed in this release

For more information, visit: https://launchpad.net/maas/+milestone/2.3.0rc1

  • LP: #1727576    [2.3, HWTv2] When specific tests timesout there’s no log/output
  • LP: #1728300    [2.3, HWTv2] smartctl interval time checking is too short
  • LP: #1721887    [2.3, HWTv2] No way to override a machine that Failed Testing
  • LP: #1728302    [2.3, HWTv2, UI] Overall health status is redundant
  • LP: #1721827    [2.3, HWTv2] Logging when and why a machine failed testing (due to missing heartbeats/locked/hanged) not available in maas.log
  • LP: #1722665    [2.3, HWTv2] MAAS stores a limited amount of test results
  • LP: #1718779    [2.3] 00-maas-06-get-fruid-api-data fails to run on controller
  • LP: #1729857    [2.3, UI] Whitespace after checkbox on node listing page
  • LP: #1696122    [2.2] Failed to get virsh pod storage: cryptic message if no pools are defined
  • LP: #1716328    [2.2] VM creation with pod accepts the same hostname and push out the original VM
  • LP: #1718044    [2.2] Failed to process node status messages – twisted.internet.defer.QueueOverflow
  • LP: #1723944    [2.x, UI] Node auto-assigned address is not always shown while in rescue mode
  • LP: #1718776    [UI] Tooltips missing from the machines listing page
  • LP: #1724402    no output for failing test
  • LP: #1724627    00-maas-06-get-fruid-api-data fails relentlessly, causes commissioning to fail
  • LP: #1727962    Intermittent failure: TestDeviceHandler.test_list_num_queries_is_the_expected_number
  • LP: #1727360    Make partition size field optional in the API (CLI)
  • LP: #1418044    Avoid picking the wrong IP for MAAS_URL and DEFAULT_MAAS_URL
  • LP: #1729902    When commissioning don’t show message that user has overridden testing

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K. Tsakalozos

I read the Hacker News post Heptio Contour and I thought “Cool! A project from our friends at Heptio, lets see what they got for us”. I wont lie to you, at first I was a bit disappointed because there was no special mention for Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK) but I understand, I am asking too much :). Let me cover this gap here.

Deploy CDK

To deploy CDK on Ubuntu you need to just do a:

> sudo snap install conjure-up --classic
> conjure-up kubernetes-core

Using ‘kubernetes-core’ will give you a minimal k8s cluster — perfect for our use case. For a larger, more robust cluster, try ‘canonical-kubernetes.’

Deploy Contour and Demo App

CDK already comes with an ingress solution so you need to disable it and deploy Contour. Here we also deploy the demo kuard application:

> juju config kubernetes-worker ingress=false
> kubectl --kubeconfig=/home/jackal/.kube/config apply -f http://j.hept.io/contour-deployment-norbac
> kubectl --kubeconfig=/home/jackal/.kube/config apply -f http://j.hept.io/contour-kuard-example

Get Your App

The Contour service will be on a port that (depending on the cloud you are targeting) might be closed, so you need to open it before accessing kuard:

> kubectl --kubeconfig=/home/jackal/.kube/config get service -n heptio-contour  contour -o wide                                                                                                        
NAME TYPE CLUSTER-IP EXTERNAL-IP PORT(S) AGE SELECTOR
contour LoadBalancer 10.152.183.201 <pending> 80:31226/TCP 2m app=contour
juju run --application kubernetes-worker open-port 31226

And here it is running on AWS:

Instead of opening the ports to the outside world you could set the right DNS entries. However, this is specific to the cloud you are deploying to.

As the Contour README says “On AWS, create a CNAME record that maps the host in your Ingress object to the ELB address.”
“If you have an IP address instead (on GCE, for example), create an A record.”
For a localhost deployment your ports should not be blocked and you can fake a DNS entry by editing /etc/hosts.

Thank you Heptio. Keep it up!

Resources

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admin

Hello MAASters!

I’m happy to announce that MAAS 2.3.0 Beta 3 has now been released and it is currently available in PPA and as a snap.
PPA Availability
For those running Ubuntu Xenial and would like to use beta 3, please use the following PPA:
ppa:maas/next
Snap Availability
For those running from the snap, or would like to test the snap, please use the Beta channel on the default track:
sudo snap install maas –devmode —beta
 

MAAS 2.3.0 (beta3)

Issues fixed in this release

For more information, visit: https://launchpad.net/maas/+milestone/2.3.0beta3
  • LP: #1727551    [2.3] Commissioning shows results from script that no longer exists

  • LP: #1696485    [2.2, HA] MAAS dhcp does not offer up multiple domains to search

  • LP: #1696661    [2.2, HA] MAAS should offer multiple DNS servers in HA case

  • LP: #1724235    [2.3, HWTv2] Aborted test should not show as failure

  • LP: #1721824    [2.3, HWTv2] Overall health status is missing

  • LP: #1727547    [2.3, HWTv2] Aborting testing goes back into the incorrect state

  • LP: #1722848    [2.3, HWTv2] Memtester test is not robust

  • LP: #1727568    [2.3, HWTv2, regression] Hardware Tests tab does not show what tests are running

  • LP: #1721268    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Metrics table (e.g. from fio test) is not padded to MAAS’ standard

  • LP: #1721823    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] No way to surface a failed test that’s non CPU, Mem, Storage in machine listing page

  • LP: #1721886    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Hardware Test tab doesn’t auto-update

  • LP: #1559353    [2.0a3] “Add Hardware > Chassis” cannot find off-subnet chassis BMCs

  • LP: #1705594    [2.2] rackd errors after fresh install

  • LP: #1718517    [2.3] Exceptions while processing commissioning output cause timeouts rather than being appropriately surfaced

  • LP: #1722406    [2.3] API allows “deploying” a machine that’s already deployed

  • LP: #1724677    [2.x] [critical] TFTP back-end failed right after node repeatedly requests same file via tftp

  • LP: #1726474    [2.x] psycopg2.IntegrityError: update or delete on table “maasserver_node” violates foreign key constraint

  • LP: #1727073    [2.3] rackd — 12% connected to region controllers.

  • LP: #1722671    [2.3, pod] Unable to delete a machine or a pod if the pod no longer exists

  • LP: #1680819    [2.x, UI] Tooltips go off screen

  • LP: #1725908    [2.x] deleting user with static ip mappings throws 500

  • LP: #1726865    [snap,2.3beta3] maas init uses the default gateway in the default region URL

  • LP: #1724181    maas-cli missing dependencies: netifaces, tempita

  • LP: #1724904    Changing PXE lease in DHCP snippets global sections does not work

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admin

Hello MAASters!

It’s been two weeks since my last update when the MAAS 2.3 beta 2 release was announced! Since then, the MAAS team has been split, both by participating in internal events (and recovering from travel) as well as continue to focus on the stabilization of MAAS 2.3. As such, I’m happy to provide the updates of the past couple of weeks.

MAAS 2.3
In the past couple of weeks the team has been focused on stabilizing MAAS 2.3 and has fixed the following issues:

  • LP: #1705594    [2.2, HA] rackd errors after fresh install
  • LP: #1722848    [2.3, HWTv2] Memtester test is not robust
  • LP: #1724677    [2.x] [critical] TFTP back-end failed right after node repeatedly requests same file via tftp
  • LP: #1727073    [2.3, HA] rackd — 12% connected to region controllers.
  • LP: #1696485    [2.2, HA] MAAS dhcp does not offer up multiple domains to search
  • LP: #1696661    [2.2, HA] MAAS should offer multiple DNS servers in HA case
  • LP: #1721268    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Metrics table (e.g. from fio test) is not padded to MAAS’ standard
  • LP: #1721886    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Hardware Test tab doesn’t auto-update
  • LP: #1722671    [2.3, pod] Unable to delete a machine or a pod if the pod no longer exists
  • LP: #1724181    maas-cli missing dependencies: netifaces, tempita
  • LP: #1724235    [2.3, HWTv2] Aborted test should not show as failure
  • LP: #1726865    [snap,2.3beta3] maas init uses the default gateway in the default region URL
  • LP: #1724904    Changing PXE lease in DHCP snippets global sections does not work
  • LP: #1680819    [2.x, UI] Tooltips go off screen

 

MAAS 2.4
I’m happy to announce that the roadmap for  MAAS 2.4 has now been defined, and it is targeted for April 2018. However, I’ll create a bit of suspense as we will announce the upcoming features once MAAS 2.3 final has been released! Stay tuned!

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facundo

Distribución de teclado


Arranquemos la historia a principios de siglo, porque en algún momento hay que arrancarla.

Mi computadora principal hogareña tenía un teclado con distribución "en español" (lo que normalmente se consigue en las casas de computación), pero en el laburo que arranqué en el 2000 (Unifón) todas las computadoras tenían distribución "latinoamericana" (que es lo que venden las marcas grandes, como IBM, Dell, etc, en toda latinoamérica).

Los teclados eran diferentes, sí, pero no tanto. Encima alrededor del 2004 decidí comprarme un teclado de buena calidad, y elegí uno marca IBM, como los de la oficina, que me gustaban mucho. Obviamente, era distribución latinoamericana.

Desde ese momento usé esa distribución exclusivamente.

La laptop que usaba los últimos meses de Movistar, la que me dieron en Cyclelogic (una Dell Inspiron), y la que me dieron en Ericsson (creo que una HP) todas eran compradas acá así que eran todas con teclado latinoamericano.

Cuando entré en Canonical, me compré una laptop yo. En ese momento compré en Argentina una Dell XPS m1330, muy linda máquina. Al momento de renovarla busqué mucho y terminé en una Samsung que nunca me convenció mucho, también comprada acá. En ambos casos, teclado latinoamericano.

Y mientras tanto, seguía usando en la desktop el excelente teclado IBM que me había comprado hace tanto tiempo.

El año pasado volvía a renovar la laptop, y luego de buscar varios meses algo que me convenciera acá en Argentina, en Chile o en Uruguay, terminé tomando la decisión de comprarla en USA (una Lenovo Thinkpad). Claro, con teclado en inglés, pero mi idea era luego comprar el teclado acá y cambiárselo.

Muchas personas (desde hace mucho tiempo) me preguntaban por qué no usaba teclado en inglés y listo. Puedo agrupar toda esa gente en dos grandes grupos:

  • los que usan el teclado en inglés configurado como "inglés", sin acentos ni eñe, pero escriben todo el tiempo con faltas de ortografía; esto es llanamente inaceptable para mí.
  • los que usan el teclado en inglés configurado como "internacional con teclas muertas" (que era como yo tenía la laptop nueva), donde para poner un acento hay que teclear el tilde y luego la vocal; el problema de esto es que para escribir el tilde sólo, hay que teclear el tilde y luego espacio (y como es la misma tecla, para comillas hay que hacer shift+tilde y luego espacio). Funciona, pero es tremendamente ineficiente y molesto.

El 2017 me encontró con el mismatch de teclado entre el desktop y la laptop, algo que me molestaba bastante. Y en Agosto pasaron dos cosas.

Por un lado ya me había cansado de esperar que Lenovo Argentina me vendiera un teclado en latinoamericano para la laptop. Nunca lo importaron, siempre me lo patearon para adelante, ¡durante un año!

Por otro lado, Joac me mostró que hay una configuración "internacional con teclas muertas por AltGr", que lo que hace es evitar el "doble tecleo": para poner una á, sólo hay que hacer AltGr+a. Y listo. Tilde es tilde, comilla es comilla, etc. Hay casos donde necesitamos componer caracteres con varias teclas, pero no es frecuente (por ejemplo, si queremos escribir una ü, donde ahí si tenemos que teclear AltGr+shift+tilde, y luego la u).

Esta configuración me resultó bastante funcional (aunque no ideal), así que lo que tenía que hacer también era solucionar el mismatch con la desktop, por lo que me compré en el último viaje un teclado Lenovo que es igualito al IBM que tenía... pero en inglés.

Así que acá me ven, a la vejez viruela, etc, etc.

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James Henstridge

One of the options available when configuring the my ThinkPad was an Infrared camera. The main selling point being “Windows Hello” facial recognition based login. While I wasn’t planning on keeping Windows on the system, I was curious to see what I could do with it under Linux. Hopefully this is of use to anyone else trying to get it to work.

The camera is manufactured by Chicony Electronics (probably a CKFGE03 or similar), and shows up as two USB devices:

04f2:b5ce Integrated Camera
04f2:b5cf Integrated IR Camera

Both devices are bound by the uvcvideo driver, showing up as separate video4linux devices. Interestingly, the IR camera seems to be assigned /dev/video0, so generally gets picked by apps in preference to the colour camera. Unfortunately, the image it produces comes up garbled:

So it wasn’t going to be quite so easy to get things working. Looking at the advertised capture modes, the camera supports Motion-JPEG and YUYV raw mode. So I tried capturing a few JPEG frames with the following GStreamer pipeline:

gst-launch-1.0 v4l2src device=/dev/video0 num-buffers=10 ! image/jpeg ! multifilesink location="frame-%02d.jpg"

Unlike in raw mode, the red illumination LEDs started flashing when in JPEG mode, which resulted in frames having alternating exposures. Here’s one of the better exposures:

What is interesting is that the JPEG frames have a different aspect ratio to the raw version: a more normal 640×480 rather than 400×480. So to start, I captured a few raw frames:

gst-launch-1.0 v4l2src device=/dev/video0 num-buffers=10 ! "video/x-raw,format=(string)YUY2" ! multifilesink location="frame-%02d.raw"

The illumination LEDs stayed on constantly while recording in raw mode. The contents of the raw frames show something strange:

00000000  11 48 30 c1 04 13 44 20  81 04 13 4c 20 41 04 13  |.H0...D ...L A..|
00000010  40 10 41 04 11 40 10 81  04 11 44 00 81 04 12 40  |@.A..@....D....@|
00000020  00 c1 04 11 50 10 81 04  12 4c 10 81 03 11 44 00  |....P....L....D.|
00000030  41 04 10 48 30 01 04 11  40 10 01 04 11 40 10 81  |A..H0...@....@..|
...

The advertised YUYV format encodes two pixels in four bytes, so you would expect any repeating patterns to occur at a period of four bytes. But the data in these frames seems to repeat at a period of five bytes.

Looking closer it is actually repeating at a period of 10 bits, or four packed values for every five bytes. Furthermore, the 800 byte rows work out to 640 pixels when interpreted as packed 10 bit values (rather than the advertised 400 pixels), which matches the dimensions of the JPEG mode.

The following Python code can unpack the 10-bit pixel values:

def unpack(data):
    result = []
    for i in range(0, len(data), 5):
        block = (data[i] |
                 data[i+1] << 8 |
                 data[i+2] << 16 |
                 data[i+3] << 24 |
                 data[i+4] << 32)
        result.append((block >> 0) & 0x3ff)
        result.append((block >> 10) & 0x3ff)
        result.append((block >> 20) & 0x3ff)
        result.append((block >> 30) & 0x3ff)
    return result

After adjusting the brightness while converting to 8-bit greyscale, I get a usable image. Compare a fake YUYV frame with the decoded version:

I suppose this logic could be wrapped up in a GStreamer element to get usable infrared video capture.

I’m still not clear why the camera would lie about the pixel format it produces. My best guess is that they wanted to use the standard USB Video Class driver on Windows, and this let them get at the raw data to process in user space.

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K. Tsakalozos

When was the last time you had one of those “I wish I knew about that <time period> ago” moments? One of mine was when I saw MAAS (Metal as a Service). Back at the University, as a member of the MADgIK lab, I had to administer a couple of racks. These were the days of Xen paravirtualization, Eucaliptus and the GRID. Interesting times, but I now realise that if I had MAAS and Juju back then, I would have finished with that adventure a couple of years sooner!

Was told blogs with figures are more attractive. There you go!

From a high level MAAS will render your physical cluster into an IaaS cloud that provisions physical instead of virtual machines. As you might expect a PXE server will serve the images you ask via a good looking web UI. MAAS will discover what is on your network and make it dead simple to set VLANs and network spaces. Juju can use your MaaS deployment as if it were a cloud. This enables you to deploy OpenStack, Kubernetes and BigData solutions directly onto your hardware. It is a really powerful combination that can save you time (in the range of years in my case).

Lets do it!

Do not waste any more time on this blog, go and try MAAS on QEMU instances on your own machine. This play list will get you started. At the end you will have a (virtual) cluster on QEMU. One of the machines will act as the MAAS controller, the rest will be the cluster nodes.

Your virtual cluster.
MAAS nodes

Next step is to use MAAS from Juju.

Just to show off :)

Conclusion

I am off to the shop to get more RAM. No wonder this is such a short blog.

Resources

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Alan Griffiths

Mir release 0.28

[reposted from https://community.ubuntu.com/t/mir-release-0-28/545 comments are enabled there, and disabled here]

Mir 0.28

We are pleased to announce that Mir 0.28 has been released and is available in Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful).

As the content (and even the name) of this release has changed over the time we’ve been working towards it now is probably a good time to reflect on what it is, and what it isn’t after all.

What is in Mir 0.28?

There is now a stable server ABI

This simplifies the use of “Mir snaps” making it possible to release new library versions without breaking servers.

One of the barriers to the adoption of Mir has been the potential for Mir releases to break downstream projects that depend on a stable ABI. This is provided by libmiral, which is now part of Mir.

The Yunit project which uses Mir as part of its graphics stack has already started migrating code to use libmiral for this reason.

The start of Wayland support

The desktop community has adopted Wayland as the client-server protocol of choice for replacing X11. This is already supported by several server implementations (Weston, Kwin and Mutter are the best known). By providing Wayland support we will make Mir servers compatible with the various toolkits and libraries that already have Wayland backends.

Our MVP goal for Mir 0.28 has been to support a Wayland client with a single fullscreen surface. We have slightly exceeded this goal in 0.28 as you can see from this short video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sfcZrpkc2NU

We will continue to expand on this Wayland support in future releases.

The MirAL shells are part of Mir

The miral-kiosk shell is used by the mir-kiosk-snap to provide graphics support on UbuntuCore. This release includes a number of improvements to miral-kiosk based on feedback from potential users.

The miral-shell is now the canonical example of writing a Mir server. We’ve dropped several older examples that used other APIs (and reworked mir_demo_server to fit the new server APIs).

There is a (currently unstable) API for “graphics platform” plugins

We had planned to stabilize the graphics platform API and ABI before publishing it but we had to change that plan. Canonical no longer has the infrastructure to test and maintain the “android platform”. However there is was interest from UBports both in continuing to support the “android platform” and for developing a “Wayland platform”.

What is NOT in Mir 0.28?

We have not upstreamed Mesa distro patches

These patches support “Mir EGL” which forms part of the Mir client API. With the adoption of Wayland (and Wayland EGL) it looks likely that these will not have a long term future and upstreaming a wasted effort.

This should also become less of an issue as it only affects EGL clients using the legacy Mir client APIs. Software rendering, Xmir and Xwayland clients will work without these patches.

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admin

Hello MAASters!

I’m happy to announce that MAAS 2.3.0 Beta 2 has now been released and it is currently available in PPA and as a snap.
PPA Availability
For those running Ubuntu Xenial and would like to use beta 2, please use the following PPA:
ppa:maas/next
Snap Availability
For those running from the snap, or would like to test the snap, please use the Beta channel on the default track:
sudo snap install maas –devmode —beta
 

MAAS 2.3.0 (beta 2)

Issues fixed in this release

https://launchpad.net/maas/+milestone/2.3.0beta2

  • LP: #1711760    [2.3] resolv.conf is not set (during commissioning or testing)

  • LP: #1721108    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Machine details cards – Don’t show “see results” when no tests have been run on a machine

  • LP: #1721111    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Machine details cards – Storage card doesn’t match CPU/Memory one

  • LP: #1721548    [2.3] Failure on controller refresh seem to be causing version to not get updated

  • LP: #1710092    [2.3, HWTv2] Hardware Tests have a short timeout

  • LP: #1721113    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Machine details cards – Storage – If multiple disks, condense the card instead of showing all disks

  • LP: #1721524    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] When upgrading from older MAAS, Storage HW tests are not mapped to the disks

  • LP: #1721587    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Commissioning logs (and those of v2 HW Tests) are not being shown

  • LP: #1719015    $TTL in zone definition is not updated

  • LP: #1721276    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Hardware Test tab – Table alignment for the results doesn’t align with titles

  • LP: #1721525    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Storage card on machine details page missing red bar on top if there are failed tests

  • LP: #1722589    syslog full of “topology hint” logs

  • LP: #1719353    [2.3a3, Machine listing] Improve the information presentation of the exact tasks MAAS is running when running hardware testing

  • LP: #1719361    [2.3 alpha 3, HWTv2] On machine listing page, remove success icons for components that passed the tests

  • LP: #1721105    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Remove green success icon from Machine listing page

  • LP: #1721273    [2.3, UI, HWTv2] Storage section on Hardware Test tab does not describe each disk to match the design

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Alan Griffiths

that which we call a rose…

For the last six months we’ve been working on, and talking about “Mir 1.0”.

But today’s Mir release is not going to be called “1.0” it will be called “0.28”. The code is the same, just the name has changed.

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Francesca Granato

During our user testing sessions on ubuntu.com, we often receive feedback from users about content on the site (“I can’t find this”, “I’d like more of that” or “I want to know this”). Accumulated feedback like this contributed to our decision here on the Web team to find a more standardised way of designing our product landing pages. We have two main motivations for doing this work:

1)  To make our users’ lives easier The www.ubuntu.com site has a long legacy of bespoke page design which has resulted in an inconsistent content strategy across some of our pages.  In order to evaluate and compare our products effectively, our users need consistent information delivered in a consistent way.

2) To make our lives easier Here at Canonical, we don’t have huge teams to write copy, make videos or create content for our websites. Because of this our product pages need to be quick and easy to design, build and maintain – which they will be if they all follow a standardised set of guidelines.

After a process of auditing the current site content, researching competitors, and refining a few different design routes – we reached a template that we all agreed was better than what we currently had in most cases.  Here’s some annotated photos of the process.

Web pages printed out with post-it notes

First we completed a thorough content audit of existing ubuntu.com product pages. Here the coloured post-it notes denote different types of content.

Flip-chart of hand-written list of components for a product page

Our audit of the site resulted in this unprioritized ‘short-list’ of possible types of content  to be included on a product page.

Early wireframe sketch 1Early wireframe sketch 2Early wireframe sketch 3

Some examples of early wireframe sketches.

Here is an illustrated wireframe of new template. I use this illustrated wireframe as a guideline for our stakeholders, designers and developers to follow when considering creating new or enhancing existing product pages.

Diagram of a product page template for ubuntu.com

We have begun rolling out this new template across our product pages –  e.g. our server-provisioning page. Our plan is to continue to test, watch and measure the pages using this template and then to iterate on the design accordingly. In the meantime, it’s already making our lives here on the Web Team easier!

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facundo

Usando Go desde Python


¿Alguna vez necesitaron usar un código de Go desde Python? Yo sí, y acá cuento qué hice.

Antes que nada, un poco de background, para que el ejercicio no sea demasiado teórico: en el laburo tenemos que validar las licencias que se incluyen en el .snap, y aunque el formato en que están sería estándar (SPDX), una condición de contorno es usar el mismo parser/validador que se usa en snapd, para estar 107% seguros que el comportamiento va a ser el mismo hasta en los corner cases o bugs.

El detalle es que snapd está escrito en Go, y el server está escrito en Python. Entonces tengo que compilar ese código en Go y usarlo desde Python... de allí este post, claro.

Es más fácil de lo que parece, ya que el compilador de Go tiene la capacidad de buildear a "biblioteca compartida", y de ahí usarlo desde Python es casi trivial ("casi", porque tenemos que poner algo de código en C).

Para ser más claro, si queremos ejecutar "la lib de SPDX hecha en Go" desde nuestro Python, tenemos que poner dos componentes, que funcionan casi de adaptadores:

  • Un pequeño código en C para armar "como módulo" una funcioncita que recibe y entrega objetos Python, y hace la traducción al "mundo C" y llama a otra función en Go.
  • Un pequeño código en Go que traduce los parámetros desde C y llama a la biblioteca SPDX correspondiente.


Adaptador de Python a C

El archivo completo es spdx.c, paso a explicarlo haciendo antes la aclaración que es para Python 2 (que es lo que tenemos hoy en ese servicio), pero si fuera para Python 3 sería muy parecido (la idea es la misma, cambian algunos nombres, revisen acá).

Antes que nada, incluir la lib de Python

    #include <Python.h>

Vamos a llamar a una función de Go, necesitamos explicitar lo que va recibir (una cadena de bytes, que a nivel de C es un puntero a chars)  y lo que nos devuelve (un número, que interpretaremos como bool).

    long IsValid(char *);

Definimos la función que vamos a llamar desde Python... es sencilla porque es genérica, recibe self y argumentos, devuelve un objeto Python:

    static PyObject *
    is_valid(PyObject *self, PyObject *args)

El cuerpo de la función es sencillo también. Primero definimos 'source' (el string con la licencia a validar) y 'res' (el resultado), luego llamamos a PyArg_ParseTuple que nos va a parsear 'args', buscando una cadena ('s') la cual va a poner en 'source' (y si algo sale mal nos vamos enseguida, para eso está el 'if' alrededor).

    {
        char * source;
        long res;

        if (!PyArg_ParseTuple(args, "s", &source))
            return NULL;

Finalmente llamamos a IsValid (la función en Go), y a ese resultado lo convertimos en un objeto de Python tipo bool, que es lo que realmente devolvemos:

        res = IsValid(source);
        return PyBool_FromLong(res);
    }

Ahora que tenemos nuestra función útil, debemos meterla en un módulo, para lo cual tenemos que definir qué cosas van a haber en dicho módulo. Entonces, armamos la siguiente estructura, con dos lineas; la primera habla sobre nuestra función, la última es una marca en la estructura para que sepa que es el final.

    static PyMethodDef SPDXMethods[] = {
        {"is_valid", is_valid, METH_VARARGS, "Check if the given license is valid."},
        {NULL, NULL, 0, NULL}
    };

En la linea útil tenemos:

  • "is_valid": es el nombre de la función que vamos a usar desde afuera del módulo
  • is_valid: es una referencia a la función que tenemos definida arriba (para que sepa qué ejecutar cuando llamamos a "is_valid" desde afuera del módulo.
  • METH_VARARGS: la forma en que recibe los argumentos (fuertemente atado a como luego los parseamos con PyArg_ParseTuple arriba.
  • "Check ...": el docstring de la función.

Para terminar con este código, va el inicializador del módulo, con un nombre predeterminado ("init" + nombre del módulo), y la inicialización propiamente dicha, pasando el nombre del módulo y la estructura que acabamos de definir arriba:

    PyMODINIT_FUNC
    initspdx(void)
    {
        (void) Py_InitModule("spdx", SPDXMethods);
    }


Adaptador de C a Go

El archivo completo es spdxlib.go.

Tenemos que meter el código en un paquete 'main'

    package main

Importamos el código para SPDX de snapd (tienen que bajarlo antes con go get github.com/snapcore/snapd/spdx):

    import "github.com/snapcore/snapd/spdx"

Importamos adaptadores desde/a C, indicando que cuando buildeemos vamos a usarlo desde Python 2:

    // #cgo pkg-config: python2
    import "C"

La función propiamente dicha, donde indicamos que recibimos un puntero a char de C y vamos a devolver un bool:

    //export IsValid
    func IsValid(license *C.char) bool {

El cuerpo es nuevamente sencillo: llamamos al ValidateLicense de SPDX (convirtiendo primero la cadena a Go), y luego comparamos el resultado para saber si la licencia es válida o no:

        res := spdx.ValidateLicense(C.GoString(license))
        if res == nil {
            return true
        } else {
            return false
        }
    }

Cerramos con la definición obligatoria de main:

    func main() {}


Lo usamos

Primer paso, buildear (yo tengo Go 1.6, creo que necesitan 1.5 o superior para poder armar directamente la biblioteca compartida de C, pero no estoy seguro):

    go build -buildmode=c-shared -o spdx.so

Segundo paso, profit!

    $ python2
    >>> import spdx
    >>> spdx.is_valid("GPL-3.0")
    True

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facundo

Trabajando en New York


Toda la semana pasada estuve también de viaje, aunque no de placer, sino de trabajo. De sprint, bah, como tantas otras veces.

Esta vez tocó New York, una ciudad bastante grande y conocida, pero a la que yo no había ido nunca. Así y todo de ciudad cosmopólita y una de las más "importantes" del mundo (atenti a las comillas) yo no tenía demasiada expectativas con el viaje.

Es que, como dije antes, era por laburo. Entonces uno no se arma de lugares para visitar y pasear, ya que no hay demasiado tiempo, normalmente. En este caso tuve la suerte que el horario de laburo fue 8:30-17:30, y sumado a que recién arrancaba el otoño, había luz bastante rato al salir cada día, entonces pude pasear más de lo que preví.

Restringido a adultos

Viejo taxi

Muchos carriles en el subte

Como me gusta a mí, estuve caminando un montón. Yendo de un lado para el otro, mirando la gente, etc. El domingo que llegué, ahí nomás, estuve caminando una hora sólo para llegar al restaurant donde íbamos a almorzar con Naty, Matias, y una pareja amiga de ellos.

Por otro lado, no me moví demasiaaaaaado de donde estaba el hotel. O sea, algunos kilómetros para acá, algunos kilómetros para acá, pero (casi) no salí de la isla de Manhattan, que es como la parte más monona de Nueva York.

Esquina típica

Estación Central

Mis primeras impresiones fueron... digitales. No, digo; mis primeras impresiones fue que había demasiada gente y demasiado ruido. Después me di cuenta que la ciudad huele feo, por todos lados, todo el tiempo. Y es cara, y hay poca luz.

En otras palabras, no me gustó New York. No todo es malo, eh. Tiene un parque fantástico (ver abajo), una vida cultural buenísima, la comida es decente (lo cual es bastante, para ser Estados Unidos), buenos bares, y un par de detalles más, pero en general, es una ciudad que no disfruté como otras.

Todo esto no evitó que pasee y conozca.

Contraste entre dos edificios

Una de las tardes me fui a caminar un rato por Chinatown (el barrio chino, bah... me quedo con los de Londres y Buenos Aires), que está pegado a una zona llamada "Little Italy" (Pequeña Italia), que tiene una interesante variedades de lugares para comer italiano. No me quedé por esa zona, porque mi idea era cenar en un local clásico de Nueva York: Katz.

Aunque es un restaurant famoso por ser sede de escenas de varias películas (la más famosa quizás fue el escandaloso orgasmo fingido por Meg Ryan en Cuando Harry conoció a Sally), mi intención era ir allí porque es uno de los mejores lugares para comer pastrami.

Barrio Chino

Pastrameeeeeeeeeeeee

No me volvió loco, el pastrami. Si lo tengo que describir, piensen en una tapa de asado ahumada y cocinada muy lento, tanto que se deshace completamente, con un sabor que parece un embutido rico. Fue algo totalmente nuevo para mí, a nivel comida: objetivo cumplido.

Algo que sí me gustó bastante fue el Central Park. Un espacio verde enorme, ahí en el medio de la ciudad, de los rascacielos y las avenidas. Como los bosques de Palermo, podrán pensar... bueno, como para ponerlo en perspectiva, el Central Park es OCHO veces más grande que los bosques de Palermo.

El viernes cortamos el laburo a la 4, y yo aproveché el extra de luz y me fuí para el parquecito. Llegué rápido (estaba a unas 10 o 15 cuadras) y estuve caminando hasta que se hizo de noche. Lo crucé a lo ancho, y no llegué ni a la mitad longitudinalmente hablando, pero todo lo que ví me gustó: un bosque, basicamente, con senderotes, senderos y senderitos, iluminado y cuidado.

Parque Central

Biblioteca de New York

El sábado tenía varias horas para pasear. Con Ricardo y Maxi nos tomamos un subte hasta el sur de Manhattan, y de ahí un ferry hasta la isla de enfrente, un paseito corto y piola para sacarle unas fotos a la Estatua de la Libertad. Cuando volvimos pegamos una vuelta por la parte financiera (Wall Street y eso), nos acercamos hasta el puente de Brooklyn (el cual empezamos a caminar, pero no cruzamos), y luego enfilamos para pegar un par de vueltas al Barrio Chino y a la Little Italy, donde merendamos en un café muy bueno (yo probé un capuchino y un cannolo a la siciliana, impecables).

En tu cara, toro

Manhattan, desde el ferry

Después no mucho más. Subte de vuelta al hotel, agarrar las valijas, juntarnos un grupito e ir a la parada del NYC Airporter, el micro que nos llevó al aeropuerto, checkin, espera, viaaaaaaje, y casita :).

Todas las fotos, acá.

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admin

MAAS 2.3.0 (beta1)

New Features & Improvements

Hardware Testing

MAAS 2.3 beta overhauls and improves the visibility of hardware test results and information. This includes various changes across MAAS:

  • Machine Listing page
    • Surface progress and failures of hardware tests, actively showing when a test is pending, running, successful or failed.
  • Machine Details page
    • Summary tab – Provide hardware testing information about the different components (CPU, Memory, Storage)
    • Hardware Tests tab – Completely re-design of the Hardware Test tab. It now shows a list of test results per component. Adds the ability to view more details about the test itself.
    • Storage tab – Ability to view tests results per storage component.

UI Improvements

Machines, Devices, Controllers

MAAS 2.3 beta 1 introduces a new design for the node summary pages:

  • “Summary tab” now only shows information of the machine, in a complete new design.
  • “Settings tab” has been introduced. It now includes the ability to edit such node.
  • “Logs tab” now consolidates the commissioning output and the installation log output.

Other UI improvements

Other UI improvements that have been made for MAAS 2.3 beta 1 includes:

  • Add DHCP status column on the ‘Subnet’s tab.
  • Add architecture filters
  • Update VLAN and Space details page to no longer allow inline editing.
  • Update VLAN page to include the IP ranges tables.
  • Convert the Zones page into AngularJS (away from YUI).
  • Add warnings when changing a Subnet’s mode (Unmanaged or Managed).

Rack Controller Deployment

MAAS beta 1 now adds the ability to deploy any machine with the rack controller, which is only available via the API.

API Improvements

MAAS 2.3 beta 1 introduces API output for volume_groups, raids, cache_sets, and bcaches field to the machines endpoint.

Known issues:

The following are a list of known UI issues affecting hardware testing:

Issues fixed in this release

https://launchpad.net/maas/+milestone/2.3.0beta1

  • #1711320    [2.3, UI] Can’t ‘Save changes’ and ‘Cancel’ on machine/device details page
  • #1696270    [2.3] Toggling Subnet from Managed to Unmanaged doesn’t warn the user that behavior changes
  • #1717287    maas-enlist doesn’t work when provided with serverurl with IPv6 address
  • #1718209    PXE configuration for dhcpv6 is wrong
  • #1718270    [2.3] MAAS improperly determines the version of some installs
  • #1718686    [2.3, master] Machine lists shows green checks on components even when no tests have been run
  • #1507712    cli: maas logout causes KeyError for other profiles
  • #1684085    [2.x, Accessibility] Inconsistent save states for fabric/subnet/vlan/space editing
  • #1718294    [packaging] dpkg-reconfigure for region controller refers to an incorrect network topology assumption

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facundo

CDPedia, release y planes


Nueva versión

Hace unos diez días terminé de armar las imágenes para la nueva versión de la CDPedia, la 0.8.4 con contenido actualizado a Junio 2017, y la semana pasada hice los avisos correspondientes en todos lados menos acá.

Ya saben qué es la CDPedia, pero vuelvo a insistir: descárguenla, compártanla, difúndanla, ya que ayuda a que la mayor gente posible acceda a la Wikipedia y al conocimiento que la misma permite.

Vayan a la página oficial para ver cómo descargarla y otra info.

Esta versión no trae demasiadas novedades más que el contenido actualizado (que ya es bastante), pero también renové el contenido de la página de inicio, e hice varias mejoras a la hora de la generación de discos y tarballs, así como también en la calidad del código.

Velita en un festival de jazz en Baradero


Grupo de trabajo

Por otro lado, tengo ganas de mezclar dos cosas que me vienen dando vuelta en la cabeza: la idea de meter más gente a trabajar con CDPedia, y la de hacer algo de mentoring para que gente más nueva aprenda a programar (no sólo a nivel lenguaje, sino también las buenas prácticas, etc.).

Entonces, tengo la idea de armar un grupo de trabajo para CDPedia. Buscar tres o cuatro newbies, más quizás alguien con experiencia que me ayude, y ponernos a trabajar (de forma relajada, remota, pero más o menos constante) en CDPedia.

A nivel del proyecto a varias cosas al alcance de la mano, desde modernización del código y hacerlo más robusto en varias situaciones, hasta mejorar y normalizar los logs, preparar todo para Python 3, corregir bugs, etc.

Claro, la idea también ronda alrededor de las personas, los que participen del proyecto, que aprenderían Python en un nivel básico o intermedio, y obtendrían experiencia en trabajar en grupo de forma remota (y algo de presencial). También se haría foco en usar herramientas como control de versiones, manejo de issues/bugs, y prácticas modernas de desarrollo en general.

En algún punto es parecido a lo que en otro momento se llamó Adopte un Newbie, pero en este caso no hay una relación uno a uno entre mentor y participante, sino que sería un grupo donde cada integrante puede ayudar a otros, todos tutelados o guiados por mí (y como dije arriba, quizás alguien más), todo en un ambiente amigable y "seguro".

Fuente en el Cerro Santa Lucia, Santiago de Chile

Tengo que terminar de redondear la idea, especialmente a nivel operativa: composición del grupo (haría una búsqueda/oferta y luego una selección), formas de comunicación, ¿reuniones presenciales?, etc. También quiero definir la duración de la experiencia: quiero hacerla finita, y luego de alguna manera presentar los resultados con el grupo en alguna conferencia.

Ya les iré contando más novedades.

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admin

Hello MAASters!

This past week, the MAAS team met face to face in NYC! The week was concentrated on finalizing the improvements that users will be able to enjoy in MAAS 2.3 and preparing the for the first beta release. While MAAS 2.3.0 beta 1 will be announced separately, we wanted to bring you an update of the work the team has been doing over the past couple weeks.

MAAS 2.3 (current development release)

  • Hardware Testing Phase 2
    • Backend work to support the new UX changes for hardware testing. This includes websockets handlers, directives and triggers.
    • UI – Add ability to upload custom hardware tests scripts.
    • UI – Update the machine listing page to show hardware status. This shows status of hardware testing while pending, running, failed, degraded, timed out, etc.
    • UI – Implement new designs for Hardware Testing:
      • Add cards (new design) on node details pages that include metrics (if tests have been run) and hardware test information.
      • Add a new Hardware Test tab that better surfaces status of hardware tests per component
      • Add a more detailed log view of hardware test results.
      • Surface hardware test results per storage device on each of the block devices (on the machines details page).
      • Add ability to view all test results performed on each of the components overtime.
  • Switch Support
    • Add actions to switch listing page (still under a feature flag)
    • Fetch Wedge 100 switch metadata using the FRUID API endpoint on the BMC.
    • UI – Add websockets and triggers to support the UI changes for switches.
    • UI – Update the UI to display the vendor and model on the switch listing page (behind feature flag)

  • UI improvements
    • Add DHCP status column on the ‘Subnet’s tab.
    • Add architecture filters
    • Implement a new design for node details page:
      • Consolidate all of machine, devices, controllers, switches Summary tab into cards.
      • Add a new Settings tab, combined with the Power tab to allow editing different components of machines, devices, controllers, etc.
      • Consolidate commissioning output and installation logs in a “Log” tab.
    • Update VLAN and Space details page to no longer allow inline editing.
    • Update VLAN page to include the IP ranges tables.
    • Convert the Zones page into AngularJS (away from YUI).
    • Add warnings when changing a Subnet’s mode (Unmanaged or Managed).

  • Rack controller deployment
    • Add ability to deploy any machine as a rack controller via the API.

  • API changes:
    • Add volume_groups, raids, cache_sets, and bcaches field to the Machine API output.

  • Issues fixed:
    • #1711320    [2.3, UI] Can’t ‘Save changes’ and ‘Cancel’ on machine/device details page
    • #1696270    [2.3] Toggling Subnet from Managed to Unmanaged doesn’t warn the user that behavior changes
    • #1717287    maas-enlist doesn’t work when provided with serverurl with IPv6 address
    • #1718209    PXE configuration for dhcpv6 is wrong
    • #1718270    [2.3] MAAS improperly determines the version of some installs
    • #1718686    [2.3, master] Machine lists shows green checks on components even when no tests have been run
    • #1507712    cli: maas logout causes KeyError for other profiles
    • #1684085    [2.x, Accessibility] Inconsistent save states for fabric/subnet/vlan/space editing
    • #1718294    [packaging] dpkg-reconfigure for region controller refers to an incorrect network topology assumption

Libmaas

We have improved the library to allow the managing of block devices and partitions.

  • Add ability to list machine’s block devices.
  • Add ability to update, create and delete block devices.
  • Add ability to list machine’s partitions.
  • Add ability to update, create and delete partitions.
  • Add ability to format/unformat partitions and block devices.
  • Add ability to mount/unmount partitions and block devices.

The release of a new version of libmaas will be announced separately.

CLI

MAAS has been working on a new CLI that’s based (and uses) MAAS’ python client library. The work that has been done includes:

  • Add ability to log in/log out via user and password.
  • Add ability to switch between profiles.
  • Add support for interactive login.
  • Add help command.
  • Ability to list nodes, machines, devices, controllers.
  • Ability to list all components in the networking model (subnets, vlans, spaces, fabrics).
  • Ability to obtain details on machines, devices and controllers.
  • Ability to obtain details on subnets, vlans, spaces, fabrics.
  • Ability to perform actions on machines (with the exception of testing and rescue mode).
  • Add ability to perform actions for multiple nodes
  • Add a ‘maas ssh’ command.
  • When listing, add support for automatic paging.
  • Add ability to view output in different formats (pretty, plain, json, yaml, csv).
  • Show progress indication on actions that are synchronous or blocking.

The release of the new CLI will be announced separately.

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Alan Griffiths

Custom compositing in Mir servers

Although Mir 1.0 hasn’t quite shipped yet my thoughts are turning to what we do next. One of the work items that got paused was removing the mirserver dependencies from QtMir.

While Canonical isn’t using QtMir, the purpose of the affected code is still relevant. It enables custom compositing for transitions and other effects and this is of continuing, wider, interest.

Clearly Qt isn’t the only framework that might want to customize the way the server composites the scene and Mir ought to support a range of options through a stable, well thought out API.

We need to start somewhere. A few conversations over the past few days have identified a couple of options: GDK4 and Clutter.

I don’t know enough yet to prioritise or plan this work, but input from anyone interested in helping get one of these toolkits working would be great.

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jdstrand

This may be totally obvious to many but I thought I would point out a problem I had with slow boot and how I solved it to highlight a neat feature of systemd to investigate the problem.

I noticed that I was having terrible boot times, so I used the `systemd-analyze critical-chain` command to see what the problem was. This showed me that `network-online.target` was taking 2 minutes. Looking at the logs (and confirming with `systemd-analyze blame`), I found it was timing out because `systemd-networkd` failed to bring interfaces either online or to fail (I was in an area where I had not connected to the existing wifi before and the wireless interface was scanning instead of failing). I looked around and found that I had no configuration for systemd-networkd (/etc/systemd/network was empty) or for netplan (/etc/netplan was empty), so I simply ran `sudo systemctl disable systemd-networkd` (leaving NetworkManager enabled) and I then had a very fast boot.

I need to file a bug on the cause of the problem, but I found the `systemd-analyze` command so helpful, I wanted to share. :)

UPDATE: this bug was reported as https://launchpad.net/bugs/1714301 and fixed in systemd 234-2ubuntu11.


Filed under: ubuntu

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